Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: American History  (Read 29499 times)
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #1215 on: October 04, 2007, 05:08:51 PM »


Another reason why NYC was so important to industry is because it is approximately half way between the beginning of the East Coast megalopolis in Boston to the Southern point in Washington, DC. While it is true that the railroads were preeminent in the transportation of passengers and commerce, the shipping industry remained quite viable at that time. Therefore, NYC with its enlarged population (it amalgamated in 1898 into what is officially known as The City of Greater New York when Brooklyn, Queens, and Staten Island entered into its jurisdiction) remained the ideal  urban commercial center.



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thanatopsy
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« Reply #1216 on: October 04, 2007, 05:22:46 PM »

I wonder why the NY Times believed the Grand Central Station to be so inconvenient and aesthetically unpleasant.

Here is the admittedly unattractive original building:




and here's the new site in 1904:




For the life of me, I cannot understand what was so objectionable --- the trolley stopped off at its door step as you can see from the photo, another line or two probably stopped there as well, the elevated lines ran near it:



and in that era there were a number of private, independent  horse drawn buses that ran along that route as well.


Therefore, the site was quite convenient and it sure as heck looked quite good as well!
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Dzimas
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« Reply #1217 on: October 05, 2007, 03:30:59 AM »

Grand Central Station was first built in 1871, and I imagine had fallen on hard times as any train station would after 30 years of service.  "Between 1903 and 1913, the entire building was torn down in phases and replaced by the current Grand Central Terminal." *  It would seem that Cassat forced Vanderbilt's hand after all.


* http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Grand_Central_Terminal
« Last Edit: October 05, 2007, 03:36:23 AM by Dzimas » Logged
thanatopsy
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« Reply #1218 on: October 05, 2007, 09:22:06 PM »

NO PAIN, NO GAIN


Paradoxically, railroads  promoted social progress while creating great jeopardy in the advancing society. They ''reduced costs of transportation ... created {new} marketplace, new industries, and a new industrialized world ... {and} could cause wrecks, damage property, and kill people".  Thousands died or suffered severe injuries every year.  Sadder still is the notion that uninsured workers and their families bore these costs while the railroad  corporate interests profited from the subsidization they received from the government in bridge and tunnel construction operations.

p 26
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« Reply #1219 on: October 05, 2007, 09:31:12 PM »

In the old days, ferry boats were the only way to get quick access into NYC from the mainland.

Here is the ferry boat depot in Perth Amboy, NJ --- across the Arthur Kill is Tottenville, Staten Island, NY:








I once stood on the Tottenville Station and looked across the way to Jersey. It was my only trip to that area.
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« Reply #1220 on: October 06, 2007, 02:15:56 AM »







Taken from this website:
http://www.worldshipny.com/nyferries.htm
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johnr60
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« Reply #1221 on: October 06, 2007, 11:22:29 AM »

Would anyone know the name of the case in which Marshall described the difference between tax avoidance and tax evasion?
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« Reply #1222 on: October 06, 2007, 03:46:11 PM »

Johnr60: I'll have to look that one up...
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« Reply #1223 on: October 06, 2007, 04:11:36 PM »

Chapter two is interesting because it tells the story of the Haskins and his troubles building his tunnel and it also gets  into the idea for a trans-Hudson bridge. I hadn't realized that Lindenthal obtained a Federal Charter for the proposed bridge. The financial troubles in the last decade of the century aborted the idea along with the opposition of Cassat who thought it would only invite his competors to use the same bridge. Cassat had his ferrys (or is it ferries?) in place by 1871. I also learned that tracks used by the PRR to gain access to Jersey City were owned by another railroad, the Philadelphia, Wilmington  & Baltimore and that the Baltimore & Ohio tried to get control of the tracks. Cassat undercut them and issued a check for $15 million to buy the entire PW&P---it was the largest check ever issued to that date.

