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pugetopolis
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« Reply #15 on: June 13, 2007, 08:17:39 PM »

Encroaching Sea Haiku

In South Pacific
Two islands, encroaching sea,
Life as known is lost.*


*Kiribati and Tuvalu, two inhabited islands near two uninhabited islands that have already sunk, are preparing for disaster.


March 2, 2007 | Posted by Bill Chameides in News, Haiku

http://environmentaldefenseblogs.org/climate411/2007/03/02/south_pacific

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Pingback from Climate 411 » Fallacies of Movie Critics - Environmental Defense
March 15th, 2007 at 1:46 pm

[…] The Facts: Climate has changed in the past, true. The difference now is that there are 6 billion people in the world. If millions of people are displaced by rising sea levels (a disaster that is already happening in some places), where will they go? If east coast cities are decimated by storms (think Katrina), what will we do? […]



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« Reply #16 on: June 13, 2007, 08:26:45 PM »

Drought Haiku

Warming of planet
Shifts global winds and rain clouds.
Land parched, people starve.


March 30, 2007 | Posted by Bill Chameides in Science, Haiku

http://environmentaldefenseblogs.org/climate411/category/haiku
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« Reply #17 on: June 13, 2007, 08:31:36 PM »

Too-Warm Winter Haiku

Apple blossoms bloom
On too-warm winter days, then
Frost, dead. No apples.




Yesterday was the first day of spring, so it's a good time to look back on the winter we just had. For most of the United States, it was really crazy. It started off with balmy, record-breaking temperatures in December and January, then turned bitter cold in February and March with some memorable and deadly snow storms.

March 23, 2007 | Posted by Bill Chameides in News, Haiku

http://environmentaldefenseblogs.org/climate411/category/haiku
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« Reply #18 on: June 13, 2007, 08:34:42 PM »

Coral Reef Haiku

Coral reef brilliance
Bleached white by loss of algae,
Killed by warming sea.


March 16, 2007 | Posted by Bill Chameides in News, Haiku

http://environmentaldefenseblogs.org/climate411/category/haiku
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« Reply #19 on: June 13, 2007, 08:37:24 PM »

Arctic Villages Haiku

Arctic Villages
On permafrost for millennia
Falling into sea.


March 9, 2007 | Posted by Bill Chameides in News, Haiku

http://environmentaldefenseblogs.org/climate411/category/haiku
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« Reply #20 on: June 13, 2007, 08:42:13 PM »

A Climate Change Haiku

Glaciers in Andes mountains
frozen for 5000 years
now melting.


February 23, 2007 | Posted by Bill Chameides in News, Haiku

http://environmentaldefenseblogs.org/climate411/category/haiku

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Comment from Beth Wellington
February 24th, 2007 at 12:06 pm

APPALACHIA's LAST STAND

for thirty years coal
300 million years gone
our mountains war zoned
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« Reply #21 on: June 13, 2007, 09:22:12 PM »

Students' haiku spotlighted at the United Nations

http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20070613f2.html

By CRYSTAL WONG
Wednesday, June 13, 2007

NEW YORK (Kyodo) More than 70 haiku in both English and Japanese written by students of all ages are on display at the United Nations, marking a first for an annual haiku contest sponsored by a group of English and Japanese teachers for the last nine years.

"One may describe feelings directly or suggest them indirectly through the depiction of nature," Japanese Ambassador to the U.N. Kenzo Oshima said about haiku in a message to the winners. "Perhaps this is why the art of haiku has become so popular among non-Japanese speakers."

The Japanese mission to the U.N. became a cosponsor of the contest last year, along with the Northeast Council of Teachers of Japanese and the English and Japanese departments of the U.N. International school.

Sixteen students from elementary and secondary schools were chosen as first- to third-prize winners, while the rest of the haiku displayed at the U.N. won honorable mention out of more than 500 entries submitted by U.S. East Coast schools between last November and April.

Proud parents and relatives of the young haiku writers gathered on the first floor of the U.N. to hear the winners read their poems in both English and Japanese.

