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Author Topic: Asia  (Read 2843 times)
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« on: April 16, 2007, 09:01:55 PM »

Discuss Asian politics.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2007, 02:24:48 AM »

Tanka for Prince Charles

"I happen to believe climate change is the greatest challenge facing us all."
http://news.uk.msn.com/Article.aspx?cp-documenti [...]


we need new kigo—
for global warming problem.
but what would it be?

slow death of all cherry trees?
new dust bowl depression time?
« Last Edit: June 13, 2007, 03:03:34 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2007, 02:28:22 AM »

Elba haiku

“here where a thousand / captains swore grand conquest /
tall grasses their monument”—basho


she escapes again
she and her Edo-lover—
young napoleon
« Last Edit: June 13, 2007, 05:18:05 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2007, 02:30:28 AM »

Political Haiku

“at midnight under the bright moon a secret worm digs into a chestnut”—basho

galloping gobsmacks—
there’s a secret worm inside
my little pea-brain
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« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2007, 02:34:06 AM »

The Young Prince

“with no underrobes bare butt suddenly exposed a gust of spring wind”—Buson, translated by Sam Hamill & J. P. Seaton, The Poetry of Zen, Boston: Shambhala, 2004, page 157.

how quickly I move—
when my toilet is chilly
beneath the cedars
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« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2007, 02:37:02 AM »

Palace Intrigues

“myself monopolizes me”—tom clausen

evening zazen—
me and my cat doing some
palace consulting
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« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2007, 02:42:11 AM »

The Palace Library

"What, at this moment, is lacking?"--Rizsai

swept away the books—
yet in an alcove corner
a Gobi Desert…
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« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2007, 02:45:15 AM »

Edo Evening

—for Elizabeth Bishop

it’s really easy—
the art of giving things up—
time, palace, kingdoms
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« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2007, 02:52:18 AM »

Kyoto Protocol

“If not now—when?”—Rinzai

clean air is okay—
kyoto muse is fine but
I want New Edo
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« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2007, 03:42:50 AM »

The Politics of Haiku

“…like watching a slow-motion nature documentary where an anaconda ever so lazily disarticulates its jaw and inch by inch, millimeter by millimeter, swallows a goat.”—William Logan, “Falls the Shadow,” The New Criterion, Vol. 20, No. 10, June 2002.

I got good at it—
disarticulated night
encompassing me
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« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2007, 04:50:39 AM »

Notes on Japanese Poetry and Politics

“Thanks to the reforms effected by Shiki and his followers, even Japanese who were impatient with old usages discovered that a tanka or a haiku could be more effective in conveying certain perceptions, especially brief but memorable experiences, than any more modern form of poetry. A short poem is rather like a photograph: unlike an oil painting which may demand days or months of concentrated effort, a photograph can be taken in less than a second, but it too reveals the artist’s sensibility and his outlook on the world.”—Donald Keene, Dawn to the West: A History of Japanese Literature, New York: Columbia University Press, 1999, pages 3-5

There is a politics to haiku. Japanese poetry has been very politicized from the very beginning—all the way up until now. The history of Japan and China, the various schools, the various poets such as Basho—there’s nothing quite like it in America. America has its political poetry from Whitman to Sam Hamill—but it’s not as “embedded” in our culture like it is in Japan and China.

I first became aware of the politics of haiku during a brief time when I posted on the NYTimes Urban Haiku forum—a part of the New York Forum separate from the NYTimes Readers Group Forum along with its book lounge and other literary fora. There were traditional 5/7/5 haikuists—as well as experimental haikuists conjoined with youtube and other internet venues.

The idea of “urban haiku” was to make the traditional haiku relevant to city life—the cosmopolitan Big Apple’s dizzying rush of people, traffic, skyscrapers, work and living within the fast-paced Gotham moment. The urban haiku forum was online from 2003-2007 and many haiku were published by talented poets across the country and in Europe.

The Big Apple haiku grew and expanded to encompass many urban lifestyles in the US and Europe—although there was always an anti-urban undertow with some of the haikuists who were more interested in local myth and magic. Most poets published urban haiku however—giving the simple 5/7/5 haiku form a new uniquely contemporary outlook toward living in the city.

The political tension between the young British poets, for example, and the more experimental American poets was very intense—with a great deal of online debate and discussion about the nature of haiku and how relevant the haiku form was to contemporary cosmopolitan issues such as crime, lifestyle and other cosmopolitan matters separate from the usual concerns with nature and the seasons.

Haiku for me is a quick photo of the political zeitgeist—specifically the ever-increasing global warming problem. The Greenland icecap is melting much faster than computer projections predicted—in 5 years the gulf stream will be diverted and major parts of the globe will be flooded such as Florida, Louisiana and much of England and the European lowlands.

Thus global warming adds both a cosmopolitan and natural problematic to the equation--the politics of the Kyoto Protocol v. the Bush Administration is intense. Prince Charles is an advocate for global warming awareness. And that’s why I’ve begun this Asia political thread with a haiku dedicated to him. The haiku form is quick and politically precise. It fits the sound-byte communication culture we live in—TV, youtube, podcasts and the internet.

