Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 41178 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #3615 on: February 24, 2008, 03:54:59 PM »

jbottle, that's already been discussed this morning:"...to see if Europe took off its BLOUSE AGAIN.", over in Celebreality forum. Dzimas in Europe asked and I replied (at length, ugh) but admitted I think I read the buzz for it in a UK format. US celebrealities have been known to take off whatever they have on if it will get them a role.

You were quite right, about the holding the garbage can lid over the head by Pacino in Carlito's way; that whole "intermezzo" was "lovely". Alas, while watching him duck into the alley,which I think followed the first long shot of the building beyond, I didn't intuit the connection; and then he exits from the stairway that accesses the roof which most of us in the neighborhood are familiar with if you know how to jimmy all the hardware in between. This is a sleeping spot for those without funds in the warmer months and in the winter months they develop a bedroll for using those access stairs or the immediate top-floor entry-way as a bedroom.  The knack for having cased your routes is a sport of youngsters on the East River, Lower East Side/Lower Manhattan:the Olympic High-Jumping team.

But the area that he mentions, in response to her favourite post-coital question, with "You do what you gotta do", is talking about the oddity that became West Side Story, in from the Hudson, and I think it may be the area which received urban renewal as a Lincoln Center  upgrade when Columbus Circle became housing for whatever designation was pre-Yuppie and liked coffee-bars and small intimate family restaurants because they were young marrieds or, living together, with kids until their parents arrived(that is, the adults' parents).  It's based on the premise that the Irish will keep you off their dock-turf along the Hudson and the Italians who can subway up by-passing their old neighborhood and arrive directly from Brooklyn have the prime real estate of the upper East side as their personal protection agency gig.  Still, Carlito mentions Park Ave. in some context so, if I check my Sunday New York Times real estate map to convince myself, I think what we are working with here is Spanish Harlem north of Columbia University as it was. Wasn't this Mira Sorvino in Summer of Sam territory? Now that was a dance not to forget.



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madupont
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« Reply #3616 on: February 24, 2008, 05:32:04 PM »

oilcanboyd23,jbottle,barton,harrie,et al --

A Critic’s Critic

Paul Thomas Anderson, apart from being the holy vessel of hope and aspiration for critics and cineastes, is known in the industry as both a straight shooter and a barrel of monkeys — someone who takes the work seriously, but not himself. On Thursday night at STK, he did not disappoint.

He was in full cry with his mates, staying late and talking with all comers. The Bagger, who has admitted here that he finds “There Will Be Blood” more admirable than convincing, introduced himself. Mr. Anderson laughed for a while. And then he laughed a bunch more.

“You know you don’t know a thing about movies,” he said. ...

...But the filmmaker just kept laughing.

“ ‘There Will Be Blood’ was the best movie of the year,” Mr. Anderson said....

...Um, there seems to be one omission in that gracious tick-tock, the Bagger noted. The one that sent the Bagger into fan-boy convulsions. The Coen brothers’ “No Country for Old Men.”

“You really think that movie was better than ours!” Mr. Anderson said, scoffing. “C’mon, do you really believe that?” Mr. Anderson laughed one more time, clapped the Bagger on his back and wished him on his merry, misguided way.

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/23/movies/awardsseason/23bagg.html?_r=1&th&emc=th&oref=slogin

Essay   Blood and ‘Oil!’

By ANTHONY ARTHUR
Published: February 24, 2008

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/24/books/review/Essay-t.html?ref=movies

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/02/24/books/review/Essay-t.html?pagewanted=2&ref=movies

And,  "To All a Goodnight!", you know what I mean....
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jbottle
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« Reply #3617 on: February 24, 2008, 06:50:08 PM »

I cain't say, but I'm amped.  I hope that Day-Lewis isn't pre-loaded with too much gas, because if he comes from the gut you might really have a moment.

I wouldn't count Ellen Page out at all, serve youth, but expect Christie to say nice things about here along the way.  She's a bit of a rube, or pretends to be rather common, so expect a little salt from Julie.

I hope that the writer haven't forgotten all the jokes they shoul've been thinking about while they were drinking.

Enjoy, all.
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barton
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« Reply #3618 on: February 25, 2008, 10:33:06 AM »

I hope I didn't put your phrases, "too much gas" and "comes from the gut" together the wrong way.  I skipped the Oscar show, but caught a brief clip of "thank you love, thank you life, thank you puppies and angels" this a.m.  Congrats to Joel and Ethan!
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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
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« Reply #3619 on: February 25, 2008, 11:54:01 AM »

I just lost an entire review in here so for now, all I'll say was that jbottle was on the money, particularly description of Christie which I have always felt was true and could not have said any better myself.  Now,  morning after, is pretty much retired unless somebody writes something that she can't resist starring in.
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Urethra_Franklin
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« Reply #3620 on: February 25, 2008, 05:17:21 PM »

Glad to see that "No Cunt for Old Men" won best pic...the Coen's have certainly earned it over the years

Have any of their other movies even been nominated?

