Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
April 24, 2018, 02:22:50 PM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: As you may have noticed, this is a very old backup, I'm still working through restoring the site.  Don't be surprised if you post and it all goes missing....
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Poll
Question: What is the best show of the most anticipated new shows this fall?
Pushing Daisies
Private Practice
Bionic Woman
Chuck
Dirty Sexy Money
Back to You
Big Shots
Cane
Journeyman
Samantha Who?
Other

Pages: 1 ... 48 49 [50] 51 52 ... 94
  Print  
Author Topic: Television  (Read 19360 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1143



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #735 on: October 13, 2007, 09:52:01 PM »

Butting in here where I have no business.....An ancestor of mine was scalped (by Yankees). She is said to have lost a good chunk of flesh off her head, but she did live. 

I wasn't there, this was one of those stories passed down.  But as far as I know, it wasn't embellished as it rolled along, or by the time it got to my generation she'd have recovered instantly, beaten the Yanks, and we'd still be under British rule.
Logged
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #736 on: October 13, 2007, 10:52:43 PM »


Butting in here where I have no business.....


Oh, that's okay    Grin Grin Grin
Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
nytempsperdu
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 402


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #737 on: October 13, 2007, 11:51:53 PM »

harrie: You most certainly do have business here, or wherever you choose.  I'm intrigued by the ancestor scalped by the Brits, sounds like quite a tale--where and when was that, and however did she survive?
Logged
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1143



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #738 on: October 14, 2007, 12:29:47 AM »

Thanks for the vote of confidence, nytempsperdu.  The scalping was before the Revolution, or possibly during the early part of it. I have a little family history thing, but it's not handy.  I had ancestors who were both Tories and Yankees, but my direct ancestor was a Tory.  He and his family fled the colonies to accept a land grant from George III in Canada; or, depending on your point of view, they were chased out of the colonies (but there was a land grant). 

In the fleeing, a sister got scalped in upstate New York, but was determined to go on, and did.  She continued to live and function once they arrived in Canada, it's not like they arrived and she dropped dead or anything.  To go crazy with the family lore, she was carrying her melodeon on her back, and supposedly the blood stained it forever... etc.  My mom has the instrument, and it's all just a very dark cherrywood, no blood stain that I can see.

I should go find that family history, though, because I think there's a lot of assumption on my part that it was Yankees who did the deed, since they were hostile parties to the Tories.  Given that it happened in upstate NY (which I think I recall correctly), it may have been a different hostile party.  Or just a grumpy fur trapper, for that matter.
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2395


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #739 on: October 14, 2007, 01:14:50 PM »

Someone elsewhere pointed out not to take a show that features an experimental car which runs on dandelions too seriously.  That said, I do wonder how the Pie Maker in PD deals with eating meat.  If anything dead is touched back into life, then...

the mental pictures are both grisly and funny.

Is he vegetarian?  If someone keeps watching this, let me know.

Logged

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
Donotremove
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1068


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #740 on: October 14, 2007, 01:47:52 PM »

Nytemps, yes Ian is my Globe Trekkerfavorite.  He's so normal. Not a herioc bone in his body.   Smiley
Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #741 on: October 14, 2007, 04:15:57 PM »



Perhaps what is being thought of is scalping (which I seem to recall was introduced or adapted by Native Americans from French fur trappers), but "counting coup" as I taught it when I taught US History did not involve the taking of body parts.  I know wikipedia isn't the last word, but their version is in line with that:

Quote
Counting coup
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Counting coup was a battle practice of Native Americans of the Great Plains. A nonviolent demonstration of bravery, it consisted of touching an enemy warrior, with the hand or with a coup stick, then running away unharmed. Risk of injury or death was involved, should the other warrior respond violently. The phrase "counting coup" can also refer to the recounting of stories about battle exploits.

The term is of French origin from the verb couper, which means literally to cut*, hit or strike. The expression can be seen as referring to "counting strikes".

Coups were recorded by notches in the coup stick, or by feathers in the headdress of a warrior who was rewarded with feathers for an act of bravery.






*"The term is of French origin from the verb couper, which means literally to cut,... "

Sorry, as a teacher you are out-ranked by my cousin's husband who wrote a treatise on warfare among the Sioux, which I think was published by the Univ.of Nebraska. I read it in the early 1990s and don't even remember his name. I  am no longer in correspondence with her.  She and I spent some of the early years of my life together when her parents were at St.Carlos reservation working with the Chiricahua Apache in Arizona. When she became a teenager, we delivered her back to the reservation, and I spent a little time there  living among "Native Americans" (my grandmother called them "savages")as I was somewhere between age three and age five, sort of after three but not as late as five when I began kindergarten.