Contest judges John Stevenson and Hiroaki Sato were on hand to provide commentary after the readings.
Baraa Elhariry, 15, whose first foray into writing haiku garnered him both second and third place in the contest, said his success was "unexpected" since he wrote his first haiku as part of an assignment.

Working within the 17-syllable limit did not allow him to capture complex ideas, he said, but the ninth-grader at Midwood High School in Brooklyn, N.Y., added it was not hard to write more than five haiku to submit to his teacher. His second-place entry describes the feeling of a fall moment:

Autumn winds
Blow across the blades of
grass
I turn my head


Contest judge Stevenson said: "The poet was present and sensed something. The way to appreciate such a poem is to put yourself in the same place and see what you notice. What turns your head?"

Meanwhile, Elhariry's third-place entry captured a feeling of freedom as one leaves class:

The bell rings
I rush down the stairs
The breeze fills my coat


Stevenson said: "the breeze is something that the poet identifies with for one free moment of sensation. The breeze 'wears' the coat."

"Hopefully I will write more haiku," said Elhariry, an avid reader. "I want to be a writer of novels, children's books, maybe a little nonfiction."

Stevenson, editor of an English haiku journal, said he looked for students who responded in interesting ways to the assignments given by their teachers, and "celebrated their resilience" in working within their given themes.

He noted that it is widely accepted that the common English haiku format of three lines of 5-7-5 syllables each is too long, because English syllables can be much longer than the uniform sounds in Japanese. But no one can agree on a specific form or length.

"There are no perfect English-language haiku, though there is an old saying that practice makes perfect. I prefer a variation of this that I've heard in recent years: practice makes progress," the judge told students in a message.

Judging the contest for the first time, Stevenson said it was touching to see parents and students respond to seeing their entries on display. "I'd love to do it again," he said.

Japanese-language winners read their poems first in Japanese, while Sato, a leading English translator of haiku, jokingly said he would have the young poets, all of whom were ably bilingual, provide their own translations.

The haiku will be on display at the U.N. through June 15.



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« Reply #22 on: June 14, 2007, 05:42:01 PM »

Moonviewing Party

—for basho

moon-viewing thru clouds—
moon-shadows scudding down low
thru the tall cedars

then moon goes ka-plunk—
falling down into the sea
the sea that is me


“China and India need to be encouraged to pursue decarbonizing industrialization. Reducing carbon emissions through energy-saving measures will not only cut costs, but also enhance economic competitiveness. As future economic giants, China and India should be urged to accept certain responsibilities and participate in the emissions credit trading program. If this is a too heavy burden, we can help by offering technological cooperation and economic aid. Once this direction is set, further discussions can be carried over to the G-8 summit in Toyako, Hokkaido, next year.”—The Asahi Shimbun, June 6(IHT/Asahi: June 7,2007)

http://www.asahi.com/english/Herald-asahi/TKY200706070088.html



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« Reply #23 on: June 14, 2007, 06:52:37 PM »

GREEN JAPAN?
Japan's green strides belie spotty record


http://search.japantimes.co.jp/cgi-bin/nn20070612i1.html

By ERIC PRIDEAUX
Staff writer

Last month, Prime Minister Shinzo Abe sought a leading role in the fight against climate change when he proposed a global initiative to halve greenhouse gas emissions by 2050.

But for all its dramatic appeal — made in the leadup to last week's Group of Eight summit in Germany — the disconnect between Abe's Cool Earth 50 proclamation and Japan's spotty environmental record had many people scratching their heads.

Japan boasted its green credentials in 1997 when it hosted talks leading to the historic Kyoto Protocol, in which signatories agreed to cut their greenhouse gas emissions from 1990 levels by an average of 5.2 percent by 2012. Japan itself committed to cuts of 6 percent by 2008-2012.

Yet Japan has little to show by way of results. According to the Environment Ministry, output of greenhouse gases in 2005, the last year for which data are available, were in fact 7.8 percent above the 1990 level — or 13.8 percent above target. The increase in carbon dioxide emissions was even more pronounced, at 13.1 percent above the 1990 level.

Following are some basic facts about global warming and how Japan is dealing with it:

What's the latest on global warming?

