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Exiles of the New York Times
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Question: What is the best show of the most anticipated new shows this fall?
Pushing Daisies
Private Practice
Bionic Woman
Chuck
Dirty Sexy Money
Back to You
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Journeyman
Samantha Who?
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Author Topic: Television  (Read 14411 times)
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #825 on: November 14, 2007, 10:25:49 AM »

Did anyone see the season finale of Curb Your Enthusiasm last night?  OMG, it was GREAT.
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kidcarter8
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« Reply #826 on: November 14, 2007, 10:29:23 AM »

This was easily the best seaosn since #1.

I started out with not much appreciation for the direction they were going with the BLACKS - and it turned out just grand, didn't it.

Love Leon, Auntie Rae - and Vivica did a real nice job.  Even the kids were well cast.
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madupont
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« Reply #827 on: November 14, 2007, 10:32:57 AM »

Leon is the best thing that ever happened to Larry David.
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kidcarter8
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« Reply #828 on: November 14, 2007, 10:40:03 AM »

Yes another list, top 50 TV icons. My surprise omission was Bob Hope;

Johnny Carson Tops 'TV's Greatest Icons' List
Nov. 13, 2007, 1:30 PM EST
The Associated Press

It doesn't take a psychic in a bejeweled turban to figure out that Johnny Carson landed the top spot.

But deeper down the ranking of "The 50 Greatest TV Icons," you may find a name that surprises you (or even makes you scratch your head). Which is part of the fun.

The list, released to the Associated Press, was compiled by cable's TV Land network and Entertainment Weekly magazine.

It's the source of a two-hour TV Land special airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST (and is also featured in the issue of Entertainment Weekly appearing on newsstands the same day). The special counts down from Larry Hagman (No. 50) to Carson, with mini-profiles of each "icon" in turn.

But what's a "TV icon" anyway?

Someone who "jumps off the screen into your home," says Henry Winkler, who is ranked 32nd, while Regis Philbin (No. 27) says, "If you hang around long enough, they call you an icon."

Along with human TV stars, the list contains a pooch (Lassie), a Muppet frog (Kermit), a cartoon dad (Homer Simpson) and a full-blown comedy troupe (the original Not Ready for Primetime Players from "Saturday Night Live").

There's one "Friend" (Jennifer Aniston) and two current late-night hosts (David Letterman and Jon Stewart made the cut, but Carson's successor, Jay Leno, did not). TV comedy trailblazer Milton Berle is on the list, though not his contemporary, Sid Caesar.

The list of "The 50 Greatest TV Icons," compiled by TV Land network and Entertainment Weekly magazine:
50. Larry Hagman
49. Calista Flockhart
48. Jimmy Smits
47. Simon Cowell
46. Lassie
45. Sarah Michelle Gellar
44. Susan Lucci
43. Flip Wilson
42. James Gandolfini
41. Jon Stewart
40. Sally Field
39. Jennifer Aniston
38. Bea Arthur
37. George Clooney
36. Diahann Carroll
35. Michael J. Fox
34. Bob Barker
33. Ellen DeGeneres
32. Henry Winkler
31. Sarah Jessica Parker
30. Alan Alda
29. John Ritter
28. Howard Cosell
27. Regis Philbin
26. Farrah Fawcett
25. Heather Locklear
24. Michael Landon
23. Barbara Walters
22. Milton Berle
21. Kermit
20. Carroll O'Connor
19. Andy Griffith
18. William Shatner
17. Bob Newhart
16. David Letterman
15. "Not Ready for Primetime Players"
14. Ed Sullivan
13. Jackie Gleason
12. Dick Van Dyke
11. Roseanne
10. Dick Clark
9. Homer Simpson
8. Jerry Seinfeld
7. Mary Tyler Moore
6. Carol Burnett
5. Walter Cronkite
4. Bill Cosby
3. Oprah Winfrey
2. Lucille Ball
1. Johnny Carson


Thanks for the list

We could have some fun noting some we feel were left out

DANSON over Flip Wilson
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law120b
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« Reply #829 on: November 14, 2007, 02:55:07 PM »

i had a chat with larry david at the fred claus premier a week ago saturday.  we had been chatting about my own daughter's having become orthodox many years ago, a topic in which he was quite interested.  i told him that thought the scene where the ultra-orthodox woman jumped out of the ski lift at sundown rather than be seated next to him was not a fair jab at orthodoxy, because observant jews place so high a value on life, and that the obligation to save life trumps almost all religious prohibitions.  he smiled and said "true story."
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #830 on: November 14, 2007, 03:10:15 PM »

Someone mentioned the casting on "Curb Your Enthusiasm" being so great this season.  That's exactly what I kept raving about last night - we love "Leon", too.  Really, someone should find out who this actor is - he is just too funny.  Bringing on the Blacks is a stroke of genius, IMO. 

