Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: The Environment  (Read 536 times)
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Donotremove
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« Reply #30 on: November 06, 2007, 03:40:36 PM »

Dzimas, whoops.  BIG whoops.  I can't live without cornmeal myownself.   Embarrassed  Gotta have that cornbread.
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #31 on: November 08, 2007, 09:47:23 AM »

Donot -

I was going to say!  Sheesh!  And don't forget your grits, home boy!   Wink
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weezo
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« Reply #32 on: November 08, 2007, 01:01:27 PM »

Wow, and don't forget the spoon bread - a holiday must in some parts of the country!
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desdemona222b
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« Reply #33 on: November 08, 2007, 01:14:30 PM »

Cornbread dressing is the only way to go during the holidays. 
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weezo
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« Reply #34 on: November 08, 2007, 01:32:40 PM »

Methinks the Native Americans did good when the conjured up their own means of "selection" to breed that satisfactory vegetable and grain -- corn!

For all you corn lovers out there, next time you see a Native American, give his hand a shake and tell him "thank you" for developing corn. Actually, the credit really goes to his wife. Women raised and did the selection of seed from year to year, so probaby were the source of corn's development.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #35 on: November 09, 2007, 03:58:13 AM »

Another interesting use of corn was that of Barbara McClintock using maize to test her theories on Genetics.  Much easier to see genetic combinations in corn kernals than it is in fruit flies:

At the time McClintock started her career, scientists were just becoming aware of the connection between heredity and events they could actually observe in cells under the microscope. McClintock pioneered the field of maize cytogenetics, or the cellular analysis of genetic phenomena in corn, which for the first time provided a visual connection between certain inheritable traits and their physical basis in the chromosome.
http://www.accessexcellence.org/RC/AB/BC/Barbara_McClintock.html
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barton
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« Reply #36 on: November 09, 2007, 11:28:36 AM »

I live in a state where a lot of people have been conned by the corn/fuel scam.  I agree with Donot that corn is just a bad thing, both for fuel tanks and cow's innards -- and it's a high glycemic food for people, i.e. fattening and without much nutrition.  Not that I'd ever give up cornbread or corn cakes.

For the temperate zone, switchgrass has the best efficiency for making ethanol. 

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madupont
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« Reply #37 on: November 10, 2007, 01:20:29 PM »


Donot -

I was going to say!  Sheesh!  And don't forget your grits, home boy!   Wink


Incidentally, as the question came up in the Food Matters forum, I learned this week from Beatrice at Gustiamo (in Manhattan) that grits are the same as polenta meal.

The one thing that I had never learned from ten years in Amish country is that fried corn meal mush is called, "Schlatter".
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madupont
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« Reply #38 on: November 10, 2007, 01:46:37 PM »

Ps.

I agree about the stuffing that it should be made with pre-made corn bread to dry a little before preparing the dressing as my mother used to call it. Here, the people have never referred to it as anything but "filling",probably for obvious reasons.   One of their best dishes -- served when large amounts of people have to be fed -- such as that first Viggo Mortensen movie, Witness, where he sits at the long outdoors- tables looking at Kelly who plays,"Rachel", who is trying to make herself obvious to John Buch, Harrison Ford, at the barn-raising -- is large sized flat baking pans(although they do have sides) filled with something called, "Amish Turkey", which is a mixture of lots of shredded turkey and gravy mixed with the "filling". I seem to remember that my mother added mushroom-slices. It is a feast fit for a king.  We could eat this until we are "stuffed".

I must admit that every now and then I prefer to make German dressing for certain meals, rather than the corn-bread version. Germans generally prefer it very moist or much wetter than most of us grew up thinking it always should be because when we were at home it was fluffier. It may have more celery which is an important vegetable in Amish country and is usually known as the "Wedding Vegetable" since most of it is harvested and will only store so long around the time of the weddings each November.  Some of the Celery can remain  hoe-d up in the kitchen-garden or in a cold frame.

Other Germans will tell you that stuffing or dressing should always be made with some rye bread in the recipe; that is the flavor they grew up to expect.

Our problem here is that when everyone else begins singing,"Where did all the automobiles go?", it is still costly to invest in your horse and buggy, besides you have to know when your horse outsmarts you and knows what you are thinking.  It is an entirely different method of driving that you have to learn at an early age; little girls are taught by their mothers when they are about eleven; although you will see little children practicing with a miniature horse or pony and a miniature sized cart.
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