Escape from Elba

Arts and Television => Movies => Topic started by: liquidsilver on July 30, 2018, 12:02:06 PM

Title: Movies
Post by: liquidsilver on July 30, 2018, 12:02:06 PM
Discuss your favorite movies.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on July 30, 2018, 05:00:10 PM
Here are two great movies that you can only find on You Tube, for free, you cannot buy them.

"Harrison Bergeron"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XBcpuBRUdNs

And Orson Welles' version of "Othello"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=09NWcKA7JKw

These are two great films that you cannot buy, which can only be found on You Tube for free. It is awesome that they can be found on You Tube.

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on August 03, 2018, 11:51:44 AM
Claire Foy has a noteworthy role in "Unsane," as an office worker who goes through a harrowing involuntary commitment to a private mental hospital (part of an insurance scam). The plot is fairly off-the-shelf in a "bad day keeps getting worse" motif (turns out her former stalker is now an orderly at the hospital), but Soderbergh's experimental approach (which includes shooting the whole film secretly, on an Iphone) makes something that could have been generic quite fascinating. This is NOT a "found footage" film, btw - the production quality is actually excellent and I did not realize until after watching the brief DVD extra that the film was made on an Iphone.

Foy is an actress to watch - considerable talent and screen presence who, in this film, shows her power to completely inhabit a character. There's a scene where she is brought breakfast in a padded room and you feel certain she went full Method Acting on this - skipping a couple meals perhaps - and wolfing it down in a way that I rarely see actors do. No fake chewing here - that girl was hungry.

(after two seasons of "The Crown," what fun it must have been to cram half an egg mcmuffin into one's mouth in front of a camera)
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on August 06, 2018, 07:14:18 PM
Sad news of the death of producer Vincenzo Labella marred by an In Bruges induced snot shot upon reading that he was the producer of Jesus of Fucking Nazareth, with Robert Fucking Powell in the title role.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on August 07, 2018, 09:36:28 AM
Sfunny, I was just reading this,  regarding children in Belgium....

https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/children-are-being-euthanized-in-belgium/2018/08/06/9473bac2-9988-11e8-b60b-1c897f17e185_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.9f9a49d7298c (https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/children-are-being-euthanized-in-belgium/2018/08/06/9473bac2-9988-11e8-b60b-1c897f17e185_story.html?noredirect=on&utm_term=.9f9a49d7298c)

The chocolates are just for getting them to consent...
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on August 07, 2018, 12:26:31 PM
It's a film thread.  Not a "use the topic to be snide to others" thread. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on August 07, 2018, 02:48:18 PM
It's a film thread.  Not a "use the topic to be snide to others" thread.

So, why are you doing so, snide one?

You don't know kid. He'd be open-minded enough to go see Spike Lee.

Now, move along, Barney Phife. I'm sure there's some real crimes out there In which you can stick your big nose.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: smithtod1 on August 10, 2018, 12:13:49 AM
What's going on?
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on August 10, 2018, 12:27:24 AM
Now there's a forum moniker I haven't seen in a few years.  Hi,  Smith.   You still in the Dakotas somewhere?   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on August 13, 2018, 11:16:40 AM
Smithtod!

Have you seen Spike Lee's new movie, anyone?  Hearing good things.  And the topic seems pretty timely.



Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on August 17, 2018, 07:43:17 PM
Watched The Last Jedi because having seen the first seven I felt duty bound to do so. Eh. I thought it was ok. Until the very end, when a slave child walks out with a broom he holds like a light saber and a Resistance ring and I realized I was not seeing the end of episode 8 but the set up for episodes 10,.11 and 12. Holy shit this Fucking thing will never end.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on August 17, 2018, 11:23:57 PM
Someone needs to build a deathstar that works.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on August 18, 2018, 01:43:36 AM
I've never seen a Star Wars film . . .
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on August 18, 2018, 11:44:04 AM
I predict "Black Klansman" wins the Best Picture For 2018.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: jbottle on August 21, 2018, 01:52:25 PM
Smitty, what up?

I've seen "baby driver" like 50 times now because it's always on SHO, don't pay for HBO or Max for whatever reason, $$, been watching "Get Shorty" the tv series, which is acually better than the movie, darker, and more true to what I thought EL would have envisioned.

