Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Question: What is the best show of the most anticipated new shows this fall?
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Kam
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« Reply #900 on: January 10, 2008, 04:44:33 PM »

Interview with David Simon - creator of HBO's THE WIRE

http://www.believermag.com/issues/200708/?read=interview_simon

“MY STANDARD FOR VERISIMILITUDE IS SIMPLE AND I CAME TO IT WHEN I STARTED TO WRITE PROSE NARRATIVE: FUCK THE AVERAGE READER.”
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kitinkaboodle
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« Reply #901 on: January 10, 2008, 05:34:36 PM »

Gabriel Byrne anyone?  HBO's upcoming format (on 1/28) may be of some interest...
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« Reply #902 on: January 11, 2008, 10:59:24 PM »

Greetings, kam.   Another connection to the newspaper was a brief scene of Bubbles peddling papers in traffic--can't recall which ep it was in.  Speaking of Bubbles, I can't remember ever wanting so much for a (fictional) addict to succeed in getting clean.  What was said about the element of shame had me saying "Amen!" at the screen and I still weep at the scene when his old sponsor finds him. 

Thanks so much for the wonderful Simon interview.  Quite different from him speaking to Terry Gross on NPR.  Re this from that:

Quote
But instead of the old gods, The Wire is a Greek tragedy in which the postmodern institutions are the Olympian forces. It’s the police department, or the drug economy, or the political structures, or the school administration, or the macroeconomic forces that are throwing the lightning bolts and hitting people in the ass for no decent reason.

If I could beg another season focused on another institution as "Olympian force" it would be public health, as in a hospital--NOT Hopkins--but a "general" hospital treating the GSWs from the street battles as well as the myriad diseases afflicting those who might be called "collateral damage" in the "drug wars."

   
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madupont
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« Reply #903 on: January 13, 2008, 03:27:05 PM »

Did anyone see, The Legacy, on night before last, as part of the Sundance Festival 31 days pre-ParkCity?  It's a strange tale in French and Georgian(with the music of the latter) which shows you how the other half lives according to old traditions in the midst of poverty, and the culture clash between the French travelers ideas compared to the abominable local  customs but this angst is somewhat relieved by meeting someone in their own age group for awhile.

Oddly enough the film on cable went through local translation problems when listed in  the local newspaper. I had already been sent a reminder from Sundance channel but was nevertheless upset when I checked the time in the paper and discovered a film description that was anything but what I had been told by Sundance on-line.  I hated to think the same thing would happen to me as did the other night when I set a reminder for something that looked interesting, only to have it last 15 minutes and I cannot find any indication of that on-line at Sundance which describes a usual movie-length. I wonder now if somehow a slip up provided a nice prevue for the public without a future film to follow?

Anyway, The Legacy came on, right on schedule. And when it was over, being altogether too sad a feeling with which to leave you, I began to look forward to someday seeing that other film that the local newspaper mistakenly thought it was, a real rouser of the weird and occult and scary stuff, also known as The Legacy, with Katharine Ross and Sam O'Neill, anybody seen that one?

Here's the lagniappe, when they didn't provide anything more than 15 minutes of prevue-like light fluff the previous night,entertaining short about short kids in school for the first early years and with a male teacher who seems to enjoy teaching very little children although none of their natural science projects work out because the subjects never fail to die. He and the kids just don't have the knack of nurturing butterflies,snakes, visiting puppies, etc.  but I got to see and listen to an almost ancient Yves St.Laurent talk about his career, after his mother talked about when they first knew he had a flair for dressing women. Well, he was a little older than the kids who could not raise butterflies...

Yves did seem to enjoy dressing women in the things that he magically drew. He described it as, he would sketch a woman, her face, and as he began to go along the neck, everything she wore came into view as her personality dictated. I can believe it. From there on he had enough satisfaction dressing the appropriate model in what had arrived creatively on his sketch, so that he didn't cross dress. He was an Algerian pied noir, so I kept thinking of Jean Rochefort as The Hairdressers Husband who used to  dance to North African records in the shop to make his wife laugh.

They went through most of his changing presentations from the time that he took over at Dior upon Dior's death, and I remembered them one by one, The New Look, which was elegance and full skirted, corseted,fitted jacket, worn with a small hat,most often veiled. The the Geometric look when the average American decided whether or not to actually buy and wear a pair of white boots or not because one or the other decision made all the difference in the world  as to "how you were seen". I don't believe St.Laurent had anything to do with that boot; but people wore them with geometric designed wardrobes.(and short-hair by Vidal Sassoon) Then, the memorable era of the Russian look after an inspiring trip to Russia where women asked how should we dress? They had nothing to work with, how could they buy anything. Yves changed that and told them what they had. It of course appeared immediately in The New York Times, after he got back from Russia with his drawings of what came to mind. Very exotic looks that very few of us would be able to afford either.
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madupont
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« Reply #904 on: January 14, 2008, 12:45:12 PM »

It must have snowed heavily because no comment on movie awards from Golden Globes.

