Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33956 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #3585 on: February 18, 2008, 12:25:48 PM »

Barton, the worst part of the Infamous plot-line on screen is the re-enactment of the scenes you are familiar with from In Cold Blood.  That rather sets the tone, after the previous early film sequences of fun,fun,fun, tweaking people, you go from humor into this deep dark emotional pit.  You get fair warning that it is coming though from the moment that little Truman and Sandra Bullock/Nell Harper Lee arrive in Kansas and are left standing there looking over the landscape while you figure out which one of them is Dorothy and which one is Toto in a floor-length muffler.

One of Harrie's favourite actors, Jeff Daniels supplies them with a house-tour in which you walk through the familiar farm-house door and then go room to room just as they were left.

It does bring back the entire movie from the novel In Cold Blood,as you sit there watching tv and say, "Gosh, I remember that scene", being repeated in, Infamous. Kind of snaps your head around,from then on it all gets darker, although Tru lightens many scenes with his humor until he just can't anymore. Some of his (Toby Jone's) finest acting in character is in the latter part as he tries to return to his New York life style, and spontaneously slips back into Kansas while sitting at a dinner table among friends.  People have often wondered why Capote was gone after he began his following book promised the publisher after the great success of, In Cold Blood.  It is known as, Answered Prayers, predominantly written by the editor in order to get his income from the book by piecing together Truman's notes. It has however been reissued as a result of both films: Capote -- and, Infamous.
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jbottle
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« Reply #3586 on: February 18, 2008, 07:44:11 PM »

"Jumper II:  You First"

"Jumper II:  The Leapening"

"Jumper II:  Bon Voyage, Mon Amour"

"Jumper II:  Beyond Jumpingdome"

"Jumper II:  Ledgendary"
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3587 on: February 18, 2008, 07:52:57 PM »

Jumpman 2: J, Jumpman, J
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jbottle
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« Reply #3588 on: February 18, 2008, 09:26:17 PM »

You just know there will be a STV "Jumper II," I mean, why not, even if half were turned on by the film they will see the next chapter, right?

But how?  Like, if you are in the Ballbuster and you see "Fire Down Below" or "Ticker" or "Submerged," how would you be so amused to rent it if you can't hold it in your hand??

The future of the B-movie is problematic to me.  In the town that I grew up in, you could rent every Chuck Norris and Bruce Lee movie on video, and everything else, a nudie section behind the curtain, etc., but what now??  If you are a high school kid how do you have the full movie experience by renting movies based on the incompetence of the video store? 

I would have never seen "The Party Animal" based on the current paradigm where you download movies directly to your IPOD or so I am told, but no, I just think something is lost where there is a legitimate moment of WTF? "clarity" in the store where did you find the movie or did it find you??  You and the movie are in the same place at the same time and then you pick it up and take it to the counter, you give them money and promise to bring it back.

The risk is that you won't bring it back for them or that it will suck for you.  But at least you have to actually hand "Fraternity Vacation" to a pizza-faced geek whos son would later see you sneak out of "The Chronicles of Narnia," you actually have to do the leg work and spend the gas money to actively see some of the worst movies from people who replace imagination with bloodshed and explosions, and dammit, that's how it should be.
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jbottle
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« Reply #3589 on: February 18, 2008, 11:19:03 PM »

"Jumper" looks to compete with total theatrical take with "Fool's Gold," and eclipse "Welcome...Roscoe," which is a mighty feat considering no confidence, a lackluster though surprisingly middle-push ad campaign, not bad for a sci-fi film dismissed by all critics of note and not having a date movie or black base.

HC, star?, or do the kids like sci-fi?, either way, win/win.
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barton
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« Reply #3590 on: February 19, 2008, 12:00:56 PM »

Madupont, thanks -- I'll read your comment on Infamous after I've viewed it.

In Jumper IV: The Rock, our hero, after a few drinks, teleports inside a mountain, where his molecules and granite molecules occupy the same space at once, causing the end of the world as we know it.  Kindly aliens employ a time machine to travel back a few weeks and stop him before his tragic misstep, advising that "friends don't let friends teleport drunk."

