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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 38403 times)
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barton
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« Reply #3825 on: March 25, 2008, 02:04:24 PM »

You're right, there's a lot of big empty in Texas that'll just tire your eyes out -- indeed, I've noticed that several movies have shot exteriors in New Mexico and then called it Texas, apparently wanting something a bit more scenic than Texas could offer.  In fact, the recent "Astronaut Farmer" did just that, locating Billy Bob Thornton in Texas, but shooting him in NM.

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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
ponderosa
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« Reply #3826 on: March 25, 2008, 02:38:39 PM »

Anyone read the novel? The movie still has me confused about who did what to whom, etc.


The War on Some Drug Consumers killed everybody and drastically altered the life of the Sheriff  :'(

Read it. It's quick but interesting.
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #3827 on: March 25, 2008, 09:11:15 PM »

Earl, you won't get disagreement from me.  Your estimation of In Bruges coincides with that of critics I heard before I went.  My post was more about my own reaction and inability to enjoy comedy with so much blood.  I love a dark comedy, like Dr. Strangelove, even one with deaths (Arsenic and Old Lace springs to mind). The aversion treatment in A Clockwork Orange would not be necessary for me.

Even In Bruges, I enjoy when thinking over lines and dialogue in retrospect. I can't say why carnage writ large on the screen tenses me up, though at least one friend says I have too much of what she calls "bad imagination."  My mind just doesn't get to the point of "Hmm, that's interesting, wonder how they made that look like his head was blown off" because it's busy with "Oh geez, look at that, the guy's head was blown off." 

I wonder if there have been any scientific studies of brain changes when viewing such scenes. 
 
« Last Edit: March 25, 2008, 09:17:08 PM by nytempsperdu » Logged
ponderosa
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« Reply #3828 on: March 25, 2008, 09:29:10 PM »

Always thought San Antonio would be a nice place to visit - Selena (One of my wife's favorite movies) made the river look so nice, there's also some mission there whose name I forget...

I believe somebody made a film or two about it.

Besides that more famous one, if you're a photographer the mission trail is worth a look.

http://www.lsjunction.com/facts/missions.htm

http://www.americansouthwest.net/texas/san_antonio_missions/historical_park.html

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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3829 on: March 26, 2008, 12:49:50 PM »

Okay, No Country for Old Men -

Anyone read the novel? The movie still has me confused about who did what to whom, etc.

I've seen the movie thrice and read the book twice.  I've got a pretty good idea of what happened, but I think some of it is open to interpretation.

Anyways, ask me anything!!
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madupont
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« Reply #3830 on: March 26, 2008, 01:23:01 PM »

Thanks, Ponderosa, I want you to know that I had the most horribly gringo version Mexican cooking in my life  when I was starved for it by the time that I arrived in California. You would think that they would serve some on the Amtrak train menu, when you have to spend five hours looking at the Red Cliffs in the desert, which wets my appetite for some reason, possibly the poverty of the Native American which is all that is visible. A horse, a dog, saw not one human in five hours.

On the other hand, the Missions of California are not bad, done back in 1948.  My youngest sister and daughters seem to prefer the New Mexico version 2007.
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madupont
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« Reply #3831 on: March 26, 2008, 01:31:05 PM »

maddie -

Austin was one of the first areas in Texas to get w/ the late sixties/early 70s drug culture because of UT - it wasn't cool until around 1967.  My Dad is a Texas Ex. 

Also had an aunt who died in Odessa.


Gee, your Dad could possibly be a classmate(on other hand, perhaps too young?)of the father of the young man who showed up in my driveway directly from India and went there because -- his father flew the Hump in WW2 and he was curious about Burma. I never was; cobras. Somehow, I just don't get religious about them.
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madupont
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« Reply #3832 on: March 26, 2008, 01:41:13 PM »

Earl, you won't get disagreement from me.  Your estimation of In Bruges coincides with that of critics I heard before I went.  My post was more about my own reaction and inability to enjoy comedy with so much blood.  I love a dark comedy, like Dr. Strangelove, even one with deaths (Arsenic and Old Lace springs to mind). The aversion treatment in A Clockwork Orange would not be necessary for me.

Even In Bruges, I enjoy when thinking over lines and dialogue in retrospect. I can't say why carnage writ large on the screen tenses me up, though at least one friend says I have too much of what she calls "bad imagination."  My mind just doesn't get to the point of "Hmm, that's interesting, wonder how they made that look like his head was blown off" because it's busy with "Oh geez, look at that, the guy's head was blown off." 

I wonder if there have been any scientific studies of brain changes when viewing such scenes. 
 


