Escape from Elba

Home and Garden => Pets => Topic started by: Admin on August 21, 2007, 09:33:42 PM



Title: Pets
Post by: Admin on August 21, 2007, 09:33:42 PM
Are you a cat lover?  Do you need help training your dog?  Discuss your pets here.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on August 21, 2007, 10:21:11 PM
Oh, thanks ever so much!

I never had a cat until I began teaching. I don't quite remember how Icey came to be our cat. Probably someone gave her to us when we moved to Blackstone. But, as all female kittens do, she had a litter, which arrived just before we were moving into our home in the country. The largest cat in the litter was an all white kitten. We found homes for all but two of the kittens, keeping a male named Tigre (who looks a lot like Rescue) and the female white kitten whom we named Snow. Tigre ran away one weekend when we all went to the beach, but Snow was sitting on the porch when we got back. So, for awhile, we had Snow and Icey. A cool pair. Both mother and daughter loved the range of our property, taking themselves into the woods, and up on the road when it pleased them.

One day, Icey was up on the road waiting for us to come home, and, probably hearing our car on the road, sat in front of the mailbox. When we got to the house, she wasn't stiff yet, but cold. Snow sniffed uselessly at her mother's dead body, and vowed never to trust the road again. We put Icey in an Avon box, and buried her on the edge of the woods, and planted bulbs and perennials above her.

For the rest of her 13 years of life, Snow never again sat on the road to wait for us. If she followed us up to the mailbox, we shushed her off the road. When she did cross the road in her never-ending quest for the perfection of catchable rodents, she scurried quickly from our side to the woods.

Snow was a wonderful cat. She never used a litter box. One time, we left her inside with a tray of litter, and she wouldn't use it even tho we were gone for three days. We couldn't put a collar on her, she'd run in the woods and come home with a paw tangled in it, hanging with bits of briars. She loved our week at the beach. She went down and chased the skunks from under the trailer. She visited the feral cats on the point, and came home at night to eat her favorite food. She was terrified of the Bay, but would allow hubby to bathe her every few months. She would walk around looking like a wet rat, until the door was opened, then she would run out to the yellow dirt in the driveway and roll in it til she was just a dirty as before the bath.

We couldn't grow catnip in the garden. Snow would roll in it until it gave up the ghost!

And, one day, when whe was 13 years old, she went out in the woods on the first day of hunting season, and we never saw her again. It took a long time to get over her loss. We had Fred for awhile. But Fred was my mom's cat, and barely tolerated us until the catnip in the sky took her away. Finally, after hubby moped for almost two more years, I said it was time to get another all-white cat. It took us about six months to find one "free to a good home", but we did find Snowkitis, who is now the queen of the roost. Even tho Rescue grew into a large cat, and Snowkitis is still a small cat, Rescue knows to defer to her in everything. When the good food goes down, he always stands back and lets her at it first. When we call them in, and the come barrelling up the steps like a team of mules, he never runs ahead of her until they are almost in the door, and then he bound over her, runs to the food dish, and waits for her to take the first bite.

Well, enough for now. It's time for others to share their kitties!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Furphy on August 21, 2007, 10:38:31 PM
I have five cats. Everybody is pretty civilized except for Buster. His nickname is Mr. Cheney because he is just pure ass mean. He wants to kill someone or at least be allowed to hurt them.

His target of choice is Bruno, an old homeless cat I took in last year. Bruno is blind in one eye and doesn't have a whole hell of a lot of teeth left. But he does have claws like an eagle's talons.

Buster jumps Bruno every chance he gets. Best we can tell Bruno wins the fights because we come home to hands full of Buster's black hair strewn about the place.

Since Bruno wins, why can't Buster just leave it alone?

I don't want to part with Buster because he is as beautiful as he is evil and that is saying something.

But what can I do to take some of the fight out of him?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Furphy on August 21, 2007, 10:40:13 PM
And the first b*astard to suggest shipping Buster off to Michael Vick is going to get a poke in the eye...


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on August 22, 2007, 12:00:25 AM
Furphy,

Confine Buster when you are out, and discipline him when you are around. I use a single finger tap  on the nose, and that usually works for a cat trying to climb up to my plate. When they get to scrapping, Hubby "takes out the stick". It is a wooden back scratcher that for some reason put a fear in both cats and they run to separate corners. They have never been struck with the stick, but it seems to put them on warning but good. Raising a fly swatter will also send them scurrying, but at least they've seen what a fly swatter can do to a pesky fly. If you usually talk sweetly to the cats, an angry voice may put Buster on notice. One thing to remember is that discipline other than the moment when something is happening is wasted energy. The cat has to know. We talk to our cats a lot, and they act like they understand. They do understand a few single words, but overall I think they just judge from the tone of voice. They know the word "out", and if that's what they want, they will immediately walk towards the door. If I ask if they want "food", they will walk to the kitchen to show me the bowl is empty. When it's time to come in for the night, and Snowkitis is already in, I can call to Rescue that it's time for "bed", and he'll stop chasing whatever his eye is on, and come in. He know if I call "bed" it's the last call for the night.

If you are gone, separate the cats, and put Buster where he can't get at Bruno. When you come home, love up on Buster. Let him loose from time to time, and if he fights with Bruno, tell him he's locked up tomorrow. You can confine him in the bathroom, any room with a door and a litter box, or put him in the pet carrier as an extreme. We used to put Rescue in the hall closet to calm him down, and let him out a little bit later. He usually settled into a nap in the closet, and forgot what he wanted to fight about when he came out.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on August 22, 2007, 01:05:43 AM
AWWWW.....Rescue is truly adoreable!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on August 22, 2007, 09:14:23 AM
Thank you, Laurie,

He is alternately, My Sweet Boy, My Silly Boy, My Pretty Boy, depending on what he is doing. He loves to be petted on the top of his head, scratched on either side of his face, and under his chin. In a playful mood, he'll lay on his back and let me get his belly, which results in a cat-caphony of teeth and claws holding my hand in place, but, as he has matured, neither teeth nor claws break my skin. His favorite napping spot is laying on my scanner with a full view of the front yard through the window. When he is ready for attention, he walks across the keyboard, adding to whatever I'm typing, or even wiping out the whole of an email message so I have to start over after I've petted him. When it's time for bed, he's somewhere at or on my feet. Sometimes he gets an urge to walk and walks over my feet and legs. I've tried pulling him under the covers with me on a cold night, but he struggles to get out. He doesn't like being covered. Instead he lays on top of the covers as close as he can get to my chest.

He doesn't like violent storms.  If the cats are outside when a storm is brewing, they will come inside if I tell them it's going to "RAIN" soon. But if I don't get them in in time, Snowkitis will sit under the Spiney Greek bush, sitting as pretty as you please, and if I search for Rescue, he is under the boxwood, sheltered by a shingle that feel in there when we re-roofed the house a few years ago. I leave the shingle in place, since it's a nice cover for him from the rain.

Ever since he was a baby, he's been fascinated with the toilet. He loved to run in and check out the progress when one of us was using it, then climb on the seat the enjoy the view as it all swirled away. One time, he was watching the water in the toilet, lost his balance and fell in. Out he came,  and, truely embarassed, paraded around with a very wet head. Now, he keep a firm perch on the seat to watch the wonder of modern plumbing.


Title: Feline Memories Found to be Fleeting
Post by: Kam on August 22, 2007, 10:28:27 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/20070820/sc_livescience/felinememoriesfoundtobefleeting;_ylt=Atssjr2ms9eUijb7rBVOVGys0NUE (http://news.yahoo.com/s/livescience/20070820/sc_livescience/felinememoriesfoundtobefleeting;_ylt=Atssjr2ms9eUijb7rBVOVGys0NUE)

A new study has measured just low long cats can remember certain kinds of information—10 minutes.
Visual information is stored for several seconds.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on August 22, 2007, 10:40:08 AM
Kam,

After reading the link on the science, I have to wonder if it is a paucity of memory, or the intelligence of the animal to note that the obstacle has been withdrawn and no need to step over it.

It seems to me from observing my pets, that cats have good memories of what to avoid. Rescue, having once fallen into the toilet, perches securely on the seat to enjoy his favorite site of the swirling water. It took one time for him to learn that if he perches himself on the side of the tub while I was bathing, that I might pull him in, and he only perches on the side of the tub when I am not inside it. Likewise, he used to enjoy taking a flying leap from the bath rug into the tub, until one time, when he landed in hubby's bath that hadn't been let out yet. He no longer takes that flying leap, but climbs on the side, checks for the presence of water therein, before taking a rolick in the dry tub.

Ten minute memories? Fie and Hi-Diddle-dee-dee!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: lulu on August 22, 2007, 11:12:46 AM
I am in love with Rescue.  Lovable; adorable and a tabby.  I love tabbies and think they are the most adorable (but I'm not putting down other cats).

Losing a pet (not to mention several) is devasting and nonanimal lovers simply don't understand the joy and love they bring.

I don't have a pet but there has always been one in my family.  When Neeka (my sister's Norwegian Elkhound died, we cried so hard).  And when my nephwe's beloved Honey died, well, we were all devastated.  And when I go to his home, I still look for Honey, who was ring bearer at my nephew's wedding.  (Truly.)  You cannot part a boy and his dog (even when the boy is close to 40).

My sister used to bring my mother (who suffered from dementia) from the nursing home to stay for awhile.  Neeka would sit near her and mom would pet her.  It calmed her and my sister could work.  When Neeka died, she could no longer bring mom home because she would get agitated and restless.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: sevrox on August 22, 2007, 11:29:36 AM
Uh oh - cat people.

DogMan meself - have a 135 pound brindle bullmastiff by name of Daisy Marlena Stanley. "Daisy" because of the breed's tendency towards flatulence. "Marlena" after Marlena Dietrich. "Stanley" after my own last name. She's the nicest animal I've seen/owned - although she's somewhat flustered by my SigOther's cat Boethius.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on August 22, 2007, 12:14:47 PM
Lulu,

Honey is the name of my brother-in-laws current Golden Retriever. When I wrote the stories about acquiring pets for my First Readers series, I asked Larry for a picture of his first golden retriever, Maggie. He sent pictures of Honey, but in the resultant story, the selected dog is named Maggie. The real Maggie had had a very long life, and was the constant companion of Larry's two sons. Rescue was, of course, used as the selected cat in the kitten story.

 



Title: Re: Buster in Purgatory
Post by: Furphy on August 22, 2007, 03:24:55 PM
I lock Bruno in the back room with bed, box, food and water while I am out.

Buster resents this and guards the door tirelessly lest it be opened and he have a chance to rush in.

But Bruno gets to eat, bathroom and get a drink in peace....not to mention stretching his legs. He is sedentary and one large room is world enough for him.

Buster has the run of the other five rooms of the house...and access to the basement.

Buster appears to be wildly jealous of me. That seems to be the source of his "anger management" problems. But I didn't know cats got attached enough to any one person to be possessive.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on August 22, 2007, 04:10:58 PM
Furphy,

I think cats are capable of a wider range of emotions than suspected. Although most of the time Rescue defers to Snowkitis, there are times, when Snowkitis and I are playing musical chairs (between my soft chair and the computer bench. I sit in the soft chair to watch tv or think/relax, and then back to the computer). Sometimes Rescue will hiss and fuss at Snowkitis for jumping onto the computer bench when I've just stepped away for a moment. He seems to sense when I'm not really going away and gets angry at Snowkitis for taking advantage of the situation.

I give Rescue way more attention than Snowkitis, who gets most of hers from hubby. When hubby is away, I try to pet each regularly. When I am petting Snowkitis, Rescue just gets disgusted and leaves the room.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on August 22, 2007, 05:01:06 PM
The following was in today's email:

Three new recalls have been recently issued on pet
foods. This includes Wal-Mart sold Jerky Treats,
Red Flannel Dog Food, and Krasdale Gravy. For more
information please visit:
http://www.nationalpetfoundation.com/foods/various.html

Dont wait for the FDA to make their
announcements. Get notifications within the hour
of new recalls and save your pet's life. Sign your
family and friends up for the free pet alerts at:
http://nationalpetfoundation.com/pet-food-recall.html

The full list of already recalled food can be found at:
http://nationalpetfoundation.com/list.html


Title: Re: Just Wondering
Post by: Furphy on August 23, 2007, 01:52:05 PM
Does anyone but me find it odd that my cat's antibiotic is bubble gum flavored? Are pets supposed to find this attractive?

And why do pet food makers go to the trouble to shape kitty kibble into tiny drumsticks, fish and steaks? Do they really think that Mommy's Little Precious can tell what the shapes represent or would give a damn if they could?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on August 23, 2007, 02:28:32 PM
Furphy,

It is only sales appeal to Mommy who is shelling out the beans to pay for those treats! Mommy's Little Precious will either eat the treats or walk away from them, based on smell and taste, not on shapes or colors.

I suspect the bubble gum flavored antibiotic is just making use of the leftovers from last winter's supply of antibiotics for kids.


Title: Re: Just Wondering
Post by: Kam on August 23, 2007, 02:48:46 PM
Does anyone but me find it odd that my cat's antibiotic is bubble gum flavored? Are pets supposed to find this attractive?

And why do pet food makers go to the trouble to shape kitty kibble into tiny drumsticks, fish and steaks? Do they really think that Mommy's Little Precious can tell what the shapes represent or would give a damn if they could?

I kind of find it odd that you're tasting your Cat's antibiotic, but hey... who am i to judge.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Furphy on August 23, 2007, 03:18:56 PM
Both the color and the smell of the antibiotic makes plain what it tastes like. You don't have to be Sherlock Holmes to figure this one out.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on August 23, 2007, 03:35:59 PM
This conversation reminds me of a stand-up comic who remarked that catfood certainly didn't seem to come in flavors that cats "go for" per TV advertising.  No rat nor mouse nor squirrel nor chipmunk nor lizard flavored food to be had.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Kam on August 23, 2007, 06:51:51 PM
Both the color and the smell of the antibiotic makes plain what it tastes like. You don't have to be Sherlock Holmes to figure this one out.

It was a joke. Perhaps a tired one. But i've had to give antibiotic to a cat before so I know what you're talking about.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on August 23, 2007, 06:52:15 PM
Okay, guys, I still have no luck putting the picture up with complete directions that I copied out from harrie. What's the catch? After seeing nothing in the messages area that some of  us use too much, I assumed that possibly she was referring to the above board which I am filling out right now since she referred to "on the buttons above the message box --second row, second button in(just under the l [for "Italicized"] button)...

But I'm not accomplishing a thing.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Kam on August 23, 2007, 06:58:42 PM
madupont...

the way to post an image in your post is to place the URL of the picture between these two tags: [imgKAM]http://placeyourimageURLhere.jpg[/imgKAM]

just extract the KAMs

if you're trying to get a picture as an avatar then thats an entirely different set of directions.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: pugetopolis on August 23, 2007, 07:38:49 PM
(http://images.tribe.net/tribe/upload/photo/823/d51/823d5132-8d57-4be4-b5cb-166ebb2eaf87)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: pugetopolis on August 23, 2007, 08:18:41 PM
(http://www.veronicasart.com/small%5CEgyptianCat.jpg)

Cat haiku

A long time ago—
In an old temple of Thebes
I was once a cat…


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on August 23, 2007, 08:27:01 PM
Puget,

I know a picture is worth a thousand words, but how 'bout parting with ten or so from the thousand, and insert a caption on you pix.

I' twould frae many a blunder free us,
And foolish notion.

That first cat has unusually tall ears!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: pugetopolis on August 24, 2007, 02:34:52 AM
Liquid Silver,

Thank you for setting up this forum.

And all the other forums too.

I've almost forgotten the Big Apple...

Elba is so much better.

Puget


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: pugetopolis on August 24, 2007, 09:11:23 PM
(http://images.tribe.net/tribe/upload/photo/3b7/be9/3b7be970-766b-458d-be10-67fc87eef0ca)

Pretty Boy

I didn’t know what else to call him—I’d run out of names. The dynasties of cats and princes had ended for me—at least that’s what I thought. A dozen cats out in the garden by the stream—I just didn’t feel like I could go thru it again. Losing them—the heartache and sadness after they were gone.

 I just couldn’t do it again that’s all—so I lived alone for a couple of weeks after I buried Rickie under the blue hydrangeas. I was so blue I cried & cried—I said I’d never have another cat again. Then the house started making noises at night—I’d wake up alone and listen to the grandfather clock ticking away. It was just awful—I couldn’t sleep. Nothing seemed the same anymore—everything had a film noir shade to it.

Then one day a lady friend of mine called me—she knew what I was going thru. There was this cat lady in Bothell who had some extra cats—some of them were strays and others kittens. I didn’t want to go but I said okay—it was way up north by the lake. The cat lady lived in this huge mansion on a hill—her hobby was sheltering strays from the neighborhood.

There was this dumpy little apartment down by the road—people came and went and ditched their pets. The cat lady knew this and would lure them into cat-carriers with food. She worked with Paws and found them homes. She said she had one just for me…

It turned out he wasn’t just a regular stray—it was a kind of The Prince and the Pauper story for me & cat. He’d just got back from the vets—all clean and shampooed and dewormed. He’d been scrounging around the apartment house all summer—after a Hispanic couple had unceremoniously dumped him there when they moved.

He was an exhausted little thing—an Exile kind of like me. He was about a year old—but still pretty much a kitten. I picked him up and he gave me this big long sad sigh. Being an orphan was such an awful thing—it’s lucky he survived at all down there by the road. I took him home and he hid for a couple of days. Finally he got hungry and then he was my pal…

I called him Pretty Boy because he was indeed a pretty little boy. So delicate and grateful—he clung to me like glue. He hid when I went off to work or to the store—he felt safe under the bed. He slept with me every night—when his head on my pillow. I swear he must have been a prince one time or another. But then all cats are regal aren’t they—surely descended from ancient Egyptian kings and queens…

Browsing thru a cat book, I found a perfect picture of him. A bright orange Turkish Angora right there on the page—I was totally amazed. Lots of Persians in the country—but not too many Turkish Angoras the book said. I put down the book—and smiled at Pretty Boy. He was a Prince after all—it made me feel so good.

This photo is when I first got him—he’s put on weight and looks better now. But I keep this photo to remind me what little paupers look like—and what Pretty Boys they can become…



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on August 24, 2007, 10:25:04 PM
Puget,

I our family, Pretty Boy is called a Sissy Cat, for the yellow cat named Sissy that belonged to my mother-in-law before she passed on. Sissy was more solid yellow than the stripped of Pretty Boy. He is more of a Pineapple Cat, as the editor of a story I wrote about Sara, The Pineapple Cat (coming out around the first of the year, hopefully), calls him and her. When a friend sent me the ad to write a Pineapple Cat story, I knew it was something I could do, and my story was accepted by the editor as the first in his planned series. I can't wait to see what the illustrator does with the "Too High Adventure".

Pretty Boy also reminds me of the cat my son came home with a bit more than a year ago. My son had fallen on hard times, and we persuaded him to come home, regroup, and try again. He arrived two days later than expected due to car problems coming over the mountains. The next day, after he slept off the drive, he said he had a "surprise" for us. He brought out Barnabus. Barnabus was a huge yellow male as friendly a cat as you would ever want to meet. He was with us for several months, enjoying the routine, loving Snowkitis, and keeping Rescue in line (Barnabus made about two of Rescue, who is big compared to Snowkitis). We were talking my son into having Barnabus fixed, and suddenly he disappeared into the woods, never to be seen again. I still suspect that Sam encourage Barnabus to go to preserve his balls, rather than submit to the vet's knife.

Barnabus had, according to Sam, been a free spirit. We don't know how old he was. He adopted Sam when he lived in a small apartment in Muncie, Ind. I suspect he found a new home here in Virginia. He seemed like he could love people for a while, be a model cat (well, once we smelled that he tagged the kitchen cabinets with his odor), and very loving and accepting of whatever circumstances his current owner lived under.

I expect to some day see a yellow kitten floating through the yard, and if I do, it will be the offspring of Barnabus. It if isn't attached, it will have a home here.

BTW, is Pretty Boy a talker? Both Sissy and Barnabus were talkative cats. When I wrote the Pineapple Cat story, I made Sara a talker. So, does Pretty Boy extend the tradition?



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: pugetopolis on August 25, 2007, 03:11:13 AM
My gawd, this cat talks all the time. I've never heard of so many variations on a Theme by Paganini. It's all done with purrs of different pursuasions. It's ongoing from the minute we get up to when we go to bed. He's got every windowsill in the house for a lookout perch and he talks to everything that moves. Actually it's more a howl and long lament since I don't let him out. He's a real talker -- more than any other cat I've even known. Why I don't know. Maybe it's the breed. Maybe because he's an Exile. I don't know but I like it. Pretty Boy is a Literary Cat...and I understand every word he says...


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: pugetopolis on August 25, 2007, 04:34:27 AM
Puget,

When a friend sent me the ad to write a Pineapple Cat story, I knew it was something I could do, and my story was accepted by the editor as the first in his planned series. I can't wait to see what the illustrator does with the "Too High Adventure".


Congratulations on your short story! May you publish many more stories about kitty-cats.

My Pretty Boy says yes indeed!!!!


Title: Re: Crazy Love
Post by: Furphy on August 26, 2007, 11:53:53 AM
I don't know how I could have said that I didn't know that a cat would get so attached to a person as to be jealous.

Sweet Pea, my only female, is crazy in love with my husband. When he comes upstairs to make his toilette she sits at the bottom of the stairs and cries for him to come down again.

This turns the scenario into a reverse Romeo and Juilette. Juliette is below calling out to Romeo who steps out of the bathroom and leans over the bannister to sooth her worried mind.



Puget,

I our family, Pretty Boy is called a Sissy Cat, for the yellow cat named Sissy that belonged to my mother-in-law before she passed on. Sissy was more solid yellow than the stripped of Pretty Boy. He is more of a Pineapple Cat, as the editor of a story I wrote about Sara, The Pineapple Cat (coming out around the first of the year, hopefully), calls him and her. When a friend sent me the ad to write a Pineapple Cat story, I knew it was something I could do, and my story was accepted by the editor as the first in his planned series. I can't wait to see what the illustrator does with the "Too High Adventure".

Pretty Boy also reminds me of the cat my son came home with a bit more than a year ago. My son had fallen on hard times, and we persuaded him to come home, regroup, and try again. He arrived two days later than expected due to car problems coming over the mountains. The next day, after he slept off the drive, he said he had a "surprise" for us. He brought out Barnabus. Barnabus was a huge yellow male as friendly a cat as you would ever want to meet. He was with us for several months, enjoying the routine, loving Snowkitis, and keeping Rescue in line (Barnabus made about two of Rescue, who is big compared to Snowkitis). We were talking my son into having Barnabus fixed, and suddenly he disappeared into the woods, never to be seen again. I still suspect that Sam encourage Barnabus to go to preserve his balls, rather than submit to the vet's knife.

Barnabus had, according to Sam, been a free spirit. We don't know how old he was. He adopted Sam when he lived in a small apartment in Muncie, Ind. I suspect he found a new home here in Virginia. He seemed like he could love people for a while, be a model cat (well, once we smelled that he tagged the kitchen cabinets with his odor), and very loving and accepting of whatever circumstances his current owner lived under.

I expect to some day see a yellow kitten floating through the yard, and if I do, it will be the offspring of Barnabus. It if isn't attached, it will have a home here.

BTW, is Pretty Boy a talker? Both Sissy and Barnabus were talkative cats. When I wrote the Pineapple Cat story, I made Sara a talker. So, does Pretty Boy extend the tradition?




Title: Re: Crazy Love
Post by: pugetopolis on September 16, 2007, 08:47:52 PM
Sweet Pea, my only female, is crazy in love with my husband.

Well, at least somebody is...


