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Author Topic: Fitness and Nutrition  (Read 5596 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #270 on: November 06, 2007, 10:58:16 AM »


A brisk walk, an orgasm, and an espresso enema will cure anything.




Any chance your cybernym is short for "no trabajando"?
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madupont
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« Reply #271 on: November 06, 2007, 11:05:55 AM »


I was surprised to ready your post that cats will tolerate almost anything as long as reasonably well treated -- but it makes sense.

Cats tend to embarrass very easily though don't they?

I can think of a couple of examples from my youth.  We had a cat that climbed up the slide on the swimming pool in our backyard and then lost her balance and slid unceremoniously (clawing all the way down) and splash - into the pool.   As there were several of us lounging in the backyard we could not help but notice the commotion and laughed hysterically as she swam across the pool to the steps.

She appeared to slink away in humiliation and hid in the bushes for 3-4 days before rejoining the family...



I've been known to do that myself, all the time, around here.

But interesting that you already knew that cats could swim quite well on their own. I learned that in a line of cats, when Mehitabel had produced Hecate who one day had her litter playing around in the bathroom and fortunately, I had a bubble-bath. The kittens hopped up to the toilet and gingerly stepped over to the tub where they fell in and just naturally swam. I'm not at all sure they even knew they were in water but they continued in motion. I hopped out fast, grabbed towels and dried all of us off before they caught a cold.
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notrab
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« Reply #272 on: November 06, 2007, 02:44:44 PM »

"no trabajando"

-- or perhaps "not rabid" ?

My email box was hacked and I'm signing in this way until that one is mopped up and I'm sure it's still usable.

I said "brisk walk" not "brisk run" btw, Cap0.  I have no evidence that Jim Fixx died any younger as a result of running, however.  Some say the cardio stimulation he got actually prolonged his life, which was destined to be quite short due to a congenital heart problem.

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madupont
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« Reply #273 on: November 06, 2007, 03:45:04 PM »

I'm glad you mentioned that factor because I just lost several hours of time, in between this forum and the next that I went to, with computer problems caused by people who have also caused this web-site to crash twice  in the previous month although they began somewhat earlier.  I thought you were a "newie" and wanted to welcome you.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #274 on: November 07, 2007, 08:18:07 PM »

I don't think it was the run that killed Jim Fixx...he had massive undetected heart problems.
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madupont
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« Reply #275 on: November 08, 2007, 12:54:23 PM »

TrojanHorse


http://www.moveon.org/cafire.html
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madupont
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« Reply #276 on: November 09, 2007, 03:58:42 AM »

barton,

The Peru FTA even contains NAFTA-style language that requires the United States to accept imported food that does not meet our safety standards.
If the Peru FTA passes (especially by a wide margin) it could open the door to other Bush administration trade deals with Colombia, Panama and South Korea. It’s not too late to stop the Bush trade agenda -- but only if we can convince our elected officials to vote NO.

                                                                               - provisions that allow foreign investors to challenge U.S. environmental regulations, food safety regulations, consumer protections and even court decisions in international tribunals that circumvent our judicial system

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martinbeck3
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VIVA EL CAMPO ARGENTINO

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« Reply #277 on: November 29, 2007, 04:30:45 PM »

They tell me I´m very fit Undecided therefore next time I go to my favorite watering hole I´ll place the empty bottles in the ground and try this trick  Cool

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tukdHKZAs1E
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BorisBartenov
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« Reply #278 on: February 16, 2008, 12:09:09 PM »

Coming soon:  The Ozzy Osborne Live Food Diet!  (Ozzy goes to "bat" for the raw food movement!)

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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
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« Reply #279 on: March 01, 2008, 05:08:47 PM »

Barton, let me introduce my son.

What are bad Fats?

Most bad fats are a creation of food industrialization. Truly, it’s difficult to get excessive amounts of bad fat from whole, unprocessed foods.

To understand how a fat becomes “bad,” let’s first talk about fatty acid structure.

Where a carbon-carbon double bond exists, there’s an opportunity for either a "cis" or "trans" configuration. I know, bordering on really "sciency" but bear with us here...

