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Author Topic: American History  (Read 30272 times)
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Bob
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« Reply #540 on: July 17, 2007, 05:40:10 PM »

It's BENEATH THE AMERICA RENAISSANCE

http://www.amazon.com/Beneath-American-Renaissance-Subversive-Imagination/dp/0674065654
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Bob
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« Reply #541 on: July 17, 2007, 05:45:38 PM »

There's a new biography of Henry Ward Beecher, complete with the juicy sex scandal ---now available in paperback. He's a very interesting character.


http://search.barnesandnoble.com/booksearch/isbnInquiry.asp?z=y&EAN=9780385513975&itm=2
« Last Edit: July 17, 2007, 05:47:59 PM by Bob » Logged
Lhoffman
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« Reply #542 on: July 17, 2007, 06:00:50 PM »

Quote
With the price of plays in New York its a wonder even the snobbish still go. Its getting more and more difficult to expect  even middle class people to attend at the prices they charge. Anyhow, that's not a comment on Cliff, just a personal observation.
 


I dunno...my son can afford to go to Lincoln Center and City Opera and Carnegie Hall as well.  He's hardly wealthy; he's a grad student. 

In my own area, we have a chamber music festival in the summer.  They sell tickets to under 25's for only $8.00.  The theatres in Detroit are quite reasonably priced.  Detroit Symphony tickets sell at a wide range of prices, and every time I've gone there have been many families attending.

Aside from the top Broadway plays, it is usually possible to get tickets at a very good price. 

What I find shocking is the cost of tickets to Wrestling.  Who buys these?
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #543 on: July 17, 2007, 06:05:29 PM »

I thought overall, Cliff was very good, too.  I really only disagreed with his inferences in the final chapter.  And, Thanatopsy, I really enjoyed his writing about Shakespeare.  He did seem to lack appreciation for American arts, but there is no getting around the fact that Shakespeare was a phenomenal author who had quite a bit of influence on the American authors who followed him.
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madupont
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« Reply #544 on: July 17, 2007, 08:34:10 PM »

Quote
With the price of plays in New York its a wonder even the snobbish still go. Its getting more and more difficult to expect  even middle class people to attend at the prices they charge. Anyhow, that's not a comment on Cliff, just a personal observation.
 


I dunno...my son can afford to go to Lincoln Center and City Opera and Carnegie Hall as well.  He's hardly wealthy; he's a grad student. 

In my own area, we have a chamber music festival in the summer.  They sell tickets to under 25's for only $8.00.  The theatres in Detroit are quite reasonably priced.  Detroit Symphony tickets sell at a wide range of prices, and every time I've gone there have been many families attending.

Aside from the top Broadway plays, it is usually possible to get tickets at a very good price. 

What I find shocking is the cost of tickets to Wrestling.  Who buys these?




Lhoffman  "Aside from the top Broadway plays, it is usually possible to get tickets at a very good price."

The way around that is to go to the office of the theater manager and apply gratis to be an usherette in the theater for matinees, depending on your own hours, and as many evenings, again depending on your other responsibilites, and if this is a theater that is booking only the Broadway tours in a separate venue, you will see all the top shows,armed with a small flashlight,sensible shoes, a black skirt and a white shirt.  I did this to study professionals and saw Julie Harris as a young woman, Judith Anderson as a woman of indiscriminate age, and Deborah Kerr as a "woman of a certain age.
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #545 on: July 17, 2007, 10:00:37 PM »




+++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++


I especially liked the following comment about the book:


One of the most powerful pieces of scholarship and criticism on American literature in a very long time...[It exhibits] wonderful range, insight, verve, and critical sophistication. This is a most welcome and timely book; it helps set a new agenda for American literary and cultural studies.

--Alan Trachtenberg, Yale University




As someone who read the book, I can attest that  this is true!  Professor Reynolds outlines all that is to follow in American history in a way that Professor Tyler could not do in her encyclopedic Freedom's Ferment. It is a sensational book.

But since we just a read book that dealt with that period, it would perhaps be preferable to read a book that deals with more recent matters such as Truman.  As always, I'm open to whatever decision is reached by a majority on this board. Smiley


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Lhoffman
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« Reply #546 on: July 17, 2007, 10:15:02 PM »

American Renaissance sounds very good.  But as far as Melville and company as subsersives, there is something to the idea that art MUST be subversive if it is to have meaning.
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #547 on: July 18, 2007, 09:42:30 PM »

there is something to the idea that art MUST be subversive if it is to have meaning.

Emerson played a great role in the American Renaissance. It was he who said, to be great is to be misunderstood.  The fact that so many misunderstood what that great American Renaissance  stood for and what its ultimate impact has been, validates that it, indeed, was something great.
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madupont
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« Reply #548 on: July 18, 2007, 10:43:37 PM »

Bob,

I was pondering about another churchyard that I recall from the same period of my discovering Trinity during a walk.  Was going to ask you about it but then looked it up. I recall it being on a corner but could not remember the exact location.  As it turns out, it is fittingly appropo to the book just discussed about -- The Shakespeare Riots, although it is rather much a follow-up period by the 1920s.

It may surprise you what it has to offer.

http://www.littlechurch.org/theater.html

and:        http://www.actorsguild.org/aboutus2.html
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #549 on: July 18, 2007, 11:57:04 PM »

''Little Church Around the Corner'' is near Marble Collegiate Church in NYC.  Passed by there a few times many moons ago.

I sure do miss those historic sites in the Big Town.
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madupont
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« Reply #550 on: July 19, 2007, 04:01:26 PM »

''Little Church Around the Corner'' is near Marble Collegiate Church in NYC.  Passed by there a few times many moons ago.

I sure do miss those historic sites in the Big Town.


You left? How could you?  Like some people, I live in it every day as it was because it may never ever again be the same.
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #551 on: July 19, 2007, 05:15:00 PM »

You left? How could you?

It was due to an incurable condition called ''temporary insanity''. Too bad I didn't have a crystal ball back then!
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Bob
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« Reply #552 on: July 20, 2007, 07:31:25 PM »

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/22/books/review/Lewis-t.html?8bu&emc=bu

New Books in American History.

Are there any more  suggestions for the next book?

I recently finished YOUNG J EDGAR Which is about how good ole J Edgar supervised the Palmer Raids---its very associative to today's responses to terrorism.
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Bob
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« Reply #553 on: July 20, 2007, 07:43:39 PM »

Then there's THE BARBARY WARS  by Frank Lambert (America and the pirates)

Also, there are two conservative views of current Constitutional issues: TEN TORTURED WORDS by Mansfield  (First Amendment issues surrounding Everson and  the Establishment Clause) and ARMED AMERICA by Clayton Cramer, attacking Bellisile's ARMING AMERICA which contended guns were rare in Colonial America. Cramer argues the Second Amendment protects  an individual right to bear arms and that guns were common and required many times in colonial times. In view of the Supreme Court taking on a case for decision next term, its a timely view. The lower courts upheld Cramer's view. It might also let us look at the Bellisiles controversy----which involves the issues of poor reasearch and intellectual dishonesty.
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #554 on: July 20, 2007, 07:48:27 PM »

http://www.historybookclub.com/doc/full_site_enrollment/detail/fse_product_detail.jhtml?repositoryId=667663B205


more reading about J Edgar Hoover ...
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