Elmore Leonard test:  Who does it best?  Soderbergh, Tarantino, whoever did GS, or the the Peter Weller one, "cat chaser" I think.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on August 21, 2018, 02:52:28 PM
"Three Identical Strangers" ...see it.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on August 22, 2018, 02:51:09 PM
Albuquerque/Winifred has died.  RIP Nothing left on her grave but Clorox bottles and flyswatters with red dots 0n 'em.

https://youtu.be/4BYyDusJYJo (https://youtu.be/4BYyDusJYJo)
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on August 23, 2018, 11:27:06 AM
I was just watching something with Keith Carradine when I heard about Ms Harris.  Altman cast everyone perfectly, though Carradine didn't think so at first.  He hated his character, then realized that's why Altman chose him, because he wanted "Tom" to be somewhat self-loathing. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on August 23, 2018, 12:44:14 PM
Second greatest movie ever.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on August 24, 2018, 11:54:11 AM
Smitty, what up?

I've seen "baby driver" like 50 times now because it's always on SHO, don't pay for HBO or Max for whatever reason, $$, been watching "Get Shorty" the tv series, which is acually better than the movie, darker, and more true to what I thought EL would have envisioned.

Elmore Leonard test:  Who does it best?  Soderbergh, Tarantino, whoever did GS, or the the Peter Weller one, "cat chaser" I think.

Soderbergh, for Out of Sight.  With Jackie Brown and 310 to Yuma maybe a close second/third. (Taratino and Mangold, respectively)

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on August 25, 2018, 04:36:58 PM
We have one of the best film schools in the world here in the O.C., Dodge College at Chapman University. Here is a link for a page with some student films on it...

https://vimeo.com/album/1965724

I need to get some new headshots made, and I want to submit to act in student films here locally. 

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on August 28, 2018, 06:05:13 PM
Black Klansman is pretty good.   It's darkly comic but also disturbing because the major roles are real people.   A good reminder of how human desire to be "in the club" and find love and camaraderie can take people to bad places.   Lee isn't coy about what he wants to say about right now in America.   But maybe he doesn't really need the coda with Charlottesville footage.   He's already allowed the viewers to make the connection.  He doesn't need to be Michael Moore. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on August 29, 2018, 11:39:59 AM
"Crazy Rich Asian" was colorful and interesting. Not up to the to rom-com standard of "My Big Greek Fat Wedding", but a fun watch.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: jbottle on September 03, 2018, 12:50:00 PM
As ethnic movies go, not as self-consciously Jewish as a Woody Allen movie, but as Asian rom-com goes it nailed all the low hanging stereotype fruit...[cough]...
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 03, 2018, 03:38:42 PM
Banana is the Asian metaphor equivalent to Oreo.   Some good jokes,  lots of trite but fun stuff,  and Singapore has great sky candy.  I heart Gemma Chan,  who plays a sister.   She's also great in the UK science fiction series "Humans. " 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: jbottle on September 03, 2018, 09:55:54 PM
Do they address the Asian porn famine??

Terrible.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: jbottle on September 05, 2018, 12:02:05 AM
Just saw “Thunderheart” again, really good.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 05, 2018, 05:27:46 PM
When I saw Wind River last year,  I recalled Thunderheart having some similar theme elements and wondered if I wanted to see it again.   Both movies,  as is the case with almost all NA themed films,  have Graham Greene in the cast.   Might have a look. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on September 06, 2018, 03:36:41 PM
Burt Reynolds, Movie Star Who Played It for Grins, Dies at 82
 

https://www.msn.com/en-us/movies/celebrity/burt-reynolds-movie-star-who-played-it-for-grins-dies-at-82/ar-BBMY3KT?OCID=ansmsnnews11 

--------------

RIP Burt.

Burt Reynolds was great. 

Salute,

Tony V. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on September 17, 2018, 03:25:50 PM
We're going crazy out there at the lake.

Just rewatched season two of "Fargo, " which is the best season of the three so far,  and so artfully captures the spirit of the original film.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 20, 2018, 11:35:23 AM
SPOILERS FOR "TULLY"

Seriously, this movie has quite the plot twist and so I'm going to type a couple of run-on sentences in here, just in case you absent-mindedly kept reading past the SPOILER ALERT or somehow have the notion that maybe you can stop reading before it gets too spoilery. No. I am going to really really spoil this movie if I even obliquely allude to the plot twist in the final reel. OK, then.

The movie started out for me as a fairly standard indie dramedy with some fairly standard off-the-shelf parts about modern family life, and middle-aged motherhood, and the amusing rigors of affluent suburban life. I probably would have bailed, if not for a strong cast - Charlize Theron, Mark Duplass, Rob Livingston and a new-ish face, Mackenzie Davis, who plays the "night nanny" that Theron's wealthy brother hires for her as a support system for a middle-aged mom with a newborn and a couple of kids already (one of them is "quirky," which is apparently the term that everyone in the movie settles on for the autistic/Asperger's boy).