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on September 16, 2007, 10:22:06 PM
Don't know how often it is true, but it seems that female cats prefer the male in the family, and the male prefers the female.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Kam on September 24, 2007, 02:52:46 PM
http://studiokatdesigns.com/funny_cats_1.wmv  (http://studiokatdesigns.com/funny_cats_1.wmv)


Title: Re: Kittlings
Post by: Furphy on October 07, 2007, 10:39:49 AM
Smicket has produced another batch of kittens. At this very moment Honore de Balzac, Henry James, Jane Austen and Edith Wharton are eating on the back deck. Of course I doubt that the original Henry, Jane and Edith would have put their front paws into their dish as do their namesakes. But Balzac just as likely would have done so.

And I'm pleased to see that the kitten I have named Honore is always the first to the dish. This, too, is very Balzacian.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on October 07, 2007, 02:01:03 PM
Congratulations on the new grandkids!

When Rescue was little, we had to set him in the saucer of milk since he was too small to reach it from the edge. That was before we took him to the vet and learned that milk was a no-no.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on October 07, 2007, 02:11:03 PM
I've heard that about milk and cats.  But I had a cat that lived to be 18 years old whose favorite treat was an occasional bowl of iced milk with a touch of sugar added.  Just the sight of the bowl and she'd purr and purr.  She was a lovely old cat, and quite well-loved.  Simpler times.....


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on October 07, 2007, 08:59:54 PM
Laurie,

Maybe it has something to do with how milk is processed these days. Our first white kitty also enjoyed a bowl of milk, but now the vet says to way hosay! And, we did notice that it gives them diarrhea, which is problematical with kittens. Our first kitty's favorite treat was a raw egg put down, but the vet also nixes that now, saying too much danger of bacteria - cook it first. That was then, this is now.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on October 07, 2007, 11:34:16 PM
Well, no kitties for me these days.  I have a goldfish.  Seven years old, about five inches long.  He's a real beauty, but I suspect he's beginning to go blind. 

(http://www.bunshine.com/images/goldfish2.jpg)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: pugetopolis on October 08, 2007, 12:55:16 AM
Thankfully I'm down to one cat now...Pretty Boy.

A cute orange angora male orphan kitty-cat about a year old.

In a previous lifetime I thought a bunch of kittens would be fun...

So I let my Norwegian Forest Cat do his thing with his girlfriend.

I ended up with 10 baby Norwegian boys and girls...

They were all so cute I couldn't give any of them up...

What a family we had...so many fond memories.

They're in the frontyard now...beneath the hydrangea bush, lilacs...

Cats taught me to accept life and death easier...

Seeing how their brief little life-cycles go...

Cats and books and movies go together for me...

How many lap-kitties have shared my joys with me...

Such wise little companions...











Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Kam on October 14, 2007, 05:24:46 PM
My loving cat cleo died in the very early saturday morning hours.  Miss cleo was with me just 3.3 years.  She was originally a street cat and when I got her she was already at least a year or so.  For me this was a shock.  I thought I had another 10 years with her ahead of me.  She got sick very suddenly.  She had a brief period of pain and misery before i was able to get her to a local all night veterinary hospital.   I took her in and a minute later the vet came out to inform me she was dying.  There was so little time to even say goodbye.  I lost my best friend and constant companion.  I'm devastated.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on October 14, 2007, 05:30:39 PM
Kam,

I am so sorry to hear about Cleo. Surely a mere three years is hardly enough to get to know the intricacies of the feline personality.

You have my shoulder to cry on. And, do get another kitty to replace Cleo. There are lots begging to be adoped in any shelter.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Kam on October 14, 2007, 10:09:17 PM
I am very grateful for this forum. If not for you folks putting up pictures of your cats I would not have been motivated recently to take some new pics of my own kitty.  I have several beautiful recent photos of her thanks to the inspiration I found here.  I even posted one a while back but after a day or so the image vanished so I deleted the post.  Maybe I'll try again when I have more focus.  But i've been sending out these recent pics to my close friends and family and I treasure them so much.  Again, all thanks to this thread.

Thanks Weezo for the kind words.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on October 15, 2007, 01:19:58 PM
Kam -

Good to hear you have been able to take solace in the photos.  Deepest sympathy on the loss of your cat.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on October 16, 2007, 10:04:07 AM
weezo -

I got really tickled yesterday afternoon because about 15 minutes after I responded to your frog inquiry my son told me that Kitten had apparently fished one of the frogs out of the pond and then spit it out.  It was sitting there on our deck as though it was dead, but turns out it was only scared stiff.  Corey returned him to his watery home.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on October 16, 2007, 12:00:36 PM
Dessie,

Yes, frogs and cats are a no-no. So, according to the vet, are shrews. They are "poisonous" to cats, and we think that was what made Rescue sick enough to need to see the vet a few months ago. At least that was the vet's suggestion as to why she blew up around the neck, and ran a fever. Myself, I wouldn't know the difference among a shrew, mole, vole, or mouse. They are all creepy critters in my mind!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on October 18, 2007, 10:46:07 AM
The mouse can be distinguished by that long thin gray cord and the red laser glowing from its belly.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on October 18, 2007, 11:01:20 AM
He'll be here all week, folks...try the veal. 

Seriously, a vole is a little smaller than a mouse, with a very short tail.  I know this not because I keep them as pets (officially, anyway), but because they set up shop in the garden this year.   I guess they could be considered pets -- I mean, we kept them well-fed and sheltered, though not intentionally.

Moles are easy - sort of blind, funky looking front feet (all the better for digging), rarely seen above ground (in my experience).

A shrew?  Well besides being called one on occasion, I have no idea.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on October 18, 2007, 11:43:06 AM
Shrews look something like voles in that they have a very pointy snout, but they have furry tails and they're aggressive.  Some of them are also venomous. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on October 19, 2007, 10:55:40 AM
{chuckle}

Voles are the really tiny ones, IIRC.  We had a mole, one at least, in our yard when we lived in Oregon.  Oregon has a lot of very Green-thinking people, and they alerted me to the good things that moles do for the topsoil and such.  I wasn't going to try and get rid of it, in any case.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on November 16, 2007, 04:10:13 PM
http://money.aol.com/cnnmoney/general/canvas3/_a/how-much-is-the-kitty-in-the-window/20071112154009990002
 
Barton
http://tinyurl.com/2v82pl

Back when I was trying to describe what Kiki the cat looked like( who strongly resembled that cat icon on your posts which reminded you of a cat that you knew, and looked close to the male equivalent of the female Kiki) nothing came to mind close. 
 
Until this morning, I discover this article on new breeding of wild cats as expensive pets for ostentatious and also probably unwary consumers because I've read these articles before about what the African Serval cat can actually become. Dangerous 
 
This morning however, I was surprised by the appearance of two of the cats  shown in the article at the above link. The Ashera and the Bengal cross breeding with  domestic cat.  Both have larger ears by far than Kiki and I would suspect that is because they are hunters in the wild side of their family, from terrain where it is imperative to swivel those ears around to pick up any clue that danger approaches.
 
As you see the Bengal is already displaying signs of being frightened by something. The adrenaline rush provides a full display of "I'm doing my best to scare you" but the next thing that happens is that it feels compelled to attack and there is no reasoning with it because it is merely protecting itself from a danger only it imagines.  The bone structure of the head already reveals it is highly strung in temperament, not a personal fault but a result of the breeding experiments to get the survival factor or they'd have nothing to sell the public.
 
Other than that I noticed the body markings/spotting are remarkably akin to Kiki, including the horizontal rings on the legs and tail with even the "thinking lines" on the forehead as if it were a Brahman priest. But here a strange aberration  appears. When I look closely at the face, something is off kilter and I just figured out what it is; see those markings of light at either side of her head?   
 
Kiki is blessed with having those exactly as if Elizabeth Taylor had decided to do Cleopatra's eye makeup for her with a careful rich yellow gold color of eye-shadow  around her eyes to enlarge them but then with the dark elongation lines placed parallel over and under the soft yellow.  Apparently, the breeders in breeding to the smaller cat were unable to retain the same pelt markings on a smaller frame. I've forgotten what it is called when displayed on the genetically naturally bred Bengal Tiger on which it also causes an illusion that the Tigers eyes are glowing in the dense darkness of jungle foliage that it moves amidst; sufficient to scare off potential victims or other predators when the cat just wants to take a siesta.       
 
Kiki has none of that white underbody tiger coloration either but like the Ashera has only the white chin without the extravagant elongation of the neck that the wild ancestor needs  for surveying the  entire  horizon  for the entire 360 degrees. The Ashera in the photograph displays the feline's lower  ventral  peach colored or foxy fur similar to that smoldering tigerish background color on the long neck just above the breast bone.
 
In her kittenhood, Kiki had none of her orange-red mother's color to display when we left her mother behind and hunting at the fall of evening in the notorious town of Hamilton,New Jersey; and fortunately a few years before it came to national attention.  Kiki was about three months old and still had an licorice black nose which gradually turned to the color that I call "Eraser nose". as she began to fill out and look kittenish on the order of Weezo's iconic kitten, although she never was  fluffy but had a thick dense but short sleek pelt.
 
Ahah, but as maturity set in, singing included, she developed the flamboyant fox-colored breast fur (much like the Tuxedo Cat wears  black coat and tails,  with a white breast similar to a starched white shirt. I had one of those which bred a lot of variations  many years ago). Kiki on the other hand developed a match set of soft red fur top and bottom very much like the Ashera  female displays in the photograph.
 
No way of knowing whether these characteristics would then be passed along or just passed by since, she was neutered just a little over five years ago,to adapt to the demands of apartment-style living. I had been disappointed that she could not enjoy the outdoors in the country, to the degree that her mother did but she settled in to being a housecat observing wildlife and domestic animals from her perch at many windows rather than be done in by a trucker making time in the early hours of the morning; or a prowling wild cat descending at night from the range of hills to the valleys where there was no such thing as street lights along the country roads for miles upon miles.
 
 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on November 18, 2007, 03:45:19 PM
Downing Street cat Sybil, who belongs to chancellor Alistair Darling, has received a large number of letters from other cats, often signed with a pawprint.  (Observer)

[Just consider this the downstair department of Celebreality forum upstairs. The cat is obviously a celebrity. Her human with the cute name, may be a chancellor but I can't put a face to his name. If we find that he is cute enough, that may account for all the paw-prints being sent to his cat. Notice we are not informed what else is in those letters?]


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on November 25, 2007, 08:11:27 PM
The dog discovered the beach this weekend.    (http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s77/harrieb/RoddySplash.jpg)

We think he liked it.    (http://i149.photobucket.com/albums/s77/harrieb/RoddyFace.jpg)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on November 26, 2007, 09:14:48 PM
harrie,

Just what exactly went into this happy dog's breeding?   As he appears to have a beard. He reminds me of at least a couple of dogs but only in part.

For a short while (back in the Dylan period,sometime in the faraway 1960s) I was the keeper of one part German Shepherd, part Husky, who was simply a puppy with massive big feet when he arrived by way of a friend who had about nine of these and a crisis in his family  which meant there would be no time nor place to take care of the litter. He must have convinced one friend after another to take one off his hands.

My son was quite young and would take the puppy for a walk around the block. Very unobtrusively, he increased in size so that you would hardly note it happened until within three months his measurement from tip of tail to nose was quite incredible. He was now, dark toned in the way of some German Shepherds, a charcoalish hue but, his eyebrows! his eyebrows were beautifully beige and expressively so. In honor of this side of his heritage, we dubbed him Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart.

And I would say to my son," Go, take Wolfgang for his walk." but the boy and dog would be home in a matter of minutes and I would also say,"Did you take him all the way around the block?"


"No", came the reply, "he took me all the way around the block!"

It thus became necessary to find another home for Wolfgang. My husband loaded boy and dog into the car with the intent that he would have to go to the Humane Society.  As they parked the car, and were just getting out with Wolfgang, another father and son arrived and asked about the dog before any of them ever got to the door of the HS. They asked about Wolfgang and if they could have him because they had a farm; Wolfgang would now have plenty of living space on which to exercise.

The other familiar looking dog was a lady named Max with that huge loose fur coat which she would shrug around herself for she was a Mountain Bernese; the dog whose body type is like the St.Bernard but is longhaired black with those butterscotch and white markings. Your one happy dog has none of those white symetrical arrangements in his coat, nor any indication of the hugeness that takes over. Max belonged to a neighbor of our's in a cottage behind the inn across from the Lawrenceville Prep school.  Max had the friendliest,happiest disposition.

Do you know those Gorsuch people who sell skiing fashions out of Colorado? Vail -- Beaver Creek -- Keystone--Aspen   I acquired their catalogs at the point where I had a Switzer landlord whose own household gave me a keen eye for the kind of furnishings that these gals in the ski clothes might enjoy.  Last year, at this time, I was running through their on-line Christmas presents for good little girls and they do have a heading, "Childrens", for the littlest of the good little girls, and when I clicked that  -- there was a miniature Max known as Ben the Bernese as a Christmas puppy.   He was a little wider but otherwise about the size of Kiki, the cat.  She might enjoy someone about her own size to play with?   

When she found him standing on the window-bolsters on her bed, when Christmas arrived, she immediately attacked him with a hissy-fit, just beside herself with rage.  He seemed impervious.  And he remained, because I told her, "No".  He stayed and she became used to that. They usually look out the window together for passing puppies each morning when I open the draperies and hoist the blinds.   

As you can tell, I am in -- if not my second childhood--at least,the repeat stage just before it,My Second TeenAge?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on November 26, 2007, 10:27:00 PM
harrie,

Just what exactly went into this happy dog's breeding?  

madupont, your guess is as good as mine.  Actually, we believe he's a Rottweiler-Border Collie mix.  He was billed as such at the pound, but we took that with a grain of salt because so often it's just a wild-ass guess. But he moves like a Border Collie, and as he gets in shape he's beginning to look like one, just with Rottweiler colors and big bones. He got off to a rough start so he's kind of a special needs guy, as in much patience required; but he's turning into a great, very sweet dog.

That's such a happy ending for your Wolfgang.  I love when things work out well like that; he sounds like he was a beautiful dog.  (Not that I've ever seen an ugly one....)  Bernese Mountain Dogs are sooo beautiful -- if you put a gun to my head and forced me to buy a purebred dog, that would be one of my top choices.  Am  I correct in guessing that your Ben eats lightly (ie, he's stuffed)? 

I see nothing wrong with multiple childhoods.  I plan on having many of them myself.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on November 27, 2007, 11:45:54 AM
harrie -

That doggie of yours looks more like a black german shepherd/border collie mix to me, but I guarantee you there's something else there with that beard!  Anyway, there's something else there with that beard, let me tell you.  Very nice pics.

Okay, everyone, it's official.  I'm turning into a dotty older woman (was dotty as a younger woman too, so it can only get worse, I guess).  Last night on the way home from work, I just about ran over a tiny white and orange spotted kitten.  Lots of feral cats where I live, and this was in a non-residential area.  In spite of what I know about feral kittens, I couldn't stand it.  It was so fluffy and adorable!  I stopped in the driveway of a business a few yards down the road and contemplated crossing the busy street, which has no shoulder, to the other side in an effort to nab it.  I already have two cats, which is two cats more than I should have because I'm allergic to them and the vet bills are driving me into bankruptcy.  Reason overcame emotion in the end, so I sadly got back into my car and drove home.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on November 27, 2007, 01:32:19 PM
Thanks, desdemona -- I'm not usually big on posting the critters, but he's normally afraid of everything (the wind, his water bowl); so when he relaxed and had fun, I couldn't contain myself. And he's beardless (and very possibly part Shepherd); that's just his ruff, post-shake. I think the salt water helped spike his fur and create the beard illusion.

So....is that kitteny road one you drive often or daily or anything?  I picture you slowly driving up and down, shaking the bag of cat treats.  If you're allergic to cats, do you just live with it, or take stuff, or do they stay outside?  Not trying to be nosy, I just wonder how/why you would take in someone to whom you were allergic.  Besides the fact that fish get kind of boring after a while.  Perhaps it's because my father was and sister is allergic to cats and they both absolutely hate(d) them that I think this way.  We came to find out much, much later that my dad wasn't actually allergic to cats as much as deathly afraid of them.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on November 27, 2007, 01:40:12 PM
Valid question, harrie.  I too hated cats - HATED them - and I was taught to fear them from a very early age by my mom, who taught me to be afraid of damn near everything.  "Watch out!" she'd hiss.  "Don't touch it, it might have ringworm."  I remember looking askance at a tabby cat with my playmate at about age 4 and saying, "LOOK! It DOES have ringworm!" (I was seeing the rings on its tail.)

That's not to say that I didn't pass along the same fears to my own children.   ;)

Anyway, I left town for three weeks a couple of years back and came home to discover that we had a cat.  My daughter's boyfriend was moving, he came by to bid her farewell, and Banjo, his cat, was very freaked out and jumped out of his car.  At first I was going, "Okay, we'll feed him, but he is NOT ALLOWED IN THE HOUSE."  That lasted about 2 weeks, and by that time he had me wrapped around his paw.  I found he didn't make me sick like cats used to - very odd, because I used to get terrible hay fever and asthma from them - I'd even break out in a rash if I handled them.  So, I decided they don't bother me anymore, and I adopted Kitten about 2 years later.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on November 27, 2007, 02:20:22 PM
I'm glad that you have changed the subject back to cats, des, because the most peculiar thing arrived this morning and this could keep--

Barton, busy....

http://www.petpublishing.com/catkit/breeds/bobtail.shtml
 
Short on Tail, Long on
Personality: The Japanese
Bobtail November 27, 2007


"Charming" says it best when it comes to the Japanese bobtail, with its short, tufted tail, sweet singsong voice, and truckloads of personality. And this breed's angular head, high cheekbones, and big, beautiful eyes rival Audrey Hepburn's classy good looks. Brought to Japan from China roughly a thousand years ago, bobtails are also spirited, smart, and somewhat strong-minded, so keeping them entertained with ample play and attention is key. (Bored bobtails have a tendency to find trouble.) But willfulness is tempered by a loving and affectionate nature, making the Japanese bobtail a delightful feline companion.

http://www.breedlist.com/japanese-bobtail-breeders.html

(above leads to photos of variations in achieving the continuance of the breed; whereas the top link gives some contemporary Japanese happenings, when they decided to go for it again. These felines are historically seen in the finest Japanese but particularly Chinese art which is how I first ran into them pondering why the markings were so different in the ancient Chinese cats compared to those "around my house, inside and out" who were blue-skinned, Persian long hairs by descent but always Black with White markings rather than "Mi-ke" white with several nicely placed dots of black and red on preferably a close coat.  As you can see by all the variations now bred in this country, many excuses are made for the coloration or body conformation that result.  Worse yet, careful reading of the "seller's" advertisements  warn you, if you know how to read between the lines, yet mostly they come right out and say it without realizing that they let the cat out of the bag --about problems that you the buyer will probably have no trouble with because the cat is such a sweetie and all personality.

They often mention the talking. I suggest that this is common to the Siamese for instance and you do not want to have more than one of those in the same household because you won't get any sleep while they converse for hours back and forth.  Mi-ke owners describe the nice low pitch of the tone when their  cats talk to them).

My very hybrid cats crossed from a black American short-hair who would occasionally throw  a fluffy gray kitten with blue eyes from a Persian past. I gave those away, to see what came next when I finally got the first Tuxedo Cat but had no idea that is what it was called; she then produced a male cat with her coloring, same blue skin underneath what was however long Persian fur. He was indeed a cold climate cat. He napped in summer, got up from his naps alerting me to check that there wasn't an actual Man in the house descending the stairs with heavy steady footfalls, preferring to make the rounds of his territory in Winter.

He was a sight to see with his long haired fur lifted with the wind as he posed on a snow bank. After awhile, Mao returned only on the anniversary of his birthday.(Mao is the actual Chinese word meaning Cat)  Two of his offspring were long-haired twins and are commonly known as Maine Coon cats in this country. They have a different name in Asia:the Himalyan coon-cat.  Their mother,Ming-I,which is The Mother of Us All, in Chinese,or:from the I Ching,The Darkening of the Light, kept the house  as her own territory; only kittens were allowed there , as I started to say, they listened attentively to me speaking Mandarin Chinese as if they completely understood it far better than I could ever and they were correct.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on November 27, 2007, 03:00:14 PM
Harrie,

"wasn't actually allergic ...as much as deathly afraid ..."  That's interesting to me because of course I have encountered people with "cat-phobias" (who seem to get over  it when distracted by something more immediately stimulating and rewarding than what I suspect was an induced fear that made them phobic; and the conflict when they would like to enjoy cats makes them feel somewhat guilty enough to develop an allergic reaction).

I say this right up front because my father was overly interested in allergic reactions and decided to cure these in two of his sons by the same procedure, as Jenner would have vaccinated to prevent disease; that is exposure to very small amounts of the substance  a little at a time until the tolerance to exposure is built up and they are immunized against any large scale exposure.

In this particular circumstance it was a food dislike, a fairly common development in childhood when they begin to eat "solid food", I guess it is a protest against having been weaned. From then on they stubbornly insist they don't like That, it makes them sick, and it does. But, they got what they wanted, they didn't have to eat That. (Also, siblings will follow the example of the dominant in sequence).  The eldest brother did not care to eat fish (he now lives in Juneau,Alaska, so you see how that goes). After that he didn't like whatever it was about Raspberries; the red raspberries.  His junior imitated him in that and it may have been a seasonal allergy caused by eating something in season when the pollen is in the air, we usually just refer to it as "hayfever". Some smart aleck medically pontificated that boys get the skin reactions and girls get the breathing reactions; or was it vice-versa.  I've observed how the onset could be one or the other in either sex.

The boys sat there and ate one red raspberry off their plate. The next day two, the third day three, and so on.

I never had the least trouble developing a craving for a raspberry schaum torte at the same season where drinking an appropriate white wine could have me in tears with swollen eye-lids as if I had lost my best friend. I kept that in mind -- when the blossoms are pretty in the garden, the wine in the bottle is going through the same process down in the cellar and you might not want white wine with fish(?). One of the things that I discovered as a rare treat, while growing raspberries next to a wheat-field rotated with corn in Summer, was that when I went in search of the local winery on a former Quaker farmstead to taste-test their reds to send to my youngest non-allergic brother, I arrived on a hot sunny day when the vineyards were in bloom. Another building of the Amish or Tyrolean kind was used because these provide a shady above ground cellar while the timbered above floors with their overhang roof provide shade as does the deck that runs partially around the "chalet" and to which you climb by the broad front steps past the summer floral border. As I began up the steps, I was suddenly hit by the most divine aroma, a combo of the little domestic flowers  with the vineyard blossoming,once I got up to a level where the wind swept the fragrance aloft; it had a particularly piquant spicy scent.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on November 29, 2007, 11:24:05 AM
Harrie,

I recently mentioned Ben the Bernese Mountain Dog. Here are a few illustrations:

http://www.gorsuchltd.com/CatalogItem.aspx?ID=4415

The original Ben (do not think I am going to buy him that Pillow as a doggy bed however...)

http://www.gorsuchltd.com/LargePictureViewer.aspx?imageName=939.0499

enlargement of Ben for better view of his face,alas they shorted his tail.

http://www.gorsuchltd.com/LargePictureViewer.aspx?imageName=805.2322

Image of a Bernese like Maxine but I think this guy is probably male.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on November 29, 2007, 10:46:07 PM
madupont, very cute Ben dog.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on November 30, 2007, 11:31:38 AM
In the event of a major catastrophe and disruption of food supplies, should household pets be eaten by humans?

Discuss.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on November 30, 2007, 11:41:09 AM
Not at my house, but I may ask to share some of the dog's tasty-lookin' canned food.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on November 30, 2007, 11:41:45 AM
Have you been reading that 2012 book, by any chance?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on December 01, 2007, 02:37:58 PM
Is that the one with the Mayan prediction of the end of the world?

