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Author Topic: Fiction  (Read 25224 times)
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martinbeck3
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« Reply #555 on: September 11, 2007, 12:34:19 PM »

JOSH, I think MAD is an excellent example and they´ll love it.

http://www.dccomics.com/mad/
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martinbeck3
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« Reply #556 on: September 11, 2007, 12:38:35 PM »

PUGET, O.K. I´ll wait until next week.Meanwhile I´ll keep on scribbling questions and notes on the margins.


READER, I think you and I as readers of LatAm.lit. have an advantage when reading Faulkner as we have read -specially in the old NYT forum- lots of novels that used the Faulkner method. I´d say most.
 
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #557 on: September 11, 2007, 05:38:53 PM »

That is really what this statement (and the ursidic 715 are getting at).

Hey man, john over in Meandeville says ursidic means "bearassed" [sic].

Well, being the grammar queen that I am, I couldn't help myself.

I suggested john meant "bare-assed" rather than "bearassed" dontchaknow?

Maybe I should be more cryptozoid and go into a trance...

That way I can understand one-liners better sorta...  Smiley Smiley

BTW speaking of satire...I'm on a roll over in La La Land...

I gots Eraserhead on da brain, baby...

http://forums.escapefromelba.com/index.php/topic,30.msg30412.html#msg30412










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Lhoffman
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« Reply #558 on: September 11, 2007, 06:00:23 PM »

reader pontalba

What about Benjy in The Sound and the Fury?

How did Faulkner handle that one? If you think Rosa Coldfield or Quentin Compson in Absalom, Absalom is hard to follow, then take a dip into the chapter narrated by the child-idiot Benjy...

To say it’s just stream-of-consciousness is an easy way out. It’s Southern stream of consciousness—but with a twist and a snap:
The Sound and The Fury is next on my Faulkner list. 
The only other Faulkner I'd attempted was As I Lay Dying, and I didn't like it one bit, now I suppose that is because I just didn't care for the people.  When I have a better grounding in Faulkner, I'll have to go back to it, but really I am attracted more to the Snopes trilogy more than anything after TSATF.

I did find it a little difficult to follow at first, probably reread the first few pages 4 or 5 times, but all of a sudden it just fell into place beautifully.  Once you get Rosa's rhythm of thought it is easy.


Just piping in here while I catch up on posts, but The Sound and the Fury is a great read to follow up Absalom, Absalom.  It brings clarity to some of the issues in AA, and adds a whole heap of new ones to the pile.

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Lhoffman
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« Reply #559 on: September 11, 2007, 06:02:44 PM »

If I may interject a diversion for a wee bit, I am about to be teaching a Parody and Satire class to a group of homeschooling adolescents.

Swift, Aristophanes, Twain, Horace, Juvenal and all the usual suspects are likely to be represented.

What less than obvious satirists or parodists would you recommend?

And how do you delineate between the two?

Thanks in advance!

The teenagers I've worked with usually like Vonnegut and Murakami.  They don't seem to  approach Twain with the same enjoyment we might have when we were teens.   The big complaint I hear is that they find it anachronistic.
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« Reply #560 on: September 11, 2007, 06:04:25 PM »

JOSH, I think MAD is an excellent example and they´ll love it.

http://www.dccomics.com/mad/


YES!!!!!
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pontalba
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« Reply #561 on: September 11, 2007, 06:12:32 PM »

reader pontalba

What about Benjy in The Sound and the Fury?

How did Faulkner handle that one? If you think Rosa Coldfield or Quentin Compson in Absalom, Absalom is hard to follow, then take a dip into the chapter narrated by the child-idiot Benjy...

To say it’s just stream-of-consciousness is an easy way out. It’s Southern stream of consciousness—but with a twist and a snap:
The Sound and The Fury is next on my Faulkner list. 
The only other Faulkner I'd attempted was As I Lay Dying, and I didn't like it one bit, now I suppose that is because I just didn't care for the people.  When I have a better grounding in Faulkner, I'll have to go back to it, but really I am attracted more to the Snopes trilogy more than anything after TSATF.