Another ingeniously cast character was Larry's therapist, Dr. Bright.  My God, he talks just like William F. Buckley.
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madupont
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« Reply #831 on: November 14, 2007, 05:36:35 PM »

kitcarter8,re:#833

Did you know that I just found out that Homer Simpson (mentioned in your posted article) is some kind of a quasi-villain in a novel by Nathanael West.  I think the quotes in fiction forum were in regard to his novel,Miss Lonely Hearts (but it could have been: The Day of the Locust).

But a little further enquiry revealed that Homer Simpson comes up quite a lot in great literature. Enquiring minds want to know.

Do you think it is possible that the creator of The Simpsons wanted to be a Hollywood writer like Nathanael West?
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madupont
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« Reply #832 on: November 15, 2007, 10:03:06 AM »

Desdemona

"Really, someone should find out who this actor is - he is just too funny.  Bringing on the Blacks is a stroke of genius, IMO."

That's J.B. Smoove.  Believe it or not he has been a writer (and won an award for it) as well as an actor on: Saturday Night Live.  He has a film in post-production,Frankenhood.

I think the writing shows.  No one could improvise as fast as he does without  having put it to some writing experience. We get to see the speed at which his mind works as he works opposite Larry David.

I started catching up last night with my backlog of episodes unseen in last few weeks, by watching Curb Your Enthusiasm, for three back to back. I am as far as Larry and Sheryl coming down from the Ferris wheel after her therapist having phoned her about the real deal because the therapist has a new patient: Dr. Bright
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #833 on: November 15, 2007, 10:13:19 AM »

I started catching up last night with my backlog of episodes unseen in last few weeks, by watching Curb Your Enthusiasm, for three back to back. I am as far as Larry and Sheryl coming down from the Ferris wheel after her therapist having phoned her about the real deal because the therapist has a new patient: Dr. Bright

Maddie -

Corey and I did the same last night and decided we had seen most all of them.  Which episode number is that with the ferris wheel?  Don't think I remember that one. (Asssume you're watching this stuff On Demand like we are.)
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madupont
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« Reply #834 on: November 15, 2007, 12:07:06 PM »

Des,

#59 which could have been titled,"The Duelling Therapists"  because Larry and Sheryl continue to communicate throughout this separation but only according to the words of their personal therapist's advice.

That touch of Larry selling his good points, that misrepresent him in the best light to Sheryl's therapist, was a stroke of genius. Observing her sliding into this groundless infatuation of transference-touche  for the patient's husband was priceless; since, of course in his self-centeredness, he would never perceive it as seductiveness. (This is where Jeff Garlin's acting ability comes in handy, his readiness to register the rapid take on any psychology.)

The repeated encounters, by coincidence, of "friends" who decided they "were with Sheryl", took me right back to a period of time many decades ago, many, which everybody has had to experience at least once to be "previously married".   Watching it on tv, as an outsider, permits you to realize how extremely funny it is; that no human beings ever grow up. Psychiatrist Melanie Klein could have written it but I don't think she is any longer around.

Of course, the very beginning premise of the ever willing to be helpful female seated at the next table in the hospital dining room as Larry and Jeff grab lunch, ought to be revisited but probably won't be. From the point where you get her "clinical"perspective on sexual relations, her every scene reminds you in detail of how doctors approach life, and that in fact their living arrangements are never exactly  charmingly domestic but are business-like and their business is "health"(at least in the earlier years of their practice).  This interaction of Larry and the Lady Doctor was very well written and I was in hysterics as each scene with her developed into further submission on his part and unconscious dominance on her's.
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #835 on: November 15, 2007, 12:45:21 PM »

Well steel yourself for Episode 60, because it is roll on the floor funny.  I love Dr. Bright.
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barton
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« Reply #836 on: November 15, 2007, 01:38:02 PM »

Don't have cable and have no time to watch more tv on an "appointment" basis, but I do rent some of the best on DVD when they come out.  I assume there are some CYE eps out on DVD by now, so I'll have a look.  Have heard good things about it, and Larry David was the major writing talent behind Seinfeld, which bodes well.