On May 21, the magazine New Scientist reported that recent global carbon dioxide emissions are growing more quickly than the worst-case climate scenario used by the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, the organization created by the United Nations to assess scientific, technical and socioeconomic issues connected to climate change. The reason was inefficient production of energy across the globe, the magazine said.

Although emissions grew 1.1 percent annually on average during the 1990s, growth climbed to 3.3 percent between 2000 and 2004, when the study ended, the magazine said, citing a research team led by Michael Raupach of the Australian Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organization.

What's the world doing about it?

In 2005, a record $ 38 billion was invested in renewable energy, up dramatically from $ 30 billion the year before, according to the Renewable Energy Policy Network for the 21st Century, which connects governments and environmental groups worldwide.

Who is leading the pack?

China boasted renewable-energy generation capacity of 42 gigawatts that year — most of it small hydroelectric plants. After that came Germany, with 23 gigawatts, chiefly from wind energy, and the United States, combining 23 gigawatts of mostly biomass, geothermal, wind and small-hydro power. Spain and India followed, with Japan lagging behind in sixth place.

These figures exclude large hydroelectric dams, which despite being a source of renewable energy often exact a toll on surrounding ecosystems.

What has Japan contributed?

Japan has made dramatic progress in energy efficiency over the decades following the 1973 oil crisis. Measured as the equivalent in tons of petroleum per $ 1,000 in actual gross domestic product, Japan has boosted energy efficiency by about a third since 1970.

The lower the ratio, the more efficient the energy use. In 2004, Japan stood at 0.11, better than 0.18 for Germany, 0.22 for the U.S. and 0.85 for China, according to figures from the Paris-based International Energy Agency. Higher efficiency, of course, translates into lower greenhouse emissions.

And at government ministries, the bureaucrats charged with crafting green policy set the example by dressing seasonally to keep summer air conditioning and winter heating low. Documents are printed on the back of scrap paper and reusable bags are distributed.

Thanks to these and other efforts, Japanese ministries' greenhouse-gas emissions dropped almost 16 percent between 2001 and 2006.

How much does Japan figure on the global energy stage?

Greatly. Japan ranks fourth in the world in both consumption of primary energy and emissions of carbon dioxide from fossil fuels, according to figures from the U.S. Energy Information Administration. The only countries with more impact were the U.S., China and Russia, in that order in both categories.
Still, there are wide gaps between Japan and the others: The U.S., for example, outpaces Japan in terms of energy consumption and output of carbon dioxide by more than four times.

Has Japan shown initiative in further improving energy use?

In several areas, yes. Electronics giant Sharp Corp. is the world's largest manufacturer of solar cells, for one. And thanks to aggressive government support, Japan now accounts for half of total global photovoltaic production and installed capacity, according to Kanagawa Prefecture-based New Energy and Industrial Technology Development Organization.

And though it has opposed efforts by California to introduce ambitious limits on emissions from autos — efforts that have inspired other U.S. states to take similar action — Toyota Motor Corp. can still rattle off a long list of green accomplishments, among them a 19 percent reduction of carbon dioxide emissions in fiscal 2005 compared with 1990, due to streamlining of operations and new technologies.

That, of course, is not to mention Toyota's Prius hybrid automobile, whose 35.5 km per liter fuel efficiency has made it a green sensation. Japanese insiders now whisper about a next-generation battery for a plug-in hybrid that could do much more to reduce the country's — and the world's — reliance on gasoline.

So why hasn't Japan been able to cut greenhouse gases more?

One reason is that industrial efficiency isn't matched by a sense of urgency over emissions across society. Some of Japan's sharpest increases in carbon dioxide came from the service sector, the source of a 44.6 percent rise in emissions above the 1990 level. This is partly attributable to demand for heating electricity during cold weather. Unlike government ministries, it appears, private companies were too reluctant to ask workers or customers to just bundle up.

More important was the transport sector, representing a fifth of total carbon dioxide output. Within that segment, leisure travel-related emissions in 2005 were nearly 40 percent above the 1990 level.

Is the government cracking down?

