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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 41197 times)
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jbottle
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« Reply #3495 on: February 09, 2008, 02:21:14 AM »

No, I think you said it all, perfectly.
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jbottle
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« Reply #3496 on: February 09, 2008, 02:30:10 AM »

http://www.boxofficeguru.com/weekend.htm

I'm taking the under on "Fool's Gold" at THE NUMBER TWENTY_THREE, think 16.543M.

Also taking the under on "Roscoe," though there hasn't been a good black movie this century and they all make money.
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barton
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« Reply #3497 on: February 09, 2008, 11:08:45 AM »

I'm going to rent On Golden Pond -- clearly I missed something the first time through.

Just saw 2 Days in Paris which might have been a tiresome indie exercise in intercultural cuteness without the saving graces of Adam Goldberg.  He and winsome frog Delpy play lovers who visit her parents in Paris, with vast and painful cultural shocks ensuing.   Lots of clumsiness-of-love of the Woody Allen kind, but it's the moments where Goldberg is on his own, sans bilinguality, that attain high-grade comedy, with much that feels fresh and improvised.   

   
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martinbeck3
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« Reply #3498 on: February 09, 2008, 01:07:24 PM »

Hi! Back from my long holidays and a Sopranos addiction.Tonight I´ll be going to the local theatre -super seats- and watching Atonement, excellent critcs.I´m looking forward to it.It´s been ages since I´ve felt I really wanted to see a film.
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #3499 on: February 09, 2008, 03:17:04 PM »

Good anecdote from the NPR interview.  Maybe it's just as well the studio didn't send My Beautiful Laundrette to the mother & son...

Quote
one point where DDL is staring at Pfeiffer with such intense longing

This reminds me of seeing Last of the Mohicans in a theater where we sat near a gay couple who were staring at DDL "with intense longing," so much so that in one scene when DDL was shirtless and wounded, one made noises very much as if to faint.  It added a dimension otherwise missing from the film. 
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3500 on: February 09, 2008, 03:28:38 PM »

I'm going to rent On Golden Pond -- clearly I missed something the first time through.

Jane Fonda looks sort of, uhh, inspirational, I guess, in some of those scenes where she's using a handkerchief for a top. 
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jbottle
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« Reply #3501 on: February 09, 2008, 04:31:45 PM »

My "On Golden Pond" comment was just riffing on barton's "one time when I was at the theater" thread, I didn't mean to suggest that there is anything remotely erotic about OGP, just that it was out during my adolescence and the idea of trying to make it with a girl during OGP struck me funny, like yeah, I put my **** through the popcorn box during "Out of Africa" but couldn't score, I don't know, the "A Beautiful Mind"/Judd Hirsh/"Ahhhfuck" was true but I made up the other.  There's one where a friend saw a movie and somebody did a really loud yawn, which is also funny if unoriginal.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #3502 on: February 09, 2008, 05:03:19 PM »


I'm going to rent On Golden Pond -- clearly I missed something the first time through.
 

Me too. Enquiring minds are just dying to know...

Louella!?!?!
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“Other people's obsessions
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #3503 on: February 09, 2008, 05:08:23 PM »




... like yeah, I put my **** through the popcorn box
during "Out of Africa" but couldn't score..."


Enquiring minds want to know...

Out of Africa??? Hm-hmmmmm...

Oh Lordy, Lordy... have mercy, baby...

What was the problem, anyway?

Why didn't you score?

The anaconda wasn't big enough?


 Cheesy Cheesy Cheesy

« Last Edit: February 09, 2008, 06:21:48 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

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barton
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« Reply #3504 on: February 09, 2008, 05:57:45 PM »

Jbot, I was jesting right back at you with my "rent Golden Pond" remark -- yeah, clearly not a film dripping with the level of eroticism that would butter anybody's popcorn.  Mainly I just wanted to type a sentence with a lewd sexual innuendo about buttered popcorn, but I also hope you will rent 2 Days in Paris and validate everything I said.  I'm slightly insecure in my assessment of Adam Goldberg, due to the sheer mass of pasta I had eaten right before watching and my longterm pro-Semitism that makes me assume Jews are just funnier.

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pugetopolis
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« Reply #3505 on: February 09, 2008, 06:13:47 PM »



Tom and Viv (1994)

"Mrs. Eliot put on her hat.
This had stitched on it the
rather garish purple and
green dust-jacket of Eliot’s
play, with the letter-print—
MURDER IN THE CATHEDRAL
very prominent round the rim.”
—Stephen Spender, T. S. Eliot

Ménage a trois marriages—
They can be very difficult...
Very down and dirty but…
They also produce Poetry…

Everybody knows about—
Sylvia Plath & Ted Hughes
As well as Assisi Wevill…
And what happened..

