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Author Topic: Mental Health and Treatment  (Read 1778 times)
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« on: April 16, 2007, 08:54:17 PM »

Share your opinions on the evaluation and treatment of depression, and other issues related to mental health.
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Bart
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« Reply #1 on: June 05, 2007, 11:56:21 AM »

Beads, rattles, snake oil.

We believe therapies and pharmas will work, ergo they do.

Studies have been done that find that the mere passage of time will often alleviate many psychological ailments, which has called into question the real therapeutic value of many treatments, i.e. would it have gotten better anyway?

Still, for the extreme forms of psychosis, it's clear that the drugs are of some use in getting neurotransmitters a bit more in balance.

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weezo
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« Reply #2 on: June 14, 2007, 09:57:41 PM »

Depression is a collection of illnesses ranging from an extreme of the person who takes or destroys their own life due to it, the bipolar person who may approach two personalities is the mood swings are severe enough to the simple sadness following the lost of a close loved one. Persons who suffer from depression may have a single huge episode, or a lifetime of ins and outs.

The problem with the pharmaceutical treatments is that no one seems to know which, if any drug, will be effective for which depression. Treatments seem to be a matter of trial and error, from which some emerge healthy whether due to the medications or not, and some end up six foot under in spite of the medications and perhaps therapy. Therapy seems to be effective, as suggested in Crocadile Dundee, because we do not have enough "mates" to talk things out with.

It is very disconcerting that, if depression responds to medications that "rebalance" chemicals in the brain, there is no chemical/blood test that can determine when those chemicals are out of balance, and which chemicals are the ones at fault. Medication is still too much of a crap shoot!

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Kam
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« Reply #3 on: June 14, 2007, 10:21:53 PM »

Depression sucks.   Is it something one can be genetically pre-disposed to in life?

Meaning: To be clinically depressed vs. just going through occasional blues due to life events.
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weezo
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« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2007, 10:29:42 PM »

Kam,

I do not know if a study of depression genetically has been done. I do know that chemical tests to determine the presence of depression, whether a short term, like a cold, or a big whopper, like pneumonia, do not yet exist. Depression does seem to occur in families, but that doesn't necessarily mean it is genetic - it may be due to similar life events. In short, we just don't know!
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« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2007, 01:23:39 AM »

Yeah, the realization of the idea that you are whacked where you stand is a downer, if you take it clinical, I can't say that I blame you.
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #6 on: July 05, 2007, 01:34:45 PM »

kam -

If you'd like information about clinical depression from A-Z written by someone who actually has the facts, the stats, and the studies, read Listening to Prozac.  It's a great read for those interested in the disorder in general and how medications work.  Not that you'd know it from the posts on this board, but psychiatrists can differentiate between clinical and non-clinical depression, and if they're good, he/she can figure out the correct medication combination for most people the first time around. 
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fleate
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« Reply #7 on: July 31, 2007, 08:58:11 PM »

The author of Listening to Prozac , Peter D. Kramer, has a more recent work on the subject called Against Depression . The latter, along with Styron's Darkness Visible are in my opinion the best works to date on this subject.
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« Reply #8 on: August 07, 2007, 05:09:51 AM »

I have many opinions on depression and mental illness, most of which I will neglect to share at this time. However:

People who make claims that it's all in your attitude, or expect you to simply get over it, do more harm than good. While I do believe that sometimes everyone deserves a strong kick in the ass, I also believe that it is usually more detrimental to kick at the wrong time than to abstain from kicking altogether. I also think that encouraging someone to come off their medication, or implying in any way that that should be their eventual goal, is just plain lunacy. There are doctors who are much more qualified to make that call. I also think that people who deny the genetic predisposition are just absolutely blind; you need only look at Van Gogh or Hemingway's family tree to be convinced!
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« Reply #9 on: August 07, 2007, 01:17:02 PM »

Fleate, I have to be careful when reading "medical" type books.  I tend to "get" whatever I'm reading about. Embarrassed  I agree the Styron book is powerful.  The only one I've read that gives me some sort of uderstanding of severe depression.

I've been depressed off and on all my life.  I talk to myself about it and that seems to have worked all these years--at least I have not, so far, killed myself.  I decided on this non chemical, self talking therapy long ago when while seeing a psychiatrist it dawned on me that I was the source of my own healing.  That the psychiatrist was merely a conduit, and an expensive one at that.

Phoenix, welcome to Melba.  It is my opinion there are many roads to mental health.  There is no one road fits all AFAIK.
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« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2007, 02:55:57 PM »

Phoenix re: #9

Please swear you are not related to River?  But you are right about those Hemingways . It even shows. I think those girls should pluck their eyebrows but that would be the end of Woody Alan movies!
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« Reply #11 on: August 09, 2007, 02:02:15 AM »

I swear I am not related to River. Out of curiousity, why?
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« Reply #12 on: August 10, 2007, 01:26:14 AM »

Oh, because you said that you would neglect to share opinions at this time.

