Escape from Elba

Arts => Music => Topic started by: Admin on April 16, 2007, 08:42:02 PM



Title: Classical Music
Post by: Admin on April 16, 2007, 08:42:02 PM
A forum for classical music enthusiasts and casual concert-goers.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on May 09, 2007, 12:36:18 PM
Recital in King's Chapel, Boston (http://www.kings-chapel.org/music2.html)


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: lulu on May 31, 2007, 01:47:43 PM
Hiya, Karl!

Regards to the ladies for me!


 ;)


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on June 26, 2007, 01:13:09 PM
Yoo-hoo, lulu!


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: rmdig on June 27, 2007, 08:25:55 PM
Hello, Karl.  Did I do something wrong?


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on June 28, 2007, 09:45:21 AM
Mediaeval Baebes--  http://youtube.com/results?search_query=mediaeval+baebes&search=Search


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: sugarblues on June 28, 2007, 10:09:52 AM
Mediaeval Baebes--  http://youtube.com/results?search_query=mediaeval+baebes&search=Search

Loved the music..although my internet connect/speed took a while to download.  So I got a little frustrated waiting for the complete download.  Interesting video....thanks for sharing


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on June 28, 2007, 10:10:15 AM
Hello, Karl.  Did I do something wrong?

So far as I can tell, why, no :-)

I'm seldom here, and the Classical Music ghetto seems to do the opposite of flourish . . . .

Cheers,
~Karl


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on June 28, 2007, 11:53:52 AM
sugar--so glad you enjoyed the music...lots of Baebes stuff on youtube....i find the group incredibly talented and creative. Hope you get the chance to hear even more.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: rmdig on June 29, 2007, 10:13:25 AM
karlhenning

I responded to an email you sent me sometime ago and hadn't heard anything since then.  I feared I might have insulted your musical tastes.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on June 29, 2007, 11:24:30 AM
karlhenning

I responded to an email you sent me sometime ago and hadn't heard anything since then.  I feared I might have insulted your musical tastes.

Not a bit of it!  I don't get to my non-work e-mail near often enough.

I hope, on the contrary, that my irregularity as an e-mail correspondent has not given offense?

Cheers,
~Karl


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on July 05, 2007, 11:41:54 AM
A forum for classical music enthusiasts and casual concert-goers.

Who knew they'd be such rare birds here?


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on July 06, 2007, 02:44:46 PM
It is funny that the classical forum at the ny times was so active but is so moribund here...but perhaps that is the explanation.

By contrast, the pop music forum at the nytimes was like a tomb more often than not.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on July 19, 2007, 08:37:48 AM
QED


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on July 20, 2007, 10:08:31 AM
Well, OK.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on July 20, 2007, 12:54:58 PM
Well, OK.

Listening to (a recording of) Ian Tracey playing the Widor Organ Symphony No. 5 at the console in Liverpool Cathedral.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on July 20, 2007, 01:36:07 PM
My last classical listen was at the other end of the time spectrum: Gregorio Paniagua's Tarentule-Teretelle .


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on July 20, 2007, 01:42:03 PM
Now that I am back in a classical mood, am listening to Beethoven's String Qt. Op. 18 No. 6. Every time i listen to these early quartets I am struck as to how fresh and delightful they are. And it only gets better from there.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: lulu on July 23, 2007, 04:14:33 PM
How about Schubert's Trios and Chopin's music.  There is always Mozart.  And lately I'm in a Saint-Saens mood (nonopera music).  Just wonderful.

I have very little Beethoven trios/quartets/piano pieces and need to correct that.

And more Gluck.  This man has written some of the most exquisite music ever written.  Orfeo ed Eurydice is just plain gorgeous. 


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on July 24, 2007, 12:40:50 PM
Berlioz and Mendelssohn both revered Gluck, lulu.

Cheers,
~Karl


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on July 30, 2007, 09:49:12 AM
Gluck is quite wonderful indeed.

IMHO, as a general notion, the best of any quality composer is found in his chamber music.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: lulu on July 31, 2007, 10:38:47 AM
Karl:

How odd you mentioned Berlioz, a favorite of mine.  :).  How'd you know?  And Mendelssohn of course.

But the Met's recent Orfeo with David Daniels will love in my mind as long as I live.  Truly a beauty beyond words.

