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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33920 times)
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3450 on: February 01, 2008, 07:38:18 PM »

Defense counsel called no witnesses.  Just rested, man.
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jbottle
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« Reply #3451 on: February 01, 2008, 08:02:51 PM »

Yeah, that's hilarious.  "U.S. Attorney and IRS, you failed to prove your case, and we are just going to tell the jury that in closing argument."

I'm not a lawyer, but doesn't that mean that the Government did a pretty fucking shitty job?

Now "Blade IV" is not a necessity, but an honor and priviledge, unless it's already happened or whatever.
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jbottle
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« Reply #3452 on: February 01, 2008, 10:13:03 PM »

I happened to be on the computer while "Jaws" was playing in the other room, and the whole QUINT'S DEATH SEQUENCE had a lot of strange audio that almost sounded like the sounds of childbirth, or a woman struggling to have a child and then the sounds of the child wailing, as QUINT returned to the sea, if I had been watching the movie I might not have noticed this but just listening to the sound, you could almost, absent the splashing of the waves, have been in a delivery room.  One of the many ways "Jaws" is better than it has any right to be, including the accident in casting perfectly and having a could-have-been auteur at the helm, the guy just said "Jaws" lost to "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest," and I can't say which I think is the better film, because it would be most likely the one I just saw, but I think "Jaws" is something you could show a 14 yr. old 25 yrs. from now and he/she would hardly blink when it gets going, "Flew" is melancholy and melodramatic and specific to the abuses in pschiatric care that I think might seem dated or certainly not universally appreciated, so if "Flew" is "better" it's also not the one I would put in the time capsule.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3453 on: February 01, 2008, 10:28:28 PM »

One of the many ways "Jaws" is better than it has any right to be...

Verna Fields won the Oscar for Best Film Editing and it won the Best Sound Oscar as well. 

Bryan Singer is a big "Jaws" fan (hence the name of his company, Bad Hat Harry Productions), as are Soderberg (says he's seen it on the big screen 50 times) and Kevin Smith.  I don't know what that has to do with anything, other than noting it's hard for me to root against anybody who swears to "Jaws".  Any "All Time Greatest Movie Ever" list that doesn't include "Jaws" isn't worth reading.   

It's my favorite non-CoenBros movie ever, and there was a time when I could pretty much transcribe it from memory.  Now that I think about it, it's also very quotable ("Not too good, is it, Chief?") in everyday situations. 
« Last Edit: February 01, 2008, 10:31:18 PM by oilcanboyd23 » Logged
jbottle
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« Reply #3454 on: February 01, 2008, 11:05:20 PM »

Next time you see it close your eyes when Quint is getting offed, sound editing indeed, and the editing to the denoument, etc., the film is a mish-mash of suspense and adventure largely held together by the collection of shots that are usable, I mean, if you don't have an editor who cares or a sound editor who gets it, you make a shit movie.  I don't know if it was the first sort of "Smile, you son of a bitch..." line movie before you talk about other mundane things so we can shuffle off as they paddle off, etc., but I guess in '79 you had the "Alien" knocked off by Ripley with the same smart-aleck, etc., and maybe there's a long-standing tradition of saying some tough sounding shit before you off some mother.....but I wouldn't be the one to say, "Jaws" comes together really well on all fronts, it's something for everybody, including the line when he kills the shark, it's a legitimate payoff, in the European version the shark swims off as the Orca sinks, or something, but there's some kind of great spirit there and that's what happens with an accident in time like "Apocalypse Now," that seemed to have to happen despite everything conspiring against it, particularly water, but anyway, the idea that Speilberg must've had where "I hope we've got enough to piece together..." and some editor thinking "Baby..."
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #3455 on: February 01, 2008, 11:12:15 PM »

Sorry if I seemed defensive about Juno, oilcanboyd, and I think I got what you were saying about it. Re this:  

 
Quote
I never criticized the "pissing like Seabiscuit" expression or any other expressions, jarring or otherwise.

In fact, I was the one that criticized that line as "jarring" and I still think it was one no contemporary 16-year-old would use, but that's no reflection on whether it was funny.  Overall, I found enough in the movie to make it worth the cost of the tickets and I was glad to see it with my own often-sarcastic adolescent daughter.  It's interesting that the people I've talked to about it found her posing and snark more annoying than the Jason Bateman character's matching her "my music is cooler than yours" adolescent attitude, which I haven't heard remarked upon at all.  

I might be up for TWBB at some point, have so far only seen DDL in a few movies, of which My Beauiful Laundrette was my fave.

