Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
April 22, 2018, 05:57:37 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: As you may have noticed, this is a very old backup, I'm still working through restoring the site.  Don't be surprised if you post and it all goes missing....
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Pages: 1 ... 248 249 [250] 251 252 ... 303
  Print  
Author Topic: Movies  (Read 40707 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1143



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3735 on: March 16, 2008, 09:48:29 AM »

Quote
...Allan Arbus, the photographer husband...


Not to mention Sidney Freeman, the Army shrink on MASH (plus many other acting credits).
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2383


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #3736 on: March 16, 2008, 01:20:37 PM »

Madupont, I like your parallels between Belle et le Bete and "Fur."  I think it's the director who imaginatively (hence the subtitle of the film) recreates one possible interpretation of the biographical material on Arbus -- we know it's fiction, but it's in that mode that uses imagined situations to somehow give us an enhanced understanding of the biographer's subject.  It seems to work well on the biography of an artist, because an artist is always trying to recreate and reinvent their own life anyway.  Anyway, great review -- getting me to reflect on something I've seen a while back before it just slides into the memory fuzz.

 
Logged

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2383


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #3737 on: March 16, 2008, 01:32:05 PM »

"Scanners" is lesser Cronenberg, BTW, i.e. interesting concept, but essentially a B-movie about psychics who can read minds and, if so inclined, kill with their thoughts (even to the point of exploding heads).  Patrick McGoohan does an interesting but rather sedate version of a scientist, and there's Michael Ironside in the early stages of his acting career, portraying bad guys with brains.  He hams it up in this one, contorting his face and popping f/x head veins while sending out killer thoughts.  "Scanners" (1981) was made back before people gave Crones much money, so he makes do with some rather prosaic Toronto neighborhoods and interiors -- which kind of adds to the B-movie fun and gives glimpses of his developing visual artistry. 
Logged

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3738 on: March 16, 2008, 03:13:36 PM »

Quote
...Allan Arbus, the photographer husband...


Not to mention Sidney Freeman, the Army shrink on MASH (plus many other acting credits).


Harrie, yes, that kept rattling me how to best describe Allan Arbus because I knew that I knew him from somewhere, and I just could not come up with the right term to adequately convey what I needed to say without it being an expression right over the top! Frankly, he reminds me of the German Jews of my childhood who arrived and became converts or "hidden" Jews among American Roman Catholics. Of course not all did, since the New York family of the Cassirers were the only branch who survived of their very large family of European Jews who made so many significant contributions to the arts. The only other had been Nadine Gordimer's husband Paul Cassirer, in South Africa, who opened the first art galleries there.

Plus, I knew that I recognized the actor's name!  So, what had I seen that he had done?

Did he,Allan Arbus -- I seem to recall a rumor-- also commit suicide?
« Last Edit: March 16, 2008, 03:15:31 PM by madupont » Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3739 on: March 16, 2008, 03:29:26 PM »

Madupont, I like your parallels between Belle et le Bete and "Fur."  I think it's the director who imaginatively (hence the subtitle of the film) recreates one possible interpretation of the biographical material on Arbus -- we know it's fiction, but it's in that mode that uses imagined situations to somehow give us an enhanced understanding of the biographer's subject.  It seems to work well on the biography of an artist, because an artist is always trying to recreate and reinvent their own life anyway.  Anyway, great review -- getting me to reflect on something I've seen a while back before it just slides into the memory fuzz.

 
  I know you will find this as hard to believe as did I, but it turns out that in French -- Bete, is listed as, noun,feminine. Even when in this case when Cocteau filmed, the intent was that he was obviously male. So, I guess that means that we can not insist that there are no female beasts.  I know that I wrote it exactly as you did until something told me to reach for my French dictionary before I wrote the whole thing.

