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harrie
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« Reply #3720 on: March 13, 2008, 03:11:36 PM »

So I saw about half of Idiocracy. It was funny enough, no great shakes. No need to go back and see the other half, though. 

Also saw parts of Syriana, which I would like to see again -- I caught it about 20 minutes in and was following along just fine up until Clooney's fingernails were being pulled out. Then I was gone. Though the movies are different, I believe Syriana and The Good Shepherd were compared often, due to their plot lines and release dates. Right now, I'd give the edge to TGS as a better flick.  But of course that's not a fair assessment, not having seen all of Syriana. Matt Damon rocks, though -- he's got a whole genre almost all sewn up with these two flicks, the Bourne ones, etc.

Caught Disturbia, which I believe has been discussed here.  Though it was highly derivative of Rear Window, and though in real life I'd hate everything about Shia LaBoeuf's character and if I were his mom, I'd tie him up and throw him in the closet rather than deal with him, I really enjoyed Disturbia -- probably largely to David Morse's work (as noted by others here).   I do have to say that I don't really know LaBoeuf for anything except outrunning the paparazzi in footraces, but I really enjoyed his work here, too. It's funny though -- after the flick, I thought of about 50 implausibilities that take place in Disturbia, but during the movie I was totally into it.  For what it was -- a Hitchcock classic updated/ripped off/reinterpreted/what have you (and did anyone else think for a second they were going to have a To Catch a Thief homage of sorts with the roof-hopping scene?) -- Disturbia was remarkably well done, IMO.

Topped everything off with Chinatown, which just makes all the rest look like crap.
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barton
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« Reply #3721 on: March 13, 2008, 06:39:54 PM »

Yeah, Morse pretty much carried the film.  I knew nothing of Mr. Boeuf, so was surprised how un-ethnic he looked, given his name.  The film is holy as swiss cheese, as you noted, but it does move you along past the holes when you're watching.

Heard about Idiocracy a while back and then forgot everything I'd heard, so you've at least piqued my curiosity.  I sometimes endure states of film apathy and can't think of titles to put in my queue, so this helps.

Better than I expected:  "The Brave One" -- watched the dvd last night and totally got into Terence Howard's cop and Jody Foster's crime victim-turned-vigilante.  Perhaps it was having Neil Jordan direct, but the camera just seemed to discover a different New York than I usually see in films and brought something very visually compelling.  Also, "Lost" fans will get a kick out of seeing Naveen Andrews as the fiance that gets bumped off.
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madupont
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« Reply #3722 on: March 13, 2008, 06:55:07 PM »

harrie,

I hear you.  But I seem to remember that was an Evan's production, so well structured that everything was covered, no matter how mysterious it seemed  to be in which ever scene it was presented.  It always came back to resolving the mystery. Excuse me that was Robert Towne, not Evans.  To me, that movie was like what you picture in your head while reading a novel written in first person narrative, preferably in the 1930's.
Personally, I broke my baby-teeth on these by growing into my wisdom teeth on what ever we mentally chew on when we are about age thirteen, by reading the books that my father's sister had read and tucked into her guest bedroom in San Francisco.  My  mother's hidden copies were more like Forever Amber because the Church had not given it Imprimatur and regaled against it in church on Sundays.

Give Syriana another chance, I was told about it by a friend who was interested in the oil aspects of it, and I think that I went to see it because of the connection of Clooney having done: Good Night, and Good Luck. In which I loved Frank Langella, as Bill Paley; as well as David Strathairn as Ed Murrow.

Then there was also Robert Downey,jr. as the secretly married employee who was married to another employee, that's how uptight that era was! (i don't care how or what kind of drugs he prefers if this is what he does: such as I finally saw last night in the way of consciousness expanding voyeurism in which he was a great sly pet to have around the house when it is a residential apartment building.)

I like to see Langella in anything, we are steadily coming toward the end of being able to do that and he is perhaps the only master-actor that we have left. I missed all but one, the last, in the series he did on tv about off-off Broadway theatre, simply because I did not know entirely what it was about or that he was in it. I was blown away by what he did in the last episode, recognizing it as true to everything I have experienced with instructive directors who will not let you slide or cheat.

There is a minor miracle of acting in Syriana,beyond Clooney, who chose to put on that weight to get the feel of it when being tipped out of a chair ahd having his finger-nails pulled to show us exactly why we are living through the period that we are living thorugh.   I think that I know what scenes you missed in the first 20 minutes so my lips are sealed! The other than Clooney "go-for-it", is Jeffrey Wright as Bennett Holiday; from a book that I've been meaning to read since seeing the film but then promptly forgot to do. This man has an acting range in making a role his own, while disguising himself within it so naturally as a person, that you never doubt it.

