Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Business and Technology  (Read 1601 times)
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« on: April 16, 2007, 09:11:16 PM »

What technologies will have far reaching impact on the market?
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chuckamok
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« Reply #1 on: May 10, 2007, 11:10:37 PM »

Ultra-low-sulfur diesel and engines to take advantage of it (coming soon from Daimler and Honda) will, if adopted on a large scale in the U.S., will help us say ta-ta
 to Hugo- the-Goon and our Saudi - ahem - friends.

We can thank the Clinton admin for this intiiative.
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liquidsilver
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« Reply #2 on: May 29, 2007, 12:34:29 PM »

http://houston.bizjournals.com/houston/stories/2007/05/28/daily4.html
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"I hate listening to peoples dreams. It's like flipping through a stack of photographs. If I'm not in any of them and nobody's having sex, I just don't care."
jbottle
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« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2007, 09:44:54 PM »

Is there a short explanation of why bond yields have such a dramatic effect on stocks?  I guess I get the traditional summer selloff and jitters about earnings but there don't seem to be any indications that the economy is anything other than robust from the armchair economist.  I think there might be a boomer effect of large numbers of people shifting into bonds but given the longer life expectancy and continuing income flow, I don't get what makes capital shift so much based on bond yields.  It's been a long time since economics class, but if someone could explain in thirty words or less who is moving money from one to the other, I would be a little happier today.  I think generally the summer has been a buying opportunity for fairly valued companies that produce something valuable, tangible, and sufficiently unique to distinguish themselves from competition.  I've had a good run with Goldman Sachs, Caterpillar, Google, Crox, and buying Bank of America on weakness or really any below the $50 bellweather to get the good dividend.  It seems to be working but days like today are slightly discouraging for the average knucklehead liberal arts major under 40 who doesn't understand the fundamental relationship between stocks and bonds...I mean, I do, but I think it's kind of stupid. 
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jbottle
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« Reply #4 on: June 14, 2007, 10:52:36 AM »

Nevermind, I figured it out, but it's more of a game for a 60-70 yr. old, where much of the nation's wealth is concentrated, so I get it now.
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2007, 03:28:09 AM »

Bond yields are tied to rising and falling interest rates and or the risk of the company if a private issue.

Stock prices are based on future earnings expectations.

The only direct thing that ties them to each other is that when the economy is sagging or too hot, the fed typically adjusts the discount rate.  there fore if expected earnigns are down because of bad economy, stock prices are falling, but fed may lower interest rates (depending on inflation), which would allow you to sell your fixed return bonds for more money (presuming of course you had already invested before everyone else had caught on).

I'm over thirty words and we haven't even brought precious metals into the discussion yet... nor puts or calls
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jbottle
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« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2007, 06:46:32 PM »

No, I get the basic relationship, but for the average investor, those concepts don't really apply, that's macroeconomic thinking, I mean if you are a trader managing big portfolios, that's one thing, but if you're talking about a 35 yr. old he/she should be all in equities and diversified and look at fear as a buying opportunity and always sideline money in Bank of America or other dividend-yielding stock while taking profits and reconfiguring for slowing economy, inflation, consumer behaviour, etc.

I guess what I'm getting at is that the macro trends should present themselves as opportunities for the small investor other than getting somewhat beaten up by fees...I've had a great run in CAT just because I knew it had a bottom built in and that it wasn't as levered to new homes as much as China, and I'm up 30% in 10 mos. or so...

...I know this game is harder than I'm making it, but...
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #7 on: June 24, 2007, 01:51:39 AM »

I personally think the best way to make money is to start your own business - not play the markets...but sounds like you know your way around it pretty well to me...
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obertray
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« Reply #8 on: August 16, 2007, 03:54:37 PM »

There are two things I'd like to say bout this market YEEEEEE and HAAAAAAAAAAAAAAW!

Today was a great day to be in dabbling about picking up some bargains (yes they may be cheaper next week, some of them were cheaper by the time I pressed enter and then some were higher too!

The point is that there are a couple of games going on and if you're not playing them then you're able to make yourself some scratch.

The primary game going on is "Musical chairs" Hedge funds are teying to stave off disaster by trading the volitility in the markets. It's a zero net sum game among them and if their fund can close out the day with your (your here meaning another hedge fund) money then, great. Tomorrow we'll all play again and maybe you'll win and he'll lose. If you continue to lose, then eventually you'll have run out of money and you'll be out of the game, but your money stays in the game, Thank you for playing!

The consumer is in a tight spot (I would say "Pickle" but I'd hate to contradict what I have said elsewhere on the forums) and it isn't going to get looser anytime quick. But, there'll be another consumer to take his place and, well the funny thing is that life goes on. Everyday, people stilll want to eat and poop, and that means there are jobs carting the food in and carting the poop out. It'll be ok eventually (he whistled, darkly).

Anyway there is stuff out there that is down right down (rightly). I find that if I can find something that I'd be willing to hold onto even if it went down before it went up, if I buy it then eventually others will come to the same conclsion I have and before I know it I'm kissing that stock goodbye (I hold for a 20% net move then I move on).

I'm just sayin'.
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obertray
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« Reply #9 on: August 16, 2007, 04:03:33 PM »

Ok better finish, But It doesn't mean anything that the market closed up (ish).
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ponderosa
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« Reply #10 on: November 11, 2007, 06:47:16 AM »

Fasten your seatbelts, it's going to be a bumpy ride.

http://www.lewrockwell.com/blog/lewrw/archives/016795.html

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ponderosa
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« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2007, 11:55:35 AM »

funny money

http://www.gocomics.com/jeffdanziger/2007/12/16/
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Dzimas
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« Reply #12 on: February 11, 2008, 11:47:38 AM »

I would have thought Microsoft's bid for Yahoo! might have woke this forum up, but apparently not.  Seems Yahoo! is not content with a $45 bil buyout and is playing "chicken" with Gates and co.  I really don't know why MS offered such a high bid to begin with, except maybe to repel other bidders.  But, apparently Yahoo! is looking toward another loser, AOL, as second option.
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ponderosa
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« Reply #13 on: May 14, 2008, 03:47:04 PM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ipJTqCbETog
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barton
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« Reply #14 on: October 02, 2017, 12:03:19 PM »

https://xkcd.com/1227/

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"Nothing more foolish than a man chasing his hat!"
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