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Author Topic: Gardening  (Read 6438 times)
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« on: April 16, 2007, 08:56:11 PM »

Share your gardening tips.
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weezo
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« Reply #1 on: April 23, 2007, 01:46:33 PM »

Mulch, mulch, mulch

There is no better way to keep down weeds and to keep the soil healthy over winter. Last year we mulched liberally, and this spring, getting the beds ready for the annuals is so very much easier.

Anne in Virginia
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« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2007, 02:33:45 AM »

Anne in Virginia, you're right about the mulch part.  What material do you use?  I use pine needles.

This year will be the first year I use compost I made myself.  Well, nature made it, but I bought the box to put the stuff for compost in (right here I should put a smiley face but I'm just showing red Xs and greyed out boxes).

I've got roses and amaryllis, iris and cactus blooming.  Passion flower and trumpet and honey suckle vine getting ready to bloom, with wisteria, pear, and dogwood already come and gone.  I've got climbing hyacinth and moon vine growing together on the West side of the house (keeps the West wall cool, too) but they won't be above the window tops and blooming until late June.

I do a few heritage tomatoes in pots, but generally get my veggies at the Farmer's Market.  And this year I have one hive of bees.  Started my backyard pond back up so they'd have a place to get a drink of water.

What's going on at your place?
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bosox18d
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« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2007, 03:03:26 AM »

Nice to see the Gardening forum brought back.This winter in Los Angeles was our driest on record.I always throw wildflower seeds and sweetpeas on top of a strip of dirt above a cement wall on our patio.(A Six Unit Apt).My neighbor and I put up trellis type fencing to cover the wall about five years ago.So the sweetpeas usually cascade down over the wall.This year I hardly got anything due to the lack of rain.But this week a few sweetpeas are blooming and I go out and sniff them everyday.The smell should be against the law!Next weekend I'll probably throw white impatiens up there.
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« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2007, 08:56:40 AM »

I'm thinking about trying a few of the hanging tomatoes.

I mean the ones that actually hang upside down. The thought of not having to do any ground preparation or subsequent weeding is fascinating. Not to mention no worrying about cutworms and other ground based pests.

I could just string a clothesline type deal and even string a dripline right with it to water it.

Has anyone had any experience with these yet?
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« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2007, 05:22:04 PM »

Bosox, LOL on your laid-back gardening (style?).  And I agree that the smell of sweet peas is real nose candy (like some iris, especially those with yellow throats, smell like some types of fresh made Kool-Aid tastes).  A look at the sweet pea bloom with a magnifying glass is revealing and worth going to the trouble.  Too bad you can't get more dirt up on that ledge.  Sweet peas need about 4 inches.

DoctorDoom, about those hanging tomatoes . . . are you pulling our leg?  I mean, where do the roots get purchase?  Or are you planting in something way up off the ground and the tomatoes then cascade down from there?
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bosox18d
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« Reply #6 on: April 24, 2007, 10:53:55 PM »

Donot actually I do have dirt 5 to 7 inches deep along most of the ledge.The neighbor put up a solid wood fence some years back and with the top rim of our lattice fence raised above the wall a bit I have been dumping old dirt from the pots up there as I replaced it and added some compost.It is about 14 inches deep enough for a row of like impatiens which fill in nicely.I just did not water much this winter and with lack of rain the flowers did not fill in.Last year I had a huge little garden of wildflowers atop the ledge all winter.I stick Scarlet runner beans up there each spring with posts and they climb up behind the impatiens.Today I noticed some pink sweet peas starting to bloom.All of them though are at one end of the ledge in shade.The rest went nowhere.
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« Reply #7 on: April 25, 2007, 03:01:15 AM »

Bosox, I'l be dipped and bronzed.  You've got a neat thing going on up there on that ledge.  Lucky you to have some peas volunteer from last year's seed.  I always have to plant anew.  I get some already started (about 4-6 inches high) from an old guy with a green thumb down at Farmer's Market.  Even with sometimes 50% mortality, I still get a good showing. Half my front yard is abloom with wild primrose.  I am expecting the city "yard police" to attempt to cite me for not having my lawn mowed.  I hope they don't, but I'll go to court if I have to.  I'll mow that portion of my lawn after those primrose have seeded.  Of all the wild seed I've put out there, the primrose is the only one that came up and thrived.
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bosox18d
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« Reply #8 on: April 25, 2007, 03:13:58 AM »

Well I meant 14 inches wide for the space from front to back.I have never seen sweet peas from small plants.That would be nice.
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« Reply #9 on: April 25, 2007, 03:16:51 AM »

Out here there are folks who plant "The Parkway" that small strip of grass between sidewalk and curb that is city property with flowers or gravel and southwest style plants.It po's the city to no end but it looks great.
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DoctorDoom
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« Reply #10 on: April 25, 2007, 09:55:59 AM »

Bosox, LOL on your laid-back gardening (style?).  And I agree that the smell of sweet peas is real nose candy (like some iris, especially those with yellow throats, smell like some types of fresh made Kool-Aid tastes).  A look at the sweet pea bloom with a magnifying glass is revealing and worth going to the trouble.  Too bad you can't get more dirt up on that ledge.  Sweet peas need about 4 inches.

DoctorDoom, about those hanging tomatoes . . . are you pulling our leg?  I mean, where do the roots get purchase?  Or are you planting in something way up off the ground and the tomatoes then cascade down from there?

No joke, I'm totally serious. Here's a link to one brand.

http://topsyturvys.com/10001.html

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« Reply #11 on: April 25, 2007, 12:13:47 PM »

I swan, DoctorDoom.  Who'd of ever thought of such a way of growing tomatoes.  I went to the pictures of how to plant and was stumped by the very first instruction: Insert plant from bottom.  How the heck do you keep it from falling back out while you add the dirt, etc,?
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DoctorDoom
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« Reply #12 on: April 25, 2007, 12:54:01 PM »

I went to the pictures of how to plant and was stumped by the very first instruction: Insert plant from bottom.  How the heck do you keep it from falling back out while you add the dirt, etc,?

LOL, it does sound weird.

But after giving it some thought it's possible, I suppose, that the roots would hold it in place long enough if the bottom has say a piece of plastic that is slit to accomodate the roots.

Otherwise it would seem to be a two man operation to get the thing planted. I suppose I'll just have to buy one of the darned things and find out.
« Last Edit: April 25, 2007, 12:57:00 PM by DoctorDoom » Logged
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« Reply #13 on: April 26, 2007, 11:15:50 AM »

DoctorDoom.  Okay, I'll be waiting for you to file a report on your experience with the upside-down tomatoes.

I'm trying to decide if the bug tea I make with hot peppers will upset my bees.  I'm organic and I'm used to losing X amount to "critters" both above and below ground, but this bee thing is new to me, and with all the money I've invested in this little fling I don't want to fail before I even get started good.

Does anyone coming to this discussion compost?
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DoctorDoom
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« Reply #14 on: April 26, 2007, 02:58:50 PM »

"Does anyone coming to this discussion compost?"

I've had a compost pile for years and years.

A couple of years ago my brother bought one of those drums that you turn every so often and add water to. So far he's swearing by it.

As to your bees have you ever tried buckwheat honey?? It appears waaaay darker(almost black) than regular honey but it's fantastic.
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