Escape from Elba
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Question: Would you favor or oppose a law that would ban gay marriage, requiring that marriage should be between a man and a woman?
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1080 on: June 11, 2008, 01:14:10 AM »



Haiku for Madame Quoad

“Let me taste it,” she queried—
Savoring her rhubarb cream.”
—Thomas Pynchon, Gravity's Rainbow

“Repellent?” she asked—
“Narcissistically divine?”
“Gawd, it sounds like me!?!”
_______

“The Times's original review (sorry, only in pay archive), by Richard Locke, says "Gravity's Rainbow" "is the longest, most difficult and most ambitious novel to appear here since Nabokov's 'Ada' ... its technical and verbal resources bring to mind Melville and Faulkner ... Pynchon establishes his imaginative continuity with the great modernist writers of the early years of this century."—Mick Sussman, Books Producer, The New York Times on the Web

http://forums.nytimes.com/top/opinion/readersopinions/forums/books/februaryreadinggroupgravitysrainbowbythomaspynchon/index.html?offset=0&fid=.fa91266/0


« Last Edit: June 11, 2008, 01:16:02 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #1081 on: June 11, 2008, 01:28:30 AM »



Urban Haiku
—for Shiki Masaoka (1867-1902)

A sharp lightning flash—
Between the New York Times…
And the old master
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« Reply #1082 on: June 11, 2008, 02:22:45 AM »



Brooklyn Bridge Haiku

“his sexual appetites were
voracious  and involved
far too many sailors”
—William Logan, “Hart
Crane’s Bridge to Nowhere”
NYTimes January 28, 2007

There's more than just that—
Hart Crane was writing up there…
Columbia Heights

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/01/28/books/review/Logan.t.html?ref=books


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« Reply #1083 on: June 11, 2008, 05:13:54 AM »


Elfriede Jelinek

POMO Horror Story


Reading this late this afternoon, two things: First, a sentence from the LRB review of Jelenck's "Greed": "Time becomes oppressive when we are unable to see where it is leading." Are you familiar with this author?  Non-linear style, continual present as Stein...history culminates at this point? 


Up from the Cellar
Nicholas Spice
Greed by Elfriede Jelinek, translated by Martin Chalmers 

http://www.lrb.co.uk/v30/n11/spic01_.html

And I thought I had it bad—poor little Pomo-Homo me!

Nobel Prize-winning Jelinek abandons all reference to realist form.

She writes a kind of horror prose poetry or extended dramatic monologue.

The voice of the narrator is as much the subject of the book as the events it describes.

She has nothing to do with linear form.

Her novels are like art installations.

They’re like large panels painted in the same style treating horror—but in an ever shifting kaleidoscope.

She goes to the very edge of coherence—but never beyond it.

She asks the question: “Is writing the gift of adaptability and suppleness, of cuddling up to reality?”

She’s intensely introspective, not over concerned with intelligibility, and reading her is like overhearing someone talking to themselves trying to figure something out.

She’s an internet literary bag lady and crank.

She’s a kooky “cyberite”—an agoraphobic Cassandra whose preferred channel of prophecy and admonition is the internet: www.elfriedejelinek.com 

She gets the Nobel Prize—and all hell breaks loose. 

What does this have to do with gay rights? Well…

Jelinek reminds me of Tod Browning and his horror movie Freaks. She reminds me of queer minimalist Dennis Cooper with his trashy S/M novels.

If you don’t like this POMO literary approach—don’t go to her internet site or read her novels or LRB review. And please don’t read the next post.


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« Reply #1084 on: June 11, 2008, 05:52:48 AM »


Elfriede Jelinek

POMO Horror Story 2

Hoffman, I prefer Dennis Cooper’s minimalust/minimalist writing style—maybe even more minimalist than that. I like transgressive Pomo haiku—keeping it to 3 lines & 17 syllables. And then dumping all the rest as footnotes—I don’t care, they can be a mile long.

As you know, there were the feel-good types in the NYTimes Urban Haiku Forum—doing haikus that were smoochy & schmoozey. There were the Traditionalists—who stuck with the seasons & flowers. There were the dummies who thought a You-Tube clip was all it took.

And then there was me & Roadytoad—posting gay urban haiku. We were immediately called freaks & scumballs—I guess you could say we were truly Pomo horror poets to the butchy homophobic set. As if “gays” weren’t “urban”—and the haiku form belonged to straights.

