Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Question: What is the best show of the most anticipated new shows this fall?
Pushing Daisies
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Journeyman
Samantha Who?
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Author Topic: Television  (Read 14703 times)
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barton
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« Reply #975 on: February 08, 2008, 12:06:40 PM »

Re broadcasting Eli Stone immediately after "Lost" -- is the assumption that passive viewers will willingly emerge from one rabbit hole and jump down another (lawyer who has divine hallucinations, er, visions)?   Seems like they've tried this before and it hasn't worked too well.  I suspect a fair percentage of Losties cool the set after the show, some to rush into chatrooms and blogs and such, some to just sit there with head spinning for a while.
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Kam
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« Reply #976 on: February 08, 2008, 12:40:58 PM »

One thing about "Lost" -- never lacking for mass quantities of new and ambiguous information to absorb.  Just what was that gizmo that Miles (Asian ghostbuster) flipped on in the dead gangsta's room -- looked like a handvac choking on a cogwheel?   

I think it was something to fool the lady.  She thinks he uses that instrument to find the ghosts or whatever, when in reality he is using it to drown the sound out that he knows he will be making.

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Enjoyed Hurly's booboo where he starts to mention seeing Jacob's cabin and then covers, when Locke starts probing, with "oh, the, uh, passenger cabin...on the plane...."  Lost's most lovable character and worst liar (clearly due to lack of practice).

Both Ben and John were quite interested in hurley's slip.

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And finally Ben's bombshell, "I have a man on the ship," after amazing mnemonic feats in which he spews out entire CVs of the chopper team while most likely suffering from head injuries and dehydration.

On other forums people think its either Michael or Mikael.

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And what about that bullet that went through Locke -- last season, it sure looked like a gutshot to me, not a through-and-through you could just dismiss with I don't have a kidney there so no problemo.

That was quite convenient of the writers.
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barton
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« Reply #977 on: February 08, 2008, 01:40:04 PM »

Kam, I thought the device was a prop, too -- my question was as to what it actually was, i.e. is it something one could buy at Home Depot, some kind of power tool I don't recognize?  Or perhaps something he cobbled together....

Michael is an interesting theory for the mole on the boat -- I think I saw the actor's name (Perrineau) in the opening credits, so maybe he is in the picture somewhere this season. 

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harrie
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« Reply #978 on: February 08, 2008, 04:18:04 PM »

You mean it's not an early model of these?
 
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madupont
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« Reply #979 on: February 08, 2008, 04:50:19 PM »

Harrie,there you are!  Times change. I've been looking for you ever since the Tuesday surprise; who'd a thunk it that Connecticut turned off Republican input that rapidly and so suddenly?

I'm days behind on Dr. Gabriel Byrne's psychotherapy sessions besides requisite reading skills that have to be exercised.
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harrie
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« Reply #980 on: February 08, 2008, 05:26:27 PM »

Hey, madupont.  Domestic turmoil-y  stuff's been taking up my time.  I caught about half of a G. Byrne shrink episode, the one with the gymnast - it was excellent.  Basically two people talking, but I found it to be riveting.  Then again, it was Gabriel Byrne, so of course I did. 

I'm confused with the Republican comment about my fair state -- do you mean Super Tuesday stuff?  Connecticut's always been pretty Democratic Party-leaning, I think, discounting the Gold Coast robber baron crowd.  We're a closed primary state, and most of the state residents who are registered to vote are not affiliated -- though hordes of people did declare by the day before -- so I don't know how representative our primary results actually are.
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madupont
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« Reply #981 on: February 08, 2008, 05:58:56 PM »

Me neither.  It was kind of like Lieberman.  I was totally surprised by the results.
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barton
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« Reply #982 on: February 09, 2008, 11:15:02 AM »

The real question is:

Will Michael row the boat ashore?

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martinbeck3
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« Reply #983 on: February 09, 2008, 01:15:52 PM »

Just hardly recovering from a Sopranos addiction I´ve come to realize that what I found so great about this series is that they guys are just like the politicians in Argentina.Did any of you noticed that about your country or is it totally different in the U.S.?
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nytempsperdu
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« Reply #984 on: February 09, 2008, 03:28:04 PM »

I agree he's most lovable Lostie, am wondering if anyone's keeping track of which characters call him Hugo and which call him Hurley and what, if anything, does it MEAN.  (Sorry, last week I read a bit more than I should of that Houston Chron "Tubular" blog someone posted a link to.)

Yeah, I saw Perrineau's name in the credits and wondered how in the pluperfect subjunctive they were going to work Michael back in (actually wondered if there's an agent with enough of what it takes to get characters killed off or disappeared in one season written back in subsequently). 
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MrUtley3
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« Reply #985 on: February 09, 2008, 03:46:49 PM »

Just hardly recovering from a Sopranos addiction I´ve come to realize that what I found so great about this series is that they guys are just like the politicians in Argentina.Did any of you noticed that about your country or is it totally different in the U.S.?


Totally different?

