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Author Topic: Fiction  (Read 25183 times)
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Donotremove
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« Reply #510 on: September 04, 2007, 05:37:19 AM »

Dzimas,  Smiley  Maddy's not out there yet, but her son's working on her to move.  She's up, probably hot after some fact or another that she's mislaid.  I always imagine her by her computer--wherever she's got it stashed--amidst picariously piled papers of mountainous proportions, muttering to herself about "where the hell is that".  Just now, she probably made a parthian shot and signed off.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #511 on: September 04, 2007, 06:33:15 AM »

Dzimas, it's gone, funky swamp.



"The past is never dead. It's not even past..."
--William Faulkner, Act I Scene III of Requiem for a Witch
« Last Edit: September 04, 2007, 07:02:01 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #512 on: September 04, 2007, 08:23:43 PM »

The Absalom parallel is clear, but Faulkner goes beyond creating Sutpen to parallel King David, his Sutpen parallels God.  In the beginning, Sutpen is a godlike figure, tearing Sutpen's Hundred out of the chaos.  Sutpen gives birth to a trinity.  His first child, Bon might be read as a reference to the creation myth found in Genesis.  God sees the creation and pronounces it "good,"  Faulkner puns on this and calls Sutpen's creation "Bon."  In the biblical parallel, God sacrifices his son to purify humankind; Sutpen sacrifices Bon to purify his bloodline.

The other two thirds of the trinity would be Judith and Henry who form "that single personality with two bodies....."  (Vintage 73).

Here are the texts if anyone is interested.  They are quite long, so I won't post them here.

Genesis 1:1-27

http://www.breslov.com/bible/Genesis1.htm

2 Samuel 11-15, 18 (It would be interesting to know which translation Faulkner used as his source.  In the 30's South, I'd guess the King James Version....anyone know if Faulkner could read the original?)

http://www.biblegateway.com/passage/?search=2%20Samuel%2011-13,%2015,%2018 
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johnr60
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« Reply #513 on: September 05, 2007, 02:54:26 PM »

The Absalom parallel is clear


Not to me.  If Faulkner were plotting based on the myth seems he would have followed it more closely.  He would also have more ready answers to plot questions than-- I dont remember.
I think the story was there, he needed a title, knew the brother kills brother who loves sister story, and named his accordingly--but why twice?
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« Reply #514 on: September 05, 2007, 03:46:45 PM »

Twice because it echoes the cry of David, " O my son Absalom, my son, my son Absalom!"   
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #515 on: September 05, 2007, 09:11:10 PM »



I'm thinking about moving on down the line, now, Hoffman.

I think we've pretty much exhausted the possibilities of Abasalom for now, don't you? It was an excellent discussion. Thank you very much.

Would you be interested in reading Wild Palms next?

I'm interested in Wild Palms because of how Borges streamlines the typical uber-sentences of Faulkner and how his translation skills and Argentine literary background deepen some of the concepts Faulkner is getting into, e.g. time.

What Faulkner does with time in Absalom is very interesting in terms of time, flashbacks and storytelling...

It looks like Wild Palms is along the same lines.

Enough to get Gabriel Garcia Marquez into magic realist overdrive...  Wink Wink Wink

Faulkner, William, Translated by Jorge Luis Borges, Las Palmeras Salvajes, Editorial Sudamericana, Buenos Aires, 1940.
« Last Edit: September 05, 2007, 09:13:25 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #516 on: September 05, 2007, 09:43:45 PM »

Pugetopolis.....why yes I certainly would be interested. 

That Borges translation makes me wish I could read Spanish....I can figure out the words, but I miss the subtleties. 

I ordered The Wild Palmsfrom Amazon, should have it Friday. 
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« Reply #517 on: September 05, 2007, 09:57:54 PM »

Perhaps nnyhav, elportenito, beppo and martin...

...can help us out with the Spanish translation... Smiley Smiley Smiley

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« Reply #518 on: September 06, 2007, 10:45:37 AM »

I´ll join with my Borges´translation of The Wild Palms.It´s no that I wouldn´t love to read it in English but the book can´t be obtained.
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« Reply #519 on: September 06, 2007, 11:08:48 AM »

What are the wishes of this forum?

Do you want another poll to choose the next book, or is everyone in agreement on the Palms?

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« Reply #520 on: September 06, 2007, 04:09:21 PM »

I'm not sure we can reach a concensus when your preferred reading is boring to me, and my preferred reading is boring to you.

See what I mean? I think you've answered your own question.

I don't plan to waste my time quibbling for weeks on book lists, who wants what, who hates who, whether this book or that book qualifies for Fiction or not.

The Fiction Forum is big enough for multiple Threads.

If you don't want to read Wild Palms with us, then fine. Please start your own Thread, weezo.

I hope it turns out better than your American History fandango going on over there.  Smiley



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“Other people's obsessions
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #521 on: September 06, 2007, 05:37:23 PM »

I´ll join with my Borges´translation of The Wild Palms.It´s no that I wouldn´t love to read it in English but the book can´t be obtained.

Thank you, Martin.

I really do look forward to your help with the Borges translation.

It should be fun...
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« Reply #522 on: September 07, 2007, 04:32:19 PM »

She was 88. She will be missed. She will be remembered.
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« Reply #523 on: September 07, 2007, 09:20:26 PM »

reader:

I will hold baseball in reserve for a while--I may wake someday with an opinion. 

Meanwhile, your ursidic comments on Faulkner ring true. 

I  believe this is not a reflection of the talents of writer, but of the reader.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #524 on: September 07, 2007, 09:46:38 PM »


Like that thicket wood, I can't find a trail in Absalom. 


Well, maybe that's the idea.

Memory is a labyrinth. It's not linear. It's not cause and effect.

It may not have any of the typical Aristotelean aesthetic ideals either...like plot, character development and all that stuff.

In some ways, Absalom is like Pale Fire.

You can open it up anywhere...and begin...and begin...and begin.

Not everything's logical and left brain like John thinks.

Reading Miss Campbell and Mythology books all the time...it's just another religion for some people.

Always studying and opining about the Labyrinth...rather than actually getting in there and doing it.

Just because a book like Absalom and Ulysses is difficult...doesn't mean it's stupid.

And neither are the readers who try to understand it...at least they aren't brain-dead yet...

« Last Edit: September 10, 2007, 10:02:59 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
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