That’s why I identify with Jelinek—she knew the shit would hit the fan when she got the Nobel Prize. Her critics got hysterical—they said she profaned the Novel as a sacred form & she gave all of Austria a bad name.     

Elfriede Jelinek is the author of Up from the Cellar and Die Klavierspielerin (1983), translated as The Piano Teacher—she makes an apparently startling dialectical swerve in her analysis of sexual politics, rotating the subject through 180 degrees in both novels.

The Piano Teacher is about woman-as-dominatrix-ogre and  Up from the Cellar is about man-as-dominatrix-ogre.
 
“Time becomes oppressive when we are unable to see where it is leading.”

“In Greed, Jelinek finds a way to deal with depth (with the abyss inside the human) without either reverting to the analgesic of realism or exhausting the reader with flood-lit ugliness.”

“The narrative voice is half-cracked and pitiable and speaks the language of a mind driven back inside itself by the horror of what it has to tell: like the language of Ophelia after she goes mad, or the language of a traumatized child talking to her doll, or an old lady drifting into dementia.”

“The story of Amstetten has the unreality of the ‘bad’ fairy tale. The numbers in it are fairy-tale numbers: seven children above ground, seven children below. The 24 years of Elisabeth’s captivity are as inexact as the hundred years that Sleeping Beauty slept – they stand for eternity. We might be able to imagine being locked away in a windowless cellar for 24 days, for 24 weeks even, but not 24 years. How did Elisabeth Fritzl survive this? In what sense did she survive it?”

“The style of Jelinek’s essay ‘Im Verlassenen’ is very similar to that of Gier; indeed, for some years now, Jelinek has written everything in this style: novels, plays and the pieces she posts on her website. It’s a demanding idiom characterised by long slabs of unparagraphed text, free-form and improvisatory, in which the movement of thought is impelled by association and wordplay, and changes in voice and register happen without warning. Part of the mission of this way of writing is to go down into the cellars of the language and unlock long buried relationships between words. For example, the phrase ‘Im Verlassenen’ is an invention, a gerundive formed from the verb verlassen, ‘to leave’, ‘desert’ or ‘abandon’. ‘Im Verlassenen’ means something like ‘in a place of essential abandonment’ or ‘in abandon-ness’, and it draws to the surface the derivation of Verlies – the word for ‘dungeon’ used to describe the Amstetten cellar – from verlassen. A Verlies is a place where you are abandoned.”

“She needed to be kept moderately human. So he built her a kitchen and a bathroom (did he let her choose the tiles? Jelinek asks). So that, like any good housewife, she could wash and cook. So that, like any good housewife, she would remain wholesome to fuck.”

“As an apprenticeship in dissidence, a childhood sacrificed to classical music is hard to beat. Classical music is always acceptable to authority because it cannot overtly challenge power with subversive ideas or disturbing representations. Parents and states know they are on safe ground when their children or subjects are playing Mozart or Schubert – and enjoying it.”

The Piano Teacher’s merciless portrayal of female sexual perversion is the overlay on a savage critique of normal male sexuality.

“In the year The Piano Teacher appeared, Jelinek published a short piece on the theatre with the title ‘Ich möchte seicht sein’, ‘I want to be shallow’ – the nearest thing in her output to an aesthetic manifesto. The hyperbole of the piece throws up an ironic halo around it (it was later staged as a dramatic monologue), but it explains a lot about Jelinek’s aims in her early work. ‘I want to be shallow’ is an attack on conventional realist theatre. ‘I don’t want to bring strange people to life in front of an audience,’ Jelinek, or ‘Jelinek’, says. Characters on stage should be flat, like clothes in a fashion show: what you get should be no more than what you see. Psychological realism is repulsive, because it allows us to escape unpalatable reality by taking shelter in the ‘luxuriousness’ of personality, losing ourselves in the depth of individuated character. The writer’s task is to block this manoeuvre, to chase us off to a point from which we can view the horror with a dispassionate eye.”


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« Reply #1085 on: June 11, 2008, 06:21:18 AM »



What Is A Gay American?


You're gay?
 

I was going to be PC & answer your question by saying I’m a “gay American”—along the lines of Gertrude Stein’s The Making of Americans. It’s a Modernist tome like Joyce’s Ulysses & Eliot’s The Wasteland.