By the way, in the last fortnight, I mentioned to Dzimas that the Bouvier cousin little Edie Beale, daughter of Edith Bouvier Beale (aunt of Jackie Kennedy) from the Maysles brothers film, Grey Gardens was back on tv (although he was buying a Criterion copy), ever since it won awards as a play on Broadway.   They had so many feral and semi-civilized cats on their estate as well as the raccoon in the attic to whom little Edie fed loaves of sliced white bread by opening the packages and strewing it around.

But, as she also told the Maysles, since their groceries were brought by delivery boy and she bought food for the cats, that what big Edith thought was "pate" was actually catfood from the little cans with a twist of lemon. Life in the Hamptons as it were.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on December 01, 2007, 03:08:27 PM
I haven't read any books specifically about 2012, but I have heard that it's the Mayan date for the serious poop hitting the Big Fan. 

My answer would be, no, because pets (those with some of their instincts still intact, anyway) could probably pay their way -- dogs helping hunt, cats keeping vermin out of precious food stores.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on December 04, 2007, 12:19:09 PM
Cats are also good for hunting if you don't mind eating rats, mice, or perhaps the occasional nutria.  They're always presenting their people with dead stuff. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on December 04, 2007, 01:41:38 PM
Harrie,

We always congratulate our cats on the "gifts" they bestow on the porch. We do fuss when they bring something half-dead into the house and let the task of hunting it down and getting rid of it to us.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on December 04, 2007, 02:00:57 PM
Weezo, tell me about it.  Our cats stay inside, but we're forever finding cat toys and stuff dropped into our shoes.  At least it means they like us, or so the hubby says.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 04, 2007, 02:16:20 PM
My old Tom cat, Banjo, is driving us crazy.  All of a sudden, he's behaving like an unneutered male cat, demanding to be let out in the wee hours of the morning while we're in a comatose state, and eventually positively yowling if he doesn't get out.  We have been trying to give negative reinforcement by yelling at him - okay, maybe not the most scientific approach, but it's so annoying.  I hate to leave him out in the cold all night, but Saturday morning he jumped up on my bed and urinated all over the foot of the bed, through the quilts, sheets, and onto the mattress pad.  So much for my Saturday morning sleep-in.  I can't understand why he won't use the litter box anymore.  I just changed it last night, but I've been noticing for a few months now that neither one of the cats seem to use the litter box very often anymore, but rather go outside. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: kidcarter8 on December 04, 2007, 02:17:55 PM
Get a blood test.  Could be diabetes.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on December 04, 2007, 02:20:20 PM
Dessie,

Our cats usually prefer outside to the litter box since they are about a year old. Just get used to sleep-walking them out and leave them until morning.

I agree that a trip to the vet may be in order, since an old cat will not usually start urinating on people furniture unless something is wrong.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 04, 2007, 02:24:59 PM
Hmmm....

I call him "old", but he's actually only 4 years old.  I've seen him walk up to the litter box, stick his head in, then turn around and walk away.  He seems to have gotten wilder since we moved to the new house since he also yowls to get out during the day, usually with that "baby cry" noise they make when another cat is in the vicinity.  I assumed he just lost control the other morning - there was a little stream on the floor as though he had lost control as he jumped up there and then finished it up on my bed.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 04, 2007, 09:59:23 PM
Guess I should also explain that Banjo was in the hospital a couple of months back with an injury.  I know they did blood tests on him then - I believe they would have checked for diabetes.  He is not overweight and is very active.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on December 05, 2007, 11:17:22 AM
A cat that's four won't pee on your bed unless there's a big behavioral issue (he's really mad at you) or a medical problem -- any injury to hindquarters can cause nerve damage that will affect bladder control.  Some neutered cats do seem to go wild anyway, sometimes in response to the presence of another unneutered male in the vicinity.  If there is another male in the picture, it might explain his rejection of the litter box -- he wants to store up his pee for outside deployment, i.e. marking territory. 

My ex and I, when we were together, finally abandoned the whole outdoor-is-natural thing with cats -- the vet bills mount, and there seem to be endless problems with cars, other animals (coon, possum, dog), and misc. mayhem.  Indoor cats, if they have companions, seem to do fine if you are consistent and provide an area beyond a door that has a leaving-the-house feel to it -- like a basement or sunporch or attic space, preferably with hidey holes and things to climb on.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 05, 2007, 02:57:30 PM
Now that's some good information, barton.  I just bet you he WAS mad at me for yelling.  Guess that will teach me.

So far there hasn't been any bad behavior since the incident on Saturday morning.  I changed the litter in the box and looked at him, tapped on the top of the box, and said, "Banjo, you need to go in here."  He came toward me looking at me - I believe he knows what I am saying much of the time.  I have taught him to lie down on command, although I often have to ask more than once. 

There are lots of unneutered cats in the area - my female cat wouldn't go outside for three or four months after moving here, I guess until she felt Banjo had established his parameters properly.  He gets into fights constantly, but right now he is completely uninjured.

I have never been able to get my cat to stay inside without a fight, and I can't stand the yowling.  Banjo had been an outdoor cat when I got him.  I have a friend who brought up a kitten to stay indoors all the time, and now that it's a year old, it is frightened of going outside.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on December 06, 2007, 12:16:30 PM
Cats do hate yelling.  A Canadian friend told me she had a bed urinator and that an action seemed to work less abrasively on the cat than yelling -- her action consisted of showing the cat the peed-upon area and then promptly tossing him into the snow.  Probably more persuasive in Montreal than in Atlanta.

 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 06, 2007, 01:58:39 PM
Okay, Banjo is NOT rehabilitating himself as I had hoped.  He woke me up at 3:00 am to let him out, which I VERY promptly did.  From now on, he stays outside at night.  My son was saying, "But it's pretty cold out there, Mom."  I'm saying, must not bother him MUCH since he demands to be let out in the wee hours of the morning when it's coldest. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 06, 2007, 01:59:16 PM
Damned cat - I can't believe he refuses to use the litter box now.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: liquidsilver on December 06, 2007, 02:15:52 PM
Maybe you need to show him how to use it. ;-)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on December 06, 2007, 02:29:16 PM
Quote
I have never been able to get my cat to stay inside without a fight, and I can't stand the yowling.  Banjo had been an outdoor cat when I got him.  I have a friend who brought up a kitten to stay indoors all the time, and now that it's a year old, it is frightened of going outside.


Your friend's cat is right.  There is plenty to be afraid of outdoors.  Cars, rabid racoons and squirrels, dogs, the nice little bacteria that lives in the ground that your cat digs (then comes into your home),  worms (which can be spread to the rest of the family) mean children...

It is a pain to listen to a cat's yowling, but think back to when your children were little.  When they threw temper tantrums did you walk away or did you do what was best for them?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on December 06, 2007, 06:08:16 PM
Laurie,

All of those reason not to let a cat outdoors would apply as well to dogs, kids, and even adults. We live in a nice "safe" rural area where wildlife is the only worry. Our cats enjoy being outside.

My feeling is that a cat is like a human adult not a child. When they want something, like going out, they are entitled to have it if it is in your power to do so.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on December 06, 2007, 08:32:54 PM
Laurie,

All of those reason not to let a cat outdoors would apply as well to dogs, kids, and even adults. We live in a nice "safe" rural area where wildlife is the only worry. Our cats enjoy being outside.

My feeling is that a cat is like a human adult not a child. When they want something, like going out, they are entitled to have it if it is in your power to do so.



True enough, but it's pretty traumatic to be driving a car and run over someone's cat.  And when it comes to traffic (probably the major hazard for kitties who are left to fend for themselves) cats are more like toddlers than adults.  My mother has made the argument to me several times that it's okay because her cats stop and look when they cross the road, and even when they don't, it's okay because they live out in the country....Of course that only makes me how she has ended up with so many squashed kitties.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on December 06, 2007, 08:53:37 PM
But as to the worms, next time you see your doctor, you might ask him about this.  My sister-in-law used to let her cats run outside until one of them brought some sort of intestinal worm into the house.  The whole family got them and had to be treated.  Not pleasant.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on December 06, 2007, 09:45:08 PM
Laurie,

We've had cats since we were married 24 years ago and never got sick from them. Vet does say it's safer, but we are far back from the road and neither of our cats goes as far as the road. We did have a cat hit on the road a few months after we moved in. That cat had lived in town, her daughter, who lived with us for 13 years, crossed the road every day to get to a field of mice on the other side, but, having seen her mother killed there, she was very cautious. If your mother has squashed kitties, she lives closer to the road.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 06, 2007, 10:16:05 PM
lhoffman -

Gee, thanks for the sermon and advice.  I just had Banjo wormed about a month ago and all his shots are up to date, too.   

And it is not in my cats' best interest to force them to stay in the house at this point in their lives - what's more, it would be impossible since they've been outdoor/indoor cats all their lives.  We couldn't possibly keep them inside unless we crated them constantly, and that would be just downright cruel to cats who are accustomed to play in the trees and on the craigy rocks every day..  We live on a half-acre lot on a quiet cul-de-sac, and the cats don't wander far at all.  They love the property with all the trees to climb and rocks to lounge about on.

As for saying cats are like humans or toddlers, they're like feline animals, that's what they're like.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on December 06, 2007, 10:44:39 PM
You sound like you live in Cat Heaven.  I know it's a sermon, so sue me...I like cats.  But it IS important.  I hope if you ever happen to get new cats, you rethink this.

As to the shots and worming, many cat owners tend to skip these things because in may places cats don't have to be licensed.  It is worth the money though.  My sister in law had to tear out and replace all her carpets because the worms her cat had attached themselves to their feet when they walked around the house barefoot.  Shots would have been a lot cheaper.

And it also sounds like your cats haven't been de-clawed.  Many people de-claw their cats then let them outside...poor kitties are defenseless.

From what I've seen, outdoor cats do seem more feline.  Indoor cats need to be played with and exercised, and sometimes told "no.  At these times, they seem quite toddler-like.

Anne...mom lives about an acre back from the road.  Who knows why the cats cross the road.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on December 07, 2007, 07:37:22 AM
Laurie,

If your mother lives an acre back from the road, then she is about as far off the road as we are. We live on an acre, and the house is at the back of the lot. Apparently, her cats just like to roam. But when they are kittens it is possible to train them to stay away from the road, just as it is possible to train them to stay indoors or ride in a car.

You are right that you must keep up with shots and regular vet checks for worms and other messy things. You also have to regularly dose them with good flea drops to keep down that mess. It is truly a mess when the fleas get in your bedding!

We once had a declawed cat - Fred, who moved in with us when Mom had to go in a nursing home. We didn't let her go out much, only when we were out with her, and she was pretty used to staying inside. Generally, I think it cruel to declaw cats.

The biggest problem I see with indoor cats is that you have the constant exposure to cat feces in the litterbox. Cat feces are a health risk to humans, and medical advice is for pregnant women to not even clean the litterbox. Unless you flush the contents immediately upon use, you have that bacteria flying around in the house. Not to mention the smell. That is why I like our cats to take their business outside so we don't have to live with the smell and the germiness.

Our cats have a special perch on the porch. When they get up there and stare in the window at me sitting at the computer, it's a signal to let them back in. If I'm not at the computer, and one of them is out and wants to come in, the other one pesters us until we open the door and let the other in. Sometimes, of course, opening the door means "changing of the cats", when the one outside comes in and the one inside goes out. If nothing else, they keep us from becoming couch potatoes by responding to where they want to be.





Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 07, 2007, 12:31:32 PM
You sound like you live in Cat Heaven.  I know it's a sermon, so sue me...I like cats.  But it IS important.  I hope if you ever happen to get new cats, you rethink this.

As to the shots and worming, many cat owners tend to skip these things because in may places cats don't have to be licensed.  It is worth the money though.  My sister in law had to tear out and replace all her carpets because the worms her cat had attached themselves to their feet when they walked around the house barefoot.  Shots would have been a lot cheaper.

And it also sounds like your cats haven't been de-clawed.  Many people de-claw their cats then let them outside...poor kitties are defenseless.

From what I've seen, outdoor cats do seem more feline.  Indoor cats need to be played with and exercised, and sometimes told "no.  At these times, they seem quite toddler-like.

Anne...mom lives about an acre back from the road.  Who knows why the cats cross the road.

Sorry, but these lectures of yours are just really obnoxious.  FYI, I never wanted cats, but I ended up being Banjo's owner because my daughter's ex-boyfriend stopped by when he was moving, he had Banjo uncrated in the car, Banjo jumped out and ran away, and the ex-boyfriend continued his merry way to Missouri. I came back from a 3-week business trip in England to find I had an unwanted cat.  At first I refused to allow him in the house and said I would feed him and that was IT.  He later won me over and I have spent hundreds of dollars on him since then, partly because of the fights he gets into.  I adopted Kitten 2 years later from an animal rescue program and of course she wouldn't stay indoors with Banjo around.  Sheesh.

And I refuse to declaw my cats in spite of the fact that they literally shredded my sofa to bits.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on December 07, 2007, 02:00:28 PM
Quote
The biggest problem I see with indoor cats is that you have the constant exposure to cat feces in the litterbox. Cat feces are a health risk to humans, and medical advice is for pregnant women to not even clean the litterbox. Unless you flush the contents immediately upon use, you have that bacteria flying around in the house. Not to mention the smell. That is why I like our cats to take their business outside so we don't have to live with the smell and the germiness.

weezo,  I get what you're saying, but as a caretaker of two indoor cats, I can assure you that we don't play catch with cat poo or anything.   We don't flush it either, except when a cat was nuked and we had to flush his/her (it happened twice) waste for two weeks because it was radioactive.   

In fact, I know of a coop in NYC -- so the cats there are definitely indoor -- the governing articles for which incur a steep fine for anyone flushing animal waste.  If it causes a need for repair, the offending party is supposed to pay the repair costs plus the fine.  So flushing has its drawbacks, too; even the flushable litters can muck up the pipes. 

We scoop daily (or twice daily depending), we bag it, and we pitch the bag at the end of the week.  The cats are healthy, so there's no really offensive odor unless you stick your head in the bag; which, if that's someone's thing, far be it from me to stop them.  Toxoplasmosis is a concern for pregnant women; but as a non-pregnant person, I'm kind of a fan of germs, in that many of them make me stronger.


Quote
Who knows why the cats cross the road.
To get to the other side?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 07, 2007, 03:22:44 PM
Okay, I'll bit - how did your cat get nuked?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on December 07, 2007, 04:01:25 PM
Hyperthyroidism.  Ultimately the cat sort of burns himself up and can suffer damage to the heart; I'm told  it's a pretty nasty way to go.  One of the possible treatments is an injection of radioactive iodine; the cat stays in a facility for three or so days and comes home when his/her radiation levels drop to a certain point.  We've been lucky enough to have it with two different cats.

Here's a link with pretty complete information.
http://www.peteducation.com/article.cfm?articleid=218


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on December 07, 2007, 05:09:01 PM
Desdemona...I wasn't suggesting you de-claw your cats.  My point was that if you let your cats out, they are going to need their claws for self-defense.  You mention yourself that Banjo gets into fights.  As to being obnoxious, I'm sorry if I hurt your feelings, but you can't change facts just because they make people feel bad.  I'm pretty sure that most people would agree that cats are not safe when they are left to roam outside.  And I suspect that you agree, too, but that you feel you are doing the best you can....for the cats and for yourself.  

There are people who visit this forum who may not consider my comments a lecture, who may simply be interested in the problems and choices they need to make if they are going to own cats.  It's also possible that there are people who own outdoor cats and don't understand the issues. 

But in any case, it sounds like the daughter is better off with the cat than with the ex-boyfriend.  Felicitations on that.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on December 07, 2007, 05:32:03 PM
Anne, I've wondered about litter boxes, too.  When my son visits he brings their cat along and the litter box stays in the room where kitty and son's fiance sleep.  That doesn't seem healthy to me, but they tell me kitty is happier that way.  She lives in a studio, so I guess it's all in the same room when she's at home, too.

Their cat was a rescued cat, too.  Had been living on the street for who knows how long and wasn't too healthy when they got it.  Months of treatment for giardia and he is finally looking quite sleek and healthy.  His only problem is that he seems to be afraid that he is not going to get enough food.  They feed him dry cat food twice a day and at both feedings he empties his dish as fast as possible. 



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Kam on December 07, 2007, 07:33:38 PM
Rescued cats definitely have more trouble adjusting.

My cat that died two months ago, Cleo, she never did get the hang of using the litterbox properly.  She would do her business and then leave the litterbox without bothering to cover it up with litter.  She would instead scratch the sides on the litterbox.  Why didn't she scratch the litter beneath her and paw it backwards?  I didn't use cheap litter or anything weird for litter. 

She didn't overeat, but she was in general very fearful and otherwise sedate.  Gentle too.  Wanted to be pet and scratched but in general never wanted to play typical cat games with string or toys.  What are you gonna do when you get them already a year old or so.  Tough to get them to alter their behavior at that age and after being 'homeless' for so long.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on December 07, 2007, 08:04:17 PM
Cats have unique personalities. Some like to play. Some don't. Rescue came to us from the woods, and likes to play with toys, but he will have nothing to do with catnip. Snowkitis, who has always lived with people, will have nothing to do with the toys, but loves the catnip. A former cat enjoyed catnip so much, she rolled in the plant outdoors until she smothered it. So we put a cage around the one we put in last year, but neither cat has been seen bothering the plant. Snowkitis waits until we bring in a fresh spring, and then goes crazy on it. If we are playing with Snowkitis and she claws us, she shows no remorse. If Rescue is playing with us and I say ouch because he caught me with a claw, he hangs his head and is remorseful. Rescue will not jump up on my lap unless my legs are covered because his claws have dug in before, and I yelped, so he waits until I put something over my legs if I'm not wearing jeans.




Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on December 07, 2007, 08:16:26 PM
Rescue does look sympathetic and curious in his photo. 

Nice that your cats like different things to play with, catnip or toys, no problems with feelings of invaded territory.

It's entertaining when son's cat visits.  Kitty thinks my daughter is his peer.  The last time they were here, daughter hadn't come home from university yet.  Kitty searched all over the house for her then sat in front of her bedroom door and yowled.  He wouldn't play with his toys until she got home.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on December 08, 2007, 12:04:34 PM
Listen Up!  Microsoft has just discovered what a friend phoned to tell me their Computer Tech  has put up bulletins throughout their workplace that a New Virus gets into your e-mail and then sends you an e-mail which tells you that A FAMILY MEMBER IS TRYING TO CONTACT YOU

DO NOT OPEN.  IT WILL TURN OFF YOUR COMPUTER. WHEN YOU START YOUR COMPUTER AGAIN, IT WILL DESTROY YOUR HARD DRIVE


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on December 08, 2007, 12:47:40 PM
Laurie,

Those are the things that endear our cats to us. Each is so unique in personality and they get preferences and expectations and will let you know when things are amiss.

Earlier this morning, Snowkitis was out, and I saw her sitting on the perch as if she wanted to come in. All of a sudden she was down from there and sitting under the apple tree looking up high in the tree. There were a number of birds flitted around the yard and must have been based in the tree. After she got tired of holding her head so high, I went to the door and she ran in the house. After a stop by the food bowl she was up on the front sofa sleeping softly.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: kidcarter8 on December 08, 2007, 02:48:22 PM
Wow.  Imagine that.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on December 08, 2007, 05:38:33 PM
LOL....not a cat person, Kid?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 10, 2007, 10:35:07 AM
Breaking news:  Banjo used the litter box the other day.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: kidcarter8 on December 10, 2007, 10:51:17 AM
LOL....not a cat person, Kid?

Have 3.  Sadly down from 5


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on December 10, 2007, 12:32:15 PM
Kid...how did you get 5 cats?  gifts?  adopt strays?  kittens?  Or did you think, "I like cats and 5 is as easy as 1?"  My mom keeps ending up with many pets and she often doesn't quite know how it happened.


Desdemona...what does Banjo think of your Christmas Tree?  (if you have one)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: kidcarter8 on December 10, 2007, 12:36:35 PM
Kid...how did you get 5 cats?  gifts?  adopt strays?  kittens? 

all of the above


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on December 10, 2007, 01:15:18 PM
Kid,

I may not like you political views, but your choice of pet is outstanding! If I go off on a tangent over my two darling cats, you will have to excuse me. Now that both hubby and I are retired, the two cats are our housemates as much as pets. Both are affectionate, but Rescue more than Snowkitis. Both are reticent of visiters to the house and of venturing out of sight of the house. These cats have developed personalities and some communication.

Tell us more about your cats.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on December 10, 2007, 01:34:44 PM
desdemona, congratulations. 

In my only experience with a box-avoiding cat, it turned out that she had bladder stones and attendant inflammation.  She had the stones removed surgically and went on special food, and it seemed to work well, since she lived to 21 or so.  (Her age is a guess by the vet, but we had her for 17 years; she was a stray (or dumped) who lived outside an apartment building where we lived, and when we moved, we came back and got her once we settled a little.  Coincidentally, she, who used to live outside 24/7, is the only one of our cats who expressed not one bit of desire to go outside once she came in to live with us.)

Now here's the part you really might not like.  We also had a boy cat who never missed the box -- because he was just the greatest cat ever -- but one day became lethargic.  We took him to the vet the next day because he didn't pick up at all in 24 hours.  He had stones as well, but in boys the plumbing is more complicated, and the cat can get totally blocked (and unable to eliminate).  Once the blockage occurs, the kidneys start to go quickly because everything gets backed up.  So he had emergency surgery and came home for about a month basically to die, because we weren't quick enough to pick up on his problem, and his kidney function was steadily decreasing.

I'm glad Banjo is peeing, because that means his system is working.  If he can continue to embrace the box, even better.  But I just wanted to say that missing the box can (hopefully) be just a contrarian act by the cat, or it can be something else.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on December 10, 2007, 01:41:21 PM
Not to beat the subject to death, but this has general, pretty good info.
http://catnet.stanford.edu/articles/infosheet_litterbox.pdf


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 10, 2007, 02:47:43 PM
Thanks for the useful link, harrie.  Gosh, it's even meaner than I thought to declaw cats.

Banjo seems to be doing great - no signs of any illness other than the episode previously described.  He was outside with us yesterday - he and our other kitty and Ivan.  He was just rolling over on his back and sprawling out for me to pet him on his tummy - silly kitty! 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on December 10, 2007, 04:36:12 PM
Check this out:

http://extra.msn.com/animals.aspx

 :o


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on December 10, 2007, 07:11:04 PM
Wow, those are some fat cats.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on December 11, 2007, 12:52:50 PM
harrie, want to thank you for your stanford article of very good recommendations which will be kept for reminders and circulation. I have a short holiday hints list to post as well as the most recent Bernese Mountain Dog appearance showed up on the cover of Lands'End, this past week, looking none too happy when they put him in a big red turtleneck sweater just because it was a cute splash of color for their cover-shoot.


Cat-Friendly Decorating December 11, 2007

To your cat, the holidays mean a home brimming with irresistible sparkles, jingles, crinkles, and yummy smells. So keep a close eye on your curious kitty while keeping these things in mind:

• Cats climb trees, so make sure yours (your tree, not your cat) is secured to a wall, curtain rod, or railing.
• Tinsel, ribbon, popcorn strings, metal hooks, pine needles, and glass, if ingested, can obstruct or even perforate the intestines. Use alternatives or hang out of reach.
• Electrical cords, if chewed, can electrocute. Encase in tubing made of thick plastic.
• Chocolate, alcohol, and cooked bones are toxic and potentially deadly if swallowed.
• Candles can be knocked over, leading to obvious hazardous results


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on December 11, 2007, 01:41:18 PM
Thanks for the holiday reminders for our pets, madupont.   I bet the hubby that the tree's going down this year, but the dog is going to do it.  The cats haven't taken a tree down in years; they seem to enjoy it just fine sitting/sleeping under it.   