There follows a mini-biography of Cassat and Tom Scott, who was president of the line prior to Cassat. It was Cassat who standardized the locomotives and who introduced Westinghouse's air brakes to the system. Prior to Westinghouse trains were stopped  car by car---I can't describe how, but it involved the brakeman running on the tops of the cars turning on the brakes one by one. Cach car had to stopped individually. I didn't know that Cassat's wife was James Buchanan's neice----one of the reasons I like the book is it gave me so much new information.

Jonnes brings up the Great Strike of 1877 and the costs to the Railroad. I'm used to seeing the styrike from the other side. here we see the interplay between John D Rockefeller and his scheme of kickbacks. Jonnes is honest enough to remark on Scott's "ill-starred battle with Standard Oil and Cassat's ill-advised call for the militia..." (page 28) showing what I think is a great deal of objectivity--good history. Criticism of both Scott and Rockefeller. (Chernow explains the rebate and kickback schemes in detail in TITAN).
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Bob
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« Reply #1224 on: October 06, 2007, 04:18:09 PM »

Martin Albro's quote on page 26 is very interesting: "In all of the human pst no event has so swiftly and profoundly changed the  basic order of things as had the coming of the railroad."   Nothing had moved faster than a horse (on land) for thousands of years-and now we could get across the country in a few days.

The other thing was the introduction of railroad time (the day of two noons). The telling of time had become standardized---clocks and watches were readjusted to Railway Standardized Time. (Page 18)
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #1225 on: October 06, 2007, 08:17:18 PM »

Would anyone know the name of the case in which Marshall described the difference between tax avoidance and tax evasion?


Justice Marshall said that the power to tax is the power to destroy.

The income tax did not exist until 1913.
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thanatopsy
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« Reply #1226 on: October 06, 2007, 09:03:34 PM »

I believe the case you are looking for is Gregory vs Helvering:

http://caselaw.lp.findlaw.com/scripts/getcase.pl?navby=case&court=US&vol=293&invol=465


The legal right of a taxpayer to decrease the amount of what otherwise would be his taxes, or altogether avoid them, by means which the law permits, cannot be doubted.


If I recall correctly, the IRS modified its regulations in recognition of  this USSC decision by defining evasion versus avoidance.
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« Reply #1227 on: October 06, 2007, 09:25:56 PM »

Merion Cricket Club:




Cassett was president of this elitist club in Haverford, PA.  { p 36}

Now that the sport is no longer viewed as an elitist sport, it would nice if these elites would open their doors to common folks.


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« Reply #1228 on: October 06, 2007, 11:52:46 PM »

thanatopsy

Merion is one of those places that complained and complained about all the parking in their neighborhood adjacent to the Barnes Foundation, a very unusual art educational foundation, until they got their way and the Barnes began to undergo the process of being absorbed by the Philadelphia Art Museum. Thus ruining a good thing that had been operating for nearly a century or ever since Dr. Barnes made a fortune with a patent medicine known as Argyrol and decided to hand a mittful of money to a friend of his on the way to Europe whom he trusted to buy the best that was happening in Modern Painting.

As soon as the paintings were over here in the US, and the good doctor had arranged them on his walls in the peculiar style with which he chose to emphasize the aesthetic relationships of the works, his next move was to open the place to children in Philadelphia's African-American community who might not otherwise be able to receive an education in the Fine Arts.

Since the acquisition attempt began to get into serious gear, I have yet to hear the Philadelphia Art Museum announce the children's art program going along with the art collection to the new locale.

Never heard of the Merion Cricket Club in Haverford. I always thought that Merion and Haverford were two separate communities; maybe they adjoin? Haverford is better known for the college(with an Observatory for astronomy classes, the girls from Bryn Mawr have been walking over there for that course since Kate Hepburn went to school there) on the Main Line.
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« Reply #1229 on: October 06, 2007, 11:57:55 PM »

http://www.barnesfoundation.org/
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