But they say we’re POMO now—these are the dayz of Postmodernism. In other words there’s no classic Text to worship or emulate—Modernism is outdated & POMO Lit is polymorphically perverse. Movies, You-Tube & the Internet are closer to our fragmented, multi-linked, transgressive existence now… compared with what Novels used to do back then.

Think, Hemingway, Greene, Grass, Orwell, Capote...

Things are different now. That’s why I say there's no such thing as being gay anymore & the GLBTQ Movement is dead. The gay bookstores are closed, the gay lit distribution networks are gone, the gay lit magazines are kaput—why?

Because the gay movement has been absorbed into the System—just as gay marriage has been legalized into the MA, VT, NY & CA Zeitgeist. This is how social change happens. It used to take 100 years or 4 generations for things to change—at least that’s what Gertrude Stein says in her various essays. She’s pretty astute—when it comes to writing. But she's a gone Sapphic Modernist now—along with Djuna Barnes & Mina Loy...

It’s the Blogosphere that’s the engine of change now as far as writing, publishing, marketing is concerned—and it’s the reason why the gay movement is morphing & going mainstream. The blurb & link below explains it—how the generational thing has been squeezed down from Stein’s dayz to now. 

Being a gay poet these dayz is different...

I guess you could call me kinda pomo-homo now.

 Cool Cool Cool

http://www.likethespice.com/aftereverything.html

“A queer sensibility has run through much of contemporary art since the end of abstract expressionism. Gay artists such as Andy Warhol, David Hockney, Felix Gonzalez-Torres, Keith Haring and John Waters have had major effects on the art and pop-cultural landscape. While their art is hardly restricted to gay subject matter, a queer sensibility sits at the bedrock of their production. From pop's cool fabulousness to John Waters' polymorphically perverse outsider's take on everything to artists coping with the massive scope of the AIDS crisis, gay issues have been at the center of art history since the fifties.”

"Recently there is a seismic shift in what it means to be gay. Factors driving this change are the internet's inherent capacity for social networking and increasing visibility, legal protections and acceptance of gay men. The era of a hermetically sealed gay culture, hiding in the closet or in gay bars is over. Now gay men interact with a much broader range of society and in a greatly expanded context, they also interact with men from across the world online. There is a new generation of gay men who came out at 16, took their boyfriends to the prom without hassle and hardly see the point of going to a gay bar. This exhibition examines some of the ways artists are expressing, reacting to and using these new conditions and remembering the old ones in their work.”



Look, that's all great, but apparently you don't get sarcasm.
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« Reply #1086 on: June 11, 2008, 07:01:53 AM »

Harvard Business School Haiku
—for Detective_Winslow

I didn’t know, man—
There’s a Harvard Business School…
Way out there in Kansas

_____


"So, I really don't get it...Should I be ashamed to be on the path to earning a MBA at a relatively young age?"

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« Reply #1087 on: June 11, 2008, 07:12:48 AM »

Hoity-Toity Haiku
—for vookaleer

I’m not here for fun—
I’m not paid to be subtle…
Snarky is your game



Actually not very subtle or original.  The cover and other images of the building have been used in that context several times over the years.


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« Reply #1088 on: June 11, 2008, 07:18:53 AM »

Don't put California in the confirmed list for legalizing same sex marriages.  The issue will be on the ballot this November, and California has a large white, black, and Latino contingent that vigorously oppose same sex marriage/civil union.  This hot button issue, like abortion, the death penalty, taxes, and etc., is not going down without a fight by the opposition, using all the spin that can be dredged up.

I have a cousin on my father's side who is a Baptist missionary in central Mexico.  Been down there some 30 years.  He sends me copies of e-mails (besides our personal ones) between him and his church.  From the e-mail I got this morning, the Baptists everywhere in the world are gearing up to influence the California vote.
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« Reply #1089 on: June 11, 2008, 08:23:06 AM »

California Gay-marriage opponents abandon recall campaign against judge

http://gay_blog.blogspot.com/2005/07/california-gay-marriage-opponents.html

SACRAMENTO – Opponents of same-sex marriage have abandoned their campaign to recall a Sacramento County Superior Court judge who upheld a controversial gay-rights law.

The drive against Judge Loren McMaster had been closely watched, coming as it did at the height of ideological fights in the courts and Legislature over same-sex marriage.

The state's attorney general, judges from across the country and gay-rights advocates had rallied behind the jurist, saying removing him would send an ominous message.

Sacramento County social conservatives launched the recall in late December, angered by McMaster's ruling three months earlier that upheld the state's domestic partners law granting same-sex couples many of the rights and responsibilities of marriage.