Read up on this:  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0808279/

I've been trying to locate the British review that I just read about a day ago which probably explains it a bit better; but, I seem to have eraced it?  It is Naomi Watts and Tim Roth. There are reputedly no scenes of the actual violence in the film because it is a psychological study in retort to a now big US  audience of youngsters who want the kick of getting a view. If I locate it again, will post.
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #3833 on: March 26, 2008, 02:04:43 PM »

maddie -

Austin was one of the first areas in Texas to get w/ the late sixties/early 70s drug culture because of UT - it wasn't cool until around 1967.  My Dad is a Texas Ex. 

Also had an aunt who died in Odessa.


Gee, your Dad could possibly be a classmate(on other hand, perhaps too young?)of the father of the young man who showed up in my driveway directly from India and went there because -- his father flew the Hump in WW2 and he was curious about Burma. I never was; cobras. Somehow, I just don't get religious about them.

maddie -

My dad was in the Navy in WWII - he graduated from UT in 1949.  If you remember the actor Pat Hingle, he was a classmate of my dad's there.
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madupont
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« Reply #3834 on: March 26, 2008, 02:37:34 PM »

nytempsperdu,   Here it is.

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/?storyID=24700

Critics aren’t laughing at Funny Games.

A satire of Hollywood violence has touched a raw nerve in US, says Christopher Goodwin
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madupont
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« Reply #3835 on: March 26, 2008, 02:45:25 PM »

desdemona222b,re: #3855

"maddie -

My dad was in the Navy in WWII - he graduated from UT in 1949.  If you remember the actor Pat Hingle, he was a classmate of my dad's there."

Yes, I do. But not quite in what as he made so many films.

My son was in the Navy too, pre-Gulf War; a decision he does not regret although the way he puts it is,"I'm glad that I got that out of the way when I did."
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ponderosa
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« Reply #3836 on: March 26, 2008, 05:09:00 PM »

Thanks, Ponderosa, I want you to know that I had the most horribly gringo version Mexican cooking in my life  when I was starved for it by the time that I arrived in California. You would think that they would serve some on the Amtrak train menu, when you have to spend five hours looking at the Red Cliffs in the desert, which wets my appetite for some reason, possibly the poverty of the Native American which is all that is visible. A horse, a dog, saw not one human in five hours.

On the other hand, the Missions of California are not bad, done back in 1948.  My youngest sister and daughters seem to prefer the New Mexico version 2007.

S.A. is good eatin', ma. If you're ever down these parts visiting your kin make sure they take you down there. Heck, let me know and I'll treat.
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madupont
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« Reply #3837 on: March 27, 2008, 10:44:42 AM »

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/people,808,scrubs-actress-signs-up-to-play-first-lady,22898


Oliver Stone does it again.
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barton
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« Reply #3838 on: March 27, 2008, 10:51:03 AM »

Children of Men bore repeat viewing, as Harrie suggested a week or so back there.  Love Michael Caine's urbane and jolly hippie, especially.  An excellent film in the gauntlet genre, with scenes of refugee squalor, urban decay, and urban battle that seem stunningly real and immediate.  

"How is he doing?" (asked of mother, re baby)

"He's annoyed."  (after the baby has been in the middle of a firefight, with artillery fire, massive explosions, raining debris, repeated falling to the ground, horrible screaming, etc.)

"Syd" also an indelible character, with inappropriate jauntiness and reliance on third person singular for speaking of himself.

Really, an outstanding ensemble.



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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #3839 on: March 27, 2008, 11:21:50 AM »

I liked "COM" - definitely my favorite Clive Owen performance.

Oh, and mark it "El Orfanato"!!  It was produced by Guillermo Del Toro and is a ghost story set in an oprhanage, so I feared it would be "The Devil's Backbone" re-hash or whatever.  I am pleased to report that it was not, and it is one of the best ghost movies I've ever seen.

It's further proof of Ebert's saying, which goes something like "A movie is not about what the movie is about.  A movie is about how is goes about being about what it is about."  In "El Orfanato" we don't see anything we haven't seen before, e.g., troubled spirits calling out to someone who may know something about something bad that happened a long time ago, a "Poltergeist"-like scene with a medium touring the house, assisted by a tech-guy with camera and sound equipment, etc.

These are all elements we've seen before, but in "El Orfanato", each one is executed perfectly and plausibly.   That's probably why every single dread-filled "Uh oh, what's behind that door?  I can't look..." moment works, and there are plenty of them.

And, you will fall in love with the main character - she's a Spanish actress, and if "El Orfanato" came out last year, she should have won Best Actress.  It's a great movie in many respects, and her performance is the best thing about it.

« Last Edit: March 27, 2008, 11:23:52 AM by oilcanboyd23 » Logged
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