  



  


 
« Last Edit: February 04, 2008, 02:30:47 AM by nytempsperdu » Logged
oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3456 on: February 01, 2008, 11:33:20 PM »

...the idea that Speilberg must've had where "I hope we've got enough to piece together..."

Along with the whole time thinking, Jesus, the shark is f-ing sinking again, my career is over, etc...
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jbottle
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« Reply #3457 on: February 02, 2008, 12:03:24 AM »

Right, but also, the moment where he is like we can make the water scenes work, I mean, have you ever seen "Orca," that was something that was a fucking disaster, the shots that Spielberg got in "Jaws" and thinking "I'm not sure if I got Quint..." and the editor going "Baby, baby...," but yeah, I think more of the excitement of a kid going "go ahead and tell me I made a shit monster movie but tell me it's a C+, that it will be okay," and basically the PRO going "Sheeeeeeeeeiiiiitttttt..."
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madupont
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« Reply #3458 on: February 02, 2008, 12:18:53 AM »

This is by far Daniel Day-Lewis best.  (And I did not have to go to the bathroom once.)  Full house/Friday night; they were hypnotized by There Will Be Blood. This is not your dad's(or, your grand dad's Sinclair Lewis). PTA has done considerable "adaptation  for the movies" from a simple title like,"Oil!",back in 1927, whose plot was probably more appropriate to that period of time  whereas presently other things are emphasized to apply to the current audience.

Incidentally, I kept staring at Ciaran Hinds, trying to guess where I had seen him last/in what?  Really felt like a dolt when I checked the casting and realized I had been watching him for an entire season of: Rome
on HBO, in which he played Caesar.   I thought he was just another British actor playing at being Roman as they like to do.  Current film throws a whole new perspective on him; he has the features that were considerably popular apparently before I was born, my parents' generation when they went to the movies; and I kind of became used to that "look", the all-American hero look" during my earliest movie viewing which was around age 3?

Since Sinclair Lewis had already been around a bit by then, I've got to hand it to PTA  for having the guts to make this film as a reflection of the morality of  how we live now because of you know who.  If only somebody had told us when he ran for office in 2000 that There Will Be Blood, we would have put our foot down right there.  Of course there is the old man, isn't there. The guy that brought us dozens of burning oil wells on the coast of Kuwait. Talk about Blow-back.  You would have thunk that somebody would have caught on right there that we would be short on oil and our budget blown by 2008. And then we wonder (or say, we don't wonder, rather more vehemently) why there was 9/11

Anywho, Daniel Plainview (that about says it all, too, doesn't it?) sure ties one on, for a matter of fact after he has one glass Daniel gets hysterically Irish.  I know that Huston is too(Irish;not hysterical) which  is why I say that Day-Lewis plays Plainview with a lilting higher range of intonation than the gruff delivery of John Huston; but I do think that all the central figures for the oil field enjoyed standing around in those Huston-Early California clothes, like they were posing in a diorama.

This of course is why his appearance at the Screen Actors Guild awards was as jbottle described. The excessive leaness becomes habitual to a leading actor's way of life so he can wear those clothes necessary to the location for whatever period the film. Some costuming is more demanding than others.

On the other hand, he has either been working out, or they got a double for the clear-water Pacific scenes. What's your guess?  Excellent cameras although I kept getting an unusual alignment on the in-depth shots because of using the wide open space to have characters approaching  each other over a distance. It always seemed to me that they weren't headed at the correct angle to actually meet up.  Or, is this just normal, and I haven't seen it for awhile out doors the way I used to on a daily basis ten years ago?

Next?
« Last Edit: February 02, 2008, 12:22:19 AM by madupont » Logged
jbottle
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« Reply #3459 on: February 02, 2008, 01:33:40 AM »

At the awards he seemed to be 6' 6" and 210, but I know he's probably more like 6' 1" and 175 lbs., it was interesting to me how he was able to transform the medium into what he was communicating while lesser personalities make canned jokes as if they are having a good time and just want to do "OK" when they talk to their agent later.  He doesn't care, and his sympathy for the family of Ledger seemed well-said and not to the greater good of DDL so much as he was the only one big enough to talk about the 800 lb. gorilla in the room.  He didn't have to, and probably didn't calculate that it fell to him to do it but on more of a sad personal level just couldn't ignore the absence of a real talent, and a sad recent death.  I know that he might be impossible to know, but I also know that he has the thing that transcends calculation so much that he basically has to be begged to perform in the first place, and I don't think it's a function of an oversized ego, because he clearly could've made more money in the last ten years and moved to LA and been surrounded by yes, yes, yes; but his comfort with his discomfort and fear lack of fear struck a very human and courageous chord, corny as it sounds, and nobody else had really stepped up to the plate other than the producers flashing the pictures of the recently deceased in the biz, which ain't enough, and wasn't what he felt, or felt too little and too false, if he saw it at all, he seems very complicated, and I believe you if he's not really doing an exact Huston, but he seems real, and so unafraid to flop, that he seems to succeed consistently in roles or in the terse earnest tribute the other night.  I don't know what makes him tick, and don't care, I'm just glad that whether or not he realized he cut through the bullshit with something brief and real, which, whether he knew it or not, hadn't been done, and couldn't have been done by anybody else in quite the same way.  I still haven't seen TWBB, but anyway, I like how he goes about his business seemingly oblivious to the business at hand, and has that instant karma that he can't anymore shake than be revered for, unique, kind fellow, with a nice sense of responsibility and reserve that is the opposite of calculating, big, sweet man.
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kitinkaboodle
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« Reply #3460 on: February 02, 2008, 08:48:46 AM »