Poetry doesn’t always—
Come on the wings of a
Dove sometimes it ends
Up inside an oven…

Sometimes love dies—
A thousand cuts slowly…
One revengeful slice
At a time then another…

Spender tells this story—
About my wife leaving
The hairdresser once …
Complaining about it…

How people stared—
At her walking down the
Street persistently rudely
For no reason at all…

But her garish hat—
All purple and greenish
Was meant to humiliate
Me before strangers…

It’s how she got even—
Knowing I wasn’t in love
With her anymore but with
Sailors & fishermen instead…

Wasteland divorces—
Full of guilt and remorse
Plague the cathedral...
I wanted to murder her…

Living death makes—
Modern life spiritually
Ash Wednesday every
Dead day and night…

Between man & wife—
A shadow sometimes falls…
That other One who we
Suddenly love more…

Vivienne had hers—
While I had mine…
Young dirty sailors…
Down by the Thames…

http://www.gaypoetry.com/design/poetry_dis.asp?dataID=35198


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madupont
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« Reply #3506 on: February 09, 2008, 06:38:13 PM »

"Everybody knows about—
Sylvia Plath & Ted Hughes
As well as Assisi Wevill…
And what happened.."                    No, everybody doesn't.
                                                   Lots of us weren't there.

                                                    I wasn't.

                                                    Why vote for a book,when you
                                                     aren't allowed to discuss it.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #3507 on: February 09, 2008, 07:19:07 PM »



Why vote for a book,when you aren't allowed to discuss it.


Lover of Unreason was the last official book
discussion of The New York Times Book Group.

I thought it was a fairly decent discussion given the
fact that the Readers were being harrassed by Lifeline
and the NYTimes itself with the whole forum system
being erased and exiled.

After all, my dear, that's why we're here now in Elba...
we're the Exiles of that stupid move by piss-poor
mangement who wanted to make everything pay-as-you-go...
a plan that went belly-up and failed.

Thanks to nnyhav we know that some of the book
discussions were saved, but then many others were
willy-nilly destroyed.

I'm not going to defend the tragic menage-a-trois of
the Plath-Hughes-Weville marriage fiasco. I nominated
the book and voted for it for differerent reasons, e.g.
how do failed marriages produce good poetry?

If Hughes was such a bad guy, then how did he end up the
Poet Laureate of England? Choosen by Thatcher and the
Queen? Larkin turned it down, but then he only had a few
years to live.

As far as not knowing the book, my dear Madupont...
nothing then or now is stopping you from reading the tragic
bio Lover of Unreason. If Sussman exiled you from the
NYTimes Book Group, then I'm sure there must have been
a reason. He was a good moderator and fair... he moved
on to other things that's all.

Mister Sussman's contributions to  the Henry James
Portrait of a Lady Readers Group Discussion are very
insightful and is still online. And yes my dear, your fine
contributions to Portrait of a Lady are still there as well.

Time moves on though, doesn't it?







« Last Edit: February 09, 2008, 07:21:53 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
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« Reply #3508 on: February 09, 2008, 08:36:50 PM »



Sylvia (2003)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0325055/

Speaking of tempestuous troubled heterosexual marriages, I thought that the Sylvia movie handled the delicate matters of married poets and infidelity rather shabbily. Gwyneth Paltrow was portrayed more as a whacko American dishpan dumb blonde—rather than a perceptive early feminist poet who got Ted Hughes published and started on the path of becoming the poet laureate of England.

Daniel Craig gives a fairly rich and sensitive performance—especially when he recites poetry to Sylvia and an audience of tittering women during his brief unhappy stay in America.

No wonder Sylvia was jealous—women fell in love with Hughes’s male animal presence. Pick up his Collected Poems and read thru it—the man definitely had a masculine presence.

Craig captures some of it briefly—during the readings of “Henry King” by Hilaire Belloc, “The Sorrow of Love” by W. B. Yeats, “Gunga Din” by Rudyard Kipling and “The Quaker Graveyard in Nantucket” recorded by Robert Lowell. Actually The Inkspots singing “Hey Doc” was better than the other poetry.

The real Ted Hughes: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=18DdJO9Lg-s


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“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
jbottle
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« Reply #3509 on: February 09, 2008, 08:41:59 PM »

That poem sucked, by the way.

I didn't know you were a Sophomore Girl in high school puget, but keep trying, it has a lot of "wanting to sound relevant and meaningful," which is the first step away from utter irrelevance and meaninglessness.
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