Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Fiction  (Read 25162 times)
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johnr60
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« Reply #255 on: July 30, 2007, 02:50:53 PM »

"Anyone out there read a book called Raintree County?"


I have, twice, and I'm going to again very shortly.  If there is a great american novel look here, not Absalom. 

Now I have to read the posting instructions.
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Donotremove
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« Reply #256 on: July 30, 2007, 04:04:18 PM »

Reader, foreshadowing is just a writing device as far as I know.  I was surprised, as well, when Ruth was bitten by the snake.  So horribly unfair.  But  Oleander's (I think I've mometarily forgotten the mother's exact name) response to Ruth's death was a wonderful piece of plotting and writing.  She cleaned out the house, ridding herself and the girls of every vestiage of this "thing" (the African experience,) that was choking, smothering them and now had killed one, buried Ruth and took her remaining girls and left, on foot.  I guarantee you I will not forget that scene.  Ever.
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #257 on: July 30, 2007, 06:33:16 PM »

I found the mother's grief more moving than Ruth May's death, perhaps because I expected the death.  Orleanna's giving away all her possessions and walking away felt right to me. 

And Rachel's response to her sister's death seems truest of all.  "There's a strange moment in time, after something horrible happens, when you know it's true but you haven't told anyone yet."  The thought behind that is that if you don't tell anyone, don't say it aloud, it won't be true.  Notice how people cover their mouths when they grieve?
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #258 on: July 30, 2007, 06:34:46 PM »

I'd like to read Raintree County, too. 

(of course you realize this book has been movied......)
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johnr60
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« Reply #259 on: July 30, 2007, 08:56:01 PM »

I'd like to read Raintree County, too. 

(of course you realize this book has been movied......)

http://www.raintreecounty.com/

Dont even think about the movie.  The book has been out of print but readily available used.  The movie's 50th anniversary is coming and has occasioned a new printing from a Chicago press.  I have never found in one fictional place so many forms and ideas that I can relate to, in a simple and poetic style in my mind at the top of American literature.

 I have just finished Shade of the Raintree--a biography of the author by his son, a sad but enlightening piece containing much more of the father's ideas and writings and will get back into the novel while this stuff is fresh..
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #260 on: July 30, 2007, 08:59:12 PM »

I should have written, "I'd like to read Raintree County too."

I picked up a used copy, but I see a new one is coming out this September.

http://www.amazon.com/Raintree-County-Ross-Lockridge/dp/1556527101/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/103-5545799-5355828?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1185843632&sr=1-1
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #261 on: July 30, 2007, 09:04:41 PM »

Quote
The Bible is a collection of ancient writings considered sacred by some.

A bible is also a book considered authoritative in its field (according to the  American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language).

That takes me back to the one flaw I really find in this book...Kingsolver's lack of subtlety when it comes to the Congo/Colonialism.
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weezo
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« Reply #262 on: July 31, 2007, 01:38:43 PM »

Reader,

The poll is scheduled to come down tomorrow. It seems to me that Absalam, Absalam is the clear winner, so I assume that will be the next book read.

I was not planning to put up another poll until the last week of the month. So, you will have to get another life until then. In the meantime, I will collect the suggestions as they come into the list. I expect most of them will start coming in after the middle of the month. I'm not sure if I will continue to list the books that no one voted for on the next poll, but I will certainly include the ones that were voted on and didn't gain the top spot, since there is apparently some interest in those books.

I am pleased to see that Absalam, Absalam was the choice of the month. I've never been a fan of Faulkner, and someone mentioned that he uses the bad "n" word a lot in this book, so I think I'll pass on it. I've ordered two books from the Aztec series, and, if I like them, perhaps their turn will roll around.

In the meantime, I will be writing my own stories for the little ones. I've started a new series called the Geography Hat. If you have little ones and would like to print out a personalized story as a gift for them, or just want to see what I'm doing, the announcement is on the Education board. The next story in the series will involve examining the world from outer space, with some help from Sally Ride's book "To Space and Back" which gives a child-friendly explanation of the everyday life in outer space.

Reader, if you are really so bored you are awaiting the poll results daily, take a stroll to Education, and click on the link for all my stories, and read yourself silly. If you have children in your life, you can gift them with the personalized books at no cost (not even ads on the pages), and put a smile on their faces.
















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weezo
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« Reply #263 on: July 31, 2007, 03:27:21 PM »

Reader,

I can add books to the poll list whenever, if that is what is desired. That would also relieve me of having to rush to go through the list in the last week of the month, and may result in a more interesting selection.
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lulu
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« Reply #264 on: July 31, 2007, 03:35:57 PM »

I just rereread Wilkie Collins' The Woman in White and it's as exciting as it was the first time I read it.  If you haven't read Collins before and you like mysteries, please try him.

Next up is the Moonstone and Armadale.  It is easy to get addicted to him and the Woman in White is a great way to start.

I could see where it was going but that may be because I read it before but for a first timer it may not be obvious.

And thanks to the miniseries, I rereread Bleak House, in my opinion, Dickens' greatest novels about the horrors of getting involved in the legal system.  (Nothing has changed since Dickens wrote the book) and Jarndyce v. Jarndyce has become a byword for protracted litigation.  His women are still one-dimensional but this book is a little better.  Still, his excoriation of the law is worth reading for that alone.  Dickens never minced words about the world he lived in.
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weezo
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« Reply #265 on: August 01, 2007, 09:14:35 PM »

Is everyone happy with the poll as it stands? I've taken out all the zero votes. Should I reset for a new vote, or is Absalam, Absalam a good choice for all?
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #266 on: August 01, 2007, 11:43:36 PM »

And not so subtly:  "Leah went first as always, goddess of the Hunt." 
What page?  Who is speaking?

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Lhoffman
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« Reply #267 on: August 01, 2007, 11:53:23 PM »

On Methuselah....969, a number only Adah could love.

On the mirroring of Methuselah and Nathan....Kingsolver had to do it this way.  Kingsolver's point seems to be "As ye sow, so shall ye reap."  (Not spelled out in the Bible, or in PB...the the idea is there.)  If Methuselah represents the Congo and Nathan the colonizer, when Methuselah falls so must Nathan. 

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Lhoffman
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« Reply #268 on: August 01, 2007, 11:56:01 PM »

When will the Absalom, Absalom discussion begin?  My plans for August reading:  Finish AA, Ted Hughes' Tales from Ovid, read Raintree County and Peeling the Onion
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weezo
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« Reply #269 on: August 02, 2007, 09:06:35 AM »

I don't know who usually sets the dates on this board. Whoever it is needs to set the date for Absalam, Absalam. The date has been set as Aug 20th to start the discussion on the American History list, set by Bob, who has been the traditional leader of that forum. My role, as I explained to him, is only to set up the polls, not to usurp the list leadership.


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