But then the nanny offers an extra service that seems quite above and beyond the call of duty - and which you wouldn't expect to see in her CV. The scene is a bit surreal, but the film presents it a way that dulls the edges of implausbility enough to keep you thinking it's real and maybe this is something that's even a trend in some part of the country you don't live in.

From this point on, the movie had me well-hooked. And, looking back, I don't quite understand how I didn't see the Big Reveal coming at the end. Plenty of bread crumbs were dropped for me. I usually can smell this particular twist coming a mile away. I can imagine real pleasure in watching again, knowing the true status of Tully the nanny, and considering the clever allegorical story that it all becomes when you understand that status.

Grade: A (in spite of my general aversion to films that focus too often on the details of lactation and breast pumps)
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on September 20, 2018, 11:42:22 AM
"Juliet, Naked" very entertaining. Have to love Ethan Hawke.

"The Wife", Glenn Close Oscar nomination coming.

See them both, but see "The Wife", now.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on October 16, 2018, 12:17:04 PM
I liked Tully.  Haven't seen Juliet, Naked, but any film that has naked in the title tweaks primitive Cro-Magnon movie instincts, and Ethan Hawke has been really getting better as an actor in the past decade.  I don't recommend Hereditary, which was too unrelievedly grim and then just turned into a bunch of better horror film ripoffs at the end.  A Star is Born is just shit, just like the previous version was. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on October 16, 2018, 05:11:21 PM
I can rec "Tully", also. Dark comedy with a message---hang in there, it's worth it.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on October 24, 2018, 04:26:16 AM
I found Tully pretty average and not that engaging.
The pieces didn't come together or add up to much for me.

I would strongly rec Young Adult for a Reitman/Cody/Theron film.  Just looked it up and that was way back in 2011 (I would have thought 2013 or'14).  Actually these two films are really companion pieces, so if you liked Tully, check out Young Adult.

Tully had a lot of writerly tricks which didn't work for me and were too visible on screen.  While I thought Young Adult remained unpredictable and fresh.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on November 16, 2018, 12:30:38 PM
It seems William Goldman finally went up against a Sicilian when DEATH was on the line. RIP
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on November 16, 2018, 01:02:02 PM
"What happened to the old bank? It was beautiful.”

“People kept robbing it.”

“Small price to pay for beauty.”

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on November 16, 2018, 01:18:42 PM
"What happened to the old bank? It was beautiful.”

“People kept robbing it.”

“Small price to pay for beauty.”
When I heard Goldman died, I thought of a line, from the movie where Winslet and Diaz switch houses, about an old time screenwriter played by Eli Wallach: there are things we say that we only say because he wrote them first.

You keep using that word. I do not think it means what you think it means.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on November 16, 2018, 04:56:27 PM
Maybe, just maybe..."he's only mostly dead".
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on November 16, 2018, 06:49:07 PM
Inconceivable!


One of the true masters.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on November 21, 2018, 12:23:14 PM
The Ballad of Buster Scruggs is now streaming on Netflix after a brief qualifying run in theaters. Not top flight Coens, but still pretty good. I particularly liked the last two segments, with Zoe Kazan and Bill Heck finding love on a wagon train, only to have the Coens upset our expectations, the bastards, and five people riding in a stagecoach with death hovering above them in a figurative and literal sense. Great torrents of words you dare not laugh at lest you miss something and a slowly darkening mood as three of the riders start to realize there may be something... otherworldly about the whole journey.  Also features the bleakest, darkest episode I think the Coens have have ever filmed, and a chilling, merciless smile from Liam Neeson to wrap it up. Also, Tom Waits was born - or at least aged - to play a grizzled prospectors.

Well willing to forgive that the titular first episode is the  brothers in my least favorite of their modes, and that the second is essentially a 15 minute filmed version of an old joke. A wading in before.the abyss as it were.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on November 22, 2018, 03:42:22 PM
"The quality of mercy is not strained,  it droppeth as the gentle rain from heaven. "

Never going to hear that line the same again.   



Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on November 22, 2018, 05:38:12 PM
That made me want to stick my head in the oven. Fortunately electric.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on November 24, 2018, 10:52:28 AM
We don't have Netflix but are doing a one month free trial mostly to see TBoBS.   

I will read your more extended review at 3rd Eye,  when we've watched it.   

Last night I plumbed what is truly the bottom tier of Coeniana with "Suburbicon."  An incoherent goatfuck of trite and poorly connected cliches of the 50s, which systematically exterminates almost the entire cast without any real feeling of either loss or gain.   As sterile as its suburban countertops.   Surprised Joel and Ethan didn't Alan Smithee their script contribution. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on November 24, 2018, 11:58:43 AM
I figured there was a reason they did not make it themselves.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on December 13, 2018, 05:47:46 PM
On the issue of helping the stars and the filmmakers of the future...