Syriana is, in any case, a film that you want to see more than once, I have a feeling because it is like John Malkovich's direction of: The Dancer Upstairs that I've seen three times. Each future replay causes you to say not just inwardly but, you hear it popping out of your mouth when there is nobody there to hear it but the cat, or the dog, or a stray-horse(?):"Of course!"  Not because we were so dumb but because it adds up; it was the clue to what we thought we knew already but only more so.

This was so of Matt Damon in The Good Shepherd (and dare I say it,Angelina Jolie, whose work in another film as Mariane Pearl, I still do not have the guts to go watch: A Mighty Heart); many of the people who wandered into a blog of the time hosted by Virginia Heffernan at nytimes, Visuals, i think it was called, because it included videos and You-tube as well as television, well they hated both Matt and Angelina and therefore the movie which they didn't get. Like: What was that about? They really didn't know that this was the CIA and how a CIA operative is educated (usually in the poetry department where he takes a minor and admires Professor Michael Gambon; better yet, in a very elite prep-school where he graduates to the attached university for which his prep is a feeder-school unless he gets a scholarship to go abroad). They also didn't get that De Niro researched this for five years; they thought he was quaint playing a senior, a cigar-smoking, arm-chair liaison officer.

I started referencing just that scene of the yearly reunion, at the first one of which Jolie seduces Damon, and much later on in life does as the wife of a "career diplomat" who drinks too much because she knows everything from having observed that her husband is an agent. The blog posters had neglected the obvious to movie going audiences in our time, that Robert De Niro did something he doesn't usually do as an actor but did as a director when casting; rely on the aura, the luna created by the actor's previous roles to backlight the role being played now.

Early summer picnic on the lake meeting of Bonesmen their wives and families version of Angelino Jolie allows you a refined version of Girl Interupted tempered by action films beyond endurance as background to the character who only dresses in suitable mother recommended clothes.

Matt Damon does a gradual deadening of emotions,between his quickness in The Departed, and his missing consciousness in The Bourne Ultimatum.

Ps. if you want "roof-hopping" visit Heath Ledger's Casanova, utterly unlike Donald Sutherland's triumph of sexuality; but roof-hopping with Ledger is spoiled when you watch him herd sheep on horseback or walk down a road like James Dean walking toward you on Broadway in the early morning.

I'm now due to observe how Depardieu's son has developed since I first saw him in Tous les matins du monde. He's all grown now. Depardieu, himself, Gerard the Dep that is, although doing most of a cameo role for La Vie en Rose, was good to see again. His camel-hair coat and fedora street encounter with Piaf, puts you in mind of how Danny Aiello plays back alley impressario and entrepreneur.
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jbottle
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« Reply #3723 on: March 13, 2008, 09:45:37 PM »

Barton:  Kevin Bacon made the "The Brave One" Rule of 2's vigilante flick on the cheaper; and where he joins the club of ROT SUPERSTARS because of the ROT that he has with "Stir of Echoes," that most people agree is actually better than "I see Dead People." 

So compare and contrast.  20 pts.

I haven't seen either, somehow seeing movies tends to make me snowblind because then I know what they're about and can't fairly judge the numbers and market scenarios, etc., but yeah, both are in my queueuque.
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harrie
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« Reply #3724 on: March 14, 2008, 09:42:34 AM »

Sounds like The Incredible Hulk is:

1) in trouble;
2) going to be so bad it's good; or
3) possibly both

according to this item from The NYDN:
Will "The Incredible Hulk" make its June 13 release date?

Star Edward Norton, who plays scientist Bruce Banner, was reportedly called in to a night-into-day meeting Wednesday with Marvel Studios chairman David Maisel and production president Kevin Feige, Deadline Hollywood Daily has reported.

Norton has his own vision of the flick, having written the screenplay based on the Stan Lee comic book. In his script, Dr. Banner fights warmongers who want to use his powers for evil, even as he searches the world for a cure to whatever is making him a giant green guy. Plus, he's in love.

The two-time Oscar nominee has definite ideas about any film he plays in, and famed screenwriter Joe Eszterhas came just short of calling Norton a control freak.

A source told us the 38-year-old grandson of James Rouse, inventor of the shopping mall, was trying to have a say in the final edit of the film.  Maisel and Feige were in flight Thursday, so a Marvel spokesman couldn't comment by deadline.

But Norton's spokeswoman told us, "Edward was brought on board by Marvel as a producer, screenwriter and actor, so it shouldn't surprise anyone that he has a lot of creative input into the postproduction process. His deal was for all three and he takes those roles seriously. He and [director] Louis Leterrier are enjoying a terrific working relationship. Any discussions happening now are part of the normal creative process of making a movie, the give and take among everyone trying to make the best movie possible."



Where Joe Eszterhas figures in here, I don't know; but if he is legitimately involved, I vote for #2. 
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barton
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« Reply #3725 on: March 14, 2008, 11:01:24 AM »

Wasn't aware of a Bacon ROT for The Brave One -- I'll check it out.

