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Author Topic: Fiction  (Read 25288 times)
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bosox18d
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« Reply #300 on: August 03, 2007, 04:10:06 AM »

This forum is getting goofy.The fact is that when Faulkner and Hemingway wrote,certain words were used in mainstream society.If you want to take writers from the past and apply todays morals to them you should read lite lit.Imagine the nerve of people like Mark Twain,Melville,F.Scott,Faulkner,Hemingway,Kerouac,Ginsburg,Bukowski,Miller,etc,etc all using non P.C. words about others.Lets clean it all up and call it American Lit.................... Roll Eyes
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"If it keeps going like this,the Zamboni driver is going to be the first star"
Charles
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« Reply #301 on: August 03, 2007, 04:39:38 AM »

The forum is getting goofy with a post like that.
One of the reasons I drift into and out of contact with this crowd.
Feh.
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weezo
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« Reply #302 on: August 03, 2007, 07:27:26 AM »

Thank you, Charles, for preferring to see the poll stand as it is. I know there are some on here who have been lookinig forward to reading/re-reading this book for a while. If the book is not to your liking, you can skip it and wait for the next books that may suit you better.

I am not a great fan of fiction as a body, preferring to read history or historical novels. I did like the Poisonwood Bible very much and thoroughly enjoyed following the discussion that went into far more depth than I am wont to read in a book. But I found it fascinating to read and follow.

I prefer James Michener to Ernest Hemingway, and one of the books I read that I intend to re-read again is Carl Sagan's Contact. My sister was aghast to learn that I've never read any of Stephen King's novels and do not intend to. Although I admire the fact that Harry Potter has turned many of today's tv and video addicts into readers, I have not read any of the series. I read F. Scott Fitzgerald because it was a requirement, but I would not revisit it on my own. Mark Twain, I enjoyed and did not notice the "n" word since it was in context for the story. Again, I appreciate the fact that Mark Twain was an eye-opener to the wonders of reading to one of my sons. I am currently reading William Cooper's Town which makes numerous references and comparisons to James Fennimore Cooper's novel on the same subject, but it does not induce me to revisit J. F. Cooper. I prefer to read the history and the considerations of what happened then compared to what has happened since. It is my own pechant.



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pontalba
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« Reply #303 on: August 03, 2007, 07:50:57 AM »

I don't see any use in trying to rehash a poll either, it is what it is.  Perhaps down the road some of the books in the mix will be considered again.  I hope.
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rmdig
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« Reply #304 on: August 03, 2007, 08:05:53 AM »

weezo

You write:  There was a long discussion, a poll, voting, and now you want to suggest another book? Where were you previously?

Four people voted for the book and I was one of them.  That doesn't exactly represent an avalanche of support for Absalom, Absalom!  Most book discussions will require more than four readers if they are ever to get off the ground.  Moreover, having discussed Faulkner novels in other book discussion groups, I can almost assure you that his out-dated language will become an issue.

BTW:  This is the second time you've pounced on one of my posts.  I'm not sure what I've done to deserve this.  Perhaps you are someone who went by another name at the NYTimes forums with a longstanding animus?
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weezo
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« Reply #305 on: August 03, 2007, 08:26:35 AM »

Dig,

No, I have no other agenda than to answer your post as it is here and now. I was not even active on the book forums on the NYTimes, confining myself principally to the Education board. No animus. Just answering your post.

The idea of the poll is new, and I offered to do it since it seemed a logical way to decide what book to choose. I have also offered to run a run-off poll if the voting is too close to choose a clear leader. You are right that there are more total votes for other books than Faulkner. If it is the desire of the group to do a run-off poll, I can do it in a matter of minutes. Just let me know the wishes of the group. I am here to serve, not to dictate.
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sumen
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« Reply #306 on: August 03, 2007, 09:55:49 AM »

Would you mind saying again what is the book for reading in August. Sometimes I come late to the forum and can't find out what I need to know to participate. Thank you. Susan.
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« Reply #307 on: August 03, 2007, 10:10:56 AM »

Wait.  Wait.  I've got Angels all over the place falling off the head of this pin.  I've got to get a bigger pin.

