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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 33162 times)
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #4350 on: June 06, 2008, 11:43:49 PM »

Thank you, puge, but I choose to decline the bait.

Donotremove put it very eloquently in another forum, and I pretty much agree with his assessment.

" Grin "
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #4351 on: June 07, 2008, 12:20:35 AM »

For a second there I thought Harrie posted a shot of Mickey Rourke in "Sin City 2" or whathaveyou, you know, the whole Bill Pullman/Paxton thing.

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jbottle
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« Reply #4352 on: June 07, 2008, 04:02:39 AM »

Puget has that rare combination of really queer and no sense of humor, which is evidently very frustrating for him as he hides behind the usual stereotypical fascades as an "art front," a "sensitive front," and lacking an "intelligence," he has nowhere to retreat to other than cornered dumbass blathering away and betraying his ignorance and lack of appreciation of humor over and over, not really the definition of insanity, because it happens over and over, same result, but more like the definition of boring, as if being queer gave you the same right as a meathead or cheerleader to rely and stick to the most painful and obvious of the traits regularly parodied, and yet there he is, dumb as a sack of hammers and loud and proud and in italics, the most boring person I've ever encountered on the internet.

What a loser.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #4353 on: June 07, 2008, 08:37:42 AM »

Puget has that rare combination of really queer and no sense of humor, which is evidently very frustrating for him as he hides behind the usual stereotypical fascades as an "art front," a "sensitive front," and lacking an "intelligence," he has nowhere to retreat to other than cornered dumbass blathering away and betraying his ignorance and lack of appreciation of humor over and over, not really the definition of insanity, because it happens over and over, same result, but more like the definition of boring, as if being queer gave you the same right as a meathead or cheerleader to rely and stick to the most painful and obvious of the traits regularly parodied, and yet there he is, dumb as a sack of hammers and loud and proud and in italics, the most boring person I've ever encountered on the internet.

What a loser.

http://forums.escapefromelba.com/index.php/topic,49.msg94358.html#msg94358
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harrie
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« Reply #4354 on: June 07, 2008, 09:21:16 AM »

For a second there I thought Harrie posted a shot of Mickey Rourke in "Sin City 2" or whathaveyou, you know, the whole Bill Pullman/Paxton thing.

Geez, oil, you're right!  Not that that's surprising, just that the resemblance is eerie.
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barton
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« Reply #4355 on: June 07, 2008, 10:59:55 AM »

Puget -- stop being so dense.  There was no racism in the joke about the emoticon -- perhaps a joke about the overt and ridiculous (or ridicurous?) racism in Mickey Rooney's portrayal of a Japanese and the grotesque makeup.  You seem to be taking yourself, and the rest of us, way too seriously.  As for Jbot, he likes the talk the trash.  If you keep poking the bear with a stick, what do you expect him to do, mail you a box of candy?

 
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madupont
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« Reply #4356 on: June 07, 2008, 12:16:57 PM »

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/35227,features,the-ones-to-watch-at-cannes,2

Sorry I'm late with this but I totally missed  Cannes this year, because of elections I suppose.  (Can you believe this, Bob Woodward's "partner" of yore is on right now explaining that Hillary is looking for a place for Bill in Obama's campaign!)

ANYWAY, nice picture of Jolie,1920s, in my link.
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madupont
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« Reply #4357 on: June 07, 2008, 01:02:53 PM »

Barton,

What is so weird about the coincidental emoticon rift is that I've tried to talk about this movie at length, analyzing it, in the past. But, having been around then, I WAS IMMEDIATELY DISQUALIFIED FROM KNOWING ANYTHING ABOUT WHAT THE FILM WAS SAYING.

What you've just encountered is a "generation gap", having nothing to do with Mickey Rourke and everything to do with Mickey Rooney who of course thought he was hysterically funny playing a stereotype since that was his  mindset from being a child-actor having a comedy start, who was once married to Ava Gardner, his only claim to fame.

I never could stand him(his "sense(?) of comedy"). But actually,as I've admitted before I had a misplaced arrival  on the scene as far as  comedy was concerned. I was born into an era and grew up in another era most of which bored with what was supposed to be funny.  I preferred irony.  I loved the delivery of Peter Lorre lines, which he would insinuate at you and then turn away from the target of his ironic wit because we mentally bored him. There were several others better known as radio performers, almost always European, one was also a well-known musician, definitely not Jack Benny (but he was not bad at this routine either)nor Victor Borge; they tended to be "Mittel Europeans" or displaced persons.

Anyway, as everyone who was trying to behave like an adult back then recalls this was Audrey Hepburn, as well as George Peppard's, Japanese landlord in, Breakfast at Tiffany's. She purposefully always forgot or misplaced her key to the apartment building, forcing Rooney to do a bowlegged descent of the stairs while complaining how he never got any sleep.  Not particularly sophisticated funny but that would have been the director's fault; it was very likely that they cast Mickey Rooney, for an income, so he could continue to have something to live on.

Unfortunately, it is quite true that the popular culture of the time, reflecting the public's common taste which thought stereotypes were funny, was not very discriminating about discrimination against how other races were portrayed; nor sexual identity, which is why some of the other casting varied greatly from the characters in the novel from which the film was adapted.