Now, naturally occurring unsaturated long-chain fatty acids are virtually all of cis configuration.
Cis and Trans fat configuration:
http://www.bastnet.com/fatfacts/imag...-trans_fat.gif

However, trans fatty acids arise as a by-product of fatty acid saturation during fat processing. And we've all heard how bad "trans" fats are for us.

Basically, trans fats are created by taking an unsaturated fat (soft or liquid at room temperature) and bubbling hydrogen ions through it - making it a saturated, trans fat - structurally. In terms of appearance, the natural oil "hardens" when it's hydrogenated.

Why would companies "hydrogenate" fats to create "trans" fats? Well, fats are hydrogenated by companies to improve mouth feel and increase shelf life. So, "hydrogenation" is good for the bottom line - but not for our health.

Now, keep in mind that not all trans fat configurations are harmful to health. Some are naturally occurring, such as the hydrogenation of unsaturated fat occurring in the rumen of cows and sheep. (CLA is an example of a trans fat that may be beneficial to health.) It's just the man-made ones that we should probably steer clear off.

Along with trans fats, saturated fats are sometimes touted as “bad.” And they can be when consumed in excessive amounts.

However, the amount found in non “man-made” food generally won’t contribute to chronic disease.

In excess and out of balance with unsaturated fats, lauric, myristic, and palmitic acids all are saturated fats that can raise bad cholesterol levels. However, stearic acid (another saturated fat) may even lower LDL levels.
Lauric, myristic, palmitic acids are found in:
--Beef fat, coconut oil, palm kernel oil, butter, cheese, milk, palm oil

Stearic acids are found in:
--Cocoa butter, beef

Major food sources of trans fat for American adults:
http://www.soyconnection.com/images/...pie_chart2.gif

Why are bad fats so important?
Since trans fats do not kink,or fold upon themselves like cis fats do, they pack into the cell membrane very tightly.

Clinical and epidemiologic studies suggest that this means an increased risk for coronary heart disease, cancer, and other chronic disease, possibly because of their potential to manipulate membrane fluidity.

The trans-isomer of oleic acid, known as elaidic acid, raises cholesterol and can contribute to heart disease as well.

Trans fats don’t only raise the bad form of cholesterol, but they lower the good form of cholesterol. High trans fat intake is also linked to a higher risk of Alzheimer’s disease and lymphoma.

Moving on to saturated fats, they do show a positive correlation with the risk of cardiovascular disease, mainly due to cholesterol raising effects and unfavorable shifts in the overall cholesterol profile.But it can raise both good and bad cholesterol levels.

Excessive intake of saturated fats is also associated with Alzheimer’s disease, poor blood viscosity, breast cancer, kidney disease, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, stroke and prostate cancer.

Bad fats can suppress the excretion of bile acids, enhance bad cholesterol synthesis in the liver, and limit uptake of bad cholesterol in tissues.

What you should know
Trans fats compete with essential fats and may aggravate essential fatty acid deficiency. A study published in the NEJM tracked the exercise and nutritional habits of 80,000 women over 14 years and found that the most important correlate of heart disease was the amount of trans fats in the diet.

Even a single meal with a high “bad fat” content can diminish blood vessel function and elasticity. This can contribute to the progression of heart disease.

When consuming a diet based on unprocessed, whole foods, accumulating high amounts of trans fat and saturated fat is difficult. Most of the bad fats are added to foods so profitability can be enhanced, directly or indirectly.

For extra credit
· Milk fat contains 4% to 8% trans fatty acids.

· Products containing less that 0.5 grams of trans fat per 14 gram serving may be declared as 0 grams on the label.

· For every 1% increase in total energy intake from saturated fat, a 2.7 mg/dl increase in plasma cholesterol level is predicted.

· The National Academy of Sciences 2002 dietary reference intakes concluded that there is no safe level of trans fat consumption. There is no adequate level, recommended daily amount or tolerable upper limit for trans fats. This is because any incremental increase in trans fat intake increases the risk of heart disease.

· The World Health Organization has recommended that trans fats be limited to less than 1% of overall energy intake.

· The following diet provides 20 g of trans fats:
2 microwave waffles (4.5 g)
1 small (1 serving) bag of chips (8 g)
1 order of French fries (4.5 g)
1 tablespoon margarine (3.5 g)

Summary and Recommendations
· Saturated fat should make up no more than 10% of total calories. For someone eating 2500 calories per day, that would be a maximal intake of 27 grams of saturated fat per day. If eating via PN recommendations, you should have no trouble with this. However, don't be too crazy about this. If your fats are in balance, you should be ok.

