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Author Topic: Latin American Literature  (Read 19712 times)
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martinbeck3
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« Reply #1155 on: May 12, 2008, 02:11:19 PM »

ABOUT WHAT TO READ: sorry I can´t join.At present I am deep into Argentine history reading the life of Juan Manuel de Rosas by Pacho O´Donell. I have to see into the life of this man whose dark side was a bloody dictator and his positive side was that he was a a federalist. It is like now with all the *campo* mess I have to investigate why me and my family have always been Unitarios and now I feel like becoming a Federalist.Like all history books and family history have led me to believe another history.

Argentina is a Representative,Republican Federal country.None of which it is at present. It is so just in name. Great changes are coming which I hope will be peaceful and legal. We now have to step forward into our historical destiny  which has eluded as for so long through dictatorships and revolutions.My feeling is that now we are coming of age democratically.

We have to strongly force our senators, deputees , governors to listen to their voters needs  and stop bowing their heads to central power and selling themselves for a few filthy coins.We are tired of being considered and annex of the K´s Patagonic feudal state and managed as such.

   
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mringel
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« Reply #1156 on: May 13, 2008, 12:37:25 AM »

Martin,
I do understand you although that for me, reading books is a kind of a "flight" from the terrible things in my area (as you know so well).
Anyhow, when you'll have time I recomend the book by Constantini which is the history of Argentina of the 70th with all its deaseses with a tragic humor way of describing the situation.
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"Para tão grande amor tão curta a vida." Camões
Beppo
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« Reply #1157 on: May 14, 2008, 08:06:06 AM »

I found a book by Roberto Bolaño - Nocturno de Chile (nocturno of chile)
Any recomendation?


I'd recommend By Night in Chile. 
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mringel
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« Reply #1158 on: May 15, 2008, 05:41:32 AM »

LaL friends,
I am reading THe night in Chile by Bolano
Hope others will join and we'll have at last a good discussion.
The book has around 130 p. (depend on the language)
I found an interesting link to this book
http://www.newyorker.com/arts/critics/atlarge/2007/03/26/070326crat_atlarge_zalewski
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"Para tão grande amor tão curta a vida." Camões
mringel
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« Reply #1159 on: May 16, 2008, 01:50:34 AM »

In Canne film featival Blindness is presented.
I think I'll go to see it as soon as it will be here just for the curiosity and especially for Julianne Moore whom I adore.
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"Para tão grande amor tão curta a vida." Camões
martinbeck3
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« Reply #1160 on: May 16, 2008, 04:21:43 PM »

Julianne Moore is a great actress and she´s got something dramatic about her face.

http://www.rowthree.com/2008/02/01/review-blindness/
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S2B
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« Reply #1161 on: May 16, 2008, 10:11:16 PM »

GGM coming to a bookstore near you :

http://www.criticasmagazine.com/article/CA6559051.html?nid=2712

Quote
Colombian author Gabriel García Márquez is finishing up his next novel, which could be published as early as August of this year...
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martinbeck3
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« Reply #1162 on: May 17, 2008, 10:27:33 AM »

Myriam, thou were right madam.I got tired of reading and seeing how time and time again my country has been making the same stupid mistakes for over 200 years which keeps us from its destiny as a huge provider of food to feed a hungry world.

I am now into:

 http://www.newyorker.com/archive/2006/03/06/060306crbo_books

waiting to have the Vassili Grossman book edited by Sudamericana which is coming soon.Now I am reading about this man´s life. He is called a second Dostoyesvky.Russian writers are magnificent.
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mringel
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« Reply #1163 on: May 17, 2008, 11:02:06 AM »

Martin,
The last week I finished three books
One by David Grossman, an Israeli writer (a great author)
the book by Constantini (Argentinian) that I recommened to you to read - Very good and clever
And I am in the last pages of Bolano - The Night in Chile
I read it breathless
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mringel
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« Reply #1164 on: May 18, 2008, 07:40:00 AM »