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on December 12, 2007, 02:39:51 AM
Harrie, this may shock you. I haven't heard from these people in a long time. But here goes...

dear fellow dontshootthecatters,



this is ted with WisconsinCAT.  first and foremost, i wanted to sincerely thank you all for your help and support of our last effort - our drive to stop "question-62" (the cat-hunting proposal).  you made the difference with your e-mails, resource-support, and networked involvement.



we need your help again.  while hunters sought to put our cats in the crosshairs, we are now fighting for a more humane result for the same cats at the hands of our local animal-control/sheltering agencies.  as reported on the front-page of last week's Isthmus newspaper, our local shelter (Dane County Humane Society) is now killing over 40% of the cats it takes in, our worst performance in over seven years.



we seek to change this.  check out our website at www.dontshootthecat.com for details on what's happening and how we aim to change things.



join us!



ted - WisconsinCAT


---------------------------------

Click here to visit our sponsor:

http://yourwebapps.com/click.cgi?id=233


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on December 12, 2007, 02:56:32 AM
Ps. I think that I was first told about this by willdurant (not the famous historian) but a fellow-poster living out in California (or, who had lived out there) and with whom I compared notes at nytimes.com forums.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on December 12, 2007, 02:49:49 PM
Man, that was one fat cat in that MSN link, Desde. 

The major drawback of pets is that they defecate and pee, yet rarely have the slightest knowledge of how to use a toilet.  I look forward to  a future in which advances in robotics usher in a new age of robo-pets that take in only electricity and emit only heat and used-up lithium batteries.  If you have a flesh cat that you currently favor, its mind will be uploaded into a waiting robo-pet, with a few adjustments here and there so that its desire to hunt mice will be modified to a desire to hunt mechanical mice. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on December 12, 2007, 05:42:09 PM
So uh....you're not exactly what one would call a pet lover?

You must be aware that some cats can be trained to use a toilet; and dogs use it too, just as a drinking fountain.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on December 12, 2007, 05:53:31 PM
Yes, I've heard but never witnessed. An old neighbor of ours when I was a kid told me about this years later when she had given up her house for a quiet old apartment similar to the setting for Rosemary's Baby, that era, a bit plainer but dark in the halls, fairly spacious rooms. She had the good sense to retain the same house-maid, who cooked, cleaned, did everything.

The widow, like many ladies of her generation,such as my great-aunt, or perhaps it is just a certain age that does it(?) told me such interesting stories about marital relations when you bring a pet with you into the marriage and then have to leave them on the other side of the bedroom door because...they want to protect you or they are jealous or whatever.

Not only did Jo have a bidet in her bathroom but the cat used it, after being very precise in use of the toilet for the usual purposes.  Can you imagine how much litter clean up this trick could save you? Whether it is altogether healthy is another matter. I suppose one could spray the toilet seat or wipe it down with those  anti-microbial towlettes.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on December 13, 2007, 03:08:42 PM
A mere jest, Harrie.  I have had nothing but adoration for all my cats, even those that think "outside the box."



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on December 13, 2007, 04:54:24 PM
Chew on This: Books About Dogs
Compiled by Rebecca Bialek

Shadow peruses the New York Times Sunday Book Review for an interesting book [sorry, missing photo, dog wants to remain incognito]

Freezing cold temperatures. Inches upon inches of snow. Sleet. Icy wind. It looks like Shadow, (who lives with Pattie Cox from our Mequon Bookshop), has the right idea: Snuggle up somewhere warm and read! If you need to find a gift for the "dog person" on your list, or if you're the dog person who just needs something to read while curled up with your pooch on a snowy day, we offer this list of books featuring our favorite friends with four legs.

Put the reindeer headband down, and don't even think about trying anything with that little Santa suit. Pick up The Dangerous Book For Dogs instead and find out what your pup really wants to do for fun. This hilarious parody by current and former staff writers for The Onion is a guide to the joys of doghoodincluding rolling around in the dirt, terrorizing squirrels, and turning everyday household items into fun chew toysthat's written just for dogs. Read it with your dog, and maybe she'll reconsider letting you put the elf hat on her.

The editors at The Bark magazine have collected a spirited pack of dog-centric essays humorously highlighting the droll behavior of canines in Howl: A Collection of the Best Contemporary Dog Wit. From playful puppies who wreak havoc to dogs with an array of comic tricks, this volume celebrates the sass and laughs dogs offer their people.

Good Dog. Stay, the newest book by Anna Quindlen, is a tribute to Beau, her beloved black Lab and cherished, loyal friend. With her trademark wisdom and humor, Quindlen reflects on how her life unfolded alongside Beau's and the lessons he taught her about taking things as they come and living in the moment. This heartening and bittersweet collection shows us that sometimes an old dog can teach us new tricks.

Take a trip to Bedlam Farm with John Katz, author of A Good Dog and Katz on Dogs. In his latest, Dog Days, you'll meet all the animals on the farm, from a small newborn donkey to a giant sociable steer, and of course the Border Collies and Labs who keep everything running smoothlyeven on days when the farm seems to live up to it's name.

Find out what's going on behind those doggie eyes with For the Love of a Dog by Wisconsin's own Patricia McConnell, Ph.D. In it, she reveals a treasure trove of information and intriguing accounts of man's best friend at his worst and at his very best that will help you understand your dog's emotions and could lead to a richer, more rewarding relationship with your furry friend. If you think of your dog as part of your family then you'll find this book engaging, enlightening and utterly engrossing.

You'll find these and many more books about dogs and the people who love them in our shops, as well as some cuddly life-like toys and fun gifts for friends of dogs everywhere. We'll see you in the bookshopsas soon as you can pry yourself out from under that fuzzball on your lap.


Stewart, who lives with Rebecca Bialek from the Schwartz Marketing Department, on squirrel patrol[another smart incognito dog. Really I never got the technique of reproducing pictures on this forum!]






Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on January 07, 2008, 01:14:24 PM
In case anyone's interested in becoming a part of the real news in New Hampshire elections, here's a link to vote for the new weather cat at Mount Washington.  You can't actually vote until tomorrow, but you can meet the candidates.

http://www.mountwashington.org/events/topcat/vote.php


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on January 10, 2008, 12:45:20 PM
"An indoor-only cat since kittenhood, Wilson has never been outside, which opponents say could prove problematic atop a mountain. "

LOL.





Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on January 11, 2008, 01:15:32 AM
So, who won? I forgot to vote for Sarah (when it said vote tomorrow)!

She looks like the majority of the 21 cats who marched behind me through the meadow just to see what I was up to. There were occasional previously submerged genes that would  erupt like total strangers who revealed in their kittenhood that they would have no crooked moustaches of white on black but were born to be exotic like a lone Burmese beauty. Or, the twins, a male and female, Coon cats whether Maine(?) or Himalayan.

But,you know upon rereading that piece, I realized she was being compared to Hillary.  Sarah that is.   Did you happen to read that embarrassing piece in The New York Times seriously discussing why, because Hillary shed tears, she should be President? It was by Gloria Steinem; and I made the mistake of entrapping myself in the reading of the 964 responses posted which were all very lucid where the former editor of Ms was not. Steinem was now embarrassingly out of step with the times they are a changing.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on January 11, 2008, 09:45:34 AM
So, who won? I forgot to vote for Sarah (when it said vote tomorrow)!

Marty, the long-haired guy with the dark coat and yellowish eyes, won by a sizeable margin, not quite a landslide.  Or would it be avalanche, given the locale? Anyway, here's the press release:  http://www.mountwashington.org/news/release.php?id=31

And in my defense, I posted "vote tomorrow" on Monday. 

And here is their campaign page, in case you want pictures.  http://www.mountwashington.org/events/topcat/vote.php


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on January 12, 2008, 11:18:56 AM
Harrie, I met a nice Bernese yesterday; and, as with humans, I forgot to get her name. She helps her companion to maintain her balance.

What caught my attention was that this Bernese was very much like your own dog, in stature, smaller bones. As her human friend mentioned, "her chest is just beginning to fill out."

Thanks for the cat  election run-down and congratulations to Marty for winning the position. After a little thought, i was able to recall the name of the male half of my long-haired twins,the Himalayans,Utpala, his sister was Danapati. Or, it may have been the reverse? I was reading a lot of Mahayana texts in those days.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on January 12, 2008, 11:51:30 AM
Is it true that Himalayan cats (a blend of Siamese and Persian, if memory serves) are not actually from the Himalayas?  Indeed, one wonders if someone pinpointed a region midway between Persian and Siam on a map...

Is Bernese a saucy cat?  Or did you mean "Burmese"?  One of my childhood cats was Burmese, a female with a strong hunting instinct.  At the request of a neighbor lady who liked birds, we eventually put a bell on her.  Within weeks, she learned to move so stealthily that the bells in her new collar would not jingle.





Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on January 12, 2008, 12:53:37 PM
I believe madupont was speaking of a Bernese Mountain Dog, one of my favorite breeds. if I were to fancy purebreds, that is.  They look like this -
(http://images.jupiterimages.com/common/detail/25/73/22247325.jpg)

Unless you were goofing around; in which case, never mind.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on January 12, 2008, 03:20:55 PM
Burmese cat, at #124.  Bernese mountain dog, at #126; the latter was a female version of Harrie's swimming dog.

The former Burmese was a beautiful brown, glowing color of cat and did spring from a mix that had Persian roots without their flat faces.  Some people believe that Burmese are related to Egyptian breeds of cat. I really don't know, having crossed  the Gaza strip, I suspect into Asia but could just as  likely bred the other way around from Siam to Burma and westward. They may have hopped a dinghy much later on the Muslim trade-routes and slept or had kittens in the hold. They are more petite in size like Siamese and they are short-hairs.  I met some cross bred black cats with Siamese voices in Greenwhich Village who used to keep me awake all night talking to each other. They were an old married couple and they were not talking about sex; just quarreling.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on January 13, 2008, 01:27:33 PM
Harrie, no I was really in ignorance of the Bernese (as in Berne, Switz. I gather), so you've enlightened me.




Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on January 31, 2008, 11:36:11 PM
The World of Rare Cats and Dogs: Meet the Ashera and the Lundehund

http://www.luxist.com/2008/01/30/the-world-of-rare-cats-and-dogs-meet-the-ashera-and-the-lundehu/

More of those strange hybridizing results.  Or, some very old breeds, as well, that occasionally have strange ill-proportioned offspring; although, on the other hand, just as likely create a quite beautiful combination not seen before.


For instance, the new ashera controversy vs.African serval cat. When I snapped on that link, that cat looks quite scary to have around. But,we have talked about this before.  The present photograph is a lot more explicit with the cat no longer reposing but on its feet where you get a sense that this is not just something " about the size of a mid-size dog" and therefore potentially quite lethal because I recall what a cat that size did to a dog about that same size who could not resist being stupid and going after the cat who had been laying in wait to attack the dog.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on February 09, 2008, 11:20:56 PM
Harrie,

The New/Old Breeds  http://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2008/02/08/sports/20080209_BREEDS_FEATURE.html?8dpc#

Beautiful pictures of beautiful dogs. The Tibetan mastifs had me laughing with their expressions (and the descriptions that went with them).

The Beauceron is elegant.  The Plotthound has ugly feet.  And Valhunds? I bet they herd goats!

Usually, I and the cat watch this show, almost every other year at least but I'd kind of forgotten that this is the Academy Awards of Canine Stars.


Title: A cat a rat and a dog walk down the street
Post by: Kam on February 09, 2008, 11:51:37 PM
on top of each other

http://youtube.com/watch?v=RuuesBhOR9g (http://youtube.com/watch?v=RuuesBhOR9g)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on February 10, 2008, 01:26:30 PM
"A cat, a dog, and a rat walk into a bar...."

I got nothing. 

Very Hogarth-y!



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on February 10, 2008, 11:01:01 PM
Thanks, madupont, those dogs are just beautiful.  I think the hound with the ugly feet is probably about my speed, though those little Corgi-looking guys are awfully cute.  Gettin' ready for Dog Show night(s)!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on February 12, 2008, 10:33:57 AM
One warning, the owner of the five Tibetan mastifs who referred to them as lazy and generally downplayed any extraneous negativity about their personality and breeding lineage, as you may have noticed they are "Mountain dogs" with similar markings to other breeds, neglects to mention that in Tibet around Lhasa that they are not cuties like the Lhasa Apso(lap dogs or sleeve dogs in Asian tradition).

The Tibetan mastif in a pack of that size which she has,five, at home are a guard dog to protect property both around the outside and the interior of the walled enclosures of land-owning farmers.  Because of the former peculiarities of their marriage systems, there is often a wealthy sherpa merchant trader in the "extended family" as well as the millet farmer. Which means that the farm home is also the merchant store house since in the old days(before the Chinese invaders build a direct road for trucks),the sherpa did a two directional circuit direct to Beijing,China and would then pass through home before descending in the opposite direction to Nepal and into India.

The big dogs kept anybody from invading his space and cache. Meanwhile, the streets of Lhasa have been notorious for running packs of wild dogs; I don't know if that is any longer the case.

I kept wondering as I looked at that lacrimose face peering over the back of the couch,with the paws prominent, the lady of the house must go through a lot of couchs?  Anyway, a word to the wise forewarned, it is definitely in there -- in their breeding. They may appear lazy as long as there is no excitement to interest them; but, they are territorial.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on February 12, 2008, 01:51:51 PM
Well, yeah, it wasn't so much the Tibetan part as the Mastiff part that tipped me off as to their temperament. Gentle, sort of unassuming -- until you make a false move on their owner or their owner's property. But I've found that any dog can get protective no matter what size, or lack thereof, they have to back up their bark with.  (A UPS driver once told me he'd been nipped by more Yorkie-type dogs than large bruiser dogs.) 

I think you'd have to buy a Tibetan Mastiff from a breeder at this point; you'd probably be screened, and possibly told "No, you can't have one of these dogs."  (That would be the hypothetical you, not necessarily you personally, madupont.)  I know a person who used to breed Goldens, and to hear her tell it, most reputable breeders of any kind are very picky about where their dogs go and strive to make sure that the dog and owner are a good match, that the owner will use (or not use) certain trainers, etc.

As for the couch, I'd think at some point it might be declared the dogs' property, and I'd go get myself a couch (or comfy chair) of my own.

(And if that cute little Echo dog in the Pedigree commercials doesn't get adopted, I don't know what I'll do.)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on February 13, 2008, 02:24:13 AM
Harrie, you'll love this one. I finally found out that Bernard and Doris (that's Raf Fiennes and Susan Sarandon) had started without me! So I spent the late evening fascinated at how well they did and it caused a lot of reminiscience.  Her place in Somerville, Hillsborough twp. was just north of where I lived and of course I went up to buy some foxglove to plant but did not succeed in getting them to flourish. It's just that I can not remember if I went within a year of arriving in that part of New Jersey, or possibly the year after.  The house is now closed as of Christmas which was the last party open to the public.  The property is much too big to do in one fell swoop, it really takes planning to inspect it in stages because her father developed it from local farmland and it is now environmentalist territory at 2,700 acres.

But here's the part that fascinated me and belongs in Pets, because Doris Duke covered all the details, which was how she became so wealthy. This is from her will:

 If I shall be survived by a dog owned by me and residing at my death at my residence known as Falcon's Lair, in Beverly Hills, California, I give such dog to the caretaker of such property at my death or, if such caretaker is at any time unwilling or unable to care for such dog, to one of the foundations created under this Will or of which I was a member, director, trustee or officer at my death which is caring for other dogs of mine. If I shall be survived by a dog owned by me and located at my death at Falcon's Lair, I give and bequeath the sum of One Hundred Thousand Dollars ($100,000) to my Trustees, to be held by them in a separate trust for the benefit of such dog, with the income and principal thereof to be disposed of as follows:
a. My Trustees, at any time and from time to time, shall apply such part or all or none of the net income and principal of the trust for the benefit of such dog, at such times and in such amounts as my Trustees, in their absolute discretion, shall deem necessary for the care, feeding, comfort, maintenance and medical treatment of such dog, even though any such application or applications may result in the termination of the trust. At the end of each year of the trust, my Trustees shall accumulate and add to principal any net income not so applied, any such capitalized income thereafter to be disposed of as a part of such principal.

b. Upon the earlier to occur of (i) the death of such dog and (ii) twenty-one (21) years after my death, the trust shall terminate. Upon such termination, the principal of the trust remaining at that time, and any accrued and undistributed income, shall be added to my residuary estate and disposed of in accordance with the provisions of Article EIGHT hereof.

She was thorough.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on February 13, 2008, 07:08:08 PM
Well, she also became wealthy by inheriting a tobacco fortune, if I recall correctly. But I'm glad she watched out for her pooch - I think she liked horses too.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on February 13, 2008, 07:19:48 PM
Harrie,

Hubby has the same feeling towards that pretty pooch in the Pedigree commercial. He's ready to go to the pound and get it, and he doesn't even like dogs much, but it is a beautiful dog and looks like it could get along with our two silly cats.

Snowkitis has been beating up a rug, and a piece of newspaper that had had a piece of catnip, cold and dry from the garden, on it. She actually did a sumersault, head over hind end over the spot this afternoon. So I brought in another piece for her, and she batted it all over the sitting room. Couldn't tell you where it ended up. I had picked two sprigs, so there is one more if we want a little show this evening. Rescue, on the other hand went crazy on fresh catnip one time, tried to climb up onto the bed and fell off. He completely ignores the stuff, even when Snowkitis is going wild on it.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on February 14, 2008, 01:00:05 AM
Well, she also became wealthy by inheriting a tobacco fortune, if I recall correctly. But I'm glad she watched out for her pooch - I think she liked horses too.


The original inheritance was small by comparison to what it grew into through her investments during her life time.   You must see Ralph Fiennes in this one; who would have imagined that Susan Sarandon and he would make such an interesting pair?

I don't recall much about horses other than that she gave a stable of them to Porfirio Rubirosa, her second husband.  I was told that I would be able to see the camel  up at Somerset; and, kept looking through the trees, imagining that I was catching a glimpse of it.  Not so.  They were really kept out in Rhode Island and there's fantastic story about how they were brought in because of an approaching storm, don't know whether it was expected hurricane season or what, in any case, the two camels went into the -- what is it called again?
I keep thinking of what it is called in France, the domus. It's not a green- house but the glassed-in  court yard where you can keep tropical plants,conservatory(?) and there they grazed while watching the storm outside the windows.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on February 14, 2008, 10:01:44 AM
Giant terrarium? 

For some reason, I think of Duke in connection with the (no longer around) National Horse Show in NYC, but I can't back it up with anything; will keep looking around.  Though given the treatment of many show horses, maybe I should take back the part about her liking horses and find a more accurate word.  (stepping down carefully from soapbox)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on February 15, 2008, 04:16:08 AM
It suddenly occurred to me, on the way to the kitchen to break off a piece of pound cake for a taste-testing, maybe you are channeling Jackie O.       

If you look at a map of New Jersey, Somerville,Somerset,Hillsborough is just north of Montgomery and Rocky Hill.  But to the west of there by car, it kind of swings around and meets up with Hunterdon County on the western side of the state  and there you find Bernardsville where Jackie lived  because there was room for horses, so the kids could ride and enter events. This is while she was editing at Doubleday; and, although they had an apartment on 5th.avenue, she would have a chauffeur drive her into the city, so that she could work in the car on her way to Manhattan, which in those days (I don't know how they did it) took a little over an hour and under two to cross the river. By the 1990s, when she died in Manhattan, it generally took a good two hours to drive from Princeton to New York, or to bus it, I never timed the commutter train from the Dinky station because the rail-bed was beginning to get problematic.

All I can say, is that the Time somehow just flew by from the point where everybody seemed shocked that she went off to Skorpios with Onassis and then that was over and she took a job in New York and lived out in the country, somewhat north of the Duke estate, and the next thing you knew she was dead.  I realize now in retrospect that both women died close to the same time period.

I also think that the time went rapidly because of the age of the kids during the interim.  They had reached an age, during the time that she was working, when kids do not crave being in the country but have things to do in the city, want to visit friends. I know that my son hated being in the country and really wanted to be back in  urban life which he was more familiar with; since he was somewhat younger(but not much, only three months younger than John) than the Kennedy children, I suspect they went through something similar to most kids who want to hook up with friends that they knew from either city activities or school in the city.  The prep school kids for instance in Jersey certainly didn't waste time hanging out around the dormitories. And Hunterdon county although being a nice green spread, has virtually nothing that would interest a young person.   I think it is the kind of country life that women feel most at home in when they reach a certain age, that is, in so far as there was something similar in their memory of their childhood.  There are plenty of things that they can get into to potter around, and then they can take a break from it every so often when at risk of being bored.  She apparently wanted to keep her mind occupied, and then became ill.  Good lord, come to think of it, she died and not only Doris Duke, but my mother was in the same age group and died soon after, in a couple of years, at Easter time.

What I do remember clearly, getting the news of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis death, I hadn't yet moved out to Hopewell but was still across from Lawrenceville school; and as you recall the little movie-star's stage Mom -- was the one who brought the news to my attention. Since they regularly went to church on Sunday, I asked her off the top of my head, since she looked a little lost in thought, whether she wanted to go  to church to say a rosary for Jackie Kennedy?  At which,she kind of blew herself up like a balloon and blustered, "No way! She's not going to need my prayers...." so I dropped the subject.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on February 15, 2008, 10:33:29 AM
Quote
It suddenly occurred to me, on the way to the kitchen to break off a piece of pound cake for a taste-testing, maybe you are channeling Jackie O.       


Mmmmm, no. I definitely know the difference.  How's the pound cake?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on February 15, 2008, 05:51:59 PM
harrie, the recipe,  posted prior to Valentine's Day in the  Food whatever,
says definitely 1 and 1/2 hour for baking.

It took me exactly three hours last night.  And it is exactly what a pound cake should be; but, huge.

I decided I need a steak to go with it, any minute now.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on February 18, 2008, 10:56:02 AM
Heard on the radio that someone in Pakistan's cat was on the ballot in the election.  Will post a link, if I come across it.

I thought of the Weather Cat, of course.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on February 18, 2008, 01:48:36 PM
Heard on the radio that someone in Pakistan's cat was on the ballot in the election.  Will post a link, if I come across it.

I thought of the Weather Cat, of course.

But did he get any super-delegates?  That's what I want to know. (Before I get jumped on for my unbelievably blatant ignorance of international politics, it's a joke.)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on February 18, 2008, 01:52:50 PM
Harrie,

Since you seem to be a horse person, perhaps you can answer a question that has puzzled me.

When a horse is in the wild, he runs and runs, and never gets dried off or brushed, etc. at the end of a run.

But, when a horse is owned, and does his running with a rider on his back, at the end of the run, he must be dried off, brushed, and what not.

Why is that so? Does the horse sweat more under the saddle and stuff?



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on February 18, 2008, 02:25:04 PM
Weezo, that's mostly it.  If a horse gets worked hard on a cold day, for example, and is not cooled and/or covered with a light sheet, he stands a good chance of 1) getting really stiff, muscle-wise; and 2) catching a chill, which can be deadly.  The grooming is part of keeping their coat healthy, and for a lot of people it's also a way to spend more time and bond with your horse.  By grooming a horse regularly, you can also check for ticks, bites, cuts, etc. which, left untreated, may get infected; and before you know it, you're disinfecting and/or bandaging two-three times a day.

Horses in the wild don't get groomed, but they do like to roll in the dust, which is sort of like grooming -- like birds taking a dust bath. (Whereas the horses I groom like to roll in the mud, usually right after I proclaim them "beauuuteefullll".) Horses in the wild also run just about as much as they have to; even if they're playing, they'll usually take a time out and start back up.  (At least the horses in fields where I volunteer do that.)  So in the wild, unless they're being chased down for slaughter or some other reason, they don't generally get lathered up. And the people who round them up for the slaughterhouse don't really care what shape the horse is in, so it just gets stiff, catches a chill or, if he's really lucky, avoids that stuff and becomes a healthy kill at the abattoir.