With BErgman's death, I'm renting and rewatching Zauberflote (Magic Flute) again which I haven't seen since it first appeared and before my Mozart indoctrination.  I'll appreciate it more now since I just saw it in NYC.

Another new favorite is Saint-Saens (non opera music) which I truly love.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on July 31, 2007, 03:20:15 PM
A day without Berlioz, Sheila, is like a day without sunshine  8)


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on July 31, 2007, 03:31:25 PM
No wonder the clouds hover over me always!!!  Is there enough Berlioz for every day of the year? Who knew?   ::)

Speaking of French composers of that vintage, Symphony on a French Mountain Air by D'Indy is a wonderful piece...gotta dig it out and play it.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on August 01, 2007, 10:18:41 AM
The Overture to Béatrice et Bénédict alone will dispel all clouds!

Cheers,
~Karl


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on August 01, 2007, 11:13:51 AM
Just curious, Karl...which composers are in your regular rotation? The only constant (or near constant) for me is some form of medieval/renaissance music, even if for a few minutes just about every day.

I am very eclectic in music, but there was a time well over a decade ago when 90% of my listening was classical. Back then, in addition to the very early stuff, Bach, Handel, Beethoven and Haydn were part of my daily staple, with a lot of others tossed in for variety.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on August 01, 2007, 12:21:01 PM
Just curious, Karl...which composers are in your regular rotation?

Shostakovich . . . Stravinsky . . . Prokofiev . . . Berlioz . . . Sibelius . . . Bartók . . . Tchaikovsky  . . . Dvo?ák . . . .

And phases of Hindemith . . . Rakhmaninov  . . . Janá?ek . . . Beethoven . . . Monteverdi . . . Brahms . . . Schumann . . . Schoenberg . . . Copland . . . Piazzolla . . . Ginastera . . . Debussy . . . Ravel . . . de Victoria . . . Palestrina.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: lulu on August 01, 2007, 03:08:01 PM
karl:

That's all?  [g]


What?  No Saint-Saens?  No Bocerrini, Rodrigo?  (Just kidding).  I absolutely love Bocerrini.  No Scarlatti?

But I'm beginning to really love Janacek except I only have Jenufa.  He's on my list of more composers to get (and his other operas).


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on August 01, 2007, 03:59:57 PM
You know I abhorred leaving either Saint-Saëns or Scarlatti of such a list, Sheila!


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on August 01, 2007, 04:12:33 PM
Impossible to make any short and impromptu list and not leave out many worthies. Boccherini is surely one. And what about C.P.E. Bach? This could go on and on!!!


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: lulu on August 02, 2007, 01:25:31 PM
Was listening to Dvorak this morning.  I don't think I have heard anything of his that I didn't like.  And I certainly love Rusalka, his opera, which I haven't played since I bought it.

A friend just sent me several cds which are waiting to be played along with my other new cds.

I just received (from netflix: my are they ever fast) Bergman's Magic Flute which I haven't seen since it was first released and was not a big opera fan.  However, I've become one since and just saw Julie Taymor's amazing production at the Met.  Also in my order is a tape of Monteverdi's Orfeo.

So, some interesting viewing this weekend (and listening, as well).


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on August 02, 2007, 03:17:19 PM
Dvorak is a good example of a composer who reached his apogee in his chamber music. The Dumky Trio is simply sublime. Not to mention the piano quintet.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on August 02, 2007, 04:40:05 PM
karlhenning:

Dvo?ák . . . .

"And phases of  . . . Rakhmaninov, without the k/ how about c ? . . .  . . . Beethoven . . . . . . Brahms . . . Schumann . . . Schoenberg . . . Copland . . . . . . . . . Debussy . . . Ravel . . . . . . "  Add playing Schubert, Haydn, and much Chopin.

I enjoyed playing all of them with the exception of Copeland and Schoenberg whom I listened to as with Mahler. I preferred the minor keys of Rachmaninoff,Dvorak,Prokofiev,Mussorgsky but what do I know(?) as I also became a Bach virtuoso before I was out of high-school but I had a good example in my neighborhood during my grade-school days, when he was in high-school, name of Raskin. Can no longer remember his first name(Marcus?) but he went on to the Washington,D.C. group for Democratic Studies.