Can haiku raise political awareness of global warming before it’s too late?
« Last Edit: June 13, 2007, 04:52:43 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2007, 06:12:32 AM »

Global Warming Case Haiku

April 3, 2007

A couple of months ago I agreed to post a haiku on Mass. v. EPA on the blog of the Columbia Chapter of the American Constitution Society, when the case was decided. Here's what I've come up with:

The Earth gets hotter.
Massachusetts can complain.
EPA comply.


Jamie Colburn will post a more substantive piece on the case later today, and I'll have a FindLaw column on it on Monday, April 9.

http://michaeldorf.org/2007/04/global-warming-case-haiku.html

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« Reply #12 on: June 13, 2007, 07:20:58 AM »

Some “global warming” blog haiku

http://www.reason.com/blog/show/119154.html

What makes this blog interesting is it’s a global warming debate forum topic which increasingly generates haiku as the discussion progresses beginning with “sage’s” haiku below—followed by other bloggers who try their hand at haiku too in both serious and whimsical ways in regard to the global warming debate. See the above link for the complete prose-haiku debate. Here are some of the more interesting haiku:


sage | March 16, 2007, 11:37am | #

global warming hype
they scare us to raise money
love my gas guzzler

Tom | March 16, 2007, 11:45am | #

I hate liberals
Trashing Capitalism
and wearing Che shirts

jimmydageek | March 16, 2007, 11:52am | #

The Weather Channel
Plays "Twister" repeatedly.
Weather Channel Rocks!

de stijl | March 16, 2007, 11:55am | #

Tasty weather girls
Meteorologists are hot
When they wear glasses

Warren | March 16, 2007, 11:58am | #

The weather honeys
Pale by comparison to
Reason Pillow Girl

Cab | March 16, 2007, 12:06pm | #

the weather channel
is only slightly less wrong
than Lou Dobbs Tonight

Cab | March 16, 2007, 12:12pm | #

I won't be able
to stop talking like this for
the rest of the day

pinko | March 16, 2007, 12:25pm | #

"Big" Weather Channel...
more retarded excuses
from Hummer humpers.

sage | March 16, 2007, 12:41pm | #

what the hell is this
you guys are way off topic
stick with weather crap

highnumber | March 16, 2007, 12:44pm | #

the suck of haiku
is such an abstract topic
not good for reason

highnumber | March 16, 2007, 12:49pm | #

sickness is spreading
i could do this all day long
somebody help me!

highnumber | March 16, 2007, 12:54pm | #

don't you understand?
there is no global warming
where is ron bailey?

Akira MacKenzie | March 16, 2007, 12:55pm | #

Clueless right winger
Knows not science from his ass
Evolution is fact too

violent_k | March 16, 2007, 12:56pm | #

I cannot help you
The disease has gone too far
I suggest we drink

ed | March 16, 2007, 1:13pm | #

Okay, I give in.
Haiku has captured me too.
I will die, I hope.

highnumber | March 16, 2007, 1:15pm | #

who is guy montag?
what do people think of him?
obnoxious blowhard

jimmydageek | March 16, 2007, 1:21pm | #

Guy montag no fun.
Spoils fun of haiku posters
with non haiku rant.

jimmydageek | March 16, 2007, 1:29pm | #

thank you, dear mad tom
for pointing out my errors
give us dumb folk break

katsumi | March 16, 2007, 1:29pm | #

Haiku abuses
flom Gaijin telitoly
food not dericious

Stevo Darkly | March 16, 2007, 2:04pm | #

Global disaster!
Yet you talk football, weather babes?
Focus, guys, focus!

... on weather babes, sure!
(I pleasured myself to an
Incoming cold front)

Stevo Darkly | March 16, 2007, 2:12pm | #

Thank you, Mister Moose
And for alerting me to
This here haiku fest

set aside one day
comment in only haiku
let's say march sixteenth

Good thought, highnumber
-- and eat green sushi for a
Nice St. Haiku's Day!

STEPHEN THE GOLDBERGER | March 16, 2007, 2:17pm | #

For all that I know
The Super Bowl Shuffle crew
caused Global Warming

highnumber | March 16, 2007, 2:20pm | #

avoid green sushi
unless it's the wasabi
(really horseradish)

violent_k | March 16, 2007, 2:31pm | #

I think Guy has left
did not enjoy the haiku's
should we follow him?

The Real Bill | March 16, 2007, 3:35pm | #

I haven't written a haiku since sixth grade, and I'm not going to write one now. You guys keep it up, though; I'm busting a gut! (ROTFLMFAO)

Mad Mike | March 16, 2007, 4:05pm | #

OK, haiku fans, let's cut to the Weather Channel chase:

Stephanie Abrams
Kristina Abernathy
Sharon Resultan
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« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2007, 08:26:05 AM »

Another blog haiku

Springtime nor'easter
snow-covered cherry blossoms
Al Gore gave a talk


http://smadanek.blogspot.com/search/label/Global%20Warming
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« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2007, 08:28:39 AM »

 Cool   Nicely done, pugetopolis!
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