I used to get these wonderful lessons early in the morning on the PBS channel out of Delaware that I got up for faithfully, which is not hard to do when surrounded by cow barns doing the morning milking(something about the energy just buzzes through the entire vicinity); and then five years ago, I moved about thirty minutes westward and that was enough to do with that sort of "culture". PBS from Harrisburg, the state capital, will not even broadcast Lidia's Table or her other Italian and Italian-American cooking shows on tv.
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2412


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3740 on: March 16, 2008, 05:21:31 PM »

Tobes' "Miami Blues" hits all the high points and touts George Armitrage's resume out well enough, as well as his fimiliarity with Willeford fiction, but he owes me a tit.
Logged
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1143



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3741 on: March 16, 2008, 06:37:36 PM »

Quote
Did he,Allan Arbus -- I seem to recall a rumor-- also commit suicide?

According to IMDB, he's still alive and kicking.  He's 90 if their info is correct. 

barton, I forgot to say -- I've watched The Departed twice (probably closer to 2-1/2 times) on the TV, and I'd watch it again a few more times.  I think it's an excellent flick, though I still prefer Goodfellas.
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2383


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #3742 on: March 17, 2008, 11:58:11 AM »

Thanks, and the best of my saint's day to you (me name is Patrick, outside of cyberspace, where people can hear me scream), Jbottle.  I have to re-view Miami Blues, for sure.  I like what I've read of Willeford, who influenced a TON of later Florida writers.

May your rivers run green and may the corned beef be tasty, if you're into the whole dead animal thing.

Madupont -- thanks for fixing my francais.  The beast shall henceforth be la bete, you bet.  C'est la vie, c'est la guerre, c'est la pomme de terre!

Logged

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
oilcanboyd23
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1613



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3743 on: March 17, 2008, 05:03:51 PM »

I have to re-view Miami Blues, for sure.

Do so and you'll agree that Fred Ward is one of those guys who should be, like, knighted or something. 

Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2412


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3744 on: March 17, 2008, 05:06:01 PM »

"How about another Po-lar..."

"You got the last one..."

"You sure you don't have another raholed up in there..."

But I paraphrase, oil, if you have it cold please correct me.
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2412


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3745 on: March 17, 2008, 05:24:25 PM »

Oh, and "The Departed" illustrates the difference between great (DiCaprio, Nicholson) and really good (Damon, Wahlberg) acting in ways that are hard to describe.  As well as Wahlberg is cast and acts in "Boogie Nights," where I think he is terrific and heartbreaking and funny, or Damon cast in Bourne with the physicality and immediacy and soldierly lack of affect, and as much as I can say that DiCaprio wouldn't have been as good in either of those roles, I can also say with certainty that DiCaprio seems to behave like someone who doesn't know the camera is there at all, he just seems more real in "The Departed" than anybody else.  With Nicholson, it's the charisma that transfers, women would want to have sex with Jack Nicholson even if he didn't have any money because he has that glint of the troublemaker that's attractive, but he can also do something as "minimalist" as he was in "Chinatown," probably his most nuanced performance as a confident dick who gets in over his head and over his heart, and gets burned for it all by the mad thrust of past wrongs and unimaginable greed, for caring, really.  After I saw "The Departed" the third or so time (I'm really slow at appreciating movies that I like more if that makes sense), it slowed down for me enough that once I know what happened and is happening roughly, you get a better appreciation of what somebody is thinking, and in "the departed" it involves being a less than good actor as a mole in a couple of cases, and still convincing the audience that he is convincing the other character without actually using all of his "acting" skills.  DiCaprio makes this look easy, and I don't know why or how, but that jumped off the screen for me when I saw it again, and he looks like a man now, too, and kind of grew into the part like he needed to, I think it's a major career landmark, and makes me want to take another look at his Hughes portrayal, but anyway.
Logged
oilcanboyd23
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1613



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3746 on: March 17, 2008, 05:51:50 PM »

"How about another Po-lar..."

"You got the last one..."

"You sure you don't have another ratholed up in there..."