Actors need to help each other out during the hard times, and Meryl Streep lived in a commune for a time before she was big and famous. The actors who are big and rich and famous need to help out the actors who are starving by buying places like the Oban Hotel in Hollywood, on Yucca, and making it into a hostel for actors. More communes for actors and writers and filmmakers would also be good.

In the old days there were nuns who ran apartments for starving actresses, etc, and there needs to be more help for starving artists.

The Princess Grace Awards helps actors and filmmakers by awarding them grants so that they can focus on studying, and creating art, etc, and there needs to be more stuff like that. (And I told them to help the students at the AADA where Princess Grace Kelly Grimaldi studied acting, etc)

And the big studios can do more to help the starving artists too, a lot more can be done.

There is a charity group which gets jobs for the homeless people, the charity is Chrysalis, and they get homeless actors and filmmakers jobs working at the Sony Studios in Culver City, and they are establishing a relationship with Disneyland in Anaheim to get the homeless people jobs working at Disney, etc.

More needs to be done to help the starving actors and filmmakers here in Hollywood. Someday they will be rich and famous, but right now many are starving, and they need a helping hand.

Salute,

Tony V.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on December 14, 2018, 11:43:35 AM
People in third world countries are snickering at "starving actresses...." 

I think hostels, set up as artist hubs, is a good idea, though.  It's a little easier to practice your lines, and show up for auditions, if you aren't busting your hump in a minimum wage job just to make rent. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on January 07, 2019, 11:48:15 AM
You all would like "Vice."  Good performances, some very funny/dark moments, and an hilarious mid-credits cut to a focus group that's discussing the movie itself (IOW, don't leave when the credits roll). 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on January 07, 2019, 12:11:40 PM
I did, with some reservations....here's a comment I left at Third Eye:

Quote
I liked "Vice," an amusing and unapologetically mocking dark comedy, but it definitely has some weak spots. Steve Carell is somehow just wrong as Donald Rumsfeld and made me intensely aware that he was Steve Carell doing a caricature. Almost cartoonish. And I could say much the same about Sam Rockwell as GW Bush (admittedly, Josh Brolin is a tough act to follow). I would also question the degree of coldness that is imputed to Cheney (not that he wasn't a bastard) in regard to his daughter's congress race and her tossing her sister under the Sanctity of Marriage bus. While one can argue that Cheney was some sort of evil puppet-master of the W administration, I tend to think it was likely more of an ensemble effort. There were some informative sidebars and captions that deliver some interesting information (a bit reminiscent of The Big Short) for younger viewers who may not have been aware of Cheney's adherence to the concept of the "unitary executive."

It's the kind of movie that should send any honest person off to spend a few hours fact-checking. Unfortunately, most viewers will probably just place a few checkmarks on either a Knew That checklist or a Fake News checklist.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on January 07, 2019, 10:14:07 PM
I did, with some reservations....here's a comment I left at Third Eye:

Quote
I liked "Vice," an amusing and unapologetically mocking dark comedy, but it definitely has some weak spots. Steve Carell is somehow just wrong as Donald Rumsfeld and made me intensely aware that he was Steve Carell doing a caricature. Almost cartoonish. And I could say much the same about Sam Rockwell as GW Bush (admittedly, Josh Brolin is a tough act to follow). I would also question the degree of coldness that is imputed to Cheney (not that he wasn't a bastard) in regard to his daughter's congress race and her tossing her sister under the Sanctity of Marriage bus. While one can argue that Cheney was some sort of evil puppet-master of the W administration, I tend to think it was likely more of an ensemble effort. There were some informative sidebars and captions that deliver some interesting information (a bit reminiscent of The Big Short) for younger viewers who may not have been aware of Cheney's adherence to the concept of the "unitary executive."

It's the kind of movie that should send any honest person off to spend a few hours fact-checking. Unfortunately, most viewers will probably just place a few checkmarks on either a Knew That checklist or a Fake News checklist.   

Sounds about right.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on January 22, 2019, 01:28:21 PM
Biggest surprise on the Oscar noms today has to be Pawel Pawelkowski being nominated for Cold War, over Cooper and Farrley. Haven't seen it, but I thought his earlier BFL winner Ida was a strikingly beautiful snooze.

