Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
January 17, 2018, 09:55:50 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
News: As you may have noticed, this is a very old backup, I'm still working through restoring the site.  Don't be surprised if you post and it all goes missing....
 
   Home   Help Search Login Register  
Poll
Question: What is the best show of the most anticipated new shows this fall?
Pushing Daisies
Private Practice
Bionic Woman
Chuck
Dirty Sexy Money
Back to You
Big Shots
Cane
Journeyman
Samantha Who?
Other

Pages: 1 ... 87 88 [89] 90
  Print  
Author Topic: Television  (Read 14157 times)
0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.
nytempsperdu
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 402


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1320 on: June 02, 2008, 12:48:45 AM »

Excellent, barton!  I just love stuff like the "auto-icon" Bentham head...(old faves include the many times the stone of Scone has been absconded with, and the Piltdown Man hoax, and that thing the BBC did reporting on the annual harvest of the spaghetti trees in Italy...

What Uni was Faraday et al. assoc. with, again?
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1997


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #1321 on: June 02, 2008, 10:18:39 AM »

Harrie,  re "with time being wacky, could Charlotte Lewis be Ben's little red-haired girl, Annie?  Probably not, just messing around with that thought...."

That's crazy, and I like it.

The whole donkey wheel thing is funny, as you mentioned, and it's a great way to conjure up the notion of these 19th century people running into a glob of exotic physics and trying to figure out how to harness it.

Agree about Juliet -- I was using "lady" sort of ironically.

As for Hurley actually encountering all these ghosts, I just don't know -- the way they set up the weird physics, it seems like the exotic blob has an energy field that keeps ghosts fresh and active and visible, but then it would only work on the island, right?  But OTOH, we have the island seeming to have some kind of physical influence all over the globe and there's Christian, who seems able to show up wherever he wants to.

NYTEMP -- I thought it was Oxford, but now I'm not sure.  Yeah, the Bentham auto-icon is weird, even for the field of academic philosophy.  I love that he still gets a vote, when a tie-breaker is needed. 
Logged

"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1997


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #1322 on: June 03, 2008, 10:21:17 AM »

Both Charlotte and Daniel taught at Oxford.

If anyone here wants to soak up some Lost lore during the hiatus, the wiki "biographies" are pretty useful and abounding with good hyperlinks, e.g.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Benjamin_Linus

All the characters, including the more recent ones from the Kahana, seem to be bio'd at wikipedia.


Logged

"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1997


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #1323 on: June 15, 2008, 01:54:15 PM »

Just discovered the crowning glory of forensic drama -- and it's Canadian!  A local digital channel has been running episodes of "DaVinci's Inquest" and what a refreshing break from the silly U.S. forensics where characters, some improbably good-looking, share cutesy one-liners while they solve impossible or at least highly improbable crimes.

DaVinci's Inquest seems to be about real people, solving real crimes, using real police procedures, in Vancouver BC.  The excellent writing and dramatization doesn't require the amping up of excessive gore and bloodshed or migraine-inducing gunbattles or long musical interludes that involve the sensual interaction between camera and multi-million dollar lab equipment and lots and lots of cotton swabs with gunk on them and people frowning deeply into microscopes, etc.  This is actually about human beings in law enforcement deal with other human beings who are victimized by, or are, criminals.  There is wit and humor, but not with the incessant reliance on clever puns about horrible death (ok, maybe a few are sprinkled in, but with Canadian restraint and taste) and, as I said before, the cutesy one-liners. 

A plus, two thumbs up, double steakknives, check this out!

 
Logged

"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
NoneoftheAbove
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 450



View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1324 on: June 15, 2008, 02:23:42 PM »

Steakknives? Count me in!  Grin

We have Dish Network... any idea what channel it's on?
Logged

"Those who would give up their freedom for security will have none and deserve neither."
- Franklin (and Jefferson)
pugetopolis
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 2513


Ink Inc.


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1325 on: June 15, 2008, 09:50:04 PM »

"Secret Diary of a Call Girl"
Ushers in the Summer of the Sensitive Slut.
By Heather Havrilesky

http://www.salon.com/ent/tv/iltw/2008/06/15/call_girl/?source=newsletter

(I was shocked—simply shocked—reading this Slutty Showtime review. It reminded me of somebody—not me of course.)

June 15, 2008: America loves a whore. We're a nation of whores, after all -- just try holding down a job in this great land of ours without compromising your values and shortchanging your best ideas. We grow up hearing "Be yourself!" and "Follow your dreams!" but the marketplace tramples all over such fanciful rainbows-and-unicorns notions of identity and self-respect with its big, dirty, hobnailed boots. Thus are plucky, original human beings transformed into polite, agreeable team players, anxious to waste a lifetime kowtowing to the lowest common denominator.