I'm not going to read Absalom. Absalom either but I am going to lurk (as anyone who knows me expects.)  I've read one Faulkner, The Bear.  It was for a late-in-life American Lit course and my paper on it centered on the fact that young people of today have hardly any frame-of-reference to relate to the boy and his coming-of age adventure; not for the walking in the woods, the metaphors, the hovering spirit of the grandfather . . . since all the woods that most youngsters know today are the trees outside their apartment windows (and in reality there are no large unfenced areas, today, like Faulkner wrote about,) and the grandfather's pocket watch would not bring up an image in the minds of young people used to looking at a swatch watch.

You get my drift.  All of you are so intelligent (I'm not being sarcastic--I really mean it) that I'm sure a lively, civil discussion of Faulkner's book will ensue.  Whether it lasts a while or peters out, well that's okay, too.
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martinbeck3
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« Reply #308 on: August 03, 2007, 12:11:02 PM »

I´d love to read Falukner´s book.I hope I can get it here where I live.After reading several posts I cught what the N word means.Funny,in Argentina it´s a term of endearment.

One of our most beloved humorist who has just passed away was the N Fontanarrosa:

 http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7q9LW0biKV4 
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #309 on: August 03, 2007, 12:12:52 PM »

Anne...I used to read lots of Stephen King.  The guy is morbid, bizarre, terrifying.  Not many of the books stick in my mind, but one that does is Insomnia.  Most of his other books dealt with the supernatural, the idea of good versus evil, some combination of both.  But Insomnia was quite unlike his other work.  There was the idea of good versus evil, and it was scary, but King also interworked themes of death, fate and immortality, the concept of God, and Greek mythology.  Even the hero in this one is a bit unexpected...a seventy-something widower who has been unable to sleep since his wife's death.  If you ever do decide to have a look at King, I'd go for Insomnia.
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martinbeck3
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« Reply #310 on: August 03, 2007, 12:14:21 PM »

i meant *caught*
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #311 on: August 03, 2007, 12:15:26 PM »

Would you mind saying again what is the book for reading in August. Sometimes I come late to the forum and can't find out what I need to know to participate. Thank you. Susan.

There was no book chosen for August.  This is the first vote that's been taken.  But if you're reading something you like, toss it out there.  Maybe someone else is reading it, too.  
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martinbeck3
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« Reply #312 on: August 03, 2007, 12:26:25 PM »

King is the contemporary Edgar A. Poe.His prose is awesome.His use of words and stories are carefully chosen to awake our worst fears.His characters are alive.He knows children psyche like few writers do.
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #313 on: August 03, 2007, 12:30:45 PM »

Wait.  Wait.  I've got Angels all over the place falling off the head of this pin.  I've got to get a bigger pin.

I'm not going to read Absalom. Absalom either but I am going to lurk (as anyone who knows me expects.)  I've read one Faulkner, The Bear.  It was for a late-in-life American Lit course and my paper on it centered on the fact that young people of today have hardly any frame-of-reference to relate to the boy and his coming-of age adventure; not for the walking in the woods, the metaphors, the hovering spirit of the grandfather . . . since all the woods that most youngsters know today are the trees outside their apartment windows (and in reality there are no large unfenced areas, today, like Faulkner wrote about,) and the grandfather's pocket watch would not bring up an image in the minds of young people used to looking at a swatch watch.

You get my drift.  All of you are so intelligent (I'm not being sarcastic--I really mean it) that I'm sure a lively, civil discussion of Faulkner's book will ensue.  Whether it lasts a while or peters out, well that's okay, too.

Do you know, my father and my grandfather both had pocket watches.  One of my most vivid memories is sitting between them on a porch swing at about age 3 and believing I could somehow will their watches to tick in sync.  Many decades have passed, and still coming across a pocketwatch for sale in a magazine or hearing that certain distinctive tick takes me right back to that porch swing.
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #314 on: August 03, 2007, 12:33:50 PM »

King is the contemporary Edgar A. Poe.His prose is awesome.His use of words and stories are carefully chosen to awake our worst fears.His characters are alive.He knows children psyche like few writers do.

I've always been grateful he didn't write a story about a garbage disposal gone wild....I'd never go into my kitchen again.

The clown in the sink and the sewer grate in It were terrifying.  I think King does have an understanding of how the things that scared us as children never quite leave, but burrow deeper into our cellular structure and lie dormant until some word or sound wakes them back up.

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