I didn't see her again until I was thirteen or fourteen, on another trip west, not necessarily hitting all the high points on the road like -- I had told donotremove about suddenly remembering Deadwood,after the tv series was entirely finished. 
( I just came in here to report seeing Robin Weigert again last night, not as Calamity Jane, but in an appearance of Law and Order,Criminal Intent, and episode known as "Recall", and gosh she is a tiny thing but I remembered her face; not sufficiently however to have even recognized her in a blonde wig when she played one of the street-walkers in, The Good German, until I saw the shot of her with George Clooney. www.imdb has become a regular "face-book" for actors, they don't have to carry those around with them as they appeared in different roles nor have their agents send head-shots.)

My parents and I just took the train out to San Francisco, by which time my cousin Lois was all grown up but still living at home, in one of those houses that looks like it is on the slant of the hill with a garage and a front door into the house; living-room,dining room and kitchen with back yard steps down to the outside from the first floor, up to the second where you have two or three bedrooms --and a split bathroom, half on each side of the hall!, just up the street from Golden Gate Park.  I have no idea when she was married. Her parents moved north to Marin sometime before I left for New York. So I didn't hear from her again until After my father died and Before my mother did, when Lois told me to read "the book"

Meanwhile I had lived in a region adjacent to the Sioux, my brother still lives in Minnesota,but you may want to take a look at this book:http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0143036211/ref=sib_fs_top/002-9958069-1421637?ie=UTF8&p=S00Z&checkSum=QFAtih9Dv3vEdgvn8tIhCKpXW1bGBVPCc5V3ZJPctdw%3D#reader-link

and in particular look inside the book at the back flap (on-line at Amazon) because George M.Marshall III , in photo, claims that Crazy Horse was a Lakota like himself. Others say Crazy Horse was Oglala Sioux.

My godmother didn't care one way or the other but wrote out checks for charity to Rosebud reservation.

I first caught Marshall on CSPAN2 and I couldn't put my finger on exactly who it was of whom he reminded me but it probably goes all the way back to childhood where I learned the fundaments. If I track the other textbook for the university, will let you know.

But back to Medicine Crow, about whom this all began on PBS Ken Burns,The War, whom I am sure would be offended that you doubted his manhood in never having killed an enemy during WW2 when he became a warrior by fulfilling all three of requirements as he reported back when he arrived home on the reservation. Somewhere in this mess of forums I commented in American History when reading about something following the posts with weezo between April into May, that the disfigurement of the body that occurred when the FBI men took charge of a woman's  at Pine Ridge for autopsy lab, the remains of which was returned to her family was inexcusable because the removal of the hands was more than mere scalping which would embarrass the ghost from coming back. Someone in that administration trying to prove a case against Leonard Peltier was well versed in Sioux spiritual-traditions which would shock her family when they received what was left of her remains.




Logged
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #742 on: October 14, 2007, 05:14:32 PM »

harrie,re:#743

I love that description:"I have a little family history thing,..."; I've got one of those which I call the Blue Book because it literally is between blue covers, (which I have to check regularly to remember whose kid that is, as they are dispersed all over the place)and sent by my sister after a family reunion of all the remaining live ones, for which one of our cousins compiled to the best of her ability.

I can understand your quiet description of the embroidering that takes place because when my mother had asked me to send what I had, they could not make heads or tales of it because it was from Early Generations of the Dupont Family -- and it flew in the face of my first-cousins religious indoctrination to say the least.  I figured, if they couldn't take that then they weren't ready for the rest of it.

Upstate New York, specifically Genesee, was where Victor Marie Dupont decided(upon retirement from the French National Guard) that he would become a romantic tradesman at an Indian trading post, while his brother Eleuthere tended to powder making.  This again came up in American History, before these forums, while yet at the nytimes.com with some of the readings suggested from a handful of books on the Native American experience, such as: Looking East Across the Atlantic. or, something by Merrill.

When one day, attempting to complete my reading for discussion, I came upon some beautiful drawings, took one look, identifying what it was about in the text, and quickly closed the book covers shut.  They were drawn by Victor Marie's wife , as girls had been taught to do at the end of the 18th.century and  dressed in her cute little Empire bonnet and full regalia, after saying goodbye to the family who still lived at Beau Sejour,in New Jersey from which Pere et fil(singular) ferried across to the financial district, the young marrieds traveled north to Genesee which the young bride did not like very much after drawing carefully shaded,cross-hatched studies of Indian maidens all of whom looked very sad. I am used to this, it is a high rate of depression, because it is a hard life, or it was then, and most often still is now.