I still think that "Fargo" is their best work to date
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Urethra_Franklin
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« Reply #3621 on: February 25, 2008, 05:18:51 PM »

Daniel Day Lewis is the best actor on the planet next to Johnny Depp
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madupont
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« Reply #3622 on: February 25, 2008, 05:20:36 PM »

Did anybody else wonder why the improv  technique of Jon Stewart makes us laugh anyway about our demeaning thoughts about others?  Don't misunderstand, I like the guy on a  half-hour format that he has going.(I think that I have just demonstrated the answer to the question that I asked.)

But this is what happens when writers did not expect the show to go  on as if there was no business but show business.  Obviously the special effects crew were right on target as always because this is after all Hollywood, but they had to scrounge up a host at a  moment's notice? I figure his best moment was in terms of cueing John Travolta.

Now, can I get on with the demeaning? One thing that was amusing but not necessarily demeaning was that although they had all possible winners down front in the seating arrangement, the special effects people opted for "first-come-first-serve" and you had to wonder why certain people were seated next to whom they were seated with, I took it as democratization at a higher level than even Obama; although  Euro-centric in the main categories, representations were  'pretty good,    Pretty good!'  in a Larry David sort of way.

What caught my attention was Philip Seymour Hoffman looking largely oversized surrounded by smaller members of his personal family if not midgets(which must have been very uncomfortable for all the hours involved, at least three if not more, but it made him look "King-sized" and that was when I realized they were grooming him to replace Jack Nicholson who revealed himself to be that age, meanwhile Hoffman provided balance to Nicholson from stage-right to left.

 

It was delightful to be introduced to Javier Bardem's mother, who looked just like my own. Did you catch that bling-bling. (Bling of the evening was worn provocatively by Nicole Kidman's bosom as she introduced Robert Bayle  for architectural set design and who, at age 92 was breathing better than Nicholson. This was however later in the evening.) Meanwhile Bardem was obviously sincerely ecstatic as was his mother about his receiving that best supporting; although, you know by now his Mom is considered one of the major actors in Europe, in the female category as Americans say. 

Then Tilda Swinton took her best-supporting in Fashion Statement  as a window mannequin deshabille, who offered some  remarks that let you know she could rip off that dress and you will find she was really dressed in jodhpurs so she could leap on to that bike with the baby in the side-car as seen in Orlando, my all time favorite  Vita Sackville-West(or was that really Virginia Woolf?) where Tilda got to change sexes in alternating episodes as the film proceeded to deal delightfully with human reality.

Now it was time for the really Big to appear (I am discounting the Coens for excelling in nonchalance) and the most sincere gesture of the kindly side of actors took place as Forest Whitaker realized that he would have to reassure Marion Cotillard that it really was all right to be declared the best actress of the 80th Academy Award Ceremony and took the chivalrous position of escorting her gallantly from the stage at the appropriate time in a dignified pace so that she would not faint on the spot.

Daniel Day-Lewis was now perfectly composed for being knighted by Dame Helen Mirren who then demonstrated the opposing side of the actoring repertoire, how to beat out the competition by immediately slipping her hand under his right arm and sincerely keeping him engaged in those subtle things that are conversed about in their part of the world, and never let go as she needed him for a prop as they stepped off back stage where the photographers would be waiting. This picture was worth what counts in the business; an offering of a part as the years roll by or about several thousand words memorized from a script that is offered to you. She has become a very enlightened Dame since making The Cook the Thief His Wife & Her Lover for Peter Greenaway ( I have a feeling that it was in this period that she lost Liam Neeson to Natasha Richardson).  Day-Lewis had a lovely lilting remark after that , according to the UK press,when Daniel Day-Lewis, asked back-stage what he does to unwind, snapped: "The great thing is, I don't have to talk about that, I can just do it," he said. "Why? Because it's none of your f-ing business, that's why!"

The woman with the most composure at the awards last night strode in casually from stage-left toward the end of the evening, one leg extended quite bare(the left) from her 1940s style dress, one might even say a Rita Hayworth sort of dress, and as the camera came up behind her as she approached the microphone, my God! had she been working out, her back muscles were in perfection. I think she may have been enumerating the foreign films category, (no that was that other Spanish actress) so, my trivia question of the day is  who was that best shaped  female actor of the evening for which no one had funded an award?

Then we get to the inevitable end and I could picture Javier Bardem saying to either Daniel Day-Lewis or more likely George Clooney,"Come along to our party." to which Clooney would reply,"We can't, we have guests, why not come to ours?"  And Javier would respond in his short but charming idiom,"Yes, we do too,otherwise... Maybe we can catch up with you later." 