As to television, I can tell you as a matter of fact I am not sorry that Longford did for series (although, I had no idea it was. I was under the delusion it was a one-shot perfection of drama on how we get taken by the malignant psychopaths among us.); nor am I sorry that Glenn Close won for her role in "Damages" which is somewhat about the same thing but not as well written for presenting the scenario. I guess in one case it is the State against the poor sod who got mucked about and acts out viciously to prove her worth to some creature of the opposite sex who has encouraged her to do something royally deviant that no one would believe a woman would do.   Damages merely offers us what we already knew before 2008, that the wealthy of the corporate structure will cheat the poor employee out of his rights. How is that for a mucking? while we are left guessing whether Glennie and her assorted accomplices are any better sort of people (nobody said they were human beings).

But don't you suppose if someone would write the appropriate vehicle for both Glenn Close and Jim Broadbent it could have been what the movie buffs refers to as boffo even on the small screen; when you consider that Julie Christi did win best actor of the female sex(and she did that right up to form!) for:Away from Here. Which I think is a first time out for the director giving visual form to the content of Alice Munroe's novel.

Oh, I forgot. There are no more small screens in America; just non-corporate types of little people whose salary can not afford the luxury of trying to find anything to watch on tv. Glenn Close was playing a character who tried to do right, by the first  category but, as to the production,it doesn't stand comparison to her roles as Sarah,Plain and Tall, either the Skylark episode or Winter's End. Both of which she produced.

It indicates she is a better producer than those who produced this mess for which she won best actress anyway.

"Jim Broadbent, I would like to introduce you to Glenn Close".

He's already met  Kate Winslet, a close second coming up; and Nicole Kidman who is not.
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bartolomeo
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« Reply #905 on: January 15, 2008, 11:50:06 AM »

Prison Break is back, one of the few interesting things left to watch for those of us who don't buy cable.   "Susan" is developing as a formidable villainness and arch-psychopath -- the season starts with her getting a taste of her medicine but the happy glow dissipates quickly as she escapes captivity. 
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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
Earl
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« Reply #906 on: January 15, 2008, 10:00:50 PM »

Sometimes with Prison Break I'm kind of amused at the idea that this guy named Lincoln Burrows...

...who was accused of killing the Vice President's brother once upon a time (remember that?), was minutes away from being executed for said crime, then escaped from prison, then was exonerated by a series of events too lengthly to number even in this run-on sentence, and whose face must be known all over the world due to the saturation news coverage such a situation would demand...

...could so freely walk around in Panama City, which is depicted as a cosmopolitan place with gleaming skyscrapers and posh hotels. Does no civilian ever spot him and say, "Hey, you look just like that guy. Nah, can't be."

Anyway, yeah, I agree that Queen B-word is becoming more fun to root against than Guard Brad in Season One and Agent Mahone in Season Two. (Although keep an eye on Whistler.)  Maybe if there is a Season Four she'll end up in jail with Scofield along with her two predecessors in villainy.
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Earl
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« Reply #907 on: January 15, 2008, 10:08:07 PM »

Oh, yeah, and I was just starting to like that Panamanian Colonel who was in charge. Well, as much as I could like a guy who uses waterboarding, that is. "This guy's actually getting places," I thought. "In the other two seasons it would have taken at least three episodes to get through this much plot." Then, alas, she iced him and basically rebooted all the 2008 plot development so far.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #908 on: January 16, 2008, 04:34:25 AM »

On a nostalgic note, I was very happy to see the original Mod Squad is finally being released on DVD,

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bartolomeo
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« Reply #909 on: January 16, 2008, 12:23:32 PM »

Earl, mindbending thought there, Susan ending up in a big cage with variously morally bent men lacking in female companionship. 

I've wondered about the anonymity of Burrows, and also the baldness -- as a free man, you'd think the first step was to let the prison 'do start growing out.  Then there's Michael, who spent last season in a sweltering hellhole always clad in a long-sleeve shirt, and often with a hoodie over it.  Training for the hot box?  Retains water and is too embarassed to request cranberry juice?  Who knows.

What surprises me a little is the seeming naivete of Whistler's girlfriend -- she must be deeply into him and determinedly oblivious to all the fishiness.  And, yeah, he could supersede Queen B who were meant to understand was once a good girl turned psycho by some kind of horrific captivity situation.







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madupont
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« Reply #910 on: January 17, 2008, 02:50:33 PM »

http://www.sundancechannel.com/films/500257916

STRANGE CULTURE   (this one will freek you out)

Appeared at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival
What does it take to fall under suspicion as a terrorist in contemporary America? Experimental filmmaker and artist Lynn Hershman Leeson (CONCEIVING ADA) tells the disturbing Kafkaesque story of Steve Kurtz, a conceptual artist/college professor who was suspected of bioterrorism after FBI agents found harmless microbes in his house. Breaking from documentary convention, Hershman Leeson uses comic strips and actors (Tilda Swinton, Thomas Jay Ryan and Peter Coyote) to tell the tale. "A scary testament to the power of fear" -- Seattle Times.

