Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Nonfiction  (Read 4570 times)
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Donotremove
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« Reply #15 on: June 28, 2007, 03:38:15 PM »

I'm a fan of Chalmers Johnson.  Those two books mentioned are part of a triolgy.  The newest one--don't ask me the name--is out and Johnson has been seen on Cspan2 talking about it.

I'm starting Georgina Howell's biography, "Gertrude Bell: Queen of the Desert, Shaper of Nations" which shows Bell tramping around with the likes of Winston Churchill and T.E. Lawrence.  She was one of the architects of the Iraq borders we see today.
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tjaxon
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« Reply #16 on: July 01, 2007, 09:18:40 AM »

I'm a fan of Chalmers Johnson.  Those two books mentioned are part of a triolgy.  The newest one--don't ask me the name--is out and Johnson has been seen on Cspan2 talking about it.

The name is 'Nemesis; The Last Days of the American Empire'.  I'm about halfway through it, and very impressed.
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« Reply #17 on: July 01, 2007, 11:08:17 AM »

Tjaxson, the name of that middle book by Chalmers Johnson is The Sorrows of Empire.  Thanks for the title of his newest book in the trilogy.  His writing is so clear, even though it is in depth, I am grateful when he tackles a subject I'm interested in.  Even Bernard Lewis, whom I also like a great deal, cannot write so well about a thing.
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tjaxon
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« Reply #18 on: July 01, 2007, 11:10:23 AM »

Actually, I screwed up. It should read Last Days of the American Republic, not Empire. It really details the CIA involvement in the decline of the Republic.
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« Reply #19 on: July 18, 2007, 09:00:36 AM »

I'm beginning Chalmers Johnson's Nemisis: The Last Days of the American Republic.  This book is the last of a trilogy beginning with Blowback and then The Sorrows of Empire.

Anyone want to start discussing these three books?  Or just one of the three?  Or whatever?  Our Democracy is is serious trouble, folks.  These books make clear what has happened and why, and if it's not already too late, what we might do now.

We read history and note all the Empires and governing systems that began, rose, then failed.  We think it can't happen here?
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tjaxon
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« Reply #20 on: July 21, 2007, 08:56:10 AM »

I'm beginning Chalmers Johnson's Nemisis: The Last Days of the American Republic.  This book is the last of a trilogy beginning with Blowback and then The Sorrows of Empire.

Anyone want to start discussing these three books?  Or just one of the three?  Or whatever?  Our Democracy is is serious trouble, folks.  These books make clear what has happened and why, and if it's not already too late, what we might do now.

We read history and note all the Empires and governing systems that began, rose, then failed.  We think it can't happen here?

You might want to look at the Iraq in Transition thread. There is a Bush clone there who is leading the discussion in that direction.

Another book you may enjoy is Imperial Hubris. It was published as anonymous, but after the author retired after 22 years with the CIA, it was listed as by Richard Scheur (sp).
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« Reply #21 on: July 21, 2007, 10:49:46 AM »

Tjaxon, I do more lurking than not (I have been lurking in Iraq in Transistion) but thanks for the heads up.  As for Bush clones, those we have in abundance.  Alas.  It is bandied about that the 2004 election shows that the majority of the U.S. voting populace agrees with the doctorine of Bush The Younger.  Not so.  A whole bunch of those Bush votes were really for Right to Life, Gay marriage, and immigration issues and Bush just came with the package.
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madupont
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« Reply #22 on: July 25, 2007, 07:33:00 PM »

DOES ANYBODY KNOW, whether we should consider --Peeling the Onion, by Gunter Grass as non-fiction of as novelistic fiction? Weezo just asked and I guess you can see the problem since somebody said dibs on the Fiction forum for Faulkner or some such.  Although he,Grass, writes of his true life experience in youth during the Third Reich, which could be considered non-fiction, he is after all a litterateur accompli, so I don't know what to tell her?

I merely passed a review to teddy, after which suddenly martinbeck3 said I vote for that, but that doesn't at all qualify it as Latin American Literature by a long shot even if we use our imagination and accept possibilities for what they are.