Look forward to watching Tim Blake Nelson and Willie Watson during on WaCTHSfW at the show. Hope Nelson gets wings and his harp.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on January 22, 2019, 08:36:41 PM
https://www.nytimes.com/2018/11/14/movies/netflix-ballad-of-buster-scruggs.html

The spouse and I continue to avoid streaming services for several reasons,  so we're effectively shut out of Scruggs.  The anti moviehouse business model has just firmed up our boycott of Nflix.   Movies belong in theaters, and AA nominees especially should have extended theatrical releases and second runs.   (same comment on Roma)

You should run that acronym past Bill Weeden...
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on February 23, 2019, 11:09:46 AM
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/feb/23/trump-picks-up-two-razzies-as-holmes-watson-dominates-worst-of-hollywood

When I read that "Etan Cohen" won worst director I had a moment of confusion, but Wikipedia resolved it...

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Etan_Cohen

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on February 24, 2019, 03:12:49 PM
While I'm on about spellings of names, why do the Irish need so many vowels when one would suffice?

Take Saoirse Ronan (nominated last year, in LadyBird).  It's Sur-sheh.  Dump the "aoi" and use a "u" and everyone can go home. 

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on February 24, 2019, 10:29:01 PM
While I'm on about spellings of names, why do the Irish need so many vowels when one would suffice?

Take Saoirse Ronan (nominated last year, in LadyBird).  It's Sur-sheh.  Dump the "aoi" and use a "u" and everyone can go home.

Cof, cof.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on February 25, 2019, 10:05:32 AM
While I'm on about spellings of names, why do the Irish need so many vowels when one would suffice?

Because the English were teaching them to spell.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on February 25, 2019, 10:13:00 AM
The Fair and Equal Oscars were held last night, making sure everyone both loved and hated who in whatever category was given a trophy.

Shocker of the evening was not that the most boring film of the year (Roma) did not receive an award, but that Glenn Close was denied the statuette.

It worked well with no host, producing only two awkward moments---Samuel L. Jackson's inability to read the script, and stunning-in-pink Julia Roberts left on the stage at the end meekly saying into the camera, essentially, "That's all, folks!"


Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on February 25, 2019, 11:48:31 AM
Quote
Shocker of the evening was not that the most boring film of the year (Roma) did not receive an award...   

Cinematography, directing, foreign film.  Won 3 awards.  So, yes, that wasn't a shocker. 



Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on February 25, 2019, 12:07:47 PM
The complete non-shocker was that Hollywood's Glory Syndrome, in which the Black experience can best be presented through its effects on White people, is alive and well.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on February 25, 2019, 03:28:37 PM
Bingo bongo!

Yeah, there were, what, four widely distributed movies that approached the black experience through black people, but the best pic pick was the one that didn't so much.

 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on February 25, 2019, 04:45:46 PM
Quote
Shocker of the evening was not that the most boring film of the year (Roma) did not receive an award...   

Cinematography, directing, foreign film.  Won 3 awards.  So, yes, that wasn't a shocker.

Excuse me THE BEST PICTURE Award...which it had business being nominated for, in the first place.

Glad I could clear that up for you.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on February 25, 2019, 04:49:26 PM
Bingo bongo!

Yeah, there were, what, four widely distributed movies that approached the black experience through black people, but the best pic pick was the one that didn't so much.

Maybe that is because whites are the key to changing the black experience, as they've always been, since 1619.

Btw, is Spike Lee still throwing a hissy fit like some 12 year old girl?

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on February 25, 2019, 08:02:34 PM
Green Book was maybe just intended to be a buddy movie, in which case it may be too modest a movie to really be much concerned with authentic tracking of racial experience, whatever that may be.  My reading of reactions to it, from friends, is that it drew rather uninspiredly on the tropes of Magical Negro and White Saviour, as a way to make it more "accessible."  Usually when I hear that word, I'm hearing about a film that lacks what seems to me to be that special voice that resounds from great movies.

Instead of name-calling, consider the possibility that Lee saw the deficiency I just outlined. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on February 25, 2019, 10:29:43 PM
Green Book was maybe just intended to be a buddy movie, in which case it may be too modest a movie to really be much concerned with authentic tracking of racial experience, whatever that may be.  My reading of reactions to it, from friends, is that it drew rather uninspiredly on the tropes of Magical Negro and White Saviour, as a way to make it more "accessible."  Usually when I hear that word, I'm hearing about a film that lacks what seems to me to be that special voice that resounds from great movies.

Instead of name-calling, consider the possibility that Lee saw the deficiency I just outlined.

Did you SEE "Green Book", because none of that White Savior BS applies.