· Limit trans fat as much as possible. The less you consume the better.

· Avoid man-made foods with high levels of added fats.




References
Borer KT. Exercise Endocrinology. Human Kinetics. Champaign, IL. 2003.

Mahan LK & Escott-Stump S. Eds. Krause’s Food, Nutrition, & Diet Therapy. 11th ed. Saunders Publishing, Philadelphia, PA. 2004.

Groff JL & Gropper SS. Advanced nutrition and human metabolism. 3rd Wadsworth Thomson Learning. 2000. ed.

Murray RK, Granner DK, Mayes PA, Rodwell VW, eds. Harper’s Illustrated Biochemistry. 26th ed. McGraw Hill. 2003.

Barnard ND, et al. Nutrition Guide for Clinicians. 1st ed. PCRM. 2007.

Eller FJ, et al. Preparation of spread oils meeting U.S. Food and Drug Administration labeling requirements for trans fatty acids via pressure controlled hydrogenation. J Agric Food Chem 2005;53:5982-5984.
Do Your Kids Exercise?
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madupont
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« Reply #280 on: March 01, 2008, 05:14:54 PM »

1 pound uncooked turkey tenderloin, cubed
1 medium green pepper, cut into 3/4-in. pieces
1 medium onion, cut into wedges
2/3 cup sliced fresh mushrooms
1 tablespoon canola oil
1 jar (15-1/2 ounces) meatless spaghetti sauce
1 cup sliced turkey pepperoni, halved
1/2 cup dry red wine or chicken broth
1 tablespoon tomato paste
10 ounces uncooked vermicelli
In a Dutch oven or large kettle, sauté the turkey, green peppers, onion and mushrooms in oil until vegetables are tender. Stir in spaghetti sauce, pepperoni, wine or broth and tomato paste. Bring to a boil.
Reduce heat; cover and simmer for 45 minutes. Uncover; simmer 15 – 20 minutes longer or until thickened. Meanwhile, cook vermicelli according to package directions; drain. Serve with sauce.
Nutritional Analysis: One serving equals: 321 calories, 5g fat, 40g carbohydrate, 4g fiber, and 28g protein

I believe that he called this,"Turkey sauce for Pasta" and suggested using "spaghetti squash", in another side bar of his newsletter.

Not bad for a newsletter on nutrition and health as I only spotted one typo that "sounded-like", which we all mistake in our hurry.

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madupont
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« Reply #281 on: March 15, 2008, 11:57:48 AM »

Barton, are you still out there? It's time for the mid-month update. Resolving the mysteries of two concerns: Who else wants the secrets of
Great Abs?  and  All About Cardio Training
and how much to do!

It never fails. As spring approaches people start thinking about getting in shape for summer. And every year the number one thing I'm asked is "How can I get great abs?"

You've probably pondered that question at some time or another and you're likely frustrated with your waistline. Maybe you've given up on your abs after doing dozens of crunches only to see zero results. I don't blame you.

Forget everything you've heard about how to sculpt your abs. Crunches simply won't give you a six pack.

You see, to do crunches with the hope that it will turn your midsection into a washboard is to operate under one of the most widely held fitness myths. I'm talking about spot reducing. Simply put, training one area of your body will not specifically burn fat from that area.

You've probably heard that spot reducing is a myth, but most people still train as if it is true. Doing crunches will not magically make your waist shrink, it will not cause your muffin top to disappear, and it will not give you washboard abs.

Only a drop in body fat will do that for you.

So what is the secret to great abs? Instead of endless crunches, the secret is a winning combination of fat burning cardio, resistance training, and proper eating.

It is absolutely possible for you to dramatically shape up your waistline before summer hits this year. Yes, Y-O-U. Weight loss is not reserved only for the people you've seen on the Biggest Loser or on diet pill infomercials. You can do it too.

Answer the following two questions to see how your routine measures up:

How often do you exercise? If your answer was anything less than 4 times a week, then that's the first thing getting between you and streamline abs. How do you define a fat burning workout? A routine including intense cardiovascular training coupled with effective resistance training. Do you do this?