Hmmmm...Not necessarily, but I think the Series is more about human fraility than anything else. The characters are so well drawn, but always, always, always you're kept aware of their flaws. And the flaws do matter. I suppose you could say that is true about politicians everywhere.
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"That guy over there played with Ty Cobb," said Phillies bench coach Jimy Williams, pointing to Chase Utley. "He's been here before."  quoted in the Boston Globe
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« Reply #986 on: February 09, 2008, 04:16:14 PM »

  (Sorry, last week I read a bit more than I should of that Houston Chron "Tubular" blog someone posted a link to.)



That was me. Sorry about that. It's long and detailed and I end up spending way more time on that blog than is probably healthy.

The sheer amount of analysis she puts into it is impressive. I watch each episode and think I'm doing a fair-to-middling job of catching details and stuff that flits by in the corners of the screen. Then I go on Tubular and I feel like a guy who has just won his local club tennis tournament and thinks that qualifies him to do well on the professional cicuit: Swamped, overwhelmed, how-the-hell-do-they-do-that-so-quickly.

One of the many details she posted that interested me was the full name of the red-headed woman who dropped in by helicopter: Charlotte Staples Lewis, or C.S. Lewis. In fact, there is a whole section on there about the fact that many of the names on the show have some kind of meaning.

I haven't gotten into that www.find815.com site yet, but I may try it later. It's probably a sideshow, but could be fun nevertheless.
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barton
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« Reply #987 on: February 09, 2008, 05:50:30 PM »

LOL the tubular addiction -- been there, man.  Charlotte Staples Lewis --- cleanly missed that one and I, too, thought my Lost antenna was high-gain.  The name game has been heavy on philosophers so far -- Hume, Locke, Rousseau, and Lewis (if you count theologians as philosophers) (which I do) (but some don't) (aren't parentheses the greatest thing since sliced bread?). 

As to Nytemps pluperfect and subjunctive wonderings, I just figure it's a lot easier to bring living people back into the script than dead ones, so I'd think Michael is a shoo-in.  Unless a typhoon or giant magnet, composed largely of Ytterbium and Holmium, snuffed him while he was speeding homeward on the Minnow, and he's doomed to listening to Jacob's anecdotes about poisoned Spam while crammed in the cabin with dead polar bears and such.

Mikhail is a strong contender for the boat mole, of course, unless he went to Davy Jones's locker room after that grenade exploded a few feet from his head.  But a man with microwavable brains is probably not sensitive to grenades.



 
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madupont
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« Reply #988 on: February 10, 2008, 11:11:11 AM »

Just hardly recovering from a Sopranos addiction I´ve come to realize that what I found so great about this series is that they guys are just like the politicians in Argentina.Did any of you noticed that about your country or is it totally different in the U.S.?



Martin, old friend, I guess that I must admit from the top that MrUtley and I do not or did not entirely agree as to what the Sopranos was about.  That's how we met, I linked to a New Jersey newspaper one day in total exasperation, well not total because I met a lot of nice wise guys at the nytimes.com blog on the subject but there were hundreds of dolts who have never lived Italian. I've told him before, I watched The Sopranos because I missed Jersey; after all I'd spent more than a quarter of my life there.

It's not that I adore New Jersey but if you want to meet a nice Italian girl that's where you go; it's a little more difficult to meet a nice Italian guy and besides it gets complicated because many New Jersey Italians were actually born in New York, on Mulberry street in the Village's Little Italy or maybe even Hackensack which is in N.J.  I also met old guys from Sicily who just got off the boat after they began working as a stoker when they were a young man and made the trip back and forth,back and forth, and then they stayed, moved into a nice location and bought property which they rented out and made more income, etc.

In New York, I had an Italian girl for a room-mate who came from Brooklyn, her parents from Puglia, not so nice. (How do you say crazy in Italian? I know, but do you?) Over the years, I've had friends and associates from Calabria,Sorrento,Florence, come to mind off the top of my head,who settled in the Midwest, or on the West Coast, as well as New York or Jersey, who were real painters like De Niro, real poets like Gregory Corso or Ferlinghetti, real craftsmen,like the Orlandini family,and real conscientious objectors  during the war before this one.

So, although the flaws do matter, particularly in politicians (and we have one or two in one branch of a our government at present who are particularly obnoxious,we have many more non-Italians in our government who are even more obnoxious.

But I guess why you notice the resemblence in Argentina probably has something to do with that the mafiosi depicted in The Sopranos are a political structure. Or, as a friend of mine (who spends a great deal of her life in Italy as well as New York and New Jersey) told me, "they" are a "sub rosa" government who function under the visible government of a country, who support it when they grease the works and expect their percentage in return when it is due. That's when they momentarily visibly rise to the surface. Some of the most famous "politicians" in history were Italians, sometimes in other countries, sometimes not.           
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Kam
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« Reply #989 on: February 10, 2008, 01:31:40 PM »

Translation of the above:

The Sopranos is about living Italian in New Jersey.
Many NJ italians have roots in NY.
Some Italians are crazy.
Italians have tried to increase their standing in society.
That depiction is captured perfectly in the Sopranos.
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You know when, like, you're little, your dad, you think he's Superman. Then when you grow up and realize he's just a regular guy who wears a cape.
-Dave Attell
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