Well stated jbottle... Smiley
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madupont
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« Reply #3461 on: February 02, 2008, 10:57:12 AM »

jbottle,

I first got hip to it, when I saw him star in Last of the Mohicans. In which, he proved to have a rare sense of humor when translating an American Classic Novel to the screen as the grown-up result of being "captured by Indians" during the French and Indian War.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0104691/plotsummary

along with: Russell Means, Oglala/Lakota Sioux; Eric Schweig, German and Inuit; Wes Studi, Cherokee;
Dennis Banks,Anishinabe Indian Co-founder of the American Indian Movement (AIM).

This had to be a real trip for Daniel Day-Lewis whose life began as the son of a poet.

I thoroughly agree with everything you said about his way of relating, particularly at the awards (and even in that video taped on the Oprah show interview for this film where he simply went "candid").
« Last Edit: February 02, 2008, 10:59:07 AM by madupont » Logged
barton
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« Reply #3462 on: February 02, 2008, 12:41:03 PM »

(continuation of "Sunshine" comments)

It has a Kubrick feel, at the outset, with ship interiors and exterior shots that
seem to owe some of their aesthetic to 2001 (and some to the
first "Alien"), but soon lapses, as things go haywire, into a more
contemporary style of fast cuts and wrenching pans and blurred faces
that are more dizzying than informative.  The physics is often bogus
and the physicist is played by Cillian Murphy, the last person I would
ever cast as a physicist -- it's clear the the friendship between
Murphy and director Danny Boyle has clouded judgements.  Most of the
plot developments are fairly predictable to anyone at all familiar with
the space adventure genre, and seem to comprise an odd pastiche of
2001, Alien, Deep Impact, and (for one character, who seems to have
gone mad communing with the Sun -- to the point of severe burns) Solaris.

Not helping were scenes of astonishing banality -- the ship's oxygen farm (hydroponic greens) is destroyed, but later the biologist is seen happening on to a tiny green sprout that has appeared on the charred wreckage and she is rendered into a state of deeply maternal new agey buddhistic goofiness that might just take emoting where no man has gone before.

Disappointing, but an interesting failure to watch, so I wouldn't
necessarily say to avoid it.



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jbottle
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« Reply #3463 on: February 02, 2008, 03:51:03 PM »

Oh, I thought it was pretty good, and any fan of science fiction movies like you or me are happy even when it's not perfect, right?

"Cillian Murphy, the last person I would ever cast as a physicist..."

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0143145/

I mean...

DR, really??

"Sunshine" I thought was impressive-looking and decent for a relatively low-budget movie that relies on special effects a lot, it was certainly a mish-mash as you say, but the questionable physics and science is always the best part, where you imagine the screenwriter thinking okay, if I can just take this one more bong hit, I'll be able to figure this out....."Sunshine" didn't revel in the impossibility/improbability of some of the science the way "The Core" started out f**kit, I would've liked more humor, but I still take the view that if you put a cohesive film together and can grab an audience at all that gets you to the 90% mark, the next five percent are actually compelling, the next four percent are near great movies, and the last .18% are classics.
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harrie
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« Reply #3464 on: February 02, 2008, 06:49:37 PM »

"Cillian Murphy, the last person I would ever cast as a physicist..."

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0143145/

I mean...

DR, really??

Thank you, jbottle -- I was wracking my brain trying to think of the movie with Tara Reid as a physicist or scientist, and I'm pretty sure it was actually DR.   I think there's some rule of thumb out there about not going to movies where you know too much about the subject because you'll pick it apart.  I avoid a number of horse movies because they piss me off to no end, for example.

Excellent analysis of DDL, by the way.  Very much enjoyed it.
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