It's just a form of  entertainment in which two characters of vastly different types become friends. If anything, the Savior in the movie was the black character, nit the white character. Anyone insisting that there is some litmus test to pass for making a movie involving racially different characters is an idiot, or has his or her own agenda.

Lee is not the final arbiter of art, and merely showed himself to be a stereotypical sore loser.

His statement about losing to someone driving a car every twenty years may have inspired his outfit, though. He was dressed in a purple chauffer's outfit.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on March 01, 2019, 01:41:17 PM
So aside from a racist mockery of Lee's clothing choices, which pretty much undermines everything else you said on the lofty topic of racism and litmus tests (whatever those are)....where is your evidence he is a sore loser?  Maybe he was just disgusted at the choice of an okay buddy movie for Best Picture.  And honest enough to show his disgust.  Lots of movies are "just a form of entertainment."  That doesn't really qualify them for best picture.  If Guillermo del Toro had registered the same disapproval for the Best Pic choice, what would you have done?  Tell me he's not the final arbiter of art and that he was dressed like a Tijuana pimp? 

And I'm still confused at this strawman "final arbiter of art" - who said anyone is the final arbiter of art?  People have opinions.  Some of them, like Lee, openly express them.  That doesn't mean they are having a "hissy fit....like a 12 year old girl." 

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on March 01, 2019, 03:22:45 PM
So aside from a racist mockery of Lee's clothing choices, which pretty much undermines everything else you said on the lofty topic of racism and litmus tests (whatever those are)....where is your evidence he is a sore loser?  Maybe he was just disgusted at the choice of an okay buddy movie for Best Picture.  And honest enough to show his disgust.  Lots of movies are "just a form of entertainment."  That doesn't really qualify them for best picture.  If Guillermo del Toro had registered the same disapproval for the Best Pic choice, what would you have done?  Tell me he's not the final arbiter of art and that he was dressed like a Tijuana pimp? 

And I'm still confused at this strawman "final arbiter of art" - who said anyone is the final arbiter of art?  People have opinions.  Some of them, like Lee, openly express them.  That doesn't mean they are having a "hissy fit....like a 12 year old girl."

After presenter Julia Roberts announced “Green Book” as Best Picture, AP reporter Andrew Dalton was one of several journalists who noticed Lee wave his arms in anger before storming out of the theater. However, before he could leave, he was stopped at the doors and was forced to return to his seat once the speeches had stopped.

Jordan Peele, the Oscar-winning writer-director behind last year’s “Get Out,” reportedly didn’t clap either, nor did other attendees nearby.

The backlash appears to be in response to controversy surrounding the film, which had been criticized for perpetuating what some saw as a “white savior” narrative approach to examining race relations.


https://www.google.com/amp/s/variety.com/2019/film/news/spike-lee-oscars-green-book-1203148178/amp/ (https://www.google.com/amp/s/variety.com/2019/film/news/spike-lee-oscars-green-book-1203148178/amp/)


You really should know what you are talking about before you express such idiocy as the above.Nothing racist. Anywhere, but in Lee's, and apparently, your minds.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on March 01, 2019, 03:44:54 PM
You're shifting the topic.  I didn't say the film was racist.  I said I understood that some argued that it had a racist cliche or two, and that this opinion was part of their basis for asserting it wasn't best picture.  All you argue, so far, is that anyone who has that opinion and not yours, is an idiot.  That argument is only persuasive if you are somehow sovereign over all our movie viewing and how we may react. 

Nor does informing me that Spike Lee looked angry give me a detailed understanding of his opinions.  Maybe you can make fun of his clothes again or call him a twelve year old girl having a hissy fit.  That'll convince me!

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on March 01, 2019, 03:54:29 PM
So aside from a racist mockery of Lee's clothing choices, which pretty much undermines everything else you said on the lofty topic of racism and litmus tests (whatever those are)....where is your evidence he is a sore loser?  Maybe he was just disgusted at the choice of an okay buddy movie for Best Picture.  And honest enough to show his disgust.  Lots of movies are "just a form of entertainment."  That doesn't really qualify them for best picture.  If Guillermo del Toro had registered the same disapproval for the Best Pic choice, what would you have done?  Tell me he's not the final arbiter of art and that he was dressed like a Tijuana pimp? 

And I'm still confused at this strawman "final arbiter of art" - who said anyone is the final arbiter of art?  People have opinions.  Some of them, like Lee, openly express them.  That doesn't mean they are having a "hissy fit....like a 12 year old girl."

After presenter Julia Roberts announced “Green Book” as Best Picture, AP reporter Andrew Dalton was one of several journalists who noticed Lee wave his arms in anger before storming out of the theater. However, before he could leave, he was stopped at the doors and was forced to return to his seat once the speeches had stopped.