Whatever Ed Norton does with the Hulk should be interesting -- I'm thinking of his other Jekyll/Hyde role where he oscillates between the nice kid and the angry cracker who murders a priest.   
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barton
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« Reply #3726 on: March 14, 2008, 11:28:58 AM »

Jbot, the synopsis of "Death Sentence" does sound quite a bit like The Brave One.  I would guess that TBO will emerge as distinctly the better film, but I'll have to wait and rent DS and see for myself.



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jbottle
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« Reply #3727 on: March 14, 2008, 11:45:37 AM »

Yeah, it's also made by the guy that made "Saw," whatever that's worth.
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madupont
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« Reply #3728 on: March 14, 2008, 01:36:53 PM »

Is anybody here into making video film?  I have a move-on offer if anyone is interested in creating and submitting quickly. Has very good list of judges professionally. Arrived in my mail this morning.

http://www.obamain30seconds.org/?t=2&id=12303-6817013-yY.466

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ponderosa
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« Reply #3729 on: March 14, 2008, 01:45:00 PM »

Edit this down to :30.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kBqiee2RM60
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madupont
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« Reply #3730 on: March 14, 2008, 03:32:51 PM »

Oh, Ponderous one,

the ending of that reminded me of how my Austrian friend used to be followed by children begging for "baksheesh" in Varanasi  up on the steps near the burning ghats. She gave liberally. and guess what happened? She married a prince, whose father had a farm outside V(Benares),a 200 room palace at New Delhi, and a summer home in Nepal to keep cool during the hot summer season.

Why is it, I suspect that Hillary did not give away that much in her 25 or 35(?) years of change?  (I caught that explanation she did, last night, amidst some other things I want to post when I figure out how much of it I can.)
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barton
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« Reply #3731 on: March 15, 2008, 12:08:11 PM »

"Scanners" is due in my mailbox today -- it's the one Cronenberg film I haven't seen, released in 1981.  Trying to be the resident sci-fi specialist, I feel this has been something of an oversight.  Will report back.

Heard a Dropkick Murphy's song on the radio today -- an Omaha station, and Omaha always gets into the Irishness this time of year -- it's their song on the soundtrack of The Departed, Shipping Out for Boston or whatever it's called.  Has anyone rent The Departed and if so, did you find it worth watching again on the small screen?

   
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madupont
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« Reply #3732 on: March 15, 2008, 01:28:49 PM »

Barton,

The Departed is excellent on the small screen.  I found this out by thinking that it was a movie that I would not be interrested in: until,
second time round, when it was not at the local theater and i took a flyer in terms of I wanted to see the latest Jack Nicholson.  I may not go to a movie house to see it but I did not even pass by that weird business with
Diane K., because it is what he brings to a role.

At the moment, I had been suspicious that I wasn't interested in another Leonard DiCaprio,Matt Damon, Mark Wahlburg made for the youth market.

So, although i may often pass by a shown locally Big Picture, one evening I sat down to catch Jack.   I was blown away. Because, of course, this is an ensemble performance cast, and definitely when you are a youngster, after you have had your early discoveries in both senses of the term,you are quickler on your feet "verbally" and none of these guys has a bad record. DiCaprio is in fact one of those actors with whom you can watch his mind at work visually. Matt and Mark perhaps less so. (Until they are in a good mood; or, rather their character is and then they light up.) The trick with a young neophyte actor is to get the verbiage to register mentally, once they have got the significance of the line and develop their own personal feeling for it, then the mind and the mouth coordinate at the same rate of speed.  The fact is, none of the three is as young as when he began; which places them at their prime. So I was definitely not ready for another Alec Baldwin.


But Nicholson, from the point where he walks in to collect, on his rounds, looking like my youngest brother used to on a bad day, the interaction of "Francis" with the "boy", young actor,Conor Donovan, and it is all in the bag.

What blew me away however was the rapidity of the wit as Matt Damon discovers Vera Farmiga(who is a Jersey girl,by the way) as the "house doctor", Madelyn Madden. Good choice by Scorsese.  The dialogue however comes from William Monahan.

The combo of this latter, to put words into their mouths, puts the former cadets now ranks of actors up on their toes.

Months later, a second viewing took place  because I was just walking through the room to do something, supposing I would be changing the channel to what I planned to watch that evening, and there The Departed was on the screen!  It captured me yet again, with the rapidity of the nuance, for which the Irish are reputed, which tends to go right over your head, you are so damned charmed, and that is more than half the wonder of this film. I stood there stock still on the spot staring at the screen and did not move nor dare to sit down for a good twenty minutes lest I lose the "nuance".

It's a perfect movie for which you wish someone was writing a sequel but that probably wouldn't be quite the same so you are lucky to see and hear everything that there is there now.