Bolano - The Night in Chile is a fantastic book.
One cannot stop reading until you finish it.
I hope people here will join a discussion.
I am a bit frustrated here and still it is a pity to think this forum is simlpy "dying"....
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elportenito1
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« Reply #1165 on: May 18, 2008, 08:52:19 AM »

martinbeck3: Hi Martin!. La Patrona was in Buenos Aires untill the end of April, ands went to the Book Fair (Feria del Libro), I, being the iliterate brute I always was, asked her to bring me La Argentina Que Rie (The Argentina that Laugh-ed), you know, the history of cartoonig in the 1940's and 50's, excellent reproductions of artwork and "historietas" you and I and many more still remember, Rico Tipo, and the rest of the comics with a humorous vein.

Some of the illustrations are masterworks, in those years Argentina, United States and France were the three leading countries of graphic humour, and Argentine artists were invited to work in those countries, some, given the high standards of pay they received in Argentina then, remained home. Then tv came in, and that was the end of it.

The Sydney Spanish Film Festival ended today, The Orphanage was one of the films screened today in two cinemas dedicated to the festival, we saw the Argentine film:Who Says It's Easy? (Quien dice que es facil?)with Diego Peretti and Carolina Pelleritti. The cinema roared with laughter, and last night we saw Scandalous (Por Que se Frotan las Patitas) a Spanish comedic film where the characters break into song, as in those Bollywood films from India, something I can't get to decide if I like or loathe.

I've finaly broken my promisse to the Virgin of The Macarena, the priest said it's allright, no need for pennance.

I've got meself an anthology of modern African poetry and a handfull of cheap Penguin Clasics, from a sale at a book shop, kind of fire sale.Among them Orwell's Homage to Catalonia.

Which you've read some years ago and comented at the NYT's  literchure forum,as I can remember.

And these are the latest news.
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in vino veritas
elportenito1
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« Reply #1166 on: May 18, 2008, 09:00:24 AM »

mringuel: Mariza, the Portughese fado singer made me wet my eyes with her way of singing at the Concert for Lisbon, which I watched from a DVD about that concert which took place  a year or so ago. I MUST visit Lisbon, and ofcourse the rest of Portugal. Last year when we went to Spain we didn't have time to cross over into Portugal, something I regreat. Fado is so close to tango, I can relate to it and the sadness in it. 
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elportenito1
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« Reply #1167 on: May 18, 2008, 09:05:22 AM »

Love in The Times of The Chollera made into a movie by who else but Holly-bloody-Wood.

Despicable!!!. Boycot the bloody film, stick to the book. RESIST THE CHEAPNESS OF HOLLY-bloody-WOOD!!!!
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elportenito1
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« Reply #1168 on: May 18, 2008, 09:12:42 AM »

I remember Garcia Marquez once saying at an interview he whould NEVER let one of his books be turned into a movie.

Well..he bloody did, and the fact that HE is the author doesn't, I think, give him the right to do THIS to his readers.

What if one day, by mistake, we watch the film, and the images of the book we dearly keep in our minds get damaged by the interferance of the rubbish contained in the film?

Would we be alowed to sue Marquez for damages?.....probably not.










Gabo, a cuanto el kilo te has vendido?.....devuelveme las royalties del libro tuyo que te compre, El Amor en Los Tiempos del Colera!!!. Tu eres Gabriel Garcia Marquez, te acuerdas?...y no una puta barata de prostibulo flotante que se mece para alla y para aca. Tu palabra no es, o asi lo creia yo, pedo de vieja.
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mringel
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« Reply #1169 on: May 18, 2008, 11:37:41 AM »

Elportenito,
Mariza is one of the best fado singers.
I can imagine you crying while listening to fado music.
I think it is closer to Piazole, true, as a representative of tango music.
Do you know Arturo Marquez?
A great mrxican composer which wrote few pieces of music, but each one is a masterpiece.
here is a link to the Danzon no 2
You'll like it
http://www.benjaminzander.com/ypo/mexico.asp

And Portugal, especially Lisbon is A MUST
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"Para tão grande amor tão curta a vida." Camões
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