I did find it a little difficult to follow at first, probably reread the first few pages 4 or 5 times, but all of a sudden it just fell into place beautifully.  Once you get Rosa's rhythm of thought it is easy.


Just piping in here while I catch up on posts, but The Sound and the Fury is a great read to follow up Absalom, Absalom.  It brings clarity to some of the issues in AA, and adds a whole heap of new ones to the pile.


Thanks for confirming that.  Smiley  I thought as much from the reading up on Faulkner I've done.  I have also just received The Snopes Trilogy as well for after TSATF.

Reader, I cannot understand why you feel you have to contradict my statement regarding my personal knowledge of the types of people Faulkner writes about.  Let me clarify.  I do not mean accents, or speech patterns.  I am referring to a pattern of thought these characters possess.

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josh
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« Reply #562 on: September 11, 2007, 08:06:28 PM »

Thank you all for your input.

Mutually Assured Destruction certainly feels like parody to me.

What? Oh! You meant MAD Magazine! Right...

Paddy Chayefsky and Jerzy Kosinski are on my list. Woody Allen's God, probably makes the cut. I was thinking perhaps of Charles Erskine Scott Wood. The Brand X Anthology of Poetry and the Fiction companion are definitely included as is the Journal of Irreproducible Results. I'll have a look at Saki. Thurber, too. (Beyond fiction, we're doing music, poetry, and movies, as well as cartooning, comics, and essayists. I think I could do 5 courses with no repetition.)
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« Reply #563 on: September 11, 2007, 09:02:44 PM »

"Faulkner is weaving a narration that is a collective narration, one that includes not merely human characters but history and the land as some sort of character/force/entity/cause and effect too.  The narrative is a product of collective voices and experiences."

True.  But pontalba experienced it first hand.  You and I only thru Faulkner.  The difference is so obvious to me that I feel I'm missing something
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bosox18d
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« Reply #564 on: September 11, 2007, 10:40:09 PM »

Josh if you are about there is a great web site The Literary Gothic that has Saki and a lot of others.Click on the author link and under Saki there are plenty of free stories online.It is the third link under H.H. Munro that has a bunch of free stories.
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« Reply #565 on: September 11, 2007, 10:45:45 PM »

Thank you all for your input.

Mutually Assured Destruction certainly feels like parody to me.

What? Oh! You meant MAD Magazine! Right...

Paddy Chayefsky and Jerzy Kosinski are on my list. Woody Allen's God, probably makes the cut. I was thinking perhaps of Charles Erskine Scott Wood. The Brand X Anthology of Poetry and the Fiction companion are definitely included as is the Journal of Irreproducible Results. I'll have a look at Saki. Thurber, too. (Beyond fiction, we're doing music, poetry, and movies, as well as cartooning, comics, and essayists. I think I could do 5 courses with no repetition.)
I learned to stop worrying and love the Bomb. Ask me how!
http://www.slate.com/id/2173108

I presume Spinal Tap's also on the list. And National Lampoon. (Bored of the Rings was the first thing that sprang to mind.)

And Monty Python.

And and and ...




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josh
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« Reply #566 on: September 11, 2007, 11:24:11 PM »

Josh if you are about there is a great web site The Literary Gothic that has Saki and a lot of others.Click on the author link and under Saki there are plenty of free stories online.It is the third link under H.H. Munro that has a bunch of free stories.

Found it, thanks. I've added it to my list of sites with free e-texts on it, of which I have about a dozen now, from ancient to current and with dozens of languages available, as well. It looks great!
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josh
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« Reply #567 on: September 11, 2007, 11:33:57 PM »

Thank you all for your input.

Mutually Assured Destruction certainly feels like parody to me.

What? Oh! You meant MAD Magazine! Right...