Then again, once a horse came in to the rescue who had lived in a field for 11 years with no shelter and no hay (and New England winters) -- he was lucky enough to have had a good supply of tall grass and a clean stream of water. His owner had been dead for a couple of years, so he hadn't been groomed or fed at all, yet he was pretty resilient. He was just put down a couple months ago at the age of 32, because his body had started to betray him and he was no longer comfortable.  So, while horses can be extremely delicate in some health respects, they can also be tough old buzzards -- it just depends.

That's probably extremely TMI, but hey.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on February 18, 2008, 05:23:35 PM
Thank, Harrie, I had wondered that over time reading/hearing about the care needed in owning a horse.

As to the dust bath, one of ours was famous for letting us (grudgingly) give her a bath, dry her off, and then she would scamper out and roll in the yellow dirt at our house, and end up looking like before she had her bath. Rescue likes to be combed for a few strokes, but really likes it when I help get that heavy fur out when it starts getting hot here in Virgnia (in May and June). Nicely combed, what does he do? Go out and roll in the dirt!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on March 09, 2008, 12:08:17 AM
.... Bet you've noticed how the slaughter ban has overwhelmed so many rescues... and sent to many hores to Mexico to face an even more brutal fate.

I've only been doing the rescue thing for 5+ years, but the place I work has always been at capacity, even before there was talk of HR503.  Some horses get adopted out to qualified homes, but there's always another one coming in to fill that spot, and we monitor other horses in an attempt to keep them from having to come to the rescue facility. Where we have no room.

I don't want horses to be slaughtered, and my position is admittedly 100% emotional. I believe that a person owes an animal that has worked for them or been a companion a humane death, should death be the appropriate action.  (In fact, I think that just about everyone deserves a humane death.)  Death at a slaughterhouse is not humane. A properly placed .22 caliber pistol is more humane than the abattoir. If you can't afford the shot and cremation/backhoe rental (usu. around $250 depending), you probably shouldn't own the horse(s) in the first place. Every vet I know will work out a payment plan if you ask.

I do think that there are too many horses in the US and that an awful lot of people who have no business owning a horse insist on keeping them.  One of the reasons I work at the rescue is because I can't afford a horse but enjoy working with them.  But there are people who are sure that they're entitled to stuff simply because they want it; and when that "stuff" lives and breathes -- be it equine, canine, feline, avian or whatever -- it is the critter that suffers when things go wrong.

I don't think the answer to the surplus horse population is slaughter, painfully slow starvation or neglect. I think we can do better than that.

This is where I'll stop.   


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 09, 2008, 09:44:24 AM
Quote
I don't want horses to be slaughtered, and my position is admittedly 100% emotional. I believe that a person owes an animal that has worked for them or been a companion a humane death, should death be the appropriate action.  ... I do think that there are too many horses in the US and that an awful lot of people who have no business owning a horse insist on keeping them.

Amen to all of that! Keeping horses is a tremendous financial, emotional and physical commitment. To be really happy a horse needs a job, too. And working them out several times a week in the dead of winter can be difficult to say the least. I've found it rewarding in the extreme, but had to quit my 9-5 job to be able to do it right.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 09, 2008, 06:18:20 PM
harrie,

Pretty soon the horses will be at their best in Pennsylvania horse country when Spring arrives.  There is a continual tableau of horsing around and horse family antics to observe.  Some of the neighboring farmers on the road down through Hartland Station to Witmer, where you turn in to the Old Kings Highway, keep "the family" grazing together in an extensive area, so that you can watch the growth from foaling to colt, to one-year old, to eventual sale for breeding, I especially watch the painted ponies for their markings.    They are of course neither the preferred work horse nor the  buggy horse for getting around, going to "tzchurch" at somebody's home on Sunday, and the afterward Sunday afternoon courting.

That is probably what I miss the most by not living immediately in the vicinity of  Amish neighbors, because late on Sunday summer nights, I could read when everything else was quiet in the wee hours with the windows open, and hear the horse slowly plodding home down the road on automatic pilot while his young owner slept for the last mile or two after the nervous exertions of sitting in the parlor. 

Bi-weekly Sunday mornings on the other hand, if you've wandered down to your kitchen,  to have some coffee  and remember what you were fixing for breakfast but, haven't looked at the clock, you will find your ruminations interupted and causing you to look up, sure enough the kitchen clock says 20 to 7 or Amish steady buggy time proceeding in orderly  distance lengths to some other neighbour in the district where gemeine will be held this Sunday.  Shortly, this will be succeeded by one or two or three galloping horses carrying late-comers to catch up.  This is also the most fun coming home, when parents stay behind to talk with their friends, may have been invited to dinner at somebody else's house and will catch a ride back with other friends; it allows the youngest drivers (the oldest youngsters in the family) to practice their buggy-racing skills.  There are no trucks on Sunday.   Girls learn to handle the buggy somewhere closer to age ten or twelve, so that they can go to market; to which they have been accompanying their mother and she supervises their learning to manage the horse and buggy.

Sunday nights, you may enounter racing buggies in the dark although they are outfitted with plenty of flashing colored rear lights, as young men race each other in long strands of buggies as part of the prelude to what once used to be a hoedown barndance. This custom started before dancing was allowed, despite Harrison Ford's version, when it was the occasion of the peculiar unaccompanied singing in Dietsch or low-German done for the close of Sunday, at which boys preferred to spend time with their best girls; nowadays however, if someone's folks are traveling in another county, it is more often the occasion of amplified music groups.

What most people mean by horse-country begins further south in Chester county or short of Coatesville, on the way past Kennett Square(where I get to go to The Book Barn every now and then, just short of Chadd's Ford), close to Longwood Gardens. This area has the largest expanse of horse farms , some as boarding farms,they unbelievably still Fox Hunt in the vicinity of Unionville as well as attend point to point races; it was known as the locale where Barbaro received treatment until he had to be put to sleep.  The blog at the nytimes.com following the release of that news sure was an eye-opener more so than politics of how to ( if you pardon the expression) separate the sheep from the goats -- which come to think of it is not the best analogy.  There was a rather large contingent of posters who were adamant in their statements, "I don't see what all the fuss is about, with you people, about a horse!"


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 09, 2008, 06:44:28 PM
Hi Madupont,

I lived in Wayne for a year way back when... your description brings back memories. Still make it to the Devon show occasionally. Great country.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: GrannyM on March 09, 2008, 06:46:53 PM
Quote
I don't want horses to be slaughtered, and my position is admittedly 100% emotional. I believe that a person owes an animal that has worked for them or been a companion a humane death, should death be the appropriate action.  ... I do think that there are too many horses in the US and that an awful lot of people who have no business owning a horse insist on keeping them.

Amen to all of that! Keeping horses is a tremendous financial, emotional and physical commitment. To be really happy a horse needs a job, too. And working them out several times a week in the dead of winter can be difficult to say the least. I've found it rewarding in the extreme, but had to quit my 9-5 job to be able to do it right.



You are fortunate that you are able to do that.  And your horses are fortunate. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 10, 2008, 11:17:10 AM
I consider myself very ver lucky indeed! The horse in the avatar is a high-bred cutter I've had since he was a yearling... thousands of hours of training later, he's 8 years old and a classy performer. We entered our first "money" cutting competition last year. Won the "novice" class and, encouraged, entered the "non-pro" class as well. Won that too! Beat a 2-time state champ even though we didn't have our best run. Looking forward to edging toward the bigtime ths year and with a lot of luck might pay for his feed. Now cutting is in my blood - it'll run us broke if I'm not careful. Make a bunch of $$ if we're very  lucky (and good of course). But either way, it's not a bad expenditure of time. The dog is a red heeler/border collie mix who grew up with that horse - she'll lay right in front of him while he grazes and stare lovingly into his eyes for hours on end. She also rides herd on our wayward golden retriever - don't know what we'd do without her.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on March 10, 2008, 12:17:57 PM
Wow, he's quite the beauty.  Love your dog, too -- I've had two Border Collie mixes, both just great dogs.  LOL at maybe making back your feed money.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 10, 2008, 01:42:44 PM
Wow, he's quite the beauty.  Love your dog, too -- I've had two Border Collie mixes, both just great dogs.  LOL at maybe making back your feed money.

Thank you Harrie! As far as making back feed money... well I gotta set the bar somewhere, and that's about as low as it can go, since feed money is the least of expenses associated with training and campaigning a cutting horse. And that particular horse is, above all, my PET - gentle as a lap dog and bound to me at the hip. We do have a 2 year old serious cutting prospect that I characterize as a landlocked version of the old "boat" cliche: A hole in the ocean you dump money into. Maybe some day... or not. Doesn't matter except for the future prospect of maybe building a fancier barn.





Title: Re: Pets
Post by: GrannyM on March 11, 2008, 07:53:13 PM
Quote

And that particular horse is, above all, my PET - gentle as a lap dog and bound to me at the hip.




Wonderful!  It is hard to imagine a horse as a lap pet, but they sure are beautiful animals. 

I always get my pets from rescue groups - and do the best I can to help pets I can't rescue.  Right now, these two latest are sleeping on my feet:
(http://bp3.blogger.com/_6rNugrR5tSc/R9cH9cEpFYI/AAAAAAAAACc/BR8sL7dCRhM/s1600-h/red+pack.jpg)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 11, 2008, 07:56:46 PM
I could sleep in that guy's stall without fear of anything more than being awakened by him nuzzling. He's unbelievably gentle. Incredible for a performance horse. I love him.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: GrannyM on March 11, 2008, 07:59:38 PM
I always get my pets from rescue groups - and do the best I can to help pets I can't rescue.  Right now, these two latest are sleeping on my feet:
(http://bp3.blogger.com/_6rNugrR5tSc/R9cH9cEpFYI/AAAAAAAAACc/BR8sL7dCRhM/s1600-h/red+pack.jpg)

Having a problem posting a picture.  Anyhow, it may be irrational, but my little idiot pets mean a lot to me, and anybody - ANYBODY - who hurts animals should be strung up and skinned. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: GrannyM on March 13, 2008, 03:56:46 PM
Quote

And that particular horse is, above all, my PET - gentle as a lap dog and bound to me at the hip.




I always get my pets from rescue groups - and do the best I can to help pets I can't rescue.  Right now, these two latest are sleeping on my feet:
(http://bp3.blogger.com/_6rNugrR5tSc/R9cH9cEpFYI/AAAAAAAAACc/BR8sL7dCRhM/s1600-h/red+pack.jpg)

Just a test to see if I can paste in a picture:

http://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg28/grannymc/redpack.jpg


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on March 13, 2008, 04:05:42 PM
GrannyM, on the editing buttons when you're writing your post, there's an "Image" icon -- it's directly under the Italic-I.  Highlight your link, then click on that image icon.  Your link should show up as a picture then.  Hope this helps.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: GrannyM on March 14, 2008, 01:50:13 PM
(http://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg28/grannymc/redpack.jpg)

Thanks, Harry! 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on March 14, 2008, 02:02:34 PM
GrannyM, they are Adoreable!  This was Valentine's Day?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on March 14, 2008, 03:57:34 PM
What a couple of cuties!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: GrannyM on March 14, 2008, 07:55:27 PM
GrannyM, they are Adoreable!  This was Valentine's Day?

Yes, it was!!  One of the great temptations of small dogs is dressing them up and taking pictures of them.  Here is our Christmas card.  The words:  "And just whose idiot idea was this!!???!"

<a href="http://s244.photobucket.com/albums/gg28/grannymc/?action=view&current=CapoSanta.jpg" target="_blank"><img src="http://i244.photobucket.com/albums/gg28/grannymc/CapoSanta.jpg" border="0" alt="capo Santa"></a>


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: GrannyM on March 14, 2008, 08:01:09 PM
Obviously, I have a lot to learn about using this software.  OK.  Anyway, for a really cute pic, just click on the link. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on March 14, 2008, 09:54:37 PM
Well, the link works fine, and oh what a little cutie you have there!

In fact, I was listening to some "Christmas" carols just today that someone had put together for PI day:


Ring The Bells
(to the tune of Jingle Bells)

Basking in the glow
Of a Math Class holiday.
All we need to know
Is "Pi will lead the way!"

To circles we will sing,
The digits we'll recite
The ratio gives us everything
It's geometry's delight!  Oh!

Ring the bells, Pi Day spells
Fun with 3 - 1 - 4!
It's the day to celebrate
That number we adore!  Oh!

Ring the bells, Pi Day spells
Fun with 3 - 1 - 4!
First we take one slice of Pi
And then we ask for more!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: GrannyM on March 15, 2008, 11:25:02 AM
Well, the link works fine, and oh what a little cutie you have there!

In fact, I was listening to some "Christmas" carols just today that someone had put together for PI day:


Ring the bells, Pi Day spells
Fun with 3 - 1 - 4!
First we take one slice of Pi
And then we ask for more!

And I happy Pi day to you too - even if a day late!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on March 19, 2008, 11:30:08 AM
Those two dogs pictured -- if civilization collapsed, they would be a temporary source of protein.  I would eat them.  Perhaps in chili -- making them "chili dogs" eh?



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 19, 2008, 11:34:29 AM
I think you'd get a lot more meat off that cat in your avatar!   ;D


Title: Hatching the Seeds
Post by: weezo on March 19, 2008, 03:01:18 PM
Hubby just called me into the front room to see a most humorous sight!

A few days ago, I planted a flat of flower seeds, layed a piece of plastic wrap over it, and set it on a chest by the window. When Steve called, I came in the room to see Snowkitis sitting on the plastic wrap in the seed tray. She was sitting so proud, so tall, chest poked out, and head straight. She was proud to be sitting there hatching the seeds.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 19, 2008, 04:56:18 PM
You bring up a sore subject Weezo. Our cat likes to wait until we have to take the cover off the tomato sprouts, then chew them down to the ground. If I catch her "hatching" them she's going to get a hearty taste of the kitchen sprayer!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on March 19, 2008, 07:11:53 PM
NOTA,

Our cats never eat the plants, indoors or out, tho Snowkitis likes to roll on a sprig of catnip now and then Rescue got too high the first time he did some catnip, and rolled off the bed, and he hasn't touched the stuff since. Our cats are both indoor and outdoor cats. We let them in and out often during the day, and ocassionally they will spend a warm night outdoors hunting. So ours get enough greenery outside, and they don't bother anything we plant.

I probably should have taken a picture of Snowkitis Hatching the Seeds, but I was laughing too hard to think of the camera!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 19, 2008, 10:09:43 PM
Quote
We let them in and out often during the day, and ocassionally they will spend a warm night outdoors hunting.

Our "Lucy" goes out during the day (and hunts with alarming success), but has never spent a night outside. I'd don't think she'd make it - this is a very wild area w/too many predators, incl coyotes, bobcats, raccoons, badgers, bears and a host of other critters a housecat would be ill advised to encounter. Lucky for her, "Angel" our red heeler is her nanny and can find her wherever she is on the property or even the 80 acres next door. Angel is truly her angel - they wrestle every morning for a half hour or so, then Angel grooms her head to toe - people who have seen it are amazed. There's a patch of catnip we let grow right outside the front door and Luci partakes occasionally. Not a raucus drunk though - she just falls asleep.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on March 19, 2008, 10:29:54 PM
NOTA,

Sounds like you are a bit more in the wilds than we are! Bears - I've never seen one, but the local paper last year showed a 300 lb black bear that had been shot by a local archer. I have never heard coyote, but then we are in central VA, which is probably not coyote country. But, we do have all of the other wildlife you mentioned, plus, this year our yard became the cozy spot for a flock of buzzards. I've never seen an altercation between the buzzards and our cats, but Snowkitis is small enough to be, perhaps, carried away by these buzzards. Recue, they would have to drop since he's such a big boy!

We usually go to sleep no later than midnight, sometimes earlier, and the last thing before sleep in "check for the cats" - going to the door, turning on all the lights, and calling our furry treasure. If they don't come in on the last call, I warn them they will stay out all night. I cannot say for a fact how much English they understand, but more than once, when I called out that it was the "last call for the night, if you don't come in now, you're staying out all night", someone trotted up to the porch and in the door.
 



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 19, 2008, 10:55:18 PM
Quote
I've never seen an altercation between the buzzards and our cats, but Snowkitis is small enough to be, perhaps, carried away by these buzzards

Buzzards are not notorious for going after meat that fights back. I'd be far more concerned about owls. We have them and eagles, hawks, falcons - sheesh, I really would NOT want to be an outdoor cat around here. There are some feral ones, but the vets tell me they don't usually live to breeding age and almost never much beyond.

Quote
We usually go to sleep no later than midnight, sometimes earlier, and the last thing before sleep in "check for the cats"

That's our routine as well, but midnight your time (we're in Colorado). Gotta get up at first light to feed horses, so midnight is kind of like OZ - I've heard of it...

Quote
I cannot say for a fact how much English they understand, but more than once, when I called out that it was the "last call for the night, if you don't come in now, you're staying out all night", someone trotted up to the porch and in the door.

Funny, ain't it? They may not "understand" like we'd say a person does, but there's no mistake that they  get the message. And respond.

If Luci is out past dark, Angel starts whining... we let Angel out for while then go find her - and Luci. Angel will physically pin her down (Lucy lets her do this!?) or even tree her until we come get them both. Don't know what Angel would do if Luci really got lost, but I guarantee there wouldn't be any sleep going on in our house that night. We have a Golden Retriever too; sweetest gentlest thing on the planet. Angel grooms Luci in the morning, Luci grooms the Retriever at night... weird.

PS Please forgive that I don;t know how to spell Luci - - or Lucy. My wife and I argue over it but right now I forget which side I'm on. Weezo, are you a refugee from NYT too?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on March 19, 2008, 11:05:08 PM
NOTA,

I've been noticing the past few weeks that sometimes when Rescue asks to go out, she really wants me to go to the door and let Snowkitis in. My hearing is going, but I suspect the cats talk through the door, and Rescue, knowing I've got the soft spot to get up and see what he wants, is the most likely to go let her in.

It is most interesting to see how the cats are reacting to the problems in the house. Hubby has been put on disability for a devestating depression, and has mood swings that almost raise the roof when they happen. Snowkitis, who has always been his love cushion, has learned to take his temperature, and avoid him when he is in an especially evil mood, then move in like there was never a problem, for loving when he's in a better mood.

It is truly funny about your dog who keeps tabs on the cat. Sometimes, I think that if we studied the behavior of tribal and domesticated animals, we could learn much about being good human beings.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 20, 2008, 12:31:08 PM
harrie -

Where do you live, if I may ask?  We have lots of hawks and buzzards around here, but I never worry about the cats. 

barton -

I bought new furniture a couple of weeks back, and we've been doing some mad stuff to keep the cats away.  Bought some of that double-sided tape but we're trying to gradually phase it out.  Apparently that will never happen because we went downstairs last night only to see - deja vu - a large, fat tabby spread out over the big, round chair arm a la your avatar photo!  I now have the double-sided tape square in the middle of each arm.  My daughter and I were playing cards last night and she got the tape stuck all over her!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on March 20, 2008, 12:56:26 PM
Hi, Desdemona -- glad to hear all is well with you.  I think your question is for None of the Above, who also has a horse avatar (his is horse and dog).

But for the record, I live in southern Connecticut, north of Bridgeport and west of New Haven.  We have hawks, sometimes eagles and always turkey vultures (are they buzzards?), but our main reason for keeping the cats indoors is coyotes (lots of them, all over the place), raccoons and crazy drivers. We also get the occasional bear sighting.

Gave up starting seedlings indoors many years ago because the cats just enjoyed them too much.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 20, 2008, 01:04:50 PM
Oh, okay!   :D

I truly don't think vultures, buzzards, or hawks are a danger to cats.  I've never observed one showing the slightest bit of interest in my cats, even as kittens, and believe me, the skies are FILLED with Peregrine Falcons here.

I've found that other cats are the biggest danger to outdoor cats here, at least.  My little schnauzer Ivan caught up with a squirrel a few years ago that did him some harm - the thing managed to get underneath him and bit and scratched his little tummy up.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 20, 2008, 02:33:24 PM
Quote
the skies are FILLED with Peregrine Falcons here.

Peregrines would be among the least likely of all raptors to threaten a cat, due to their size and their hunting habits. Owls, otoh, are well known to pose a threat. (We actually saw our cat being taken by a huge owl about 15 years ago).Eagles and larger hawks are usually mistaking a cat for someone else if they attack, but owls... are pretty indiscriminate.

Quote
I've found that other cats are the biggest danger to outdoor cats here, at least.
Goes with my experience all right. Luci/Lucy had a run-in with a feral cat last year and landed us a hefty vet bill. I later live-trapped the cat (after catching Lucy a couple of times) and gave him a nice long ride to a huge hay ranch with lots of barns. He's probably happy there - hasn't been back.

 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 20, 2008, 03:37:33 PM
Wow!  Did the cat carried off by the owl survive?!  Dumb question, I guess.  Was it a barn owl?  I know they get pretty darn big, but I never thought owls get THAT big!

My tom cat has been in so many fights he has scars all over his head.  He almost lost an eye and then got bitten and developed an abcess.  He was an outdoor cat when I got him so I never could get him to stay happy indoors.

Anyway, I know what you mean about hefty veternary bills, unfortunately.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on March 20, 2008, 04:06:57 PM
Fessing up!

I was me who was worried about Snowkitis and Rescue with the buzzards. I suspect there are enough barns here about to keep the owls content, I've heard one now and then, but have never seen one in the yard. I do know the buzzards will catch mice. One rainy day when I walked up to the mail box and the buzzards all took flight, one dropped something out of his mouth, and when it landed in the puddle next to where I was walking, the outline hitting the water looked like a mouse with a tail.

When I came in the house, I told our cats that they weren't doing their job well enough keeping up with the mice in the yard, and that's why those huge buzzards took up residence.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 20, 2008, 06:53:43 PM
Wow!  Did the cat carried off by the owl survive?!  Dumb question, I guess.  Was it a barn owl?  I know they get pretty darn big, but I never thought owls get THAT big!

My tom cat has been in so many fights he has scars all over his head.  He almost lost an eye and then got bitten and developed an abcess.  He was an outdoor cat when I got him so I never could get him to stay happy indoors.

Anyway, I know what you mean about hefty veternary bills, unfortunately.


Hi Des,

No, we never saw the poor kitty again, never had a chance. Broke my heart. It was (as far as I could see) a Great Horned Owl - real big. We lived in the mountains west of Boulder CO at the time, and have since moved to the Heart of the Rockies near Salida CO. It makes the Boulder County setting look downright urban. I only have internet by virtue of a radio link. Here's a few degrees of the view from our deck:

(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj214/Jorian_2008/100_0164.jpg)

7500 ft elevation and gorgeous, but growing fast. Might have to move again in the next few years if we want to stay in the wilderness.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 21, 2008, 08:59:03 AM
Fessing up!

I was me who was worried about Snowkitis and Rescue with the buzzards. I suspect there are enough barns here about to keep the owls content, I've heard one now and then, but have never seen one in the yard. I do know the buzzards will catch mice. One rainy day when I walked up to the mail box and the buzzards all took flight, one dropped something out of his mouth, and when it landed in the puddle next to where I was walking, the outline hitting the water looked like a mouse with a tail.

When I came in the house, I told our cats that they weren't doing their job well enough keeping up with the mice in the yard, and that's why those huge buzzards took up residence.



Actually, buzzards don't eat anything other than carrion, so they were probably attracted to your yard BECAUSE the cats were doing their job.  You know how those evil little cats like to just kill mice for the fun of it.