No. In contrast to steps by the European Commission and some U.S. states to slash car emissions, the government seems to be taking a back-seat approach. Only Tokyo and the prefectures of Chiba, Saitama, Kanagawa and Aichi have anti-idling measures in place, according to an official at the Environment Ministry — and those lack teeth. The official said he believed there was no movement afoot to seek a nationwide anti-idling law.

Considering the worldwide brouhaha over climate change, is anything changing in Japan?

It seems so. Another Environment Ministry official confided that policymakers feel a need "to accelerate" Japan's reaction to global warming, and that a ramp-up of policy will be announced by March.

That would be just in time to make a dramatic splash for another big, international conference with an expected environmental theme: next year's July 7-9 Group of Eight summit, to be hosted by Japan in Hokkaido.


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« Reply #24 on: June 15, 2007, 08:46:27 PM »

Carnivàle  haiku

“fumaji nao/shi no kage uzumu/matsu no yuki—I shall not tread on it/still my master’s shadow buries/the now in the pines”—Yasuhara Masaakira (1609-1603)

lodz kicks the bucket—
in “the day that was the day”
eyes glazing over…

hawkins strangles him—
is that any way to act
psychic-to-psychic?

up until then lodz—
and ben hawkins together
two peas in a pod

plus there’s management—
behind plush velvet curtains
there in the trailer

mysterious voice—
enantiodromiaesque
another psychic

what does one expect—
from a carnival of freaks
but paranormals?

all of them gifted—
led by samson the midget
thru the great dust bowl

dancing Siamese twins—
bearded ladies card readers
plus the reptile man

the penguin boy speaks—
above the roustabout din
and ferris wheel spin

it’s depression time—
stock market crash once again
kind of like now hmmm?

dazed young ben hawkins
stumbling out lodz’s trailer
after his long trance

skimpy kimono—
puce fuchsias pale white skin
against black silk

he’s the one they say—
the kid who can bring things back
from the land of dis

into the moment—
magic realism thrives*
during Carnivàle

—from "Carnivàle" (2003) Episode 12

*As the New Depression and Dust Bowl descends on us—online psychics and carnival geeks warn us about this and that. Global warming, hurricanes, flooding, droughts, pole shifts, Planet X, wars, disease, famines—along with the usual greed, anger and stupidity besetting human kind. Teitoku believed that Japanese poetry, first created by the gods, had changed itself with the times from waka to renga to haiku—the last he felt most suited to his own age. Teitoku expressed his conviction that unless the times are propitious, a work of literature cannot be appreciated. Haiku’s main purpose—magic realism embedded in carnival.

“The art of haiku places falsehood (kyo) ahead of truth (jitsu)”—Soin (David Keene, World Within Walls: A History of Japanese Literature, New York: Columbia Press, 1999, page 48)

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« Reply #25 on: June 15, 2007, 09:57:59 PM »



100 Aspects of the Moon #7, by Tsukioka Yoshitoshi: "Inaba Mountain Moon"

The young Toyotomi Hideyoshi leads a small group assaulting the castle on Inaba Mountain; 1885, 12th month
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« Reply #26 on: June 16, 2007, 04:41:32 PM »

How Writers Are Responding to Katrina

Thinking About New Orleans #3

http://bookcriticscircle.blogspot.com/2006/08/thinking-about-new-orleans_115644518674923983.html

This is the third in our series about New Orleans writers. It's hard to judge how many writers have been displaced, dislocated and disoriented by Katrina and aftermath. Romanian-born New Orleanian Andrei Codrescu is a poet (It Was Today), novelist (The Blood Countess, Wakefield), essayist, screenwriter, English professor (at LSU in Baton Rouge) and editor of "Exquisite Corpse." You can hear his NPR commentaries regularly (his Katrina anniversary contribution is scheduled to air on August 27).He answered a few questions on the status of his Katrina recovery.

Q. Where do you work now? As compared to where you worked before Katrina? (What do you see from your window, for instance?)