"Hey... Beer's gone? I'm gone..."
Logged
jbottle
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2412


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3747 on: March 17, 2008, 10:05:23 PM »

Yeah, I remember the Krishna guys in the Airport in LA when I was a kid, that, and the right-winger who used to run for president in the 1980's, the wack job from I think New Orleans, like a white libertarian or whatever, so in "Miami Blues" I kinda got the joke of the Krishna at the airport, which was something from back then, and I guess "you" the audience know to laugh when Baldwin snaps the guys finger but it's one of those really solid tone-defining uncomfortable laughs where it's like, ok, yikes, but okay, this is going to be funny...

And the Baldwin character is great, I would say the main character but the movie is really invested in all three of them heavily, equally.  Another moment like the Krishna moment is where Baldwin shoots the guy in the leg and says "Stop or I'll shoot..." because it's (a) funny; (b) cops are crooked too and now he's playing one; and (c) the crowd reaction is going to be "I heard shots and then this guy say "stop or I'll shoot," and the cop says "Ma'am, you mean the officer...and the guy kept on going.

"Well, it was very disconcerting, very..."

"It was disquieting, we were having a Bloody Mary and somebody says something and somebody shoots, it was terrible..." [takes medicine from prescription bottle]

No but that's what Armitage and Willeford are good at compressing into a line...and what follows, is an uneasy Baldwin, going...

"I'm a police officer...remain calm...I have to go call this in...from my police cruiser..." [gets around corner and runs]

Yeah, it's a noir that recognizes that noir has always been more of a way of looking at the world or a lifestyle or being "hardboiled" and funny to the core, like all the best movies are, they are always hilarious while things are desperate and dire, even when it's under the balmy sun of Miami, "Miami Blues" is certainly a noir that's superior to "Body Heat" because the sense of humor is fantastic, and the performances are all three out of the park.  You watch "Body Heat" and when you want more Ted Danson, it makes you wonder why people ever wanted to see Bill Hurt and K-Turn in a tub of ice because they had scrued their way into genital trauma.  Yeah, I know there is a joke there, but it's pretty arch when you are also trying to sell it as "steamy," on the other hand is Larry Kasdan being funny when Hurt throws a chair through the plate glass door to get to Turner teasing him??  Hurt is supposed to be a schmuck, but it doesn't help that Kathleen Turner has coke-tubes the size of nickels and sounds like she's three packs a day.
Logged
nytempsperdu
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 402


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3748 on: March 17, 2008, 11:12:14 PM »

Quote
women would want to have sex with Jack Nicholson even if he didn't have any money because he has that glint of the troublemaker that's attractive,

Expertise for this opinion? 

Re sex w/Nicholson: remake of The Postman Always Rings Twice with Jessica Lange (only movie star I ever envied on the mate scene: Baryshnikov followed by Sam Shepard--unfair!!)  I thought 'twas well done and one I think of when I think of noir, but never saw original so can't compare as to merit.

The Good Shepherd was on HBO, seemed at times to be a test of how long Damon could go without registering any expression...subject matter had some interest for this former DC area dweller.  I liked the guy who played Damon's son as young man, but overall, well, I dozed a couple times, so opinion may be unfair.

Oddest novel in which CIA figures large: John Barth's Tidewater Tales -- CIA & Scheherazade, wotta combo! 
« Last Edit: March 18, 2008, 12:11:30 AM by nytempsperdu » Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #3749 on: March 17, 2008, 11:38:01 PM »

jbottle, "Coke tubes the size of nickels" , I think that could be considered the underlying theme for some of these characters in real life, or characters in the fictional roles of what is now real life.

I know what you mean about looking at Hughes a second time; I saw it piecemeal originally. Either into after it started, or perhaps I came across it by accident and thought I've got to see this scene;what's happening here? And then went back to it at another time,  this is good for the acting --seeing it in segments, just for how the scenes are played. Bad for continuity  But you finally put it all together. Yes, Hughes was an sob, kind of like Bush. Nuttier than a fruit cake, from a childhood complex; so he developed a temper for coping with his phobia.