None -

Gorgeous country.  I figured it was a Great Horned Owl - I believe those get to be the biggest.  So how big was that sucker, anyway?  I'd totally freak out if an owl carried one of my cats off!!!!!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 21, 2008, 09:29:47 AM
That bird had to have a wingspan in excess of five feet. And yes, I freaked out, but what are you going to do? I felt heartsick about it for a long time but never had any inclination to try to DO anything about it - the owls were there first.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 21, 2008, 12:27:33 PM
Whoa!  That sound like something from a horror movie, none.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 21, 2008, 01:57:28 PM
No kidding, Des. The biggest "bird scare" I ever experienced though, was making my way along a small stream trying to creep up on some pools where I knew there were trout. Just stepped onto a rock in the water and there was a terrific loud noise, and I could have sworn the sun went dark for a moment! It was a Great Blue Heron that I had gotten too close to - MAN those things are BIG when you're close to them! Took about five minutes for my heart to settle down. We have a much more substantial river where we live now and there are lots of them, but they're still quite impressive. Don't think they're any kind of threat unless you're a fish... good thing.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 21, 2008, 02:21:59 PM
Guess I've never truly experienced a bird scare.  I'm so naive.   :D


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 21, 2008, 09:36:21 PM
Marge’s Favorite Plants 

http://www.pallensmith.com/index.php?id=16179

(Marge is Allen's cat)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on March 21, 2008, 10:34:06 PM
Maddie,

Cute article. We have a small piece of catnip, hoping it will spread a bit.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 22, 2008, 01:57:03 AM
Oh, it spreads all over the place, depending on how many cats you have to carry the seeds in their fur which, when they roll around, does a good job of seeding all over your property. I liked the article for the comparisons of a variety of fairly good smelling mint herbs,as well as edibles, and various shapes and textures, some with more color although tiny flowers individually which color areas by bunching naturally.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on March 23, 2008, 08:47:40 PM
Went walking with the mutt today and ran across some fresh deer remnants on some open space land. So apparently the coyotes (or someone's dogs running loose) are doing well.  Note to self:  next time out by myself, bring a stick or golf club or something.

madupont, I grew catmint a couple of years ago in the big garden, since it deters some undesirable bugs. Looks very pretty, grows easily in crummy conditions. After last year's vole adventures, maybe I should find some more; maybe it will bring some cats around.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 24, 2008, 02:53:14 AM
Harrie,

I used to carry a hoe.

Had no idea that you would have coyotes in Connecticut.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 24, 2008, 11:31:14 AM
Okay, I'm going to reveal what a wimp I can be here.

I have a very large backyard, only a small portion of which is fenced in.   My little schnauzer Ivan and I were out there walking around outside of the fenced area, enjoying the day, when the guy who lives behind me let out his three huge dogs, two of which are pit bulls.  He doesn't have a fenced in yard and does not always go outside with them to make sure they stay off my property even though we scrupulously walk with Ivan when he's out there and make sure he doesn't go onto other peoples' property. 

Those three dogs were all over us like white on rice - I've had a lot of experience with dogs, so I kept my cool - hollered "NO!" and "STAY!" at them, but that didn't stop them.  So Ivan has these three huge dogs surrounding him, and he's starting to get mad - he's 20 lbs of unblemished self-importance and thinks he can kick ANY dog's butt.  Just about the time he started to growl, the owner shows up and says "Oh, don't worry, they are totally okay."  I replied, "Well, MY dog ISN'T okay - he's extremely feisty."  And with that I looked him straight in the face and gave him a look.  Somehow I couldn't bring myself to say, "KEEP YOUR FRIGGING DOGS OFF MY PROPERTY!"

So do I get the wimp award or not?  Hope he got the message anyway!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on March 24, 2008, 12:59:57 PM
Desdemona, I don't think you're such a wimp.  I mean, it's better to stay somewhat neighborly with the guy and his dogs, even if he's lacking in perfect neighborliness.  Especially if Ivan's feisty (which as a Schnauzer he has every right to be), you never know what a group of dogs of any heritage will decide to do about it.  Some people are just more conscientious dog owners than others, unfortunately.


Madupont, yes on the coyotes, we have lots of them; and they are either being built out of the woods or becoming less shy.  I've only seen one up close, and he was much larger than I thought he'd be; I got chills up my spine and everything when our eyes met, but I was in a car so not exactly feeling in peril.

We also get the extremely rare but occasional moose sighting.  Authorities theorize that they follow the natural gas pipe system/trail down from Canada.  Well, first they totally deny everything; but when a moose carcass shows up by the side of the road (like one did a year or so back), they say "Okay, it could happen..."

A handful of people are also insisting that there's a cougar hanging to the north, but it's very possibly just a large bobcat, which we definitely have around.

My dog hasn't seen any of these critters yet, but if it ever happens I fully expect him to kind of say "You're on your own, Mom" and run, run, run.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 24, 2008, 01:21:10 PM
I guess Pit-bulls are what you make of them, I recently saw pictures on-line, possibly in connection to the Brad Pitt housing efforts in New Orleans that showed those former residents who still live under the bridge, among their plastic-bagged belongings piled high, guarded by the Pit-bulls who seem very affectionate toward the women who own them and to whom the dogs turn like puzzled children wondering why they have to remain there three years later (the city has a homeless rate of one out of every 25 people; the highest figure ever recorded in the US and which was never close to that high before the end of summer 2005).

Yet these are rather big dogs in comparison to the odd little dogs that became popular as an advertising gimmic some years back.

What I am implying is that you might require a sufficiently tall fence depending which type of pit-bull your neighbour is being so remiss about containing. Besides canines are pack creatures(as are humans, come to think of it), which means that as a group they behave rather badly compared to their individual "breeding" and will resort to exaggerated egging on (left over Easter expression?) in hopes of advancing in the pecking order(another left over Easter egg!).

It is truly unkind of your neighbor to not allow you the privacy of enjoying outdoor jaunts within your own boundaries when he keeps "pets" whom he has not trained and is not training to stay within his. He is being a major inconvenience. But I don't have a ready solution because bringing that to the attention of the local authorities almost always makes the situation go into the human escalation phase.  He is, however, taking advantage of you.

I live in a place where the many dog owners we have, although this varies from time to time, are required to not let the dogs wander the grass of adjoining open areas unaccompanied and the owner must be willing to do the scooping routine.

Since most of the dogs are charmingly small companions, I don't mind the exuberance of a youngster of a dog, still low to the ground as he will ever be, who comes romping over because sometimes they pick up the scent of the seasonal change  along the floral borders. These kind of dogs, with their owner following after with the leash, are so happy and will usually roll on their back in the grass(not this year however, landscapers goofed with the tree maintenance which produced yucky overabundance of fallen pitted fruiting stuff that dropped in the cold season and will ruin the lawn.  It seemed like a good idea to them. But the problem has never existed before). Happy smiling dogs are beloved by all but the worst types of humans.

One of those is a neighbour who insists on using my front yard as a short-cut to his car, or from his car. In the latter case, he comes within about three feet of my windows, a distraction from the corner of my eye when I suppose that someone with a valid purpose is arriving at the front door while I am at the computer.  He's made perfectly obvious that he has some emotional problem, after having been asked not to do that and has not been seen to smile when he'd rather just scowl for about a half-year now.  Takes all kinds to make the world less pleasurable.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 24, 2008, 01:27:49 PM
Well, maddie, the deal is I have a LOT of land out there and LITTLE money right now, so fencing isn't the answer. 

I know the obvious thing everyone must be wondering about is why I take Ivan in back instead of into the fenced in area, but he won't do his big business in the fenced area.  He hates it.

Another thing is, a fence would truly mar the beauty of my backyard - it's on a steep hill with lots of trees and hardscaping, a beautiful little path, and a wooden storage building painted the same color as the house.  (One of those huge dogs did his big business right in the middle of my little path about a month ago but I just cleaned it up.  I should have gone over there and requested the neighbor come clean it up, but again, I'm spineless at times.)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 24, 2008, 01:29:49 PM
And why on earth would ANYONE have 3 gigantor dogs with no fence?  Can you imagine what that house must be like???  Ugggh.  >:(


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 24, 2008, 02:22:20 PM
Harrie!

"My dog hasn't seen any of these critters yet, but if it ever happens I fully expect him to kind of say "You're on your own, Mom" and run, run, run."                
                            Don't run.  The cougar whose paws are quite a bit bigger, but are otherwise sometime misidentified as bob-cats, are extremely dangerous, like all cats, they chase when something running comes into their eyesight. California has had  awful occurrences because of normal people out doing the usual average "run" and being attacked.

We have them here, usually unseen but have heavily wooded areas on the hillsides of the Lancaster eastern border where they hunt. My former landlord had a very expensive German breed of hunting dog that needed four hours of surgery to survive an encounter with a cougar who left prints on the back deck of the home built into the woods; frankly the dog had not been well-trained, it used to be the scourge of my original floral borders when I came to the country from "civilization", because the owners, as des is discovering at her yard,were not properly trained People.

I once had the occasion  in the Midwest, amidst similar terrain, with doing something that I never should have done but too bad that thought did not come to mind before I set out alone, to walk down from the ridge all by myself, to be home in time to cook before a guest was expected on home leave from his foreign assignment; when suddenly, listening to the village in the distance, I had the distinct impression that I was being watched. I did not change my pace but continued methodically trekking in the worst possible shoes for the occasion, a pair of Dr.Scholls' wooden clogs! This was something that clicked in from my childhood, when we were taught all these things by "Indians" (as was said back then). That seemed like the longest walk, according to the time factor, that I ever took in my life.

Having an animal of your own with you does not improve your odds, in that situation; just heartache.    Nontheless you have to exercise the dog somewhere?  Because you yourself have  contact with the local officers who keep the peace and are probably there to keep the safety as well, inquire a lot.  It is surprising just the same how very few people spot anything unusual in their surroundings.

When I first heard mentioned that what seemed like a "large cat" (to be differentiated from the usual expression, "my cat, or her cat, or his cat is: a large cat" had been seen "somewhere" but a location not readily familiar to me, I immediately asked the landlord's wife who had been born and raised in this region some seventy plus years before I asked her if there were any "large, wild cats" in the hills that rise beyond their air-strip and the neighboring pastures beyond?

"Oh, never.", quote she. Four or five years late the attack happened at their daughter's house; after she had taken the dog back there after having lived for awhile with her parents.

I never would have expected that you would have coyotes in your territory. Back home in the Midwest, we now have wolves, thanks to the conservationists; we always had wolves, but given prime conditions and the sanctity of law, they reproduced so magnificently that they infringe on highly populated towns.  In Princeton, it was the deer population, as it is in Delaware, vast herds of them.

I have noticed that the moose can be an outsized galloping monster when it hits civilization, but here where we are not very civilized and impinge upon the Amish and Mennonite farms with that housing boom that took place just before the prime mortgage "Pennies from Heaven" to the usual establishment, no problem; what we have is the occasional buffalo  that you don't want to show up in your backyard, when it has escaped somebody else's range, since the meat became very popular. This is however more rare than the bears that arrive in New Jersey.

Llamas are the favorite yard pet in this part of Pennsylvania and they stay in the shade near the watering ponds of farmers, although cows have been known to ramble on truck routes in the middle of the night.

All the herd raising that goes on here is an attraction for the cats who will habitually water at an available watering pond at about the same hour that farmers let the overnight pastured cows into the milking barn where they are clamoring to be.

So a moose carcass at the side of your road is one of two things, if not a motorist bumping into it, then a cat who returns to the underbrush -- when the sun up begins to rise higher and comes out again some hours after sunset . Which is when it caught the dog let out to take care of its business before being locked in for the night. That was in Winter, a natural hunting necessity, when the deer usually graze by day by breaking through the snow-crust which we have not had for a good two or three years.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 24, 2008, 02:31:45 PM
And why on earth would ANYONE have 3 gigantor dogs with no fence?  Can you imagine what that house must be like???  Ugggh.  >:(

Typical dealer's residence,perchance? It's usually to their advantage to have the dogs ramble to provide advance warning. They never let the neighbours know that is the case.

About the land being larger than money on hand, I'm hip. Before you get a windfall, start considering the pricing of a feature in my region, electric fences where the Mennonites rather than the Amish dwell. Except that would involve training Ivan not to be shocked by anything. Despite childhood awareness, I too have forgotten as an adult and actually put both hands on a fence! Check with a rural veterinarian on the precautions.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 24, 2008, 03:11:19 PM
You may just have hit the nail on the head with that dealer's resistance thing, maddie!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on March 24, 2008, 03:20:14 PM
maduont,
Don't worry -- that would be my dog running. I would be busy watching my life flash before my eyes, as I can't run to save my life (one knee is totally shot, not even much of a joint left last time it was X-rayed).  My previous dog, a Shepherd/Doberman mix, would likely have put her life on the line for me or the hubby (or her cats, for that matter), but luckily the question never came up.  The new guy has many issues to resolve and may never reach that point. Again, I hope he never has to.

It's been my experience that some people just like pit bulls, or just like an individual dog who happens to be a pit bull.  I've met some very sweet pit bulls, and some absolutely evil Pomeranians and Yorkies. So you just never know.

Hopefully, desdemona, your neighbor just likes his dogs for dogs' sake and catches the hint you threw his way.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on March 24, 2008, 03:20:38 PM
You may just have hit the nail on the head with that dealer's resistance thing, maddie!

Yikes!! You really think so?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 24, 2008, 05:13:05 PM
Electric fence? You mean the "invisible" type? Might keep her dog in, but wouldn't keep the neighbor's dogs out - unless you could fit them with the collars...

They're a little pricey, too. Too bad you couldn't use the kind of electric ribbon "fence" we use for horses - you can put up hundreds of yards of it in an afternoon, no sweat. But dogs run right under it, alas.

Here's our ferocious watchdog:

(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj214/Jorian_2008/Smarty.jpg)

Just as dangerous as he looks. But that bark!



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on March 24, 2008, 07:16:49 PM
Beautiful dog, NotA.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 24, 2008, 08:23:01 PM
He ("Smarty") told me to thank you. And to tell you "I know. Everybody loves me."

When we brought him home at 8 wks old Angel the heeler (who really is a rather nasty dog to anyone she doesn't know) wouldn't let him near her. That went on for about 2½ weeks. But Smarty was just SO gentle, loving and respectful - by three weeks I saw him literally take food out of her mouth and she didn't bat an eyelash. He's living proof that love conquers all.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 24, 2008, 09:54:06 PM
NOTA,

I had somewhat that impression looking at him, that he is aware of being the nobility of dogs, possibly the Duc de Labrador Springer masquerading as "Smarty". This attitude also happens with people who are lovely. And has something to do with bringing him home at that age because if they grow up being related to as if they are special, they become special and they stay that way. Puppies, little children, and kittens,too, are very impressionable.

HARRIE , my uncles and cousins had a cross Shepherd/Doberman on the farm, apparently both breeds when in combo are that way, protective.

Back to NOTA, no, not the invisible fence, I did have the "horse fence" in mind, technically used for cows in this part of the world, but from what I recall, the old barbed wire fence was juiced and now I am trying to picture a dog stepping through between horizontal wires as delicately as possible!     But I expect a dog would dig under it.   Actual horse fence in this part of the world is pretty tame. The horse would have to be conditioned to think of it as a barrier.

Back to HARRIE -- I can see where Yorkies can be little snots and snappers, Pomeranians that I've met thus far no problem. The funniest occasion was a day when I went to buy eggs (before finding my regular who is a "specialist" and has now retired leaving the raising to her daughter-in-law) where a very young Amish boy was out in the drive playing with a small Pomeranian who immediately turned her curled tail and retreated toward the cellar; whereupon he called after her, "Kumma,
kummen sie hier, Lassie", clapping his hands gently so she would come play.




Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 25, 2008, 10:00:23 AM
A mini schnauzer was electrocuted on someone's fence about a year ago in this area - it was really a horrible thing for that man to do, putting out an electric fence with that much voltage.  The bereaved owners were ready to kill this guy because his attitude was so cavalier - "The dog shouldn't have been on my property."  Okay, but sometimes dogs get out and that give you the right to kill the poor animal?

Harrie, I find toy dogs in general have nasty dispositions, and I'll never understand why Yorkies are so popular.  Yappers!



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on March 25, 2008, 01:18:39 PM
Haven't looked in here, sorry to nonreply to replies -- Desdemona, your cat-draping story shows that the phenomenon of cat-draping is spreading.  Perhaps it's like that Hundredth Monkey phenomenon in Japan, and soon all the lazy tabbies will be spread across armrests.  LOL picturing the encounter with double-side tape.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 25, 2008, 02:49:18 PM
A mini schnauzer was electrocuted on someone's fence about a year ago in this area - it was really a horrible thing for that man to do, putting out an electric fence with that much voltage.  The bereaved owners were ready to kill this guy because his attitude was so cavalier - "The dog shouldn't have been on my property."  Okay, but sometimes dogs get out and that give you the right to kill the poor animal?

Harrie, I find toy dogs in general have nasty dispositions, and I'll never understand why Yorkies are so popular.  Yappers!




Sorry I suggested that suggestion! This guy must have known what kind of voltage or was there something else in the environment he was trying to prevent from getting to him like Count Dracula in one of his many guises not as cute as Gary Oldman?

More accidents occur through people not knowing what they are doing. This was also true in Manhattan a few years ago,somebody was not paying attention to who was the somebody who should be checking on these things when a woman and her dog were electrocuted while just out exercising the dog for the usual dog walk.  it was a rainy day and the dog stepped on one of those metal doors that are lain flush with the sidewalk, and some shorted in the underground electric lines along the street, that is beneath the street, made contact; this led to yet another journalistic investigation to find out how common this was.

Apparently while Rudy Giuliani was fighting crime in various parts of the city, he had we presume delegated responsibility for this area of metropolitan improvements to the official supposed in charge of such  matters, but then eventually, Rudy was replaced by Mayor Bloomberg prior to there ever being a Republican convention in the city. As mayor Michael was to discover there was a lousy electric situation on more than one occasion, in that Con Ed had  not accessed enough lines to keep the lights on at all time, for more than one occasion, which also turned the coolers off and the freezers in the small grocery stores of these interesting neighborhood that make up America's greatest city where little old ladies live five flights up but the elevator went out with the electricity, so did the air-conditioning in July, and the apartment appliances, even the toilet could only be flushed as set on a regulator somewhere in the basement.  So much for Homeland Security.  They have people who take surveys by phone and ask you how many gallons of water do you keep for an emergency, how much food, how much of it is in canned goods, etc.,etc.?  In a Brooklyn apartment?

Anyway, the guy who said,"The dog shouldn't have been on my property." had better have had insurance; not that this remedies the problem for the bereaved owners of their electrocuted pet.   

I had something more in mind of lower voltage suitable to smaller weight animals which is why I mentioned the local rural veterinarian who could clarify what you would have to know in case of such a project as an option in future circumstances.   

What is "hardscaping"? Is this hardwoods in the landscaping? I thought it might be a local term, as I'm not familiar with the term?  I was envisioning similar landscape as here, in which fence can remain relatively unobstructive in appearances and beside I have this inclination to go out there and give it hedgerow plantings here and there for a decorative effect in the landscaping. Here, the farmers frugally took out their windrows to have every inch for crops, so the long vistas are really obvious but it has added to the wind problem, at a time when there are more destructive coastal winds than ever, if you recall weezo mentioning the wind off the Chesapeake directly below this region.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on March 25, 2008, 02:53:08 PM
"Hardscaping" is brick or stonework used in landscaping, you know, like retainer walls.  I have lots of native rock hardscaping - it's gorgeous.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 25, 2008, 11:41:43 PM
Take Cancer Risk Outdoors March 25, 2008


Secondhand smoke poses risks for every member of the family, cats included. Research suggests that living with one smoker in the house doubles a kitty's risk of feline lymphoma, the most common cancer in cats, which kills 75% of its victims within a year of diagnosis. The risk triples when exposure to secondhand smoke occurs for 5 or more years, and quadruples with two smokers in the house.

Cats get a double whammy from secondhand smoke because they inhale the carcinogens AND they ingest them when grooming. Protect your cat's health by making the inside of your home a smoke-free zone


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 26, 2008, 12:05:32 AM
"Hardscaping" is brick or stonework used in landscaping, you know, like retainer walls.  I have lots of native rock hardscaping - it's gorgeous.


That makes sense:"Hardscaping". I had a short red brick wall in Hopewell. Part of the original era of founding. I lived on the second floor but, as the building had been built into a gradually progressing upward hillside to where it was cultivated as farmland at the top of the hill, from my windows it was actually three floors down to the town square. The old Scots farmers had used this method of settlement, mounds of forsythia at this season, and called it the "wagon wheel pattern with the center of the wheel: the corn crop, then the sections descended until wide at the street which did  have a stone retaining wall. In the back was a descending ivy garden with many daffodils in spring just next to the terrace and what had been a "mud room" as they call them in New Jersey.

The red brick wall was further up hill as a property marker, made from left over bricks when the Office had been built.  "The Office" was always a separate building in the 19th.century from the main manufactuary or home as the case may be.

The teeniest enclosed spot had been designated "your garden" surrounded by wild flowers in their natural setting; but it had been meant to protect whatever was started in that fenced area because there was a pen,a hen-house at the rear of the property adjoining the fields. People regularly stopped by as they took this back route down to the town post-office, or the pharmacy,or the children's playground with the bandstand for the summer concert. What they were stopping to look at, goats! But the chickens wandered down and I had to be very ingenious to keep them from digging up what I began to transfer to the red brick wall which was less then three feet high .

I had realized that it was one spot that would retain water at the base of the wall so, I planted it with some durable things, the original purpose was for a plant that I had told weezo about when she told me about going to Sheboygan on Lake Michigan where I had once picked up a native scouring plant growing at the edge of the lake. It likes to grow with its feet in water, best of all, and that was where I found it again outside a little Georgian style lunchroom in a rectangular pond.  Later, I added Thai basil and things that I no longer recall.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on March 27, 2008, 01:17:10 PM
I like the word "xeriscaping" which is landscaping where water is scarce.  In the long run, most of the U.S. will have to do xeriscaping.

Fat lazy cats enjoy the decreased labor, once the xeriscape is established.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: elportenito1 on March 30, 2008, 09:00:14 AM
..I ate domestic rabit yesterday, delicious. WOOLWORTHS has vacuum packed cangaroo, delicious also, with a bit of olive oil on the griddle and a simple lettuce and tomato salad with Italian dressing.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on March 30, 2008, 02:13:26 PM
Elport,

You would have been advised to have a roquefort dressing and add some red onion slices to that salad, in order to round out the meal better. Add that bit of dairy and the pure antiseptic of raw onion!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on March 31, 2008, 01:35:09 AM
I kenna naught eat rabbit anymore. Once could, fried like chicken, or hassenpfeffer as my mother cooked it but I got quite strange one day looking at it ready to go into the pot and noticed how much it resembled at that size my dear Tiger cat.

That sort of thing has overcome me at other times such as doing Jeff Smith's recipe for Seattle style fish stock for an American style soup hardly bouillabaise just plain fish and spices and onion, etc. when I decide to be revolted --although, yet, again, my mother thought fish heads excellent.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on April 01, 2008, 11:16:55 AM
There's still such a thing as Woolworth's?!?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on April 01, 2008, 01:45:26 PM
Meet the Water-Lovin'
Turkish Van April 1, 2008

Cats aren't fond of the water, right? A few breeds defy that belief, and the Turkish Van is one of them. Dubbed the "swimming cat" by some, the Van has been spotted playing in toilets, tubs, water dishes, and even the occasional pool.