Jordan Peele, the Oscar-winning writer-director behind last year’s “Get Out,” reportedly didn’t clap either, nor did other attendees nearby.

The backlash appears to be in response to controversy surrounding the film, which had been criticized for perpetuating what some saw as a “white savior” narrative approach to examining race relations.


https://www.google.com/amp/s/variety.com/2019/film/news/spike-lee-oscars-green-book-1203148178/amp/ (https://www.google.com/amp/s/variety.com/2019/film/news/spike-lee-oscars-green-book-1203148178/amp/)


You really should know what you are talking about before you express such idiocy as the above.Nothing racist. Anywhere, but in Lee's, and apparently, your minds.

It's as if you didn't even read the quote you  posted!

What do you think "a white savior narrative" is???! It's racist.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on March 01, 2019, 04:58:55 PM
So aside from a racist mockery of Lee's clothing choices, which pretty much undermines everything else you said on the lofty topic of racism and litmus tests (whatever those are)....where is your evidence he is a sore loser?  Maybe he was just disgusted at the choice of an okay buddy movie for Best Picture.  And honest enough to show his disgust.  Lots of movies are "just a form of entertainment."  That doesn't really qualify them for best picture.  If Guillermo del Toro had registered the same disapproval for the Best Pic choice, what would you have done?  Tell me he's not the final arbiter of art and that he was dressed like a Tijuana pimp? 

And I'm still confused at this strawman "final arbiter of art" - who said anyone is the final arbiter of art?  People have opinions.  Some of them, like Lee, openly express them.  That doesn't mean they are having a "hissy fit....like a 12 year old girl."

After presenter Julia Roberts announced “Green Book” as Best Picture, AP reporter Andrew Dalton was one of several journalists who noticed Lee wave his arms in anger before storming out of the theater. However, before he could leave, he was stopped at the doors and was forced to return to his seat once the speeches had stopped.

Jordan Peele, the Oscar-winning writer-director behind last year’s “Get Out,” reportedly didn’t clap either, nor did other attendees nearby.

The backlash appears to be in response to controversy surrounding the film, which had been criticized for perpetuating what some saw as a “white savior” narrative approach to examining race relations.


https://www.google.com/amp/s/variety.com/2019/film/news/spike-lee-oscars-green-book-1203148178/amp/ (https://www.google.com/amp/s/variety.com/2019/film/news/spike-lee-oscars-green-book-1203148178/amp/)


You really should know what you are talking about before you express such idiocy as the above.Nothing racist. Anywhere, but in Lee's, and apparently, your minds.

It's as if you didn't even read the quote you  posted!

What do you think "a white savior narrative" is???! It's racist.
Hamilton will always - ALWAYS - offer precisely the argument you would expect a racist to make. Including,  " No, YOU'RE a racist" and consistently negatively judging the behavior of black people.

Black persons did not clap for Green Book. White person presenter Brie Larson, for one example, did not clap for Casey Affleck two years ago. Half the white audience protested Elia Kazan's Honorary Oscar by leaving or sitting on their hands.  Guess who Hamilton has a problem with.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on March 02, 2019, 10:42:45 AM
You're shifting the topic.  I didn't say the film was racist.  I said I understood that some argued that it had a racist cliche or two, and that this opinion was part of their basis for asserting it wasn't best picture.  All you argue, so far, is that anyone who has that opinion and not yours, is an idiot.  That argument is only persuasive if you are somehow sovereign over all our movie viewing and how we may react. 

Nor does informing me that Spike Lee looked angry give me a detailed understanding of his opinions.  Maybe you can make fun of his clothes again or call him a twelve year old girl having a hissy fit.  That'll convince me!


Did you see the fucking movie?

Apparently, not. There's no White Savior in it. There is a black Savior, though.

I didn't inform you Spije looks angry. I informed you he WAS angry.

And he was angry that the movie went to white artists.

And he was dressed as a chauffeur. The end.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on March 02, 2019, 10:47:26 AM
So aside from a racist mockery of Lee's clothing choices, which pretty much undermines everything else you said on the lofty topic of racism and litmus tests (whatever those are)....where is your evidence he is a sore loser?  Maybe he was just disgusted at the choice of an okay buddy movie for Best Picture.  And honest enough to show his disgust.  Lots of movies are "just a form of entertainment."  That doesn't really qualify them for best picture.  If Guillermo del Toro had registered the same disapproval for the Best Pic choice, what would you have done?  Tell me he's not the final arbiter of art and that he was dressed like a Tijuana pimp? 

