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Author Topic: Gardening  (Read 8278 times)
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DoctorDoom
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« Reply #15 on: April 26, 2007, 03:02:03 PM »

BTW I asked the folks at Topsy-Turvy about the tomato falling out while you put the dirt in. Here's their reply,

"You have to lock the tomato plant in the locking foam split disk."


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Donotremove
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« Reply #16 on: April 27, 2007, 12:14:41 AM »

DoctorDoom, now THAT upside down tomato planting technique I understand.

Compost.  So, you keep adding stuff, right?  So, you must need two compost piles (areas, tumblers, pens, whatever you keep it in) so that ONE of them can be FINISHED and RESTED enough to actually use in your beds?  I mean, you don't want to put fresh scraps, coffee grounds, etc., in your flower and vegetable beds/pots.  And, the scraps keep coming, there's no letup.  Of course you COULD just throw the scraps away for a while (Oh Noooo, Mr Bill.)

Tell me, Doctor.  What do YOU do?
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bosox18d
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« Reply #17 on: April 27, 2007, 12:46:44 AM »

I thought about buying one of those little self contained units a few years ago but I still rely on buying storebought stuff once in awhile.
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"If it keeps going like this,the Zamboni driver is going to be the first star"
DoctorDoom
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« Reply #18 on: April 27, 2007, 08:23:50 AM »


Tell me, Doctor.  What do YOU do?

Well, coming from a large farm family and having about two acres of total garden growing up as a kid our organic gardening was on a bit larger scale than most.

And you're right there were several "piles" of material that we used.

We had our own self made greenhouse that was approxamately 20ft by 25ft.
It was completely modular in design, two budding carpenters in the family, and came apart in the fall and was stored in the #2 barn.

Its "foundation" if you will consisted of several railroad ties planted in the ground. Every spring, as soon as possible, we would take the loader and dig the inside pit out.(That material went to one of the piles to become compost) Then a layer of manure(mixed with a small amount of hay) would be placed in the bottom of the pit. Then a new bed(layer of about 8 inches) of compost material would be placed on top of it. Then we would plant several types of plants to "start" growing. These would later all be dug up and planted in the various gardens proper.(we had about 4 or 5 areas in different parts of the farm) The little greenhouse basically produced all the same things you see sold abound the country these days, Tomatoes, peppers, cukes, etc etc,  except for those cute little plastic trays.(ours just sat in wooden trays(made by those little farmer carpenter boys) And were then put in a wagon that was about twice the size of those cute little wagons that are now pulled behind people's lawn mowers these days.(And yes you guessed it we made the wagon too from an old car axle some angle iron and some wooden planks(Dad was also a millwright and had his own welder)[Some day I'll tell you about how we made a wagon out of the rear part of an old dumptruck for hauling rock for various projects] But I digress. That is how we started much of our garden. Things like beans and such were simply hand planted in rows in the garden.

The manure under the layer of compost in the greenhouse served two purposes. One when it was dug up in the spring it "recharged" the layer of compost above it when mixed up and put into a holding pile for use later. Second cow manure gives off heat(something a lot of folks don't know) And it actually will warm the layer of compost that is above it. So it basically kept our little sprouts nice and comfy cosy in the cold spring nights.

Lots more stories where that came from. If you want to be bored out of your socks that is.

« Last Edit: April 27, 2007, 08:29:37 AM by DoctorDoom » Logged
harrie
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« Reply #19 on: April 27, 2007, 09:40:59 AM »

Please, bore me some more!!  I'm envious of your childhood gardening adventures; they sound wonderful.  We do the community garden thing, and it's a lot of fun - but nothing like a couple of acres, your own compost, and a greenhouse (swoon!).
« Last Edit: April 27, 2007, 10:18:41 AM by harrie » Logged
desdemona222b
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« Reply #20 on: April 27, 2007, 10:00:29 AM »

I'm thinking about trying a few of the hanging tomatoes.

I mean the ones that actually hang upside down. The thought of not having to do any ground preparation or subsequent weeding is fascinating. Not to mention no worrying about cutworms and other ground based pests.

I have a friend who grew grape tomatoes like that last year and she said they did great.  Just put them in a spagnum moss lined basket and water liberally.

I could just string a clothesline type deal and even string a dripline right with it to water it.

Has anyone had any experience with these yet?
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #21 on: April 27, 2007, 10:06:34 AM »

Donot -

Ever planted a hanging petunia basket?  You just fill the thing with potting soil, then did through the spagnum moss at the bottom and stick your plant in, then put one or two up top.  Same concept with the hanging tomatoes - and I agree it is a great concept.

I noticed they sell ready-made moss-lined hanging baskets now, but I used to buy the large wire baskets and line them with the moss myself.  It's easier to plant that way.
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #22 on: April 27, 2007, 10:09:22 AM »

Hi, harrrie - it's bparton454 here.