Because of that factor, Victor Marie was soon back with Eleuthere on land bought at the suggestion of Lafayette, somebody purchased a  small flock of Merino sheep and Victor Marie got busy with their breeding to increase the flock. The textile institute still stands there on the other side of the Brandywine  from the compound of houses; and I ended up reading a lot of papers on experiments in producing "body armor" for Iraq because we were still in the nytimes.com forums, specifically National Security and these guys from Canada would go on and on about specifications because they were entrepreneurs who claimed to have been the first contractor on repairing pipe-line in June of 2003 back when they were posting in the Western Europe forum while posting under variations of pseudonyms as Elwood Green, Greenwood, or sometimes just Woody accompanied by a trio of friends who opened a bar in the middle of the discussion forum. Those were our first spinners for the Bush administration, best at fabricated stories, seemingly unaware why I could not agree with them.

Logged
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #743 on: October 14, 2007, 05:18:09 PM »



I like Desperate Housewives.
Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
nytempsperdu
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 402


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #744 on: October 15, 2007, 12:23:29 AM »

Quote
In the fleeing, a sister got scalped in upstate New York, but was determined to go on, and did.  She continued to live and function once they arrived in Canada, it's not like they arrived and she dropped dead or anything.  To go crazy with the family lore, she was carrying her melodeon on her back, and supposedly the blood stained it forever... etc.  My mom has the instrument, and it's all just a very dark cherrywood, no blood stain that I can see.

That is quite a compelling tale, harrie.  (Why does The Red Violin come to mind?  Oh yeah...)  Thanks.  Family lore is much pursued in VA, or was when I lived there and still is by some in the family now scattered.  And you just never know which of the young'uns is going to develop an interest.  In our case, my aunt's favorite grandson, who teaches middle school in Boise, far from any family meanderings, yet he cherishes her letters and reminiscences and will someday inherit not only her decades of accumulated genealogical work but the sword of the Chastains (unbeknownst to her two sons, his dad and uncle, who cherish very little, according to her). 
Logged
Lhoffman
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1989


View Profile WWW Email

Ignore
« Reply #745 on: October 15, 2007, 12:28:30 AM »

Yes what a story!  I was thinking along the lines of "Accordian Crimes"....one of my favorite books.  It must be wonderful to have that sort of romantic history in your family.   (Although, I suppose at the time....)
Logged
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #746 on: October 15, 2007, 01:04:58 AM »



I like Desperate Housewives...

...especially Ryan Carnes....

Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2395


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #747 on: October 15, 2007, 12:21:08 PM »

I agree with earlier post about the men mostly being kind of weak on DH.  I'm not saying it's a chick show or anything, but I do sense that suburban women would be a stronger demog for this than me.  The only woman I really dig on the show is Felicity Huffman.  I did watch several eps where she's being paranoid about her new neighbor, thinking he's a pedophile, and thought it was a dark funny commentary on middle-class paranoia.

Eva Longoria is vastly overrated.

Logged

"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 5413


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #748 on: October 15, 2007, 03:22:42 PM »

Apologies, nytempsperdu!



Why thanks, barton.  Now at least I have a term I can look up.

I take it all survived The War on PBS, or maybe "survived" just comes to mind in connection with the final ep with the death camp scenes.  Of the tales told/heard in previous episodes before I dozed (no reflection on anything other than the time of night and my work schedule), I keep recalling that of Mr. Medicine Crow, of Montana, I believe, though I forget his connection to the locales of the series (perhaps there was none but his story was too good to leave out).  His army stint enabled him to complete all of the requirements for achieving warrior status--whether he killed any enemies, I don't remember, but I do recall being a warrior only required touching the enemy. 

Anyone else here enjoy the travel channels, PBS shows like "Globe Trekker" etc.?  Now even the Food Network has travel shows, though shots of people eating unappealing foods in exotic locales isn't my idea of entertainment.  With increasing age (and decreasing dollar), this is likely to be our mode of travel for some time to come.

Another board I used to visit had several threads for people visiting (or even relocating to) various areas.  Wonder if there would be support for something like that for those "Escaping from Elba." (I haven't looked at any of the threads in the International section yet.)


I found the web-site at PBS,   Medicine Crow was exactly that: a Crow. The Sioux were his traditional enemy.

http://www.pbs.org/thewar/detail_5177.htm

The outcomes of his interactions with the enemy at the time had some humorous aspects, at least from his present older point of view.
Logged
kidcarter8
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 9177


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #749 on: October 15, 2007, 03:40:05 PM »

I agree with earlier post about the men mostly being kind of weak on DH.  I'm not saying it's a chick show or anything, but I do sense that suburban women would be a stronger demog for this than me.  The only woman I really dig on the show is Felicity Huffman.  I did watch several eps where she's being paranoid about her new neighbor, thinking he's a pedophile, and thought it was a dark funny commentary on middle-class paranoia.

Eva Longoria is vastly overrated.



LOL

Overrated how exactly?
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 48 49 [50] 51 52 ... 94
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!