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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Meander Where You May  (Read 25650 times)
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1395 on: September 17, 2007, 05:17:48 PM »

I never adequately appreciated madupont before. Anyone who can so
effortlessly elicit such outpourings from the Id of another must be gifted.

I wouldn't say "gifted," my dear caclark.

I have nothing against madame mad's meadering testimonials...

She's much more interesting than the usual same old snarky one-liners...

Snarky witty one-liners don't make conversations...

But then you know that of course...don't you?   Smiley


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“Other people's obsessions
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Furphy
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« Reply #1396 on: September 18, 2007, 12:03:30 AM »

I have no dog in this hunt. And I am deeply touched by Donot's loyalty to Ma. But I keep trying to remember any time that she was kind or humble or anything but supercilious and dismissive of other people's opinions and experiences.

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Donotremove
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« Reply #1397 on: September 18, 2007, 02:59:48 AM »

Furphy, I am loyal to all of you posters.  I want all of you to be good and play well with others. So, some of us have ticks and quirks and habits that grate a bit and are very trying at times. Come on, polish up those social skils.  And sit up straight.

Puge, I joined in a bit on the recent Kingsolver discussion, but, generally, what you all read does not interest me.  As I have stated elsewhere, even though I am not reading or listening to what the group here reads and listens to (or looks at in the way of art,) what does interest me is what you and others think and say about what you are reading, hearing, watching, and looking at.  To quote Nixon, "Let me be clear about this," if I have an opinion about something, that I feel might be useful to whatever is being discussed, I will post.  Otherwise . . . . 
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madupont
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« Reply #1398 on: September 18, 2007, 03:37:40 AM »

I have no dog in this hunt. And I am deeply touched by Donot's loyalty to Ma. But I keep trying to remember any time that she was kind or humble or anything but supercilious and dismissive of other people's opinions and experiences.




Really.   And do you suppose after all this time, I am impressed.  I heard what you had to say a plenty last year. That was kind and non-supercilious wasn't it. But you see, it was you who did care about other people's opinions, of you.  You continually act like there is something that I am able to reveal about you.  I think you should forget it.


What donotremove and I have in common is our generation and social class which gave us quite a different attitude about what goes on in this insular little society.       

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madupont
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« Reply #1399 on: September 18, 2007, 04:08:11 AM »

caclark,re:#1457
 
Do you really think it is his Id?  I thought he probably just hated his mother.  Whatever, I always felt it was more of a curse than a gift.

I guess, you are right after all, if he could never get her to do what he wanted her to do, that would be the Id all right.


After not thinking about this for awhile, it did strike me, so I simply had to come back and tell you i appreciated your insight.










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Donotremove
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« Reply #1400 on: September 18, 2007, 04:09:37 AM »

Maddy,I am of your generation, but I am not of your social class.  I come from a long line of farmers, none of which were formally educated, save one.  Most of them went to the cities during the Depression and some of them made good.  My father, for one.  His brother went into the roofing business and did exceedingly well.  He was fond of saying to my father, "Come in with me.  The Lord is just shoving money into my pockets."  But my father was fiddle footed.  He roamed the world working for guys like Bechtel and Brown and Root.  The educated one was a "professional student" who ended up as a handy man for an apartment complex in California.  Baptists and Assembly of God, they and their children lived plain lives.

I once saw the queen of England and her consort walking along the sidewalk in Sheridan, Wyoming, but other than them and an old, nearly blind Texas Ranger who believed the Milky Way could only be seen in Commanche county Texas who loved me reading to him about the travails of the Donner Party, I haven't had any social contact with anyone of note.  I have, in my travels, met some very interesting people who had myriad stories to tell, but not a single one of them (that I know of) was famous in any way nor by any stretch of the imagination, elite.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2007, 04:15:01 AM by Donotremove » Logged
pugetopolis
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« Reply #1401 on: September 18, 2007, 08:16:35 AM »



Great Expectations Online

"I never adequately appreciated madupont before.
Anyone who can so effortlessly elicit such outpourings
from the Id of another must be gifted."



Well, caclark, I wouldn’t exactly call it “outpourings of the id.”

Personally I’d call it online “scholarship—diligently going thru a few hundred Madame Madupont posts. A mere drop in the bucket of Madupont’s 1734 oeuvre of truly fascinating “outpourings of the id.”

The “recent postings” button available on all our profile pages opens up a virtual cornucopia of readerly wonders for those willing to take the time to go back and peruse what various Elba contributors have posted. It peters out on about page 18 of links—and then you’re on your own.

Nevertheless, motivated by a keen sense of detective work and curiosity, I waded thru the wonderful world of Madupontia taking notes and later posting them for all my fellow readers and partners in crime. That in itself gave me an excruciating headache—but to really get into it requires a Ph.D. in online hermeneutics.

Explicating Mad’s marvelous creations takes time and patience—but it’s well worth it. The last time I saw such an eruption of the Id was back in my impressionable youth when I was sitting in the Bijou Theater watching Forbidden Planet (1956). The Monsters of the Id definitely did overtime with my young male psyche—and I’ve never been the same since…

Except back during our readers group discussion of Giuseppe Tomasi Di Lampedusa’s novel The Leopard. I’d never met anybody like Madame Mad before—and both Frances and I were totally sucked into her trip. I’d never met a Queen of the Id—and was totally captivated and enthralled by her witty literary wisdom.