The state Supreme Court unanimously agreed with McMaster in a June 29 ruling.

"That took the wind out of our sails," recall leader Tony Andrade said in a phone message announcing the campaign had folded.

Judges said they were pleased with the outcome and that a recall generally should be reserved for unethical or illegal behavior.

Unhappy voters can oust judges at the next election or work to change the law, they said.

"It potentially could have a great chilling effect on the legal process. ...I shouldn't have to be worried about whether I'm going to be recalled based on whether some group likes my decisions," said Gayle Nachtigal, an Oregon Circuit Court judge and president of the American Judges Association.

Judge James Mize, president of the California Association of Judges, said a successful recall "would have destroyed the legal system as we know it.

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« Reply #1090 on: June 11, 2008, 08:24:13 AM »

Don't put California in the confirmed list for legalizing same sex marriages.  The issue will be on the ballot this November, and California has a large white, black, and Latino contingent that vigorously oppose same sex marriage/civil union.  This hot button issue, like abortion, the death penalty, taxes, and etc., is not going down without a fight by the opposition, using all the spin that can be dredged up.

I have a cousin on my father's side who is a Baptist missionary in central Mexico.  Been down there some 30 years.  He sends me copies of e-mails (besides our personal ones) between him and his church.  From the e-mail I got this morning, the Baptists everywhere in the world are gearing up to influence the California vote.

If they do, I hope the IRS rescinds their tax exemption for their foray into the electoral process,

In the interim, assuming the initiative wins a majority, what do you suggest be done with the same sex marriages contracted during the interim?

On the other hand, won't it be delicious if the intiative LOSES?  Then where will the homophobes go?
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« Reply #1091 on: June 11, 2008, 08:31:53 AM »

Cap, " . . . on the other hand . . . ."  From your text to God's inbox.  Smiley
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« Reply #1092 on: June 11, 2008, 08:45:07 AM »

In the interim, assuming the initiative wins a majority, what do you suggest be done with the same sex marriages contracted during the interim?

http://michellemalkin.com/2008/05/15/court-watch-california-gay-marriage-ruling/

If the measure qualifies for the ballot and voters approve it, it will supersede today’s ruling. The initiative does not say whether it would apply retroactively to annul marriages performed before November, an omission that would wind up before the courts.

The legal case dates back to February 2004, when San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom ordered the city clerk to start issuing marriage licenses to couples regardless of their gender, saying he doubted the constitutionality of the state marriage law.

The state’s high court ordered a halt a month later, after nearly 4,000 same-sex weddings had been performed at San Francisco City Hall. The court annulled the marriages in August 2004, ruling that Newsom lacked authority to defy the state law. But it did not rule on the validity of the law itself and said it would await proceedings in lower courts.

Some of the couples immediately sued in Superior Court and were joined by the city of San Francisco, which said it had a stake in ensuring equality for its residents. The case that ultimately reached the state Supreme Court consolidated four suits, one by the city and three by 23 same-sex couples in San Francisco and Los Angeles.


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« Reply #1093 on: June 11, 2008, 06:07:07 PM »



Snarky Bildungsroman


Look, that's all great, but apparently you don't get sarcasm.


Look, I’m no different than anybody else when it comes to sarcasm—I ignore it or deal with it. I’ve had to deal with it since the first grade—because I was born with a lisp, a weak wrist & a swish. Nobody told me what was wrong—they just treated me like dirt. Each gay has their own way of dealing with it—each gay has their own story to tell.

Elfriede Jelinek didn’t get the Nobel Prize for nothing—obviously she’s telling her own story over & over again. Up from the Cellar sounds like a pretty Snarky Bildungsroman to me. But after reading the LRB review my only question is just how snarky & horrible does it get?

From what I’ve read so far—Up from the Cellar sounds like a pretty good analogy to the gay “Closet” many gay people go through. Or used to go through. Being a Pomo Homo—how is that different than Elfriede Jelinek’s various horror Fabrications?

Or should I say Borgesian Fabulations?   

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« Reply #1094 on: June 11, 2008, 09:05:52 PM »

Jelinek's blog looks interesting to me...at least the translations.  Wish I could read more German.

I wasn't familiar with Cooper.  Looked him up on on Salon....death threats???  He must have something important to say.

« Last Edit: June 11, 2008, 09:07:42 PM by Lhoffman » Logged
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