Enjoy it while you've got it and maybe you will have a larger screen come into your life at a surprising moment that you didn't expect and then you can have the pleasure of a real nostalgia trip on this magnificent Scorcese.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3733 on: March 15, 2008, 10:02:22 PM »

It's a perfect movie for which you wish someone was writing a sequel...

Word, or better yet, a prequel in which Ray Winstone is the main character.
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madupont
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« Reply #3734 on: March 16, 2008, 05:48:13 AM »

It's all spoiler alerts for this one

I guess it is kind of obvious, when the romance between Robert Downey's character, Lionel Sweeney and Nicole Kidman's, Diane Arbus reminds you of  what used to be: Beauty and the Beast, by Cocteau? But, then,nothing about the 1947 film reminds you of Fur: An Imaginary Portait of Diane Arbus

Other than perhaps the opening. The opening in the trees, the pathway that naturally appears, when Diane gets off the bus with her gigantic project-book and camera, and heads over the roadside into the woods to discover a naked man mowing the lawn of a large estate which turns out to be a nudist colony.

But it is a necessary beginning, whether it is or is not the proper sequence; for in this way it parallels Belle et Bete, where Belle's father, a merchant, instigates the necessity of her  having to live with la Bete, when he wanders too far into the woods. Oddly enough, we barely begin Fur when we discover that of course, Diane Nemerov Arbus' father is also a merchant. A merchant of exquisite and stylized furs.

Unlike Belle,Diane is an introverted obedient daughter and wife. Oh, wait a minute; that is not unlike Belle. Diane is beautifully compliant, in that odd hesitant way that Kidman has, like a slightly wicked child; she has two of her own but that's necessary as well because they are stand-ins for Belle's two sisters "Two of the daughters, Felicie and Adelaide, are real shrews, selfish, pretentious, evil."

I thought that was just my imagination at first, until the older of Diane's daughters nastily delivers Diane's cache of film to Allan Arbus, the photographer husband who immediately spends hours developing them, to pry into her secret, now that he not only fears but knows that he is losing her. He fell in love with her when she was 14, or 15, or 16, depending on whether you believe the movie or some unknown outside authority; although that implies that she separated from him  when she was thirty-six but remained married either until she was 42 or was she 44? And then died by her own hand after thirty years of marriage.

I shall probably never know if it was the director of Fur, or the writer of the original material who supplied the information for the scene that introduces Lionel Sweeney, that beast, we know better as Robert Downey,jr., into Diane's imaginary life. But, whom ever it was, did it ingeniously, mysteriously, so to cause some arousal of fear in us (which is the very heart of Belle et la Bete) that will give way to passion gradually developed. It is ingenious from the film-maker's point of view, to depict this in one of Diane's moments of inherent exhibitionism, the other side of her voyeurism, when she is stopped dead in her tracks by the appearance from her window of a strange muffled man below her balcony. He is apparently  masked, as we have been given many hints of this, but it turns out to be a masquerade.

Downey reveals Lionel to be a purring, insinuating, creature covered in his own fur which he can't stop producing. It has given him a decent living, apparently, preparing wigs of all sorts from "real human hair". He entices Ms.Kidman aka Diane, goddess of chastity,mistress of wild things, to become curious as a cat and come visit him in his lair at the top of the residential apartment building which is one of those once modern addresses in New York that time has made unattractive and foreboding. Lionel's den is however the piece de resistance, filled with a clutter of artifacts, and pleasurable experiences for your surprise, and kept dusted by an armless woman who is not the Venus de Milo but whom Lionel describes as "an admirer". When Diane asked him  why she is not his girl-friend, Downey replies with perfect emphasis,"Because she does not touch me."

When you least suspect that this will end as a touching love story, it does; and it ends.  Yet it is one of the more beautiful inventions.  Obviously because beneath all that Fur is a Robert Downey,jr. like none we've ever seen before.

I think that I should end this with a little something by Diane's brother, Howard.

Insomnia I
Howard Nemerov

Some nights it's bound to be your best way out,
When nightmare is the short end of the stick,
When sleep is a part of town where it's not safe
To walk at night, when waking is the only way
You have of distancing your wretched dead,
A growing crowd, and escaping out of their
Time into yours for another little while;

Then pass ghostly, a planet in the house
Never observed, among the sleeping rooms
Where children dream themselves, and thence go down
Into the empty domain where daylight reigned;
Reward yourself with drink and a book to read,
A mystery, for its elusive gift
Of reassurance against the hour of death.
Order your heart about: Stop doing that!
And get the world to be secular again.

Then, when you know who done it, turn out the light,
And quietly in darkness, in moonlight, or snowlight
Reflective, listen to the whistling earth
In its backspin trajectory around the sun
That makes the planets sometimes retrograde
And brings the cold forgiveness of the dawn
Whose light extinguishes all stars but one.

 




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