As one who never had a book of my vote selected in four years or more, my odds of figuring what the correct protocol would be are rather slim.
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #23 on: July 25, 2007, 07:42:40 PM »

Don't know that anyone can call "dibs"....that's the idea of a vote.
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madupont
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« Reply #24 on: July 30, 2007, 01:38:38 PM »

I watched the "debate" last night, and glad I watched it a second time with real sound to catch some of the less audible thought process candidly torture, as O'Hagan interviewed, Grass and then Mailer, and then a third hour, together, at the New York Public Library for the Paris Review. 

Mailer now refers to, Peeling the Onion, as Gunter's "book", likewise --
The Castle and the Forest as his own "book"

Well, as long as people do their own work on their own reading selections but often they don't have that much in the way of literary knowledge to bring to it.  I almost always avoid picking up writing styles that will be a hindrance at this late date in history.
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fleete
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« Reply #25 on: July 30, 2007, 09:26:51 PM »

Greetings all---at last I found you.  I spent some time yesterday fruitlessly googling 'NYT exiles', but a posting on the old website today (donotremove's??) mentioned 'escape from Elba', and those were the key words I needed.

I am reading "Two Years Before the Mast".   For those who did not read it along with Robinson Crusoe during their teen years,  it is not too late, and is a rivetting good read.  It is an autobiographical account of a young man's voyage from "America" (the eastern seaboard) around the Cape to California and back, 1835-ish.  Wonderful.  I wish it were three volumes, possibly "Five years Behind the Mast".  I imagine that Patrick O'Brian must have read this one a hundred times, and mined it for every nuance and detail for his Aubrey and Maturin series.
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« Reply #26 on: July 31, 2007, 11:11:48 AM »

Welcome, Fleete.  I put that notice in a post (at the old NYT Reader's Group pick) whenever I see folks dropping by that might not know about Melba (Elba).  Every time I do I always worry that Lifeline will try to come here.

I'm reading Chalmers Johnson's trilogy Blowback, Sorrows of Empire, and Nemesis: The Last Days of the American Republic.  At the same time I'm reading Planet of Slums a very sad report from Mike Davis, a scholar I haven't come across before.  He writes well, but the word in this book is severly depressing and must be taken in measured doses.

Then, Susan Dunn has gathered under one cover the essays, speeches, and letters of the Founding Fathers in, Something That Will Surprise You: The Essential Writings of the Founding Fathers, so I have my plate full.

I'm surprised I have not read Two Years Before the Mast.  Back in my younger days I was enamored of all things "boat" and "ship" since I imagined I might get a 30 footer (or so) and sail a bit--off shore, as I already knew I wasn't brave enough to cross oceans.  Smiley

What was your handle over at the old NYT Forums?  I kept the same one but lots of folks changed theirs.  It's like going to a masked ball 24/7.  Chartres29 changed hers to Furphy, which nearly spun my head 360°.

Not too many people stop by here.  Lots more fiction readers.  Always has been.  I read very little fiction--just finished Martin Cruz Smith's Stalin's Ghost, another Arkady Renko novel (Gorky Park) and he is such a good writer I couldn't put it down.
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lulu
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« Reply #27 on: July 31, 2007, 03:32:05 PM »

tjaxon:

I just have to say I'm in love with that dog.  Is s/he yours?
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fleete
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« Reply #28 on: July 31, 2007, 05:04:08 PM »

Donotremove,

My old name on the NYT forums was fleate, but being the mad impetuous fool that I am, I changed it to fleete for this forum.  Funny, I don't feel any different.

I wasn't participating much on the NYT book forums during the last year or two, due to the fact I was too lazy, I was sometimes overseas, I was too busy reading old TinTin comics, and I had to wash my hair. Well, I actually did manage to make my way through Patrick O'Brian's series which I savoured greatly, although I must admit that I am primarily an armchair sailor.  I spent the first three weeks of this month aboard a sailboat, and don't care if I never set foot aboard one again--at least not as crew.  I have very little confidence in a Captian who would be willing to have someone like me as a crew member.  However, I would be willing to go on a large sailboat as a passenger, and spend the time reading about the sailing exploits of others.

Two Years Before the Mast was written by R.H. Dana, and has been described as "one of the classic sea stories of all time".
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fleate
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« Reply #29 on: July 31, 2007, 05:27:17 PM »

I changed back to fleate.  Couldn't cope with the new identity.

Who set up this website?  Who do we thank for this place of refuge? 

I must go and explore the other branches of Elba, and see if the Lamp Post still Blooms.
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