(The above mentioned actors have contributed their work to this for a just cause, to give resonance to the significance lest you misunderstand the opening portions of this film for a comedy)

Friday January 18 at 12:35AM
Friday January 18 at 10:35AM
Sunday January 20 at 3:35PM

http://www.strangeculture.net/
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madupont
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« Reply #911 on: January 21, 2008, 04:40:02 PM »

'MLK: A Dream Deferred' premieres at 8 PM on Jan. 21, and will repeat at 11 PM.

http://www.blackvoices.com/blogs/2008/01/16/isaiah-washington-dream-special-is-a-good-move/

If anyone knows which channel(?), post it please because Mr.Johnson who owns BET is showing the other version: Boycott

in my local area, which was a really fine film starring Jeffrey Wright and Terrence Howard and another actor playing Bayard Rustin whom I thought was stunning(more stunning in holding camera than Bay R. in real life).

This is going to take some research, I can see, to discover who has the Isaiah Washington narrative version?
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madupont
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« Reply #912 on: January 21, 2008, 04:48:51 PM »

Repeat


Grab some popcorn and a beverage - one of your favorite films is about to screen on Sundance Channel!

Film: A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints
Screening Time: TUESDAY JAN 22 11:10PM
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harrie
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« Reply #913 on: January 21, 2008, 05:59:36 PM »

'MLK: A Dream Deferred' premieres at 8 PM on Jan. 21, and will repeat at 11 PM.

http://www.blackvoices.com/blogs/2008/01/16/isaiah-washington-dream-special-is-a-good-move/

If anyone knows which channel(?), post it please because Mr.Johnson who owns BET is showing the other version: Boycott


madupont, as far as I can tell, MLK: ADD is on TV One, a network not listed on my cable system.  I checked all my syndicated channels just in case, and none of them have it scheduled. 
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madupont
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« Reply #914 on: January 21, 2008, 11:28:43 PM »

Thanks,harrie.  I found it at the last minute, but it was playing opposite
Boycott.

So I dutifully watched Isaiah Washington introduce,Dream Deferred, which is similarly to a civics lessons for necessary review.

Then I had time to switch back to Boycott, which is more of a work of art at a higher level of civics, in which Jeffrey Wright never quite gets as drawled out as Martin Luther King, no matter how low he pitches his voice; and this is one of those films where everybody has to look like everyone did back then so Jeffrey Wright manages to convince you and you realize wow, with the charisma that he is projecting, what if Martin Luther King had looked like Jeffrey Wright?

I am always irreverent when it comes to reverends but it is an equal opportunity irreverence. Lucky me, I got there just in time for The Scene and there were more of them, scenes strung together than I had remembered in which Bayard Rustin does his bit.  I had no idea who the actor was when I first saw Boycott, on tv approximately seven years ago but, coming here allowed me to discover where Bayard Rustin was raised as a Quaker in southern Pennsylvania along the Underground Railway route.

In Boycott,Rustin is played by a mysterious captivating figure from whom you cannot take your eyes away. He speakes like he is placing each word in front of you into your field of vision  like a shimmering sphere of a bead that he is stringing into a line of thought and when they break like soap bubbles popping in the air, not in sequence but all at one time, they have entered your mind permanently. He moves gracefully or elegantly, puts his cigarettes out like an early Hollywood diva; and, finally when I discovered who this person really is, was not surprised (although I was supposed to be surprised)that he had studied dance in Washington,D.C.  That figured. It isn't even weird although it is at the same time, because Erik Todd Dellums is the son of the former mayor of Oakland,California who then went on to become Congressman Ron Dellums of California.

Erik one would think would make it in movies.  He made Spike Lee movies like:Do the Right Thing.  And lots of -- Homicide: Life on the Street. Apparently was on, The Wire. And does other oddities. Considering that I was a fan of the first two categories, I did not recognize him in the least; which may have everything to do with the precise detail he put in conveying Bayard Rustin on camera.  He would have seen him in California but would have been much too young possibly to understand who that was because he is now only forty-four years old. 

Of course, the result was he became so fired up with all this activism, that his one rash moment, no big deal, was writing a small article for the San Francisco Chronicle downing the film Cold Mountain for not really being about   the Civil War, and not hiring enough black actors to look meaningfully authentic even though it was supposed to be somewhere between Virginia and Kentucky.  What can you do when you are up against one more Jude Law or Nicole Kidman movie much less one with both of them together and that perky little blond person who was just such an upper for having skills all the way through the plot?   

Yet, in terms of the prior trivia game, he out-epicenes even Rupert Everett; and frankly makes Jude Law look like some kind of a midget bereft of finesse and smooth graceful movements who probably should have been with Renee Zellweger instead of Nicole Kidman if there was any justice. Renee at least has that "zing" which Jude always overworks in his own repartee, whereas Kidman too often appears vacant, or vacuous.   

Now, if only oilcanboyd23 or jbottle happen to have seen him on The Wire, I might find him in an episode listing for Erik Dellums, but obviously The Wire enjoys having a cast of dozens of faces and types to flavor Baltimore. I really thought I must be dealing with a completely unknown actor that they hired on from God knows where you find a person like this? Although reviewers have said, Dellums was the only person who was able to come up to the intensity level of Andre Breugher, when doing episodes of Homicide: Life on the Street.                         
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