But, I'm generally so amazed when I find that somebody posting is actually in their forties, that No Wonder they disbelieve what I am saying about a movie made back in 1961 release. That's 47 years ago and they weren't born yet, so their interpretation comes from seeing it with new eyes and unaware of what we referred to as the mores in those days.

There would have been no need for Patricia Neel in the cast had they known what the writer was doing in the way of wish-fulfillment  that had to be disguised for the movies.
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barton
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« Reply #4358 on: June 07, 2008, 04:48:25 PM »

Well, though I am around _______ years of age, something that rhymes with "nifty" possibly but I don't want to get into it, I can sort of remember the ease with which Asian stereotypes were generally swallowed and digested, back in the sixties.  Though, even then, it seems to me, this was something that went down easily mainly in the less cosmpolitan reaches of American outback where non-Caucausian minorities were very few and far between.  When you don't know actual human beings of a racial/ethnic group, it's easy to let the stupidity slide.   By the time I'd moved from Kansas to Boston, in my teens, and had a Japanese friend (who taught me how to say "fish head" among other useful pejoratives), I was able to look at portrayals like Rooney's and reflect a moment on just how that would look to me if I were Asian and how monstrously unfunny it would be.  Not that I would have found him funny, in any case.  I agree that Rooney's casting does seem almost like a misguided act of charity, and is certainly a mystifying flaw in an otherwise okay film.   

And don't even get me started on the soaking of Cat.  Reeowrrr.

My couch arm friend informs me that the book is much better.  And I agree. 

   
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barton
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« Reply #4359 on: June 07, 2008, 04:57:17 PM »

While I'm here, completely different topic --

fans of Ray Kurzweil (and/or Vernor Vinge) and the whole "Singularity" concept, sometimes aka Geek Rapture, will probably need to see this (Kurzweil is actually in it, along with several other people who can't really act, but the lead is played by Pauley Perrette, who some of you may know better as "Abbie" the crime lab goth girl on NCIS...) film, to be released sometime later this year...

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt1049412/

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jbottle
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« Reply #4360 on: June 07, 2008, 07:19:18 PM »

Zohan did $15M Friday night and looks to post a respectable number, but has to be regarded as a modest flop when you have a supposed A-lister and all the pizza-faced kids are out of school.  Maybe it's that terminally-16 man-child that has finally abandoned him, that whole 28-45 yr. old demographic.

Puget is truly pathetic, isn't he, I don't know what's worse, the pathetic art-posturing or the semi-literate whining, that whole aging hag/windbag that hasn't really worked since the death of Truman Capote, who was an incredible wit, the tradition within which, puget has not a whisper of a claim to...the idea that he would attack me when I've simply done the best I can to ignore his tired posturing.  Sad.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #4361 on: June 08, 2008, 12:06:11 PM »

...the pathetic art-posturing or the semi-literate whining, that whole aging hag/windbag that hasn't really worked since the death of Truman Capote...

"Prefer Earl Grey and bagel with nova, when there is more time..."
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barton
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« Reply #4362 on: June 08, 2008, 01:54:06 PM »

God, how I miss that Persian dude!

Watched Day of the Jackal last night (again, KUDOS to my public library for ordering tons of good DVDs) and was reminded of that now nearly defunct style of really TAKING YOUR TIME -- i.e. long shots that just let you watch a single action being done, no fast cuts or jump cuts or hump cuts or bump your stump cuts (ok, I made up some of those.....), and expansive exterior shots that linger and pan slowly over a landscape or cityscape as you take in a character's movements through a much larger frame.  The effect is powerful, sometimes hypnotic, and for most of the film pretty spellbinding.  It had been so long since I'd seen it that it was basically a new film to me, and what a masterpiece of suspense, not only for the pacing and the way you are allowed to carefully watch situations develop and connect with each other, but because it creates suspense in spite of the fact that you know perfectly well, from a historical perspective, that Charles DeGaulle is NOT going to take a bullet in the head. 

There is one rather lackluster and disjointed scene, which I think our OILCAN may have pointed out some time back, in which the Jackal (Edward Fox) and the English lady meet in a hotel lounge and talk about how boring the magazines are and then, uhhhh, they're lying together in a post-coital snuggle.  This is the one odd scene where I think the general approach of slow and careful development would have made a smoother transition, esp. given that the lounge chat scene signaled, to me anyway, that they didn't much like each other and had zero going in the pheromone department.

Still, a flaw like a small scar in fine leather.  One of the great films from that "golden age" of film that was the early 1970s.





 

 
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #4363 on: June 08, 2008, 02:00:28 PM »


...There is one rather lackluster and disjointed scene, which I think our OILCAN may have pointed out some time back, in which the Jackal (Edward Fox) and the English lady meet in a hotel lounge and talk about how boring the magazines are and then, uhhhh, they're lying together in a post-coital snuggle... Still, a flaw like a small scar in fine leather...

There was another scene in a post office that had me going "uhhh...?" and maybe more that I can't remember.  Next time I see it I'll refresh my memory, and I'll report back as soon as it's done.
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jbottle
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« Reply #4364 on: June 08, 2008, 05:29:50 PM »

And then, those same head-scratching moments in an STV like "Ticker" are deemed virtuous, but in a good movie, when something doesn't make sense or clangs, it reminds you what a good movie you are watching, but also that but for a couple of poor choices, how it might've been perfect. 

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