A. I'm in my small apartment in the French Quarter in a building only
slightly battered by the Storm. Until last week I heard four Mexican
workers going about fixing the stairs, walls, and gutter. They listened to a pop station in Spanish and said hello every time I went out. On the other side of the building, another crew was working on a crumbling brick chimney. They listened to hip-hop. Right now they are all gone and the Quarter is empty on a weekday. There are no tourists, there is no calliope on the river, there aren't even any bums in Jackson Square. I haven't heard the cathedral bells and I have the
feeling that the city is dead. Last night I went to see a movie shoot
at One Eyed Jacks, and the hipsters, such as are left, looked tired as
they went through their fifth take of dancing. I'm getting ready to go
to Envie, my internet cafe on Decatur: there are always a few
desperate souls there pouring their souls into their laptops.

Q. Have you been able to pursue any of the writing subjects you were working on pre-Katrina? Or has the experience fully shifted your focus?

A. It's been an intensely feverish and creative time, all of it having to do with Miss K, the world-stopper. I've always thought that the world was ending, but I feel a new urgency. My artist friends feel the same: the waters started a fire under our butts. At the same time, it's hard to work if you're depressed. Exaltation and depression follow each other every few hours. I feel a bit like a ghost.

Q. How would you describe the difference in your mood between putting together your earlier collection, The Muse Is Always Half Dressed in New Orleans and New Orleans, Mon Amour, which includes your powerful rage-filled post-Katrina essays as well as earlier ones.

A. When I put together that book I was full of rage at our federal,
state, and local governments for permitting this tragedy. I felt that
I was drawing the portrait of a city that would no longer exist. I was
right, but now the moods are shifting as we pass through the Gray
Zone.
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« Reply #27 on: June 16, 2007, 04:45:32 PM »

HOW WE SEE US ONE YEAR AFTER
By Andrei Codrescu

(cont.)

About six months ago I went to St. Bernard Parish with my cameraman Jason to get my own share of disaster photography for the documentary that I'm making, which is different from the documentary everybody else made or is making. Every fifth person in New Orleans is either making or helping make a documentary. We are like the Amazon tribes whose families were said to consist of a mother, father, children, and one anthropologist.

We chose for our first foray a beached shrimp boat in St. Bernard
Parish, that was carried several blocks inland by the storm surge
before it slammed into a house and rested there to provide a backdrop for the news. On the lawn of the house there was a broken plasticSanta shadowed by the huge boat, and a bunch of soggy school books. I bent down to examine a notebook that was having its paged riffled by the wind, and saw that it was a first-grader's exercise book and the page I was looking at had on it, written in a child's hand, a poem entitled "I LOVE SANTA." I kid you not. It got to me. I read the poem out loud and a tear I hadn't counted on sprung down my cheek. I hope that Jason got a closeup.

…The two crimes against image and symbol-making were psychically
related. One year after Katrina, we are no longer photogenic. The
cameras focus on narrow slices of rebuilding, which is all that fits
within the lens. If you've been looking at the city for a year, things
look better. Most of the flooded cars packed in the neutral grounds
and under freeway overpasses are gone. There is no debris in places
most visible to motorists. There are trailers and gutted houses in
every wasted neighborhood. If you look only at the swarms of life in
isolated spots you might feel optimism, but if you look at what's
around these spots you might feel dread instead. Yes, there is a
recovery going on, but there is also a pervasive depression. The media
isn't equipped to deal with both hope and despair, it can only show
and tell one story at a time. The Gray Zone where we live is beyond
its power.

In New Orleans nothing is what seems. People believe things they don't say and say things they don't believe. To the media, we are
recovering. To ourselves we are sinking. Our heavily mediated and
heavily medicated city is generating paradoxes not certainties. About
the time the shrimp boat burned and the monument-building machines were ripped off, there was a picture in the newspaper of a young woman from Los Angeles playing songs on a guitar to St. Bernard residents waiting in line at a parish office. The singer looked super-optimistic and the women looked amused and disbelieving, but at least they beat the August 29 deadline/anniversary for permits to rebuild.