Originally hailing from the Lake Van region of Turkey (hence its name and perhaps its love of water), it is in no way related to the Turkish Angora. Its mostly white body bears colored patches on the head and tail. Vans are inquisitive and warmly affectionate, love mischief, and are loyal beyond words.

http://www.cfainc.org/breeds/profiles/turkish-van.html


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on April 01, 2008, 01:49:27 PM
One of my cats doesn't seem to mind getting wet - she'll run out in the rain and come back soaking wet.  The other one does the same thing, only he comes back in dry as a bone.

We had "animal illness" day at my house yesterday.  Pah!  Three incidents, two or maybe three animals.  And why is it always on my new cocktail ottoman or my new rug?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on April 01, 2008, 01:56:54 PM
There's still such a thing as Woolworth's?!?


Des,

Well, he's still in Australia where these things last longer. The Brits hate to give up on anything traditional.  As for me, I think that Heath Ledger is as traditional as I want to get.

I caught your great-aunt post, loved it, I promised mine that I would write her story, it was just that neither one of us knew what the computer would do for the internet!  Your entry-post in(was it, Meander?)was in a sense a coming-out party par excellence.  Hip,Hip, Hoorah! Three cheers and a toast(elportinito1 will have to contribute the Australian Champagne).Hip,Hip,Hoorah! Hip,Hip, Hoorah!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on April 01, 2008, 02:05:03 PM
I think, it is the flu going around, although my cat over-eats like a true Taurean, while she kept her girlish figure.

So, I bought some Carbona, 2 in 1, Oxy-Powered Carpet Cleaner. Seems to work, so far. Squeeze bottle comes with a  screw-top rectangular brush that does the trick; but, check a "safe" spot on the ottoman and rug.

The fondness for water is why I posted the Turkish vans. I had part Persian litters from a black cat whose black offspring joined me in the bath tub much to my surprise. They were curious, and quite small and, because there was bubble bath in the tub thought nothing  of it apparently thinking they were walking toward me.  They swam!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on April 01, 2008, 02:29:34 PM
There's still such a thing as Woolworth's?!?


Des,

Well, he's still in Australia where these things last longer. The Brits hate to give up on anything traditional.  As for me, I think that Heath Ledger is as traditional as I want to get.

I caught your great-aunt post, loved it, I promised mine that I would write her story, it was just that neither one of us knew what the computer would do for the internet!  Your entry-post in(was it, Meander?)was in a sense a coming-out party par excellence.  Hip,Hip, Hoorah! Three cheers and a toast(elportinito1 will have to contribute the Australian Champagne).Hip,Hip,Hoorah! Hip,Hip, Hoorah!

I have plenty of stories about my family - my dad's first cousins were some real lu-lus.  It was like I grew up in a William Faulkner novel.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on April 01, 2008, 04:40:00 PM
Yes, fathers' families are like that, which is why I noticed that the women with any presence in my family life treated all situations from a matriarchal point of view.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on April 01, 2008, 06:16:26 PM
Hubby feels that cleanliness in a cat is a paramount thing - so he has always bathed the cats. Some have liked it better than others. Snowkitis lays down in the water comfortably. Rescue tends to try to get away. Neither like to be toweled off afterwards - they'd rather drag water all over the house to show thei spite.

When it is raining, there is always a problem. The cats do not like to use the litter box, and prefer to take their business outside. When it's raining they sit in the doorway and look at us as if we are supposed to stop the rain for them. Then they go out, come in soaking wet, and proceed to make everything wet. At least they don't shake off like a dog does, which the original Snow was famous for doing! Rescue enjoyed being ruffled as much as being stroked. So, when he comes in soaking wet, he walks to me, and waits for me to ruffle the water out of his fur. If I try to do the same for Snowkitis, she just walks away.

Rescue is fascinated by running water. If we go in the bathroom, he will follow, so he can stick his head in the bowl while it is flushing. When he was small, he got too curious and fell in once. He also likes to take a flying leap from the doorway into the dry bathtub, but a few times it wasn't empty when he thought it was and he then took another flying leap from the water.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on April 02, 2008, 10:44:20 AM
Funny about cats and water.  We had one like one of Desde's, who would go out in the rain and come back looking like Cat at the end of Breakfast of Tiffany's and seem not to mind.  Another had some strategic system of moving through bushes and under eaves and would stay dry.  It never occurred to us to bathe a cat, I suppose on the assumption that it wasn't worth losing large chunks of your face.  Until my daughter had this Himalayan creature (barely a cat, in my book) which seemed to have been bred to be constantly groomed and generally handled by humans and had about ten pounds of fur in spite of weighing only about seven.  Klingons would accumulate on its ass, which eventually required a visit to the sink and getting worked over with soap and a vegetable sprayer.  It seemed to passively accept the whole process, something I'd never seen in a cat.  But again, this was barely a cat, and had about the IQ of a speedbump.  It would take naps outside in the gutter, blissfully unaware that this was a common venue for cars to park.  It was supposed to be an indoor cat, but had little trouble getting around the teenagers who had been appointed its wardens.     


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on April 02, 2008, 12:13:30 PM
barton,
"Until my daughter had this Himalayan creature (barely a cat, in my book) which seemed to have been bred to be constantly groomed and generally handled by humans and had about ten pounds of fur in spite of weighing only about seven.  Klingons would accumulate on its ass,..."

I had a pair of them, Danapti and Utpala, Himalayan Coon cats, sprung out of the menage descended from one black cat who obvious had Persian genetic complications.  There was a forebear male with long hair who was not an Himalyan Coon Cat like the twins but, partially what is known as a "Tuxedo" cat, like his mother,who was the offspring of the all black cat: mehitabel.

Like many males, he hung out around the house, napping, going out for a hunt, until returning to his almost private quarters where his favored chair gave him just sufficient space for a nice curl to his nap. Then one day, he'd had enough, examined what was to become his territory and only returned to his birthplace around his birthday, and could be seen looking mystified as to why the place was familiar.

The Himalayan offspring were much as you describe them, taking devil may care leaps across the road to hang out under some juniper bushes at a Lutheran church,( their mother was good at this). Then, Danapati set a territory as had his father but was not particularly good at it. I wonder if it was his father  who attacked him; or was it some other wild animal, because he did not want to be touched, actually dug a hole, and sat in it, lay down in it rather than be handled.

Utpala being female would have liked to remain a house cat but her mother would not allow that infraction on her own territorial imperative; the only chance Utpala had to induge this calling in life was on occasions when the retired school teacher "kitty-corner" would entice the dowager mother with cans of tuna fish,etc. until realizing that Ming was pregnant.

Then Ming would come barreling up the front walk,because she was now shaped like a barrel,  angry as all get out (which is what she had been told) she would streak through the front door and take over her house, very put out about her experience of the promising retired school-teacher.

Then Utpala had to return to the fold, that resident sangha of meditative cats who circumnambulated the grounds.  But, on one occasion in the house, she caught sight of herself in a mirror, and looked astonished; you could perceive that she was remembering her brother Danapati and that the memory now depressed her.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on April 02, 2008, 12:22:40 PM
Good cat story -- yeah, if you have an unspayed female, it's pretty much be an indoor house cat or be "barrel shaped" a lot of the time.  I had never heard of a Himalayan-Coon (as in Maine Coon cat?) combo.  I know that Himalayan purebreds are hybrids of Persian and Siamese (and someone cleverly triangulated the Himalayas as midway between those two places?) stock. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on April 03, 2008, 11:55:04 AM
Yup, I keep telling that to people ,like a Mennonite out here who had a trailer behind his barn to use just for his Maine Coon Cats or Himalayans when obviously they were genetically descended from Persians but did not have the flat faces that we usually see at the Cat Shows when you glimpse a long-haired but flat faced Persian.

The Mennonite was breeding them for the price he could get from collectors wanting Persians,long-haired cats and somewhere he got the idea they were "Coon cats".

My barrel-shaped "Mother of us all" did throw a Burmese, which is slight like a Siamese, in other words has the bone structure and the petite slinky way of moving  but instead of the pearl coloration with points and generally there are two prevalent colors, either that pearly gray with dark points, or a nice beigey to brown with darker points in a Siamese. This one had a lovely golden brown sort of bronzey coloration at different layers of her short-crop fur.

Now, although they have two names, Himalayan Coon Cat and Maine Coon Cat, this is what I got from the same line of short haired Black and through a litter of mixed Black with white markings and also gray long hairs with the same blue skin underneath but without the flat face. Eventually by the third generation --

Out popped these identicals except one was male and one was female and it looks like the cat you have that prefers to sit on the arm of the sofa like an arm-protecter, as far as the markings go, the stripe pattern,
which in this case with the twins was Black and dark gray against lighter gray but-- all important with excessively long hair that mats without incessant grooming.  So, guess what? The female kept herself groomed. The male did not but was fine so long as the female groomed him too! DOES THIS RING A BELL, AS TO THE BEHAVIOUR OF THE SEXES?

When he became territorial, no more grooming. Affecting the fearsome street-look, no doubt. Terrify the competition.  Another law, the Law of Natural Selection.  I enjoyed observing how this worked out, in having a place to let nature take its course; which is much better then living in an apartment and having one male and one female cat, believe me.

I think that the only difference in the Himalayan original and the Maine Coon Cat was the availability of other breeds of cats  in contact.  Otherwise the Maine Coon Cat (so named because it does have the marking but not the mask of the raccoon) is simply a long-haired resemblence to what we call a Chessie, which are numerous in the region north of the Chesapeake Bay.  Mine just walked out of the woods at me, in New Jersey, in the area along the Mantoloking just north of the  beginning of the Pine Barrens where botanical growth/things begin to be stunted because of the sand. This was directly behind Bay Head at the Jersey Shore where the Mantoloking bridge over the inland water way then becomes the road to Brick.  They actually have a Yellow Brick Rd.out there.

I gathered that people who had arrived for the summer season, either lost their cat, quite young, while they were getting ready to leave and were packing up at the end of their vacation, or they simply discarded it and it wandered into the woods and then out again the other side . One reason for the latter theory, as I found out when she first had kittens, was that New Jersey charges you a hefty  fee, to deal with this problem, when you call the humane society to see if they will take a litter of kittens, they quote you a price per cat in order to afford the upkeep.  The state's property owners make far too much money on summer-rentals for tourists (who like going to the beach every day) than to handle this problem any other way.

Back in Wisconsin, they handle it in an ugly manner, with which I have a problem as does any cat owner, because it is a gun culture. So, a society had to be set up to save the cats because people there have an attitude that it is all right to treat cats as a nuisance.  Robert Darnton wrote about this, it is a European attitude left over from the period of witch persecution, and he called his book The Great Cat Massacre.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on April 05, 2008, 05:31:04 PM
Cats & water, hmm.

Had one cat that liked to go fishing. We lived on a trout stream. I'd grab a pole and go outside, where the cat would be meowing while holding a grasshopper down with his paw. I'd dutifully put a hook through the grasshopper and float it down the stream while the cat would run along the bank watching it. When a fish hit the grasshopper, the cat was in the water in a flash. I'd drag the trout and the cat out of the water as a unit, and there'd be no getting that fish away from him - he'd devour a 12" trout in its entirety, leaving maybe a bit of tail as the only evidence that it ever existed. That was one weird cat. He'd also chase deer, and was utterly fearless. I saw him jump up on a backhoe while it was running one time. Needless to say he never saw six years old...


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on April 06, 2008, 01:21:44 PM
ROFL, esp. the image of dragging out the cat and the trout "as a unit."   I, too, had one cat that was a bold explorer type.  He lasted three years or so.  No remains were ever found, which is often the case with a cat who takes an interest in raccoons and possums.   


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on April 06, 2008, 01:42:09 PM
Nota,

As I've been catching up on news with family this weekend, I've been sharing the story of your fishing kitty, and it is truly a funny story. Thanks for sharing.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on April 07, 2008, 11:10:29 AM
I posted this in Film but it should probably go here....

http://video.yahoo.com/watch/2253641/7101161&cache=1


I know this is dumb.  What can I say?  I'm easily amused.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on April 07, 2008, 01:54:43 PM
Pretty cute, barton.

Loved that fish tale, NOTA!  Hilarious!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on April 07, 2008, 08:41:04 PM
Loved that fish tale, NOTA!  Hilarious!

Unlike so many fish tales, that one actually happened. A bunch of times.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on April 07, 2008, 10:58:33 PM
You know, when we were kids my brother had a friend who lived down at the beach.  The friend's neighbor had a cat, and the friend and my bro told me this tale about how the neighbor's cat dragged a 3-foot bluefish up the beach and on to his owner's front porch, complete with "tha-thump, tha-thump" sound effects.  They figured someone else actually reeled the fish in, but the cat did the dragging all by himself.  I told them nice try, you're full of it, etc.  In light of all this, maybe I owe them an apology.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on April 08, 2008, 08:47:45 AM
You know, when we were kids my brother had a friend who lived down at the beach.  The friend's neighbor had a cat, and the friend and my bro told me this tale about how the neighbor's cat dragged a 3-foot bluefish up the beach and on to his owner's front porch, complete with "tha-thump, tha-thump" sound effects.  They figured someone else actually reeled the fish in, but the cat did the dragging all by himself.  I told them nice try, you're full of it, etc.  In light of all this, maybe I owe them an apology.

LOL! There's a world of difference between a 12" trout and a 3' bluefish. Then again, my cat was a small-ish (under 10#) animal. A 3' bluefish would weigh something like 25 pounds. But if someone else beached it... cats do some surprising things, no doubt.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on April 08, 2008, 11:32:42 AM
I'll tell you guys something - cats amaze me more and more every day.  I've only been a cat owner for around 6 years now, so I knew next to nothing about them.  They get better the older they get, just like dogs - they're so amusing!  My female cat kept scratching the carpet on the stairway, ignoring her scratching post, until I started keeping a jar full of change on table where I sit to watch TV.  Three times was enough.  Last night, we found her sleeping on the bottom of her scratching post, where she's free to claw herself to sleep without fear of that loud noise she hates so badly.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: elportenito1 on April 10, 2008, 07:20:40 AM
desdemona:

"There's still such a thing as Woolworth's?!?"

Ofcourse, in Australia there are, as madupont stated before.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on April 11, 2008, 10:51:10 AM
El? elportenito1

You should see what they do with them here in the US. They make apartments out of them and call them "condos". My son once lived in a Kresges "loft".  But, you can  have "pets"(just thought I'd throw that in there).

My memories of Woolworth are fond. Back in grade school I could hop a bus and transfer; or walk a short ways to a one that was absolutely fascinating when you are about nine years old. It is perfect for Christmas shopping at that age. Where else can you take care of everybody on your list, from everything under one roof, when you are a kid with limited resources. [Four more years, and your status goes up with a baby-sitter's income!]


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on April 11, 2008, 11:46:28 AM
God, I loved walking to Kresge's as a child in Lubbock, TX.  There was also a Woolworth's, but Kresge's was my hangout.  I used to go there and buy children's books, paper dolls, and cherry Cokes at the fountain.  Also nickel candy.  What fun! 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on April 15, 2008, 12:12:38 AM
Barton,

I forgot life in New Jersey was like this!http://news.aol.com/story/_a/artillery-shrapnel-hits-house-kills-cat/20080414150209990001


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on April 15, 2008, 12:23:00 PM
Actually I just read the URL and got the idea.  Time for someone to shave their eyebrows.

I remember Kresge's, in Wichita, Kansas -- the Lubbock one sounds similar to what I remember.  That's the store that turned into Kmart, right?  What a dumbass name change.  Perhaps a science fiction writer could tell a story of an alternate universe where the word "mart" didn't catch on, and discount stores still had names like Kresge's or Crank's (a Kansas chain, I don't think it was national).  Sam Walton would have called his stores Walton's. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on April 15, 2008, 03:41:37 PM
Actually I just read the URL and got the idea.  Time for someone to shave their eyebrows.

I remember Kresge's, in Wichita, Kansas -- the Lubbock one sounds similar to what I remember.  That's the store that turned into Kmart, right?  What a dumbass name change.  Perhaps a science fiction writer could tell a story of an alternate universe where the word "mart" didn't catch on, and discount stores still had names like Kresge's or Crank's (a Kansas chain, I don't think it was national).  Sam Walton would have called his stores Walton's. 

To further complicate the matter, there was a dime store called "Kress" in some communities.  I never did understand why dime stores went the way of the dinosaurs, a fact that I'm sure dates me like nobody's business. 

Anybody remember that abomination, Woolco?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on April 18, 2008, 11:01:19 AM
I do remember Woolco, but not much about it.  Seems like there was one in downtown Lincoln (Nebr.) that morphed into a Walgreen's.

When I was younger, I was pleased to find that Walgreen's reversed was Sneer G. Law.

 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on April 18, 2008, 03:02:15 PM
"When I was younger, I was pleased to find that Walgreen's reversed was Sneer G. Law."

Still is AFAIK.

>>--------------------------->>>


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on April 19, 2008, 11:10:04 AM
 :)

That was nothing compared to my amazement in learning that "Lonely T" is Tylenol reversed.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on April 30, 2008, 09:53:50 AM
Little bitty kitties with double chins:

http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd209/desdemona222b/kitties.png


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on May 01, 2008, 12:57:19 PM
Ha!  I had some kittens whose mother died and I had to feed them kitten formula from a bottle.  The odd thing about the formula is that it seemed to give them gas.  They would crawl all over me whenever I sat or lay down on the couch, and often would come to rest on my head if I was prone.  It was all fairly endearing except when they farted and this cloud would engulf my face.  So it was a relief when they got onto solid food.  They were all given to good homes and made excellent people-oriented cats due to their close contact with humans at so young an age.  One of them did take up cigars in later years, probably due to deprivation of breast-feeding so young.  All true, except for that last sentence.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on May 01, 2008, 01:15:58 PM
The kitten formula gave Rescue diarrhea, as did cow's milk which I didn't know at the time was a no-no. But he started crunching on kitten food as soon as he came indoors, when, according to the vet, he was two weeks old. We had to hold a paper towel in the appropriate place and stroke his belly to get the water or the others to go for about two weeks until he began to go on his own.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on May 01, 2008, 02:57:25 PM
Ha!  I had some kittens whose mother died and I had to feed them kitten formula from a bottle.  The odd thing about the formula is that it seemed to give them gas.  They would crawl all over me whenever I sat or lay down on the couch, and often would come to rest on my head if I was prone.  It was all fairly endearing except when they farted and this cloud would engulf my face.  So it was a relief when they got onto solid food. 

Our cat was rescued by our vet's daughter and given that kitten formula. She's three now and still the biggest gasbag you've ever had the misfortune to get near. Wazzup widdat?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on May 02, 2008, 12:56:00 AM
I had no sooner picked up some new starter herbs (to replace some severely compromised larger plants that had seen their day, separated from other plants and kept in large container garden pots so that the garden soil would not become contaminated) but the weather turned cool and I had to bring some more tender specimens back inside.

Kiki the Kat immedately discovered there was Lemon grass in the house.

I found the next morning that she had nibbled the tips of what she could reach on the plant stand. Just like a child who supposes you will never notice.  Fortunately, the interior central stems are still producing upward and will now be transplanted entire to the garden soil as things warm. She may actually have done me a favor by "pruning" the plant.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on May 17, 2008, 11:14:50 AM
So the mutt had a big breakthrough today -- he rolled for the first time since we've had him (17 months).  Yay, he's turning into a dog.  Unfortunately, he rolled in rotten fish remnants.  I hit him with a spray coat cleaner thing we use on horses, and now he smells pretty, but with an undercurrent of fish. The cats just love this, by the way, and won't leave him alone. But he likes them, so it's not a problem.

Short of a tomato juice or other remedy bath, because he's 1)  never had one;  2)  a muscular 60 pounds; and 3) easily traumatized, does anyone have any helpful hints?

I guess we could learn to love the smell, and it'll wear off sometime....


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on May 17, 2008, 11:36:30 AM
StinkMutt update:  Google is my friend.  I'm going to give him a sponge bath with white vinegar; maybe we can turn it into a game with the hose.  Will report back the results.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on May 17, 2008, 01:18:12 PM
Magic elixir courtesy of the Mythbusters:

Baking Soda
Hydrogen Peroxide
tiny amount of Dish Soap
Water

Worked better than any of the folk remedies or commercial products. Specifically for de-skunking, but I bet it would work on fish smell too.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on May 17, 2008, 06:12:07 PM
Thanks for the tip, NotA.  The dog's had two vinegar rinses, and they helped a bit (and his coat's so shiny!); we're going to see how he smells in the morning and if necessary, go at him with the Mythbusters mixture.  I have a feeling we'll be trying it out. Luckily, we're still laughing our butts off over this, so it's not a crisis or anything.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on May 17, 2008, 06:16:12 PM
Thanks for the tip, NotA.  The dog's had two vinegar rinses, and they helped a bit (and his coat's so shiny!); we're going to see how he smells in the morning and if necessary, go at him with the Mythbusters mixture.  I have a feeling we'll be trying it out. Luckily, we're still laughing our butts off over this, so it's not a crisis or anything.

Please let us know how it works out! Glad it was more humor than mayhem.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on May 18, 2008, 06:41:01 PM
Kitten & Crow (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1JiJzqXxgxo)

Don't know if that's been posted before, but it's well worth a look.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on May 18, 2008, 09:01:29 PM
That kitten/crow story is wild, I really enjoyed that!

Just to close the book on the smelly dog story, he smelled okay this morning and so escaped further cleaning adventures.  But I saved the Mythbusters info; and if the need comes up again, I'll go right to that method. It sounds like they have the science of it backed up and everything.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on May 19, 2008, 10:03:42 AM
We (the ex and I) found that vinegar was good for urine and baking soda was good for the stinky fish type stuff.   Baking soda seemed to work best applied as a moist paste and really worked into the surface of whatever you're de-stinking. 

There's a mnemonic for the colors of the visible spectrum that also relates:

Rugged Old Yankees Go Bathing In Vinegar  (Red orange yellow green blue indigo violet)

 



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on May 21, 2008, 10:09:31 AM
Kitten is getting to be a chunky little fat cat at the age of four.  I guess I'm going to have to feed her twice a day - we have that cat so spoiled, though, that she wants her bowl completely full at all times because she likes it "topped off" I guess.

http://i220.photobucket.com/albums/dd209/desdemona222b/Kitteninamood.jpg


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on May 21, 2008, 10:34:54 AM
Cats are, by the common wisdom, supposed to not overeat if you keep the bowl supplied at all times (unlike dogs).  I've heard that this is not always the case for certain types of cat food -- some brands have so much corn meal in them that they will tend to make a carnivore species gain weight.  I couldn't say if that's the problem with your fat-cat, but sometimes it's worth trying a different brand of chow.  Higher-protein mixes are more expensive, but then the cat will tend to eat less to be satisfied by them.

 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on May 21, 2008, 01:49:12 PM
barton, that's definitely not true of all cats.  Our evil one would just park and eat, given her druthers.  Even with restricted access to food, she is known as "our little bowling ball of love" and we're just lucky she hasn't had any health complications yet.

desdemona, the vet column in today's paper addressed just that topic.  Do you feed Kitten dry only?  Dr. Michael Fox (United Features Syndicate) has long been a naysayer of dry food; as barton pointed out, the high cereal content in many dry foods can cause cats to eat more because they are coming up short on essential amino and fatty acids. (That was Dr. Fox talking, not me.)  Of course, diabetes can loom on the horizon for a fat cat; it's handle-able, but it means giving your cat shots regularly, plus money to buy the insulin.