Five to eight more years later and I was more impressed with Prokofiev scores for Eisenstein.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: Lhoffman on August 02, 2007, 05:23:56 PM
Here's my observation on high school virtuosi....on Bach or anyone....sure you can play the notes, but is it music?  Most talented high school pianists are disheartened to learn upon entering conservatory that those pieces they thought they had attained virtuosity on in HS will need to be relearned.  Walk past the practice rooms....EVERYBODY is doing some Beethoven Sonata.  True virtuousity is only attained through a combination of study, practice, performance and life.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on August 02, 2007, 05:56:55 PM
I didn't study music in high-school. That would have been foolish. I began playing before age five.  I don't think that really is so odd, considering.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: Lhoffman on August 02, 2007, 06:14:57 PM
I don't quite understand your point about the foolishness of studying music in High School.

The early playing is probably true of most students in conservatory.  True virtuosity is not possible without true understanding....and High Schoolers tend to not have the capacity to understand Bach.   It is interesting to follow the improvement of High School "virtuosi" as they progress through their studies.  It is amazing to note how much more virtuoustic they become as they gain an understanding of music history, music theory, composition  (maybe a bit of mathematics...sadly neglected by most musicians) which is why all but a very few students in conservatory study all these things (except for the math).


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on August 02, 2007, 07:11:34 PM
I didn't study in a conservatory. But the restrictions of the convent made it difficult to continue piano very much at all, although my mother did not seem to appreciate that factor. I always had  a private teacher from the point that it was understood what I was playing.  My husband did study in the conservatory which was located close to where I lived (before I went to New York) in the old Pillsbury Manor which was owned by Pete Chalifont, Louis Armstrong's manager at one point, so most of his tenents were either artists or white jazz musicians like himself.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on August 03, 2007, 10:04:07 AM
Marcus Raskin, along with Bernard Fall, was the co-editor of the Viet Nam reader...an amazing book for its time.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on August 06, 2007, 09:40:09 AM
Was listening to Dvorak this morning.  I don't think I have heard anything of his that I didn't like.

Well, and our neighbor here reminds me that I need to investigate the Piano Quintet!

Cheers,
~Karl


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on August 06, 2007, 11:15:50 AM
Marcus Raskin, along with Bernard Fall, was the co-editor of the Viet Nam reader...an amazing book for its time.


That's him! Thanks to you, cincy--man, I've relocated the guy that I used to walk to school with every day when I was in grade school and he was in high school.  On my route, you could hear him practicing piano before he left for school for the day, he must have had the piano positioned with a window view by which he could see or he had it clocked when I would pass the house for school, he would burst out the door, down the short drive to the sidewalk, with very long legs, as he was quite a tall man to a kid my age at the time although we were in actuality not altogether that many years apart in age.

He knew that I played the piano because he quizzed me thoroughly in comparing "notes". It didn't take long to check the list of his publications,etc. As I immediately found one with Gore Vidal writing the preface! Following down the resume, last but not least the remark that he was an outstanding pianist.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on August 07, 2007, 10:44:36 AM
madu--cant get childhood experiences like that living in Cincy...thanks for the sharing.

Listened to a disc that I wasn't sure I would like but did very much. Philip Glass, the Concerto Project Val. II. Contains After Lewis and Clark and Conceto for Harpsichord and Orchestra.

NP -- Buxtehude--Membra Jesu Nostri by The Netherlands Bach Society. Gorgeous music well performed.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on August 13, 2007, 09:40:36 AM
(Man, this Elliott Carter quartet has a cadenza for everybody! -- except the second violin.

What's up widdat?)  8)


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: lulu on August 14, 2007, 08:50:25 PM
Howdee, Karl.

I was listening to Saint Saens tonight.  No matter what is playing by him, I love it.  I'm developing a love affair with this composer.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on August 16, 2007, 08:45:16 AM
That's beautiful, Sheila! :-)


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on August 16, 2007, 11:11:12 AM
Here is something to chew on. How do we look at the morality of acts of musical piracy or borrowing when a composer such as Handel used themes created by other composers? He is famously reputed to have said that he didn't steal it, but rescued it. On one hand it seems dishonest, but is there a greater good served in the sense that but for his acts, some worthy themes would have been lost forever. But with his acts later generations can hear and enjoy them. Do we view his acts solely from the perspective of when they were perpetrated, or also from our current perspective of posterity?


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: lulu on August 16, 2007, 02:18:49 PM
jacobs:

There are so many pieces of music used by one composer taken from another.

Most people assume Ave Maria (one of them, anyway) was written by Gounod when it really is Bach/Gounod.  Many times the revising composer gives credit to the original composer.  Sometimes not.

Many times, like Rossini, the composer steals from himself (thereby escaping the charge of plagarism); however, using the same overture three times is a bit much, even if the composer used his own music.  [g] 

And sometimes music gets into one's head and you don't know where it came from; if you use that theme it really doesn't mean you intentionally stole it.

Folk singers have been copyrighting songs that are in the public domain for eons.  Some might change a word or two to justify it but others don't.  They are collecting royalties for something they didn't write.

didn't Tom Lehrer write something about "plagarism, plagarism" or something like that?  (Where is Lehrer when we need him today, by the way?)


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on August 17, 2007, 08:30:22 AM
There are so many different things being conflated here, we'll need a winch to sort through it all :-)  Bach rescoring a Vivaldi concerto, is "equivalent" to musical piracy?

Puh-lease.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: lulu on August 17, 2007, 10:34:17 AM
Karl:

Try to decipher the score to Boris Godonov.  It's enough to make your head spin.  Moussorgsky. Rimsky-Korsakov and God knows who else.  Maybe even Berlioz. 

And Alfano with the ending to Turandot.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: nytempsperdu on August 18, 2007, 06:31:58 PM
The wonderful Mr. Lehrer is still here (or his songs are), the one referred to is about mathematician Lobachevsky (complete with footnotes):

http://members.aol.com/quentncree/lehrer/lobachev.htm





Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: lulu on August 18, 2007, 09:36:05 PM
I know the one about Lobachevsky.  Was that about plagarism also?

I sure do miss him today.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: nytempsperdu on August 19, 2007, 07:38:54 PM
Yes, they're the same song.  Clicking on the link brings up lyrics and spoken parts as performed on one of his albums (and the footnotes give more info re song & subject).


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: karlhenning on August 27, 2007, 11:36:08 AM
I could listen to nothing but the Hindemith Kammermusiken for a week straight, I think.

Cheers,
~Karl


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: thanatopsy on September 06, 2007, 08:36:04 AM
He may be gone, but he will long live on in our hearts:

http://www.stuff.co.nz/stuff/4191866a10.html


Long live Pavarotti!


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: martinbeck3 on September 06, 2007, 10:40:08 AM
 PAVAROTTI WILL NEVER DIE:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ONUCPKdGcrk

as long as there are people who can still cry with his song


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on September 09, 2007, 10:01:33 AM
lhoffman,

While busy with the "Fall Cleaning",at least before the exterior-wall
washers spray my gardens with something definitely not good for flowers and herbs--I did remember who you and I were discussing in regard to your therapeutic exercises. If not for the great age of the musician who retired from teaching in the late 1990s, after his 88th birthday, which means the memory for past occasions may have decreased but then again may not have, for with some it sharpens, you would still have no difficulty  checking the university of Wisconsin for the visiting artists who were teaching during summer-session in the early 1960s.

This was when I met Leon Kirchner and  his wife and son, when Kenneth Rexroth managed to get the university to acquiesce on the housing arrangement. Kirchner was a very well known composer by that time and I don't imagine that Rexroth thought it appropriate for somebody in an office on campus to have shunted those who would teach that summer-- into dormitories built at the time of the G.I.Bill.   As a result, we met at the former Governor's mansion, or "summer home",off Lake Drive, above Lake Michigan,where at least three of the four artists in residence, for the summer, shared the house.

Although Kirchner was born in Brooklyn, he studied "Modern music" at the Univ. of Calif. with Arnold Schoenberg and Ernst Bloch, later teaching at Berkeley in a period of time during which Rexroth lived in San Francisco from shortly after Kirchner's birth until the beginning of the 1970s when Rexroth joined the faculty at Santa Barbara. Thus they were aware of each other and had mutual friends in the same milieu.

Leon Kirchner would have been in his forties when Kenneth introduced us. (after that, I remade Rexroth's housing arrangements when ever UWM booked him into a hotel that wasn't to his liking, if necessary disguising the location when UW was not discreet about not giving out that information)

Although it is a shame to see the physical alterations of aging that take place after more than forty years,it is Leon Kirchner's music that makes him an immortal.
http://www.schirmer.com/default.aspx?TabId=2496&State_3054=1&composerId_3054=834#
 
http://www.schirmer.com/DesktopModulesCustom/Soundclips/SoundclipPlayer.aspx?workId=29655
 
http://www.schirmer.com/default.aspx?TabId=2419&State_2872=2&ComposerId_2872=834
 
http://music.aol.com/artist/leon-kirchner/437465/main?flv=1&ncid=DaObegHZjV0000000344&icid=rbox_musicians.M





Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: rmdig on October 19, 2007, 02:21:08 PM
I have been listening to Golijov's opera, Ainadamar.  Now I want to see it in performance.  Has anyone here attended a performance.  Karl?