Once you sell a big part of your soul for a hot slice of the American dream (something about grassy lawns, enormous mortgages and life insurance policies you can't afford), you've set the stage for a lifetime of doing stupid, demeaning shit just to make your nut. When you recognize that your "success" in life has cemented you on a path of unending compromise, getting paid to get screwed up the ass by a stranger really doesn't seem like that much of a stretch.

So sure, we'll tsk-tsk over Eliot Spitzer's ambitious harlot or Heidi Fleiss' slut brigade, but underneath it all, we know they're kindred spirits, throwing a little leg to get a leg up in a world gone mad.

Hollywood loves a happy hooker.

Don't believe all that hair tearing and eye rolling over women of ill repute for a minute. No matter what we Americans might say when the microphone is on, ethical lapses for the sake of filthy lucre only outrage us temporarily, because we're guilty (or could easily be guilty) of the same moral slippage. We've been compromising our ideals since way back in the days when we still had ideals to compromise.

Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1143



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1326 on: June 15, 2008, 10:15:28 PM »

I think I've seen Da Vinci's Inquest listed on my local CW channel, if that's any help.  I didn't realize it was a real show, thought it was an infomercial or something (based entirely on the title, not on actually watching).
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1997


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #1327 on: June 16, 2008, 09:46:43 AM »

The title is a bit unfortunate, in the sense that someone unfamiliar with the show or its starting date (1998-2005) might think it was some kind of sacred mysteries slop spun off of The DaVinci Code.  The title refers to the lead character, Dominic DaVinci, a Vancouver coroner  -- he's based on a real Vancouver coroner who became mayor of that city.

The dialog is not written for Americans -- a gambler talks about entering a high-stakes game and talks about the point at which, "you start peeling off the brown and purple bills" -- a kid is killed on a train tracks and they find a "flattened Loonie" -- which apparently is slang for a Canadian dollar coin, placed on the rail to be flattened.   The show is full of unabashedly Canadian talk -- great fun.  "Yard" is apparently some kind of verb, in some contexts.



Logged

"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1143



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1328 on: June 16, 2008, 10:11:15 AM »

Sounds fun, and ya gotta love Canuck-talk.  Next time I run across that, I'll have to check it out.
Logged
nytempsperdu
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 402


View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1329 on: June 16, 2008, 09:12:40 PM »

Me, too--am intrigued as well as glad to know DaVinci name is redeemed another way, and not entirely Brown'ed off.  Thanks for the alert.
Logged
NoneoftheAbove
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 450



View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1330 on: June 17, 2008, 09:27:34 AM »

Barton, did you ever say what network it's on... eh?
Logged

"Those who would give up their freedom for security will have none and deserve neither."
- Franklin (and Jefferson)
harrie
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1143



View Profile

Ignore
« Reply #1331 on: June 17, 2008, 09:38:47 AM »

I'm not barton, but I think Da Vinci's Inquest is carried locally, so it' might be difficult to locate.  If you have DISH, do you by any chance get WGN, a superstation?  According to IMDB (see link below), it's on there.  I've seen it listed on my local CW (former "The WB") channel. 

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0156442/ 
Logged
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1997


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #1332 on: June 17, 2008, 10:00:49 AM »

Yeah, it's carried by various local affiliates and such.   Here, for instance, it's carried by "MyTV" a digital station offered by the local CBS affiliate which runs vintage tv, cheeseball movies, home repair shows, and misc.

 
Logged

"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
NoneoftheAbove
Sr. Member
****
Posts: 450



View Profile WWW

Ignore
« Reply #1333 on: June 17, 2008, 10:26:53 AM »

Shall search. WGN is on our list... I think.

Thanks.
Logged

"Those who would give up their freedom for security will have none and deserve neither."
- Franklin (and Jefferson)
barton
Superhero Member
******
Posts: 1997


View Profile Email

Ignore
« Reply #1334 on: June 22, 2008, 02:09:25 PM »

Another great DaVinci Inquest last night, with a mystery concerning a child's death, and another with a victim's girlfriend who keeps changing her story.  Great scene with "Leo," a tough old cop played masterfully by Donnelly Rhodes, where he's questioning her and she finally spews out this complex story about having an old boyfriend and a new boyfriend and how she had arranged this meeting because one owed the other money etc. and finally she stops and says, "You understand what I'm saying?"  At this point, your American tv cop would not only understand, but come up with a clever one-liner that indicated how far ahead of her he was.  But Leo just scratches his neck, sighs, and says "Not really."   And then you have to laugh, because it hits you that no one, not even a detective, is going to bother trying to make sense of her story in all its hopeless incoherence.

Generally, this show has so many scenes that remind you that truly great dialog is as much about what people DON'T say as what they do say.   And this show allows you to notice the things left unsaid and unravel what that character is about.

Logged

"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
Pages: 1 ... 87 88 [89] 90
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.20 | SMF © 2013, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!