I'm sorry to be the one to break this to you, but walking on the treadmill for 30 minutes isn't a fat blasting routine. Neither is a leisurely 20 minutes on the elliptical machine. The truth is that you can dramatically increase your results while investing less time when you exercise right.

Cardio exercise is all about maintaining an effective level of intensity. This doesn't mean that you should be out of breath or gasping for air. It does mean that you need to push yourself.

Resistance training is the second key part of a fat burning workout. This means working your major muscle groups against resistance in a way that stimulates your metabolism. Again the key here is to find the right intensity and to keep each muscle group guessing.

What kind of shape is your diet in? Diet is a big stumbling block for most people-especially as it relates to their midsection. Here's a fact: If your diet is out of control then your abs will be too. You can't trim your waist without trimming the junk out of your diet, regardless of how hard you exercise.


Keep calories in check. Do you know how many calories you eat? The best way to find out is to record everything you eat for a few days. Tally the number of calories that you eat each day and do an evaluation-feel free to recruit me to help out with this part. Together we'll chart improvements for your diet and adjust your calories for maximum results.
Just say "No" to junk food. While this may seem obvious, your definition of "junk food" may need an alteration. Refined sugar is one of the biggest culprits in the junk food world-it is found in soft drinks, blended coffee drinks, cookies, cakes, packaged snacks, and other sinfully sweet treats. Processed fat is another monster. As a rule of thumb you can safely view all processed or refined items as junk food.
Eat more frequently. The key here is to never let your metabolism "crash" by going hours without eating. One of the biggest mistakes you can make is to skip breakfast-as this is the meal that 'breaks the fast' that your body goes into each night. Stick with eating small meals every few hours and always avoid stuffing yourself.
You should now understand why you are better off not wasting time on crunches-while it is important to exercise your abs a couple of times a week, you won't expect fat to fall of that area after 100's of crunches.

Do you want to flatten and sculpt your waist in time for summer this year? All you have to do is decide that you really want it. Commit to yourself-you deserve it.

Be back with cardio information in a minute after I check out a few things
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madupont
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« Reply #282 on: March 15, 2008, 12:05:30 PM »

What is cardio training?
Cardio training involves exercising with the purpose of developing cardiovascular or aerobic fitness. Cardiovascular fitness is a good measure of the heart’s ability to pump oxygen rich blood to the muscles.

Cardio training is when someone exercises at a constant moderate level of intensity, for a specified duration, in which the cardiovascular system is allowed to replenish oxygen to the working musculature. Typical activities include walking, jogging, cycling, swimming, jump rope, stair climbing, and rowing.

Why is cardio training so important?
Cardio training plays a vital role in human health and performance. With regular cardio training, one can expect numerous metabolic changes.

So what happens with consistent cardio training?
· Increased cardiac output
· Increased oxygen uptake
· Increased blood flow to active muscles
· Decreased sub-maximal respiratory rate
· Increased blood volume
· Improved thermoregulation
· Increased mitochondrial size and density
· Increased oxidative enzyme concentrations
· Increased capillarization in muscle bed
· Lower rate of all-cause mortality
· Lower rate of cardiovascular disease
· Lower incidence of type 2 diabetes
· Lower rate of total body fat
· Lower rate of colon cancer
· Lower rate of breast cancer
· Lower rate of osteoporosis

What you should know
Just as with strength training, cardio training requires proper progression, variation, specificity and overload if beneficial adaptations are to occur.

When looking at how to design an effective cardio training program, consider the following variables:
· Mode
· Frequency
· Duration
· Intensity

Mode
You can alter the mode of exercise to your liking and/or ability. The following activities (among others) can be used for cardio training: swimming, rope skipping, jogging, cycling, cross country skiing, stairs, elliptical trainer, and rowing. When choosing your activity, consider the activities you enjoy, your skill level, your joint health and the surrounding climate.

Frequency
Frequency is the number of cardio training sessions performed per day or per week. This will be dependent on training status and intensity. 2 to 5 sessions per week will suffice. This depends on concurrent training. Health benefits can be attained by expending as little as 150 calories per day via cardio training. 20 minutes of cardio training, 3 times per week can maintain cardiovascular fitness levels (assuming appropriate intensity).

Duration
Duration is the length of the cardio training session. This is directly related to the exercise intensity. Strive for 15 to 60 minutes of continuous cardio training.