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on October 31, 2007, 10:19:06 AM

Marcus Raskin, along with Bernard Fall, was the co-editor of the Viet Nam reader...an amazing book for its time.


Okay,cincy--man, now I need advice.  I had an e-mail a couple of days ago from one of the usual political movements/groups that ask those of us on their list to lend support. To my surprise, and just as you mentioned, the above pianist is also still "authoring" and will be receiving an honor for it at an event in Washington,D.C. held by said group. Should I send a note of congratulations from his former piano-practicing neighbor whom he used to walk to school five days per week?


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on November 01, 2007, 02:52:56 PM
madu....easy question of the month....YESSS!!!!!!!!


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on November 01, 2007, 05:38:09 PM
Thanks! I needed that.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on November 23, 2007, 04:39:19 PM
elportenoi1

How about some "pre-classical" music?

Quan lo rosinhols escria
ab sa part la nueg e.l dia,
yeu suy ab ma bell'amia
jos la flor,
tro la gaita de la tor
escria: "Drutz, al levar!
Qu'ieu vey l'alba e.l jorn clar

http://www.xtec.es/~malons22/trobadors/index.htm



Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on November 28, 2007, 09:29:51 AM
madu--very nice indeed. I am  a huge fan of very early music...i.e. renaissance and medieval. Check out my amazon.com list re the same: 

http://www.amazon.com/Sampling-my-favorite-medieval-music/lm/L0CGE530I3LY/ref=cm_lm_byauthor_title_full


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on November 28, 2007, 02:27:07 PM
Thank you,   I like it better than anything.  I think that really hit me when
Jean-Claude Carrière was writing a film concept's "screen play" and consulted with Natalie Zemon Davis of the Romance Languages and French History dept. at Princeton to authenticate "background" and "production values" for Daniel Vigne's, The Return of Martin Guerre.

Although Michel Portal is credited with the music on this film (not to be confused with Sommersby) and has a long career, when I found out that Carriere is from Languedoc, I went "ahah!" that explains this music. I immediately became interested in what is called "Ancient music"( sort of a St. Martin in the Fields speciality)or, in the case of France,even "Early
Modern".

While I certainly had a long time exposure to Gregorian Chant, why I mention the Languedoc connection is that this entire southern region of
France, with it's shift into a different language pronunciation and derivations from other scources,despite the Roman conquest was also later invaded by waves of Berbers from North Africa, and other Muslim centers; and, it show in the music. Or rather, it can be heard, as a strong influence.

By the way, an interesting thing in the study of Linguistics, if you look at the word changes as they occur for even just one word, perhaps moving from East to West, you can parallel the border shift, of the musical change in emphasis, in a gradual flow. When I discovered this at about age 14,in high school, sometimes playing "hooky" when I missed the bus which sped past me (who was following the schedule while the driver was making time), I'd opt for staying on the next bus that came along rather than being tardy and having to serve detention after school.

I'd head right for the music stores, where in those days you  had wonderful spacious closed booths like small rooms of lovely wood topped with glass, where you could listen to records you might buy, and had plenty of room to do a little choreography while you were at it.

Then on to the Main Library to study; what I wanted to study. They caught up with me soon enough (which is why I got at least three months for more Liturgical music, aka Gregorian chant, and a side course in "voice" from Sister Gilbert,whom you might call," a defrocked Opera singer", extremely bitter, who lectured me while teaching me French Art Song).



Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: lulu on November 29, 2007, 09:35:28 AM
Holy cow!  Early music discussion?

Jacobs and I love the stuff.  Some of my stuff (thanks to Jacobs) includes La Nef, Boston Camerata, Ensemble Unicorn; music of Hildegarde Bingen.  I also have a cd of chants which I bought at the Met Museum in connection with their Byzantium exhibit.  I'm always anxious to hear more and learn more.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on November 29, 2007, 12:04:28 PM
My sort of early music is nothing at all like Gregorian Chant. I find that music to be incredibly boring and jejune.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on December 17, 2007, 02:21:19 PM
Interesting article in sunday times about Schwartz and the turmoil at the Seattle S. O. Anyone else read it?