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harrie
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« Reply #3591 on: February 19, 2008, 03:13:06 PM »

Geez, I hope I didn't oversell Daniel Craig as Perry Smith.....

I finally saw Rushmore -- it's one of those flicks I always meant to see but never did.  Being a Wes Anderson product, it's probably a love it or hate it movie; I liked it a lot.  Would have to see it a couple more times before committing to love. Bill Murray and Jason Schartzman were great; the music was awesome. 

Also watched The Fugitive, finally -- not that I had been meaning to watch this one, but I pulled an all-nighter and it was kind of the best thing on.  Man, that's a long movie.  They could have knocked out one of the plot points to shorten up the flick, and IMO it would have helped to do so, even though every scenario type thing Dr. Kimble did was a step in proving his innocence.  Tommy Lee Jones, as always, was excellent playing....well, Tommy Lee Jones. Still, well done. I don't think I've ever bought into Harrison Ford as anyone besides Indiana Jones, and even then he's like "eh" -- well, same thing here, Harrison Ford saying his lines and not bumping into furniture. Which is actually okay.

Also caught parts of Our Daily Bread, a German documentary about factory farming and food production in the modern age.  It's truly a documentary, with no commentary or music - you just watch stuff happening.  (Or in my case, flip away sometimes.)  It's more or less left up to the viewer to decide what's up with people wearing masks while applying toxic pesticides to plants that will become our food, for example.  If you don't want to think about how that tasty bacon, poultry, beef, or fish came to your table, this is not the movie for you.  I liked Our Daily Bread a lot, mostly in that it makes you think a little about what you're eating and how it got to your plate. There's no warm, fuzzy, happy ending here, unless you get warm and fuzzy about eating steak or something - then maybe.
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barton
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« Reply #3592 on: February 19, 2008, 06:35:22 PM »

Rushmore is from a year the Anderson vintage tasted pretty good.  Glad you finally sampled it, Harrie.  The play-within-the-film is amazing. 

I might pass on Our Daily Bread, only because I've been so steeped and marinated in the whole awareness of mass-production food to where I just don't want to dwell on it much more.  The recent recall of CA beef struck me as a bit ironic -- I mean, they recall all this meat because the cattle were sick and debilitated and treated cruelly?  My perception is that this is true of ALL factory-farming meat, and most animal products generally.

My thought is, see the film, don't see the film, but mainly just don't eat the stuff.

 
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harrie
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« Reply #3593 on: February 19, 2008, 07:03:33 PM »

I might pass on Our Daily Bread, only because I've been so steeped and marinated in the whole awareness of mass-production food to where I just don't want to dwell on it much more.  The recent recall of CA beef struck me as a bit ironic -- I mean, they recall all this meat because the cattle were sick and debilitated and treated cruelly?  My perception is that this is true of ALL factory-farming meat, and most animal products generally.

My thought is, see the film, don't see the film, but mainly just don't eat the stuff.

Same here, exactly.  But I was flipping by and got sucked in, largely because of the lack of commentary.  It was just sort of hypnotic to watch some of this stuff, and especially some of the machinery involved -- as in, "they have a machine for that??"  It's like some of the critters we eat are barely even handled by people, ever. 
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #3594 on: February 19, 2008, 09:31:44 PM »

Saw Little Children recently on HBO (?).  It seems like one of those movies I probably should read the novel of to see how faithful, etc., etc., but probably won't.  Aside from the one big thing I don't think could have happened (wouldn't you-know-who have passed out--or bled out--from you-know-what instead of being able to get to park/sit on swing?), I still find myself mulling over scenes from it and think I will for a while.  Anyone else see it, have comment?
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madupont
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« Reply #3595 on: February 19, 2008, 10:41:59 PM »

I compared some notes with Barton way back when; which means, believe me you'll get over it.  I had the same reaction; it was just so stunning but in a cheap sort of way having to do with an odd liberated humor on the part of Kate who was a good sort who picks men that make all men look weird.