There are scenes where he is revving up his engines, or bringing them up by levels  to speed, to lift that baby's weight off the ground, and you see DiCaprio still doing the kid in him. Or, taking Cate Blanchett/Kate Hepburn   out for a spin, the equivalent of a jalopy joyride that ends badly if I recall but she is so delirious, so Hepburn-is-it-real-or-is-it-phony-exhiliration, that she never even notices Hughes is this Kid with a mustache; by the end of the ride, he is all Man because he's shown her something.

His way of dealing with her crazy family is, I don't have time for this s...   Now, I've read about them but I never got the impression of them being quite so  Connecticut Liberal as this scene is played;yet, I could relate to it.  I have a family that is eccentric, or was, at the dinner table, and apparently came by it "traditionally" inherited from previous generations. It was like going to a British movie.

DiCaprio did this in a much earlier film, when he played Rimbaud(Total Eclipse) and it was less a matter of the play back and forth between his juvenile petulance and the eventual man but rather that he was self poisoning. Lots of people were at that time, Symbolist poetry, symbolist art,mysticism perhaps or just wacky theories  but in any case he was just so convinced of his exceptionalism, of being the genius of the age, plus running up against Paul Verlaine who was just a tad too bourgeois and also thought he was exceptional (for his class), so he went around deigning to relate to this mad peasant or so he thought. Really all it was  happened to be the average middle-class triangle, instead of a mistress, Verlaine had Rimbaud. It was the " Family Romance " that the French had discovered a century earlier. Or, the Holy Family, the solid father, the doting madonna, the heavenly child; everything revolves around this basic plot. Lynn Hunt called it,The Invention of Pornography.  For some reason, the middle class in Europe suddenly got psychological. The Bohemian class had drugs.  So this snot of a kid, DiCaprio after besting Verlaine, letting him ruin himself whereas normally it used to be the other way round, a century before, think of the Marquis de Sade or Adrien Brody ...  Count Nicolas De La Motte; Stephen Frears, Les Liaisons Dangereuses, with Malkovich as Valmont, or Milos Forman's, Valmont, it was the aristocracy that was libertine or twisted and DiCaprio's peasant, a century later, knew it. So he had his kicks reversing the roles, then he got religion or mysticism at least and the last you see of him, he is in Africa, being a man and you can see that this change has come over him, in his face; he now is an adult male in the same film where he has been an insouciant, petulant nuisance. This is from a woman director, however: Agnieszka Holland.

"DiCaprio seems to behave like someone who doesn't know the camera is there at all, he just seems more real in "The Departed" than anybody else.  With Nicholson, it's the charisma that transfers, women would want to have sex with Jack Nicholson even if he didn't have any money because he has that glint of the troublemaker that's attractive, but he can also do something as "minimalist" as he was in "Chinatown," probably his most nuanced performance."

I agree, Wahlburg in particular is visibly acting. Damon is verbally, right on his beats,"interacting". DiCaprio just is, from the inside out to the surface.  I can imagine what Scorsese felt like when he looked through his view-finder after having discovered this kid.

Nicholson is what I meant about my youngest brother who was no great shakes in his middle years, yet from his youth coming back from Berlin(the Elvis is in the service years) the glint of the troublemaker was mysteriously apparent to young women, where he got these "chicks"? I think he stole them. They came over and cleaned his apartment. I never ran into them of course, other than those I knew from our sometimes mutual political life; but he would tell me these Nicholson type stories as if explaining the technique of preferred bachelorhood. Actually, all of Jack's performances were minimalist, contemporaneous to Chinatown, Easy Rider, Five Easy Pieces, The Last Detail but where they got nuanced was when Warren Beatty walked up to him and said, "How'd you like to be Eugene O'Neill for me, in this thing I think I'll call,"Reds" ?    This was agreed upon throughout the film-making world, the international confering of recognition, merit, that this Nicholson who gradually moved up from B films for Friday night television viewing was an actor from New Jersey who was an actors' actor, like Laurence Olivier, Peter O'Toole, or...Jack Nicholson. An Incomparable.

« Last Edit: March 17, 2008, 11:48:24 PM by madupont » Logged
Pages: 1 ... 248 249 [250] 251 252 ... 303
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!