I am nontheless interested these days in evident self-destructive behaviour  that arises in literary plotting; some of the books that have been discussed recently in the forums, fictional of course. Where it is the basis for film scenario or television screen-play. When it is obvious that the character steps out of character and in real life then pursues a lifestyle that is detrimental to survival and,is optional,at that.

River Phoenix for instance managed to do that, apparently without close relatives or friends picking up the signs, although his most recent finished film project made you rather aware that the central figure's behaviour was such that he was practically announcing that he was on the way out because he was tired of it all.

People will say, oh, yes, but it's only a picture.  Although actors themselves are painfully aware how difficult it is to shake a character after they are through playing a "part".  It is almost as if the part is not through with them.

Another flagrant example of this was Truman Capote who had a brilliant idea, he followed it up, never having dreamt that he would become emotionally involved, because -- he was, after all, the creator of the arrangement of the material.  And then the consequences of his arrangement went down.  He proceeded to drink himself to death, after having written the most successful new literary form that lavished him with praise and attention. Before he was quite through, the coup de grace was to spitefully bring down a number of his closest friends by revealing their most private conversations which had been revealed to him, so that there was no one there for him as he sunk to his lowest point and expired.  I  have always been a little amazed that because he owed a second book on the contract, he allowed somebody else to write up the details because he was inebriated and I have to insist on some wonderment that while he was unaware -- details were written into  a book by someone who had the most motive to make money by the sale of the expected book: the editor.
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« Reply #13 on: September 11, 2007, 10:31:10 AM »

Sect leader facing rape trial to use faith as his defence

Ian Munro Herald Correspondent in New York and agencies

September 11, 2007


THE US is both religious and religiously tolerant, but if the nation's founding fathers could have imagined someone like Warren Jeffs, they may not have been so ready to embrace freedom of worship.

Jeffs, 51, the leader of a polygamous Mormon sect, is about to stand trial for being an accomplice to the rape of a 14-year-old girl. He is reputed to have dozens of wives, some inherited from his father.

The girl was married to her 19-year-old cousin in 2001, and the marriage consummated weeks later, all at Jeffs insistence. She will be the principal witness against Jeffs, who took over formal leadership of the Fundamentalist Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints when his father died in 2002.

As the church's leader, or "prophet", Jeffs claims to be in direct contact with God and therefore determines who can marry whom. The girl reportedly twice told Jeffs she did not want to marry or have sex. He is allleged to have told her it was her spiritual duty and that it was sanctioned by God.

In addition to the girl, two men are expected to give evidence about Jeffs's interference in their sexual relations with their wives, and about his instructions to persist with underage weddings regardless of state law. By Jeffs's reasoning, to oppose him is to oppose the will of God, although divine guidance failed him in August last year. He had been on the run when police stopped him for having an illegible car number plate, and he was arrested.

While the trial is about justice for one woman, it is also likely to excite public interest for its insights into the 12,000-strong community Jeffs leads.

The community, where immodest, short-sleeved shirts and movies are banned, exists in two towns either side of the Utah-Arizona border in remote desert country - Hildale and Colorado City.

Jeffs reportedly has excommunicated more than 100 men, taking their wives and children from them and placing them with other men.

Teenage boys are expelled for going to the movies, or looking at girls with interest. A welfare worker in nearby St George says teenagers are expelled almost weekly and left to fend for themselves in a mainstream society for which they are unprepared. Many end up in trouble with the law.

In the past five years about 2000 teens had been ordered out with no support and forbidden to contact their parents, said Michelle Benward, vice-president of the support group New Frontiers for Families.

"The mothers are living in such fear," Ms Benward said. "Most of them have 10 or 12 children. If they are once held as misbehaving they are told they could be reassigned to another husband or their other children can be taken away.

"There's thousands that have either been invited to leave or have left because they can't deal with the level of scrutiny. I have a couple of hundred I have contact with … hundreds of boys and 10 girls."

Polygamy is illegal in Utah, although it is not a factor in Jeffs's trial. However, the trial will hear evidence of Jeffs urging his followers to maintain the practice.

A spokesman for the Utah Attorney-General, Paul Murphy, said there were 30,000 polygamists in the state. Instead of charging people with polygamy, officers were told to focus on child abuse, fraud and domestic violence.

Mr Murphy said jury selection had begun last Friday.

Defence lawyers will argue that Jeffs is being prosecuted for his faith. Officiating at a wedding ceremony did not make him an accomplice to rape, a defence lawyer, Walter Bugden, is reported to have said.

Ms Benward, who is about to open a home for excommunicated teens, said it was not polygamy but Jeffs who created problems for his cult.

"There are other polygamous groups in Utah that do very well. The problem is having a tyrannical, obsessed, deranged leader."
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josh
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« Reply #14 on: September 30, 2017, 02:15:36 PM »

http://www.nationalreview.com/corner/452068/pushing-euthanasia-depressed

Put me down as not in favor.
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