That's it until next year. See you then.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2008, 05:31:01 PM by madupont » Logged
jbottle
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« Reply #3623 on: February 25, 2008, 05:41:35 PM »

The old fella with the Lifetime acheivement award at age 98 was exemplary of a generation of folks who are like "The picture business has been good to me..."

I thought the Coens should have said that it was an honor to recieve the Oscar from Marty, and thought that the supporting actress who thanked "love" was eloquent (from "My Vie en Rose" I think) in here semi-articulation of here happiness, very nice.

I thought that the Ledger shot was tasteful and not overplayed, even the look on his face seemed like an expression of disappointment or sadness, and it seemed right.  He probably wouldn't have have wanted any more exceptional type billing just because he is possibly the most tragic loss of potential future work, after all, he is just another member of the Academy lost, but I thought that the direction of the whole show was classy, and there wasn't as much of an emphasis on orchestral time cut-offs, which was charitable by a director trying to bring it in on time and maintain a basic love of the winner that is the main point of the show.

Amy Adams demonstrated such confidence and joy during her musical performance that I was more than a little "wowed," it would've been OK to make a "C +" and instead she aced it.  As a presenter she doesn't seemed consumed with a snary insider wit, either, she just seemed legitimately happy to be there, instead of trying to be cool she was just note perfect, and her lack of world-weariness was a breath of fresh air.

I like Jon Stewart, but I also think that the Oscar host should dance for their money in an opening number, and that Billy Crystal is tops, because he is just as witty if not more than Stewart, and dammit he can sing and dance too, if not perfectly, gamely enough.
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Urethra_Franklin
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« Reply #3624 on: February 25, 2008, 05:41:43 PM »

Stewart has nothing on Colbert


I've had no use for "The Daily Show" ever since "Colbert Repor(t)" made its debut
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"Indeed I tremble for my country when I reflect that God is just."



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madupont
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« Reply #3625 on: February 25, 2008, 07:44:00 PM »

I know what you mean.
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madupont
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« Reply #3626 on: February 25, 2008, 07:47:21 PM »

jbottle,re:#3654

Speaking of Heath Ledger:  http://www.ned-kelly.com/index.php
The saga of legendary outlaw Ned Kelly and his gang has fascinated Australians for as long as films have been made. In filmmaker Gregor Jordan's retelling of the folk hero's short life, Heath Ledger plays the iron-clad robber as a man wronged, forced into a life of crime by repressive and corrupt law-enforcement officials. Naomi Watts and Orlando Bloom costar, while Geoffrey Rush plays a counterinsurgency expert dedicated to bringing Kelly to justice. "Fans of American Westerns will find plenty to like" — Dallas Morning News.

Brief Nudity, Violence, Adult Content

Saturday March 1 at 10PM
Friday March 14 at 4PM

Director Gregor Jordan
Producer Lynda House
Screenwriter John Michael McDonagh
Cinematographer Oliver Stapleton
Editor Jon Gregory
Composer Klaus Badelt
Composer Bernard Fanning
Actor Orlando Bloom
Actor Joel Edgerton
Actor Heath Ledger
Actor Geoffrey Rush
Actor Naomi Watts

View all of the films that have recently appeared on Sundance Channel's schedule.   

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jbottle
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« Reply #3627 on: February 25, 2008, 07:56:37 PM »

Colbert owns it now; but he's not likely to be an Oscar Host as a non-Jew.
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harrie
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« Reply #3628 on: February 25, 2008, 08:31:59 PM »

That's funny, I've had no use for Colbert since The Colbert Report started.
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madupont
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« Reply #3629 on: February 26, 2008, 02:06:07 AM »

Harrie,

That's the way that I felt about it,too; at first.... I thought he was being seriously and ultraconservative wig. Until I found out that he discovered this shtick, recognized he could make it his thing, and just satirize the right wing, satirize, and satirize more.

There's nobody that I watch regularly. I haven't the time, anymore.

By the way, the British take on our Oscars was "interesting". They think that we resent having  non-USA actors win awards. What is with them?
They are so frustrated that Bush didn't restore their Empire to them. Not all of them, of course. And here they are trying to schedulize having their troops stand down in Afghanistan and it is just frustrating them to pieces. In other words for every right wing dude and dudette stumbling through MSNBC, Fox News,CNBC because some Republican bought air space commercially as a corporate entity(or collected a handful of local stations or channels, to help the cause), there is a cute little couple as counterpart over in the UK who were finally going to make it. They are scared to death of our elections; the changing of the guard. And they are now busily spinning their public, the way we were spun --starting just before Autumn 2001 until Autumn 2004.

Since the Oscars, 24 hours ago, I've come to the conclusion that possibly British actors are the likeliest people to understand our current times since they so often have to immerse themselves into  the emotions of a character they are cast to play in an American production.
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