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harrie
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« Reply #23 on: April 27, 2007, 10:20:20 AM »

Hey, bparton454/desdemona222b -- nice to see you!
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Donotremove
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« Reply #24 on: April 27, 2007, 10:38:00 AM »

DoctorDoom, As Harrie says, bore me anytime you take a notion.  It's like story time for grownups.  I never get tired of hearing "farm" stories.

BartBart, I grow some of my toonies upsidedown in hanging baskets (as you have described) every year.  I've got an ice plant in a hanging basket (not upsidedown) that has formed a huge ball.  Lord that thing loves sun. 
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DoctorDoom
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« Reply #25 on: April 27, 2007, 10:39:40 AM »

Please, bore me some more!!  I'm envious of your childhood gardening adventures; they sound wonderful.  We do the community garden thing, and it's a lot of fun - but nothing like a couple of acres, your own compost, and a greenhouse (swoon!).

Well if you like potaoes I could give you a helpful hint or two I suppose.
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harrie
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« Reply #26 on: April 27, 2007, 11:15:53 AM »

Well if you like potaoes I could give you a helpful hint or two I suppose.

I do love the spud -- in fact, the hubby wanting to grow taters like his grandfather did in Maine is mostly what started this community garden adventure a few years back.
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DoctorDoom
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« Reply #27 on: April 27, 2007, 11:53:20 AM »

Well if you like potaoes I could give you a helpful hint or two I suppose.

I do love the spud -- in fact, the hubby wanting to grow taters like his grandfather did in Maine is mostly what started this community garden adventure a few years back.

Well one method of growing potatoes makes it virtually weedless and it's basically plant, wait for them to grow to a foot or so and then just walk away and never worry about weeding them all season long.

Here's what you do. After your initial hilling is over.(I'll assume you know what hilling is) you get bailed hay, squarebailed, and remove it in chunks and place all around your tater plants. Squarebailed hay will come off in square chunks about 4 inches thick. You put these "all around" every square foot of potato plot ground. So all you're going to see is the green tater plants sticking up out of a bed of hay. Water the hay occasionally when needed but thats pretty much all you ever will need to do. Some of the taters will be undergound but many of them will simply lay on the ground under the hay. Which makes it real easy to get them come harvest time!

An added benefit is when the season is over and you've harvested, the hay can be rototilled right back into the soil for organic mulching so you build your soil up at the same time!!

Don't worry about hayseeds because they will never grow as long as you do this every year. Weeds won't grow either up through the hay as long as you spread it on in thick enough chunks. You may get an odd weed that pops up through a thin spot from time to time. But just pull it and plop down another chunk of hay in the offending thin area and walk away.

We used to plant our taters this way and basically never have to work them again all season long.

And the wonderful thing is that you can do this with "all" of your garden. The method works fantastic with tomatoes too.

The hay also does two other wonderful things for your garden. First it keeps moisture in the ground. That is essential for things like potatoes and tomatoes. But equally as wonderful its dry on top of the hay. So your tomatoes won't get that rot that they sometimes get when laying on bare soil. You'll get lots more usable tomatoes this way. The second benefit is that the hay will also act as a warm blanket for tomato roots at night-time as they take in solar heat in the daytime and retain it in the night-time. And as you know warm soil at night will make your tomatoes stronger and healthier. This added warmth is especially important in the early summer months.

Am I boring you guys yet??
« Last Edit: April 27, 2007, 11:59:32 AM by DoctorDoom » Logged
harrie
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« Reply #28 on: April 27, 2007, 01:09:36 PM »

We're big fans of hay for weed/pest control/water retention.  Our feed store guy carries salt hay, which we use instead of regular baled, or sometimes mix up the two, depending on our needs.   The hubby hills his potatoes twice a year, I think -- once at the foot-high stage, and about 4-6 weeks before harvest. They also get fish emulsion every 3-4 weeks, as does almost everything in the garden.   

We actually prefer to dig for the taters, because the garden is in a field of a state park and gets some traffic from "lost" hikers who happen to have bags with them.  Our first year, we got a bonus bag of seed potatoes from the feed guy and plantedthem in a fenceless plot. It was obvious that someone was checking them out as the season went on; every once in a while we'd find a potato lying around like someone had fished one out of the mound, decided it was too small, and just dropped it.  We don't want to make it too tempting for passersby to test our fence, so the potatoes stay underground.  We have to hide our pumpkins under hay when they start to turn orange, too.

Another gardener does the same thing ever year: He plants his potatoes and onions, hills the potatoes once, and comes back at the end of the year to harvest.  So we see him about three times a year. 

I don't think this coming summer will be our best year, but I'm still looking forward to it.  I'm planting beets and carrots in my containers this weekend, weather permitting.
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DoctorDoom
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« Reply #29 on: April 27, 2007, 01:57:19 PM »

We don't want to make it too tempting for passersby to test our fence, so the potatoes stay underground.  We have to hide our pumpkins under hay when they start to turn orange, too.

Ever think about getting a rather large dog??(Grin)
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