Of course, the best scene, after all the build up on human motivations through it up to that point: The Swimming Pool scene as everyone looks on in fascination (but revolted fascination).  There are other amusing scenes, so fire away.  Although, truth of it is that some end tragically, and others just foolishly trying to act their age as if it were younger.

Oddly enough, a related theme ran through my mind today, as this actor playing Winslet's husband is also the Mormon spouse from Angels in America who managed to get an excellent job with: Roy Cohn.
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madupont
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« Reply #3596 on: February 19, 2008, 10:49:21 PM »

Barton, I've got this crazy article for you that means to be the last word on:

Charlie Wilson's War.     I remember thinking about this in the midst of the movie but so much is happening that I let it go but it was something that I knew because of an inventive story that Our People (in other words, our administration which always insists on respect for their authority) bandied about as one of the adventures of bin Laden.  I mean, if they had really caught this story about his phoning his mom and telling her that when she had word that Masood was dead, it was him who did it,and she should be prepared for some really big news; which supposedly everybody had dreamt had happened, after the fact.

So, here is what it has to do with Tom Hanks and Julie Roberts. Oh, by the way, push the button for the video clips because -- it is not them but a creative crusader pursuing the truth.

http://www.alternet.org/story/71286?page=1
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peloux
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« Reply #3597 on: February 20, 2008, 02:06:39 AM »

"I should've been a pair of claws..."

"... ragged claws."

Sorry. I couldn't help it. It's one of the few poems I know. Now I'll crawl back in my hole. Thank you.
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barton
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« Reply #3598 on: February 20, 2008, 11:39:48 AM »

Saw "Infamous" last night and certainly not disappointed by anyone's performance, though I initially wondered if I could really buy Sandra Bullock as Harper Lee.  Toby Jones seemed to be tuned in to the Capote channel, and I was fascinated at the casting of Daniel Craig (and impressed by his interpretation) -- contrasting it with what I remember of Robert Blake's take on Perry Smith.  Craig is large and muscular, and so the physical disparity between himself and Capote is underscored -- Blake, small and lighter of voice, was a quite different physical presence.  Mainly, I was just wowed by the way the film shows us Capote's own inner conflict playing out between wanting to tell a good story -- to massage and rework what people actually say and do until it fits a certain imagined narrative he's constructed -- and wanting to have a real rapport and friendship with the condemned killers, esp. Smith, and preserve some journalistic integrity.  At every turn, his judgment is clouded, his professional commitment to be unsentimental muddied by sentiment and wanting to show the humanity he finds in Smith.  It makes you aware that the film itself cannot be relied upon, that it's but one possible story of how things went down, that the whole concept of true-life fictionalization is messy and suspect. 

It's a dark film, but leavened with some humor, esp. as regards the whole cultural collision of a guy like Capote somehow getting a social foothold in Garden City and Holcomb, Kansas.  There are moments, like Capote sharing his feelings about football with the DA (Jeff Daniels -- terrific), that are just LOL funny, as is his gradual winning over of a dinner party with his outrageous celebrity insider stories -- arm-wrestling with Humphrey Bogart and winning.    There is something almost upbeat about this film, in spite of its themes, owing to the mere fact that such a tiny and delicate man, with manners and sensitivities that could get him crushed by American society, os somehow tougher and stronger than you expect.

     

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barton
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« Reply #3599 on: February 20, 2008, 12:41:59 PM »

Madupont -- I'll check out your Chas. Wilson link, thanks -- I need to do some gear-shifting for a bit, after watching "Infamous." 

Harrie -- I've seen the inside of a slaughterhouse in Nebraska, around 1975 -- at that time, the dismembering and processing of cattle had a lot of hands-on work involved.  It would interesting to see if that has changed much -- with beef, I imagine there is still a lot of manual work, because of the dexterity involved in removing certain cuts of meat. 
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