Q. What are you working on now?

A. On my nerves. I'm going to Romania Sept 12 to receive the Ovidius
Prize, their highest literary honor, named after Ovidius, the Roman
poet exiled to Romania by Augustus. Ovid never got to go back to Rome, but I get to go back to my native first home. Kinky, but I left there long ago. I may end up being an exile from New Orleans, my second home now. There just isn't enough time in one life for so many exiles. It sounds sappy, but you should see Ovidius complaining to the Emperor in the Tristae: the winters are frigid, the women paint themselves blue, the locals are cultureless savages.Didn't work for him, I don't think it will work for the 250,000 New Orleanians in exile who are complaining right now about the barbaric lack of spices in the foods of the North and the joyless people of the high plains.

Q. Anything else you'd like to mention? Does anything give you hope about the future of the city?

A. There are thousands of bright-souled volunteers in the city now
helping gut houses and rebuilding. The hope is them and what they'll
learn here. The city itself will be shaped by developers' money. The
good samaritans will leave their mark in the form of a new spirit of
place that will add itself to the existing genii locus and maybe help
them live. Ask me the same question
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« Reply #28 on: June 18, 2007, 11:15:50 PM »

CLIMATE AND WEATHER CHANGES: THE NEW SPECTATOR SPORT

When not so drastic, just keeping track of all the types and extraordinary number of recently building natural changes has become a bit of a spectator sport, as they are more often than not, the most interesting things reported in the news from day to day.

A galactic and global system in a state of reorganization may be found to to be polarizing between climatological extremes until arriving at a new state of relative balance.

Summary:

The discovery of May 30th 2006 reveals that the apparent placement of Earth at the nexus of these two galaxies has far greater significance than any had yet imagined--

Earth and her Sun star system is not aligned with the near 90 degree off-angle galaxy in the sky (now) before us because the Milky Way is not our parent galaxy.

This has been an amazingly significant historical and scientific discovery waiting to happen, now solving age-old mysteries that have baffled science, astronomy, and ancient prophesy researchers for centuries.


THE WHY -- CONNECTING THE DOTS:

We of the overarching Sagittarius Dwarf Elliptical Galaxy have finally come down next to, and even with the massively powerful spiral armed equatorial plane of the Milky Way Galaxy.

In our movement through space --

-- our Earth has now fully begun to respond to the more powerful galactic energies and electro-gravitational bias as we have reached the higher energy equatorial disc region of the massive spiral armed adjacent galaxy, the Milky Way.

http://curezone.com/blogs/m.asp?f=1207&i=2
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« Reply #29 on: July 24, 2007, 02:57:52 PM »

BHOPAL: THE SEARCH FOR JUSTICE (clip)

No discussions, start one

Bhopal: The Search for Justice200452 minsColor Multiple Directors

On December 2 1984, the world's worst industrial disaster occurred in Bhopal, India, when a leak from a chemical pesticide plant resulted in the death of 15,000 people and the maiming of hundreds of thousands more. In the years since, the survivors have been denied scientific and medical studies concerning the long-term effects. Filmmakers Lindalee Tracey, Nadeem Uddin, Peter Raymont and Harold Crooks tell the troubling legacy of this tragedy - poisoned water, "gas widows," genetic abnormalities in later generations - and the continuing quest for justice.
Violence, Adult Content
HBO
Tuesday July 24 at 9:35PM
Friday July 27 at 12:35AM
Friday July 27 at 10:35AM
Sunday July 29 at 3:35PM
Director Peter Raymont
Director Linda Lee Tracey

I am posting this, as some of you already know about my neighbors who decided to live separately from the director of this company at Bhopal;which just goes to show that some of these things catch up with you "at home" or where ever you go. The world is a small place because I had a friend go off to India while Mrs. Gandhi was still alive, she married a prince of a fellow whose father was commissioner of railroads and rural electrification(or, was it his father before him? One or the other of two men no longer at Varanasi or, Nepal in the summer,or the state office bldgs at New Delhi and when even her teacher's ashram there at Hanuman Temple-Varanasi has been bombed in the beginning all over again of the war of Partition with an upscale on terrorism). From the looks of things(or, to all appearances)she still supports the monastery at Dorjeling/Darjeeling of his Holiness the Dalai Lama(which is a worthy cause).
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