We've converted the evil one to eating one daily meal of wet food, with some dry available overnight -- but it was hard to do. Dr. Fox (for what it's worth, I mean he's a newspaper vet -- but he has some interesting ideas) suggests moist canned food, primarily meat in the ingredients (I'm sure you know the deal about ingredients being listed in order of content, so look for meat up front); avoid wheat gluten and soy protein in the ingredients, and go organic if you can afford it.  We can't, so I hear you there.  I think he even has recipes for homemade pet foods; if you're interested, I can try to dig them out.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on May 21, 2008, 04:19:01 PM
barton, that's definitely not true of all cats.  Our evil one would just park and eat, given her druthers.  Even with restricted access to food, she is known as "our little bowling ball of love" and we're just lucky she hasn't had any health complications yet.

desdemona, the vet column in today's paper addressed just that topic.  Do you feed Kitten dry only?  Dr. Michael Fox (United Features Syndicate) has long been a naysayer of dry food; as barton pointed out, the high cereal content in many dry foods can cause cats to eat more because they are coming up short on essential amino and fatty acids. (That was Dr. Fox talking, not me.)  Of course, diabetes can loom on the horizon for a fat cat; it's handle-able, but it means giving your cat shots regularly, plus money to buy the insulin.

We've converted the evil one to eating one daily meal of wet food, with some dry available overnight -- but it was hard to do. Dr. Fox (for what it's worth, I mean he's a newspaper vet -- but he has some interesting ideas) suggests moist canned food, primarily meat in the ingredients (I'm sure you know the deal about ingredients being listed in order of content, so look for meat up front); avoid wheat gluten and soy protein in the ingredients, and go organic if you can afford it.  We can't, so I hear you there.  I think he even has recipes for homemade pet foods; if you're interested, I can try to dig them out.

Well that is really nice of you to offer doing that, harrie.  Don't think I'm ready to resort to cooking for the cat - I have enough trouble getting in the kitchen every night to try and come up with a healthy meal for myself.

As far as the wet food goes, Kitten won't touch it.  I honestly think she is overeating because she has that catfood out all the time.  We have another cat, Banjo, who is slim and trim on the exact same stuff, but he doesn't pig out like she does.  She has gone from grazing to stuffing her face very quickly.  I know I have to get a grip on this before it ruins her health - I work pretty hard at keeping my pets nice and trim.  We're going to try just giving her 1/2 cup of cat food 2x a day for now.  If that doesn't work, we may just have to find a weight loss formula or something like that.  I also think it's partly because we've been buying a new brand of cat food that they go crazy over - the weight gain seems to have taken place within very recent history.

My little dog, Ivan, is doing alright with his Senior Dog formula, but forget trying to feed him the Weight Loss formula - he starts eating the cat's food when we do that.  He's heavier than he was for a long time by about 4 lbs, but he seems to be doing very well and doesn't really look overweight or anything.

I like Dr. Fox - I read a book by him years ago.

Barton -

Thanks for the advice.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on May 21, 2008, 10:52:11 PM
... We have another cat, Banjo, who is slim and trim on the exact same stuff, but he doesn't pig out like she does.  She has gone from grazing to stuffing her face very quickly. 

Okay, then I'll ask -- do Kitten and Banjo get along okay?  Our evil cat hates our other huge-but-slim cat - hisses every time he walks by, even when he's not looking for trouble. Admittedly, sometimes he is, but not all the time.  One thing the evil one does is wolf her food if she even thinks he's nearby -- not that he's ever tried to chase her off her food that I know of.  So I was wondering if there might be an external factor to Kitten's supermunching.  Or maybe the girl just likes her kibble.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on May 22, 2008, 09:35:01 AM
... We have another cat, Banjo, who is slim and trim on the exact same stuff, but he doesn't pig out like she does.  She has gone from grazing to stuffing her face very quickly. 

Okay, then I'll ask -- do Kitten and Banjo get along okay?  Our evil cat hates our other huge-but-slim cat - hisses every time he walks by, even when he's not looking for trouble. Admittedly, sometimes he is, but not all the time.  One thing the evil one does is wolf her food if she even thinks he's nearby -- not that he's ever tried to chase her off her food that I know of.  So I was wondering if there might be an external factor to Kitten's supermunching.  Or maybe the girl just likes her kibble.

The cats love each other - heck, they even get along with Ivan the Bully Boy, who will get in their face with noisy bluster if he thinks the slightest thing is out of line.  They figured out pdq that his bark is worse than his bite - he's just bossy.  Hilarious to see him jumped up right at Kittens face growling and barking and actually touching her with his muzzle.  She doesn't even look at him anymore when he does that.

The only time the cats have had problems was when Banjo got really ill about a year ago.  Kitten knew he was weak, so she she'd attack him and harrass him, especially when he was trying to eat next to her.

When I adopted Kitten, Banjo sort of adopted her, teaching her to fight and protecting her from Ivan's idle threats. 

I think the girl just likes her chow, as you said.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: kitinkaboodle on May 22, 2008, 11:11:13 AM
Cat Pest:

Have a young cat who has developed a fondness for my dance studio -- meets and greets everyone coming and going.  She managed to sneak in yesterday -- helped herself to the resident cat's (my spoiled indoor senior kitty) kibbles before I even knew she was in (my boy was loudly snoring as I detected "munching" -- students were delighted, of course). Also, that morning I had discovered a baby cardinal struggling in the parking lot -- should have intervened but didn't.  So, this a.m. what do I find at the entrance but the (sad ) lifeless baby bird...a present from the pesky kitten as  my "thanks" for the meal?!  Now, short of being cruel, how do I discourage this beastie from my space?!?!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on May 22, 2008, 12:50:32 PM
I'm sorry, my solution would likely fall in the "Spoiled Senior, meet your new friend..." category (after vetting, a cleanup, etc.). 

Would any of your students who are greeted like to give her a home and kibble of her own?  By busting into your studio, it sounds like she had a home once and is looking for a new one.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: kitinkaboodle on May 22, 2008, 01:11:31 PM
 Harrie ~~
You are a softie... my (big) dogs and resident cat are enough at this point.
Hadn't thought about passing her along...although everyone fusses over the lil' brat-cat no one has expressed any interest in making her their own.  I'd have to jazz up the offer, somehow...
Thanks!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on May 22, 2008, 01:23:21 PM
LOL - sounds like you've been adopted, kit.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: kitinkaboodle on May 22, 2008, 02:01:05 PM


Aack!


As Bill the Cat would say...................


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on May 22, 2008, 03:35:26 PM
Hi Kit,

As a dance studio owner I thought you'd like to check out this (http://nytimes.com/2008/05/22/fashion/22physical.html) article in the NYT.

My website is the one mentioned for Blist-O-Ban, and we have some dance studios as clients so I thought you might be interested. There's even an Irish dance studio that buys that product from us and re-sells it at the studio. They swear by it, as do a lot of outdoor adventurer types.

That's sad about the Cardinal... we have a few Northern Orioles that come around every year and drain our hummingbird feeders. One male got in the house and Lucy the cat was climbing the walls going after him - I had to grab him more roughly than I intended to save him from imminent rending... my heart was racing and I was very angry at the cat (I know that's irrational and I didn't do anything but scold her), but the bird recovered and went straight back to draining the hummingbird feeder. Hope I didn't put any scent on him that alarms his family...


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on May 22, 2008, 04:02:49 PM
Reminds me of something funny that happened years ago -

A bird got into the house without my knowledge and roosted overnight in the house.  The next morning, he flew up to my room and woke me up.  Then he vanished.  I was gingerly going through the room looking for him - while I was standing near a window, I moved slightly and it turned out that he was standing right there next to me.  So I accidentally nudged him with the side of my foot and he flew up - it just scared the bejesus out of me!  I screamed, even though it was only a little sparrow.

I'm also afraid of fish.

So there you go - I'm a patsy.  :(


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: kitinkaboodle on May 22, 2008, 06:20:54 PM
  Noneoftheabove:

"Dancer's Wool" is (still) what I recommend for budding ballerinas...have tried other products.  The wool "fits" the best IMHO.  But, I can see where a product such as yours would be appropriate for other dance/shoes.

Yes, upsetting when a beautiful, tiny bird is zapped -- be one thing if the cat  "needed" (ate) it -- but it was done for "kitten fun" I guess (one reason I will only have "housecats").   BTW:  Here in New England the hummers are really late in showing -- have seen just one "scout" so far.  Guessing it's the cool spring?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on May 22, 2008, 06:28:14 PM
  Noneoftheabove:

"Dancer's Wool" is (still) what I recommend for budding ballerinas...have tried other products.  The wool "fits" the best IMHO.  But, I can see where a product such as yours would be appropriate for other dance/shoes.

Yes, upsetting when a beautiful, tiny bird is zapped -- be one thing if the cat  "needed" (ate) it -- but it was done for "kitten fun" I guess (one reason I will only have "housecats").   BTW:  Here in New England the hummers are really late in showing -- have seen just one "scout" so far.  Guessing it's the cool spring?

Wow, that's surprising (about the hummers). We've had the scouts since April 24th and they're here in droves now. And we're at 7400+ feet of elevation in the middle of the Rocky Mountains! I took this picture a couple of days after they first showed up:

(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj214/Jorian_2008/100_2905.jpg)
That little guy spent most of the day plastered up against a SW facing wall of our house, trying to absorb some warmth. It was snowing like a banshee, poor guy.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on May 22, 2008, 06:39:38 PM
Had no idea, we had dancers in the house!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: kitinkaboodle on May 22, 2008, 06:45:55 PM
  Noneoftheabove:

 
Wow, that's surprising (about the hummers). We've had the scouts since April 24th and they're here in droves now. And we're at 7400+ feet of elevation in the middle of the Rocky Mountains! I took this picture a couple of days after they first showed up:

(http://i273.photobucket.com/albums/jj214/Jorian_2008/100_2905.jpg)
That little guy spent most of the day plastered up against a SW facing wall of our house, trying to absorb some warmth. It was snowing like a banshee, poor guy.


Thanks for the pic!  I'm jealous!!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on May 23, 2008, 05:35:18 PM
For all those with cats that have a ferocious appetite, I'm sending for one of these:  SLOW  THE CHOW DOWN

Innovatively designed bowls with obstructions in the center help prevent bloat, reduce vomiting from aggressive eating, minimize gulping and excessive air intake and allow pets to feel more full. Veterinarian-recommended. Modern, no-tip shape works with kibble or canned food.
Dishwasher-safe in plastic or metal.

From a beautiful catalog, for the dog who has everything.

in the company of dogs.com         1-800-544-4595

three plastic sizes in red,blue, and black;D74-089 Plastic Brake-Fast Bowl

and one brushed-metal  medium sized bowl, most expensive of all, holds five cups of feed.

Unique design slows down fast eaters.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on May 23, 2008, 06:11:15 PM
Wow Maddie - everything but "send before midnight tonight!".


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on May 23, 2008, 08:17:14 PM
I have a cat, who was born a Taurean, she pigs out .  There is a reason they are calling this the Brake-fast bowl.  It usually happens with the morning feed. The bowl is also constructed to put the brake on this tendency, they have to eat slower and savor.

Being a Taurean, she was behaving like a Bulemic Feline, keeping her svelte figure but  barfing, -- I call it, "carking", as they could choke when doing this. And there are only so many times that you want to go get out the carbona cleaner or the oxycleaner with the brush top  to clean up just when  you are ready for your coffee and really need it, having enough problems dealing with your senior-self much less a beloved "furry person" as one of the lady poets used to call them; that was either May Sarton, or May Swenson but I forget which.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Furphy on June 02, 2008, 12:34:14 AM
She wasn't a pet but Harpo was a pretty damn good little cat. 

Harpo was a street cat who ate on my front porch every morning and evening. I inherited her and two other cats from the German cat woman down the block when she died. I named her Groucho since she had an odd rectangular "mustache" under her nose. Having named her Groucho, I always called her Harpo.

Harpo was a scrappy little cuss but I never saw her fight anyone. She was friendly but independant.

She's been around these parts for about twelve or fifteen years by our best reckoning. Harpo was getting old and thin and I didn't expect that she'd last much longer. But I didn't think the end would come as quickly as it did.

Apparently she met up with a car while crossing Roosevelt Street yesterday. I found her lying on the sidewalk last night and gave her the best burial I could manage.

She was such a part of our landscape that it is hard to believe I won't see her again. Most old cats just disappear to the "elephants' graveyard" and are never seen again. I am sorry things ended for her the way they did, for her sake and my own.

Happy trails to you, Harpo.....


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on June 02, 2008, 01:39:01 AM
Furphy,

My deepest condolences on the demise of Harpo.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on June 02, 2008, 01:44:22 AM
Past few days, our cat have been showing us that pets have pets.

Snowkitis has been sitting guard around the refrigerator for about a week. We weren't sure why. Hubby found out when he stayed awake one night, and she marched into the sitting room with a large round, brown rodent in her mouth, which she dropped. The rodent then ran across hubby's feet and hid behind the trash can. I'm not emptying the trash can.

Not to be outdone, Rescue brought his own pet in to hubby. A baby rabbit. Hubby picked up the little trembling thing and put it out in the periwinkle by the house. It wasn't there were he looked again.

Didn't know that pets would have pets, but then ours are so like people anyway sometimes. We have toys for them, largely ignored. I'm up late tonight and hope I don't get a glimpse of Snowkitis' rodent. Time to put it down. Will walk to the bedroom with a flashlight after I turn the light on just in case.

They could have at least asked permission before the brought their pets into the house!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on June 02, 2008, 11:01:19 AM
Furphy -

Sorry to hear about Harpo.   


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on June 02, 2008, 11:21:44 AM
"a large round, brown rodent..."

I think those are called "rats."

Some of my cats have kept pets.  For about two minutes.  Then they kill them and play with the corpse.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on June 02, 2008, 11:54:51 AM
LOL, barton.  ;D


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: Lhoffman on June 02, 2008, 12:04:46 PM
"a large round, brown rodent..."

I think those are called "rats."

Some of my cats have kept pets.  For about two minutes.  Then they kill them and play with the corpse.



I have a bald squirrel living in my back yard.  If I hadn't watched her go bald, I would have mistaken her for a very large rat. 

Sorry about Harpo, Furphy.  It's easy to get attached to neighborhood animals that drop around...especially if you feed and care for them.  I used to have a gigantic cat who would drop in from time to time.  One evening I was sitting on my porch with him when his owners walked by and called him by his name....Cuddles....of all things.  Well, when Cuddles heard his name, he laid his ears back and slouched on home.  I haven't seen him since....I suspect he is too embarrassed to face me.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on June 02, 2008, 02:10:29 PM
Furphy, I'm sorry you lost your friend.

I've just gotta say, I'm glad my cats stay indoors and don't bring home any "friends."  They do have a pet, though - they definitely own the dog.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: weezo on June 04, 2008, 10:33:12 PM
This is for the horsey folks:

Col. John Baylor III (1705-1772) of Newmarket, VA  imported Fearnought, the most important thoroughbred in pre-Revolutionary America, in 1764.  Big Brown, the Triple Crown contender who will race at Belmont this Saturday, is descended from Fearnought an astonishing 5,734 times.  Here is a link to an article I wrote about this appearing in today's (June 4) Fauquier Times-Democrat:

http://www.fauquier.com/news/2008/jun/03/belmont-favorite-big-browns-
virginia-legacy/

NOTE: I didn't want to put the man's signature and email on here. Not sure if it's appropriate. I hope it's on the link. He did a longer piece that he will send on request.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on June 15, 2008, 10:32:57 PM
Took the dog to an animal communicant (pet psychic to you sensationalist types), and it was very interesting.  If the communicant was a charlatan, she was very good at it as hubby and I are both kind of skeptical/cynical, and she wowed us at times.  The reasons for taking the mutt were 1) giggles; and 2) dog was abused, and while he's a great dog, he has trust issues we'd like to work on/minimize.

I mentioned this to someone else, and he said his aunt took her cat to a communicant, and it helped them a lot.  Now that's something I find impressive, since I never thought of cats as particularly compromising or reasonable.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on June 16, 2008, 02:55:16 PM
Oh, Harrie, for posterity. I saw,"Broken Flowers" with Bill Murray, by Jarmusch a few years ago, and Chloe Sevigny(who has since gone on to Big Love fame as the jealous second wife of a Mormon businessman)plays an "assistant" to a "Consultant"/communicant played by Jessica Lange.

Murray is looking for his lost loves because one has sent a note incognito, we travel with him about his part of America visiting the scenes of his past, when he gets to Sevigny answering the door and finds out what Jessica is doing professionally, Chloe does her usual and takes the flowers that he has brought for Lange and throws them in the garbage.  Murray does all  this in his usual deadpan.


"Consultants" are not at all strange when you consider that much of todays's psychoanalysis comes by way of Behaviorism which psychologists have studied experimentally for at least half a century by working with what was called an animal-lab at the time. Animals are so intimately part of our families by this point that they like having us as Pets of their Own.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on June 16, 2008, 09:59:14 PM
"Consultants" are not at all strange when you consider that much of todays's psychoanalysis comes by way of Behaviorism which psychologists have studied experimentally for at least half a century by working with what was called an animal-lab at the time.

Well when you look at it that way...still, it's just wild. We've modified some of our behavior, and so has the mutt -- and it's in the areas where the communicant said he (the dog) would try to do more.  So say what you will, I have a tough time discounting the process.  Or this one person at least.


Title: Re: Large Brown Rodents
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on June 17, 2008, 09:26:20 AM
Lucy the cat brought me a present yesterday...

...a baby weasel. I was upset. Got her a new collar with louder bells. Now considering a cowbell. Good thing she didn't run into mama.

Wildlife is taking a beating... a 5' bull snake got itself tangled in the bird netting around our rasberry bush and strangled itself despite my wife's best effort. So sad.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on June 17, 2008, 10:09:59 AM
Though I initially had an image of your animal communicant as Ace Ventura, I do have an open mind regarding such -- agree that it's easier to see a dog benefitting from this process more than a cat.  I imagine the cat being talked to and responding all Bob DeNiro in "Taxi Driver" like "you talkin to me?  you talkin to ME?" etc. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on June 17, 2008, 12:22:23 PM
LOL, barton!

Harrie, why don't you tell us some of the details about the pet psychic?  What did he or she say?  Was it like you see on television - "He says he feels uncomfortable, and he wants you to do thus and such."


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on June 17, 2008, 01:30:46 PM
Okay - twist my arm!  Seriously, it was just very low-key; dog, me and hubby, and communicant (she) in a quiet room.  We were asked to have a number of questions ready; and after we told her one, she'd be very tuned to him for a couple of minutes -- blinking eyes, head bobbing, head shaking -- then come back with information. 

A couple of times, it was information we hadn't given her by way of the questions or talking or anything, and it was a little eerie when she'd nail something that way.   Also very weird was that the dog hates looking at anyone, much less making eye contact; and on occasion, his head would whip around and he'd look her straight in the eye for a few seconds.  He was also much more relaxed than I thought he'd be.

The mutt doesn't really like his old name (understandably) because it's part of his crummy past.  I asked if he'd come when called more often if we used the name he offered up, and the response was "He'll try." The dog also said he'd try to be more willing to approach the hubby -- who's a real softie, pretty quiet, etc. but sometimes moves too quickly -- and the hubby agreed to move more slowly and say "Hey, behind you" or whatever the situation calls for.

The dog volunteered that he loves his walks in the woods (which we already knew, so didn't ask about), and he likes to play a game -- get lost in the woods and try to find his way back.  (We are never taking the leash off!)  But he doesn't like the dog park if it's too busy because a lot of dogs pick on him, which we didn't know.

If you buy into this, the mutt said he lived in a cage for basically his whole life (we know that he did for at least a year with the abusing party, and then six months in the pound while the case went to court) and that he had to learn to live in a house for the first time with us.  We pretty much believe this because we did have to teach him to walk up the stairs by straddling him and lifting his paws up one by one for a couple days -- and we have a lot of stairs -- and the hubby had to teach him to run.  He's pretty much got that down now, too. 

Because of our dog's past, and despite the fact that we've been very nice to him (he even said so, the communicant said), he's still waiting for the other shoe to drop and for us to turn evil.  Bottom line:  He just needs more time to come around.  And time is something we can actually afford -- yeah!!

All in all, it was a very interesting experience.  I'd think it's very easy to get ripped off doing this -- it's not that far removed from palm reading, fortune tellers or whatever -- but I was impressed by this lady.  She seemed to be genuinely concerned with improving things for the mutt. 

Sorry to go on -- y'all can stop scrolling now!


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on June 17, 2008, 02:29:58 PM
So did she know he had been abused and caged like that without being told?


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on June 17, 2008, 03:06:08 PM
Yes, she did -- we told her he was an abuse case, but not that he was caged up.  Abuse can take a lot of forms, so I'd go 50/50 on whether she guessed correctly or was actually told what type of abuse. 

We end up telling a lot of people the dog was abused, because if a stranger or even a neighbor goes toward him, he bolts to the end of his leash and thrashes about like a marlin trying to get off the hook. Or sometimes people who don't know dogs wonder why his tail is between his legs, curled up against his belly.  (He used to poop and pee when he got scared, so the tail thing is a huge step forward - sad but true.)  So saying "He was abused once, but not by us" kind of goes with the territory.  When we first started taking the mutt out to the park and stuff, I think this one guy wanted to report us for animal cruelty.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on June 17, 2008, 03:42:07 PM
Well you're patience and good intentions with this poor dog are very admirable, and I wish you luck rehabilitating him. 

Reminds me of the last time I rescued a dog, which will probably be THE last time, because it went so badly.  My daughter was spending the night with a friend, and the neighbors had a Rottweiler puppy tied to a tree in their front yard, I'd guess he was 4 months old.  The girls were petting him and my daughter learned that he was always tied up like that, and the people told her she was more than welcome to take him.  She called me begging to take in this dog, and he seemed okay, although I was very leary about taking in an aggressive breed that had been tied up all his life.

What a disaster.  He grew into a HUGE animal that we absolutely could NOT control no matter what we did.  Eventually he attacked and or bit one adult and two children over a period of about a year.   I finally had no choice but to have him put down, aterrible decision to make when you're looking at a young dog that is so full of life. 


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on June 17, 2008, 06:22:16 PM
Oh, desdemona -- that must have been horrible, I'm so sorry. 

I'm pretty sure my dog will be okay, maybe just not a trick-doing, ball-fetching party animal. And that will be fine.  Thanks for the good wishes.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: madupont on June 17, 2008, 08:44:29 PM
Smokey Oakey, a horse co-owned by Dame Judi Dench and her chauffeur Bryan Agar, is due to run in the Royal Hunt cup at Ascot this week. He won the £125,000 William Hill Lincoln Handicap at Doncaster in March. (Sunday Telegraph)


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on June 17, 2008, 11:07:06 PM
Smokey Oakey, a horse co-owned by Dame Judi Dench and her chauffeur Bryan Agar, is due to run in the Royal Hunt cup at Ascot this week. He won the £125,000 William Hill Lincoln Handicap at Doncaster in March. (Sunday Telegraph)

Wow, I didn't know chauffeuring paid that well.


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: desdemona222b on June 18, 2008, 10:08:49 AM
Really!   :o


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on June 18, 2008, 10:12:02 AM
I'm taking casting suggestions for my recently completed script, "The Dog Whisperer."  For some reason, I'm seeing John C. Reilly in the title role.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: harrie on June 18, 2008, 06:14:29 PM
I'm taking casting suggestions for my recently completed script, "The Dog Whisperer."  For some reason, I'm seeing John C. Reilly in the title role.


http://channel.nationalgeographic.com/series/dog-whisperer
Funny, he doesn't look like John C. Reilly -- you might want to check if the name's been copyrghted or face a nasty lawsuit.  How 'bout The Canine Conversationalist?  Then he can say "Hey, I'm conversatin' with my friend here..."


Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on June 19, 2008, 08:45:42 PM
"Raiders of the Lost Bark" was my working title, so I've got that to fall back on.

A spinoff, involving Navy dogs, was to be called, "Sub Woofer."

OK, I'm stopping now.



Title: Re: Pets
Post by: barton on September 28, 2017, 04:09:20 PM
Now that this time capsule has been opened up by booting this old forum backup, I am wondering how the adopted pooch got along in Harrie's household for the next 9 years.