Paddy Chayefsky and Jerzy Kosinski are on my list. Woody Allen's God, probably makes the cut. I was thinking perhaps of Charles Erskine Scott Wood. The Brand X Anthology of Poetry and the Fiction companion are definitely included as is the Journal of Irreproducible Results. I'll have a look at Saki. Thurber, too. (Beyond fiction, we're doing music, poetry, and movies, as well as cartooning, comics, and essayists. I think I could do 5 courses with no repetition.)
I learned to stop worrying and love the Bomb. Ask me how!
http://www.slate.com/id/2173108

I presume Spinal Tap's also on the list. And National Lampoon. (Bored of the Rings was the first thing that sprang to mind.)

And Monty Python.

And and and ...

Dr. Strangelove and Bored of the Rings made it into the course description. Spinal Tap is certainly there. So is Casino Royal, with David Niven vs. the Flint movies vs. Get Smart vs. Top Secret vs. Austin Powers. You Nazty Spy! may make it in there or may make it into other places.

What's Opera, Doc? and/or the Rabbit of Seville are probably going to make the cut as well.

So much material, so little time!
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« Reply #568 on: September 12, 2007, 07:15:58 AM »

Josh

The subject of war has produced some good satire.  Off the top of my head I'm thinking of Heller's Catch-22 and Hasek's Good Soldier Schweik and a poem like Henry Reed's Naming of the Parts.  See http://www.solearabiantree.net/namingofparts/namingofparts.html
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #569 on: September 12, 2007, 10:04:42 AM »

reader pontalba

What about Benjy in The Sound and the Fury?

How did Faulkner handle that one? If you think Rosa Coldfield or Quentin Compson in Absalom, Absalom is hard to follow, then take a dip into the chapter narrated by the child-idiot Benjy...

To say it’s just stream-of-consciousness is an easy way out. It’s Southern stream of consciousness—but with a twist and a snap:

“Faulkner portrays in the idiot Benjy a man who experiences only the "sound and the fury" and is unaware of abstractions and "false refinements" such as those his brother Quentin attempts to impose upon life. For example, although Benjy is profoundly affected by the physical change that he sense in his sister Candace, unlike Quentin he is entirely unconcerned about the abstract idea of her loss of virginity.”

How did Faulkner author this Voice? This child-idiot Benjy? How does a child-idiot think? Or speak? Or feel?

The following article looks at how Faulkner may have created Benjy—perhaps even becoming Benjy. If you know what I mean…    Wink

I don’t personally think authoring a character is a rational discursive process.

Who knows how it works? Even Faulkner in his interviews says the whole process is a mystery

“That William Faulkner was fascinated with the idiot is evident from the appearance of this figure in at least four of his novels.1 What is not so evident, however, is the source of his fascination. I propose to show that the idiot in The Sound and the Fury has probably been modeled on the protagonist of Wordsworth's ballad “The Idiot Boy”  (1798). I came to reflect upon this indebtedness after noticing the coincidence of Benjy Compson's birth date (April 7th) with Wordsworth's. Upon comparing the section of the novel narrated by Benjy with "The Idiot Boy," I found similarities in characterization and theme that seem too close to be the result of coincidence.”

—Michael A. Fredrickson, A Note on "The Idiot Boy" as a Probable,  
Source for The Sound and the Fury

http://www.usask.ca/english/faulkner/main/criticism/fredrickson.html


I'm not sure that Faulkner was so literate in poetry at the time Absalom was written that he would have been inspired by "The Idiot Boy".  An almost archtypal conception of the small town, whether in Macon, Georgia or a small town in England, includes the "village idiot".  Reference the movie "Straw Dogs", for example.  I have come to believe,  through no rational means, that nearly all southerners have at least one "afflicted" child in the family somewhere - my opinon is based solely on Faulkner novels and a lifetime of experiencing small towns in the South.  My family certainly had one (besides me).
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