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on December 31, 2007, 01:05:26 AM
Happy New Year, cincy-man (and, ne'r auld acquaintance be forgot for auld lang syne!).


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: mlewis78 on December 31, 2007, 04:27:25 AM
Cincy-man, I just started looking at the list you posted a link to on 11/28/07.  I have one of the Baltimore Consort's recordings -- Bright Star Day -- nice for the holiday season.

I have a pretty good collection of Hesperion XXI and other groups that Jordi Savall leads.  Rolf Lislevand is also very good.  I just now purchased and am listening to "Ostinato" (Hesperion XXI - Jordi Savall) in mp3 format from Amazon. 

Marti


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on December 31, 2007, 09:36:36 AM
mlewis78

Are you the same Marti from New Jersey who posted at the nytimes.com History forum? or, am I having a Monday morning coincidence?


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on December 31, 2007, 02:27:15 PM
madu...and a great new year to you!! Another one of sharing the most sublime of human creations...music. One of the few that are not fixed in time and open to new understanding, new interpretation, and new presentation.

Perhaps that is one reason that I am  so enamored of early music...it is grounded in the long distant past but so open to new ways or interpretation and presentation that bring fully to the fore the creative talents of our most contemporary interpreters.

mlewis--great groups indeed. So much more to explore!!



Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: mlewis78 on January 02, 2008, 04:25:43 AM
Madupont wrote:
mlewis78
Are you the same Marti from New Jersey who posted at the nytimes.com History forum? or, am I having a Monday morning coincidence?


Hi Maddy,
Yes, I'm that person.  I haven't been in Escape forms as often, but I posted before the Henry Adams discussion that I was going to read it and then I got caught up with 3 other books and have yet to read beyond p. 60 in Adams.  I'm in NYC about all of my adult life, but I'm from Long Branch, NJ.  In the NY Times now-dead forums, I was Marti443.

Back to early music: 

Has anyone here listened to a relatively new British choral group of 12, Stile Antico?  I'm nuts about their CD "Music for Compline."  I don't know if I would have heard of this if it were not for Archive.com's writing about it on their website and including it in their top 25 of 2007 recordings.

Happy New Year, everyone.

Marti


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on January 07, 2008, 05:44:45 PM
all choral? no instruments?


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: mlewis78 on January 08, 2008, 11:23:32 PM
Cincy,

Yes "Music for Compline" is all choral, which I am not usually a big fan of (I'm a flutist), but during the Christmas season I became very taken with this recording as well as Chanticleer's of Palestrina's Missa pro defunctis (Requiem) and motets. 

I think that my interest in it grew out of my rediscovery of renaissance bands playing seasonal music and the great recording from the 1960's of the Antiphonal Music of Gabrieli (Philadelphia Brass with Chicago, Cleveland and Boston Brass ensembles).

I've been listening a lot the past two weeks Jordi Savall Hesperion XXI recordings.  I found some YouTube videos, including one of a trio with 3 Savalls -- Jordi, Arianna and her brother -- you know it's possible that someone posted the link on this forum.  I'm not very diligent about checking back before posting.

Marti


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: madupont on January 08, 2008, 11:38:53 PM
Sshh...Marti, if nobody's listening, big secret, I used to sing Compline, and we would learn the next day's(instead of doing our study-hall) because it is the liturgy sung for each days order of Hours, somewhat like the Book of Hours is an illustrated example, and changing throughout the year, back when I was in convent school.

Of course, we did Requiem masses ever since childhood and throughout the year but particularly so in November as a penitential time of year before Advent prepares for Christmas.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: cincy--man on January 10, 2008, 03:25:17 PM
Marti..what you are describing, e.g. Palestrina,  sounds a bit restrained for my tastes. What I like most is a more energetic song such as Dead Can Dance doing an Italian saltarello:  http://youtube.com/watch?v=K3jr2aezZ00  (the figure skating video you can take or leave). This is a slightly "raved up version perhaps, but you find the same spirit in a good original group interpretation.


Title: Re: Classical Music
Post by: barton on May 16, 2008, 06:27:47 PM
http://video.yahoo.com/watch/2627975/7719382