Not only that but Mad was the only other poster who was interested in Luchino Visconti’s film version of the novel starring Burt Lancaster as Prince Don Fabrizio Salina and the beautiful sumptuous Claudia Cardinale as Angelica Sedara and the young handsome Alain Delon playing Tancredit Falconeri. Reading the novel and discussing the film at the same time was tantamount to heresy back then—but that was then and this is now. At the time it seemed rather risque and radical...and I loved every minute of it.

I remember how exited I was to discover that the famous painting that the Prince contemplated during the grand party was different in the film compared with the novel. Reading Lampedusa and seeing how a fellow Italian aristocrat like Visconti directed the film version of the novel was one of the high points in my NYTimes readers group discussion experience. There was nothing quite like it anywhere…

Later Mad and I had a falling out because she wanted to discuss the Theocrazy book and I wanted to discuss Camille Paglia’s Break, Blow, Burn poetry anthology. That’s when I discovered that there was nothing like the wrath of a woman’s scorned. BBB was chosen by the group—and I’ve suffered the consequences ever since…  Smiley

Although I sometimes find Mad’s messages rather arch—I try to remember back during our Lampedusa discussion when she dazzled Frances and me with her literary style and panache. Her love of books and movies is something I wish more readers had—that and not being shy about breaking the shallow snide "single-line" barrier to book discussions…

In this difficult time of FoxNews Orwellian doublespeak, we need more meandering minds at work...don't you think?

And now the great revelation—I am actually Madame Mad…



« Last Edit: September 18, 2007, 12:26:41 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
barton
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« Reply #1402 on: September 18, 2007, 11:23:02 AM »

Nice Gins-story, Hoffman.  What's funny is that my reminiscence is actually true.  My dad was a writer for the local paper, my uncle was an artist, and Alan and Peter thought they were interesting enough to hang out with for a couple hours, after the reading.  And Ginsberg really did read this thing I'd written and, basically, laughed his ass off.  And I think Ginsberg's poetry reading was his last reading at the Vortex, which was shut down a few months later.

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness,
Melba-posting interminable rant, critique sans understanding,
Worse Living through Lack of chemistry
with Ma Dupont.

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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1403 on: September 18, 2007, 11:28:57 AM »

"... and Alan and Peter thought..."

Actually it's "Allen" Ginsberg not "Alan" Ginsberg...
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“Other people's obsessions
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #1404 on: September 18, 2007, 11:35:24 AM »

Pugetopolis..." I am Madame Mad"....I think you deserve the Pulitzer.

Barton...your house sounds like it was a really nice place to grow up in.  I don't think I even went to a movie until I was a teen-ager.  And books?  Can't be getting strange ideas into your head, now can you.

Thank God my grandparents had a piano!
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1405 on: September 18, 2007, 11:45:12 AM »


Pugetopolis..." I am Madame Mad"....
I think you deserve the Pulitzer.



Thanks, Hoffman...

How about the Nobel Prize instead?

I can use the money.  Smiley
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #1406 on: September 18, 2007, 11:51:48 AM »

How much does one get for the Nobel?  The MacArthur Talent grant is $10,000....no strings attached.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1407 on: September 18, 2007, 12:07:56 PM »

How much does one get for the Nobel? 
The MacArthur Talent grant is $10,000....
no strings attached.

Enough for a little vacation to Aruba, maybe?   Smiley
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1408 on: September 18, 2007, 12:10:42 PM »

Vortex Poem
—for Bart

Ah yes, the Magic Theatre-Vortex Art Gallery—
Wichita, Kansas. Funny, I was there too…

Ginsberg at the Eaton Hotel—then he gave a
reading at the Magic Theatre-Vortex Art Gallery.

Not a peep in the Eagle or Beacon
word gets around tho…even in Kansas…

That was Feb 1966—later it closed down—
Money and political correctness dontchaknow…

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Furphy
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« Reply #1409 on: September 18, 2007, 09:09:14 PM »

And I quote:

"You are exactly right La Chartres29 as we know you so often are and that means if I'm not wrong I'm right that I know of whom you speak and that may well be what reminds me (or maybe I've already posted about this on another forum?) ,of something a poster who's name I will not deign to mention let's just say that he/ and or/she would not appreciate it and leave it at that ,as my half-Irish half-Scotch half-German half-Hapsburg grandmother used to say when she would listen to the radio (before tsunames mind you and before Ratzinger now Benedict's hair turned so white and when I had only just discovered in my golden book atlas a little corner of sand called Iraq which now everyone seems to know where it is ,funny huh?) and chop big red onions while joe Mccarthy (joltin?) was claiming fifty-seven (why not -eight or -nine we always wondered why it was always the -seven like the sauce of a similar name) communists in the state department and a red under every bed ,not ours ,but why not ours with I Love Lucy and My Mother the Car, who wasn't. But that was before I could track down my box of notes to recommend to you a good "world of Quixote" volume , which I know is out there , and I'm pretty sure I've read it or at least I'll claim to but don't hold me to it (to what?) or don't ask me to provide anything beyond a googled title and a hazily remembered authors name ,but to return to my grandmother's story ,which is what led me to stop clipping coupons , put down the cooking sherry ,and write to you, you cant buy red onions like that in any store nowadays let me tell you."

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