Speaking of the funniest stuff on tv, "House" this week poked fun at documentary making -- at one point, Hugh Laurie, after seeing how far off the truth a hospital documentary is going, quips, "I've got to stop trusting Michael Moore!"



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desdemona222b
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« Reply #837 on: November 15, 2007, 01:45:48 PM »

It took me awhile to 'get' to Curb Your Enthusiasm.  I never even watched it until starting maybe a year ago, and then very sporadically.  I think I turned it off several times, too.  Got a bit of a chuckle out of it here and there, but never enough to get into it.  Didn't know about the Seinfeld aspect, let alone the fact that it is impromptu.  When the re-runs of Extras started this season, I was watching them because I love Gervais, and one night my son finally became a convert when a particularly funny episode was on.  It was followed up by this season's epsiode of Curb that introduced the Blacks, and we just laughed our backsides off.  My son was so excited he started watching Curb reruns and on demand, so now we're "regulars".

Cheryl Hines is the perfect straight man, lady, whatever, btw.
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madupont
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« Reply #838 on: November 15, 2007, 11:52:29 PM »

Barton,
Strange thing is that Larry David, although the writer of Seinfeld, is not the least bit  "Seinfeldian" in his persona and desdemona is correct about Sheryl being, what used to be among comic-duos, the somewhat awed wife that he can be so outrageously smug. When the duo were both guys, one of the pair would have to be a tiny bit dumb to say the least, for putting up with the wise-acre of the team.  Playing it as Husband and Wife is actually something that I haven't seen in years, although it has probably been out there and I just overlooked it with a lack of enthusiasm for any more slices of contemporary American life.

I mean you could compare to Edith Bunker being a well-meaning sweetie of a ditz married to a guy who knows it all or so he thinks. Sheryl is not that; last night I heard her defined by three men on the show,for being a good cook, accompanying her husband where ever he wanted her to go, and being just a well rounded good looking broad which these guys do not intend pejoratively. It is the highest compliment in their strata of society which is Southern California involved in "representation of talent" or "writer"(for talent),etc.

These definitions of what makes a good wife are strictly by California standards. Edith and Archie lived in Brooklyn. Larry and Sheryl live in a creative center of the entertainment industry.  They are the younger successful people who have been around awhile. (Although I must say that every once in a while the sets for the interiors annoys me immensely because they look like the people in charge of this aspect just tacked the front door of their house to some cardboard thin walls. If anything the production-values are not even illusional but meant to cost- cut the budget whereas they do fine by using their locale's  environment for exteriors so that a lot of the business that takes place was written into the script to be set at the local dry-cleaner, some real club either of a prominent restrateur or just a popular hang-out.)

But here I have to back up a minute, because Larry is obviously older than Sheryl; so, when I said they are "young", that has to be qualified. She is young (as compared to him) but he is "successful", so that is expected in their milieu; it is just that he will never grow up. If you were ever a boy genius, why would you ever want to grow up?

As desdemona noted, "the perfect straight man,lady,whatever..."-- is a throwback to the old pre-television, radio comics of the era when the 1930s slipped into the recovery of the 1940s. You turned on the radio while you did the dishes and you listened to "marrieds" like Fibber McGee and Molly.  When you went to the movies, you were privileged to see how the other half-lived by watching Nick and Nora Charles solve a mystery which was billed as The Thin Man.

In California, this is a complete joke. When my son, who lives in this milieu and atmosphere compares some latest "Larryism" with me or vice-versa, the humor is in the fact that everybody's friends are exactly like this, these are the values that prevail in Southern California, quirky, off the wall, petty attitudes, trivial annoyances blown up to life-size kvetching.

On the other hand, where I live, it would be impossible to see television programming at all, if it wasn't brought to us by cable because that is the profit motive.

However, I have to warn you, that when I returned to the East Coast 25 years ago, I had to warn my mother, "You know what? Those television serial situation comedies you watch in the Midwest and suppose are made-up attitudes of whacky non-existent people played by "stars" of acting whom we know are "stars" because they win awards for what they do, well they aren't acting. This is the way people really behave in the greater Metropolitan area. Like Seinfeld."

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barton
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« Reply #839 on: November 16, 2007, 10:58:28 AM »

"Not that there's anything wrong with that!"

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