Intensity
Intensity of the cardio training can be monitored via heart rate response or oxygen update. The practical method is measuring heart rate. To attain optimal cardiovascular fitness, exercising between 60-90% of maximal heart rate is effective (50-85% of heart rate reserve).

Remember that heart rate increases in a linear fashion as workload increases during cardio training. The maximal level that can be attained is dependent on fitness level, age, climate, gender, medications, etc.

Maximal heart rate can be estimated by subtracting age from 220. For example, the estimated maximal heart rate for a 37 year old would be:

220 – 37 (age in years) = 183 beats/minute

(more in a second)
« Last Edit: March 15, 2008, 12:07:14 PM by madupont » Logged
madupont
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« Reply #283 on: March 15, 2008, 12:12:16 PM »

A more specific equation for determining the heart rate at which you would exercise is the Karvonen Method. This equation can be found here:

http://www.sport-fitness-advisor.com/images/heart_rate_reserve.gif

Association between heart rate and cardio training intensity:

http://hsc.csu.edu.au/pdhpe/core2/aerobic/4-2/resting_hr.gif

Chart that illustrates level of exercise intensity and fitness benefit:

http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/a/ad/Exercise_zones.png

For extra credit
· Cardio training can be helpful for achieving optimal body composition because of the high caloric expenditures. It helps to lower relative percentage of body fat, but has little or no effect on muscle mass.

· Cardio training tends to elicit a greater cortisol response than strength training.

· High levels of cardio training are associated with protein loss from muscle which can lead to a reduction in mass and strength.

· Doing a high level of cardio training can result in a muscle fiber type shift from fast twitch to slow twitch. This would be undesirable for power athletes, sprinters, and Olympic lifters. However, this fiber type shift could be beneficial for recreational exercisers and endurance athletes.

· Performing regular moderate cardio training can increase glucose and amino acid uptake in muscle and liver cells. This can be extremely beneficial for long term health. It can also greatly influence recovery from strength training.

Summary and Recommendations
After you have established the total amount of time you can dedicate to exercise, set aside less than half of that time for cardio training. For example, if you are exercising 5 hours per week, then about 2 ½ hours or less could be devoted toward cardio training.

When your goal is to put on muscle mass while controlling body fat
o Perform 10 – 15 minutes of cardio training at a low to moderate intensity after strength training workouts

o Days off from strength training should consist of recovery, high intensity interval training, dynamic flexibility/yoga, or another bout of low to moderate cardio training for 20 to 30 minutes.

When your goal is to lose body fat and maintain muscle mass
o Perform 15 – 30 minutes of cardio training at a low to moderate intensity after strength training workouts

o Days off from strength training could consist of recovery, high intensity interval training, dynamic flexibility/yoga, or another bout of low to moderate cardio training for 20 to 30 minutes.

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madupont
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« Reply #284 on: March 15, 2008, 12:27:01 PM »

Back to Basics

Losing weight may seem anything but simple. With all of the trendy diet plans and new workout fads-it is easy to become confused. The good news is that the basics of weight loss have not changed over the years. It all boils down to Calories In versus Calories Out. Too many Calories In, and you will gain weight. Extra Calories Out and you will lose it. Keep in mind that 3,500 calories equals one pound and every single calorie counts!


Fiesta Breakfast Taco
 This delicious dish is made with egg whites and sautéed vegetables and makes a wonderful light breakfast. Enjoy with salsa for an added kick. Servings: 2

Here's what you need...


1/4 cup onion, chopped
1 medium green bell pepper, chopped
1 teaspoon minced garlic
1 medium tomato, chopped
3/4 cup egg whites (about 4 large egg whites)
2 wheat tortillas
1/4 of a small avocado
A dash of Paprika
A dash of Garlic salt
Spray a medium frying pan with cooking spray. Sauté the onion, bell pepper and garlic until soft. Add the tomato and egg whites. Cook until the egg whites have set.
Divide the egg and veggie mixture between the tortillas and fold like a taco.
Slice the avocado and sprinkle it with paprika and garlic salt. Arrange the avocado on each taco and serve.
Nutritional Analysis: One serving equals: 243 calories, 5g fat, 35g carbohydrate, 6g fiber, and 15g protein.

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