And I'm still confused at this strawman "final arbiter of art" - who said anyone is the final arbiter of art?  People have opinions.  Some of them, like Lee, openly express them.  That doesn't mean they are having a "hissy fit....like a 12 year old girl."

After presenter Julia Roberts announced “Green Book” as Best Picture, AP reporter Andrew Dalton was one of several journalists who noticed Lee wave his arms in anger before storming out of the theater. However, before he could leave, he was stopped at the doors and was forced to return to his seat once the speeches had stopped.

Jordan Peele, the Oscar-winning writer-director behind last year’s “Get Out,” reportedly didn’t clap either, nor did other attendees nearby.

The backlash appears to be in response to controversy surrounding the film, which had been criticized for perpetuating what some saw as a “white savior” narrative approach to examining race relations.


https://www.google.com/amp/s/variety.com/2019/film/news/spike-lee-oscars-green-book-1203148178/amp/ (https://www.google.com/amp/s/variety.com/2019/film/news/spike-lee-oscars-green-book-1203148178/amp/)


You really should know what you are talking about before you express such idiocy as the above.Nothing racist. Anywhere, but in Lee's, and apparently, your minds.

It's as if you didn't even read the quote you  posted!

What do you think "a white savior narrative" is???! It's racist.
Hamilton will always - ALWAYS - offer precisely the argument you would expect a racist to make. Including,  " No, YOU'RE a racist" and consistently negatively judging the behavior of black people.

Black persons did not clap for Green Book. White person presenter Brie Larson, for one example, did not clap for Casey Affleck two years ago. Half the white audience protested Elia Kazan's Honorary Oscar by leaving or sitting on their hands.  Guess who Hamilton has a problem with.

Fuck you, altar boy. You don't know shit, other than running around labeling anyone with a different opinion than you as a racist, you pusillanimous, pimple-faced, putrid, piece of anal pus.

Run along and defend the Church and its fudgepackers, you elephant turd.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on March 02, 2019, 01:13:52 PM
Confused now: is he anal pus or an elephant turd?  Those are two quite different things.

I don't have my copy of Lexicon of Angry American Eight Year Olds handy, atm.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on March 02, 2019, 01:42:07 PM
Confused now: is he anal pus or an elephant turd?  Those are two quite different things.

I don't have my copy of Lexicon of Angry American Eight Year Olds handy, atm.
Like I said, ha.ilton always reacts as a.racist reacts. As in assuming Lee acted as he did not because a specific movie with a typically Hlywood view of race won, but because any white won. Hamilton is white grievance entire. Any racial protest, and he attacks the blacks for it, for the content or the manner of it. White movie after white movis has won the Oscar with no peep from Lee. But Hamilton is always loath to admit any justice to Black protest, where he cannot attack the protest he attacks the protestor.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on March 02, 2019, 08:46:41 PM
Confused now: is he anal pus or an elephant turd?  Those are two quite different things.

I don't have my copy of Lexicon of Angry American Eight Year Olds handy, atm.
Like I said, ha.ilton always reacts as a.racist reacts. As in assuming Lee acted as he did not because a specific movie with a typically Hlywood view of race won, but because any white won. Hamilton is white grievance entire. Any racial protest, and he attacks the blacks for it, for the content or the manner of it. White movie after white movis has won the Oscar with no peep from Lee. But Hamilton is always loath to admit any justice to Black protest, where he cannot attack the protest he attacks the protestor.

No assumption, chimp smegma.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on March 04, 2019, 12:35:04 AM
I found much to like in Green Book, a warm dip in what may be some fantasy, which does provide a good buddy dramedy and an amusing role reversal.  Seemed like the two guys save each other, to some degree.  I doubt the the pianist, from what i know of musicians (living with them, and being one), actually blew off his final gig.  At the end of the day, you know that hurts the next group who wants a booking there.  And the next.

In a fictional interpretation, however, it delivers an easy feelgood  moment. 

Not a best pic, imo,  but a compelling look at loneliness and oddly matched friends. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on March 04, 2019, 01:20:17 PM
I found much to like in Green Book, a warm dip in what may be some fantasy, which does provide a good buddy dramedy and an amusing role reversal.  Seemed like the two guys save each other, to some degree.  I doubt the the pianist, from what i know of musicians (living with them, and being one), actually blew off his final gig.  At the end of the day, you know that hurts the next group who wants a booking there.  And the next.

In a fictional interpretation, however, it delivers an easy feelgood  moment. 

Not a best pic, imo,  but a compelling look at loneliness and oddly matched friends.

So, you realize this positive post on Green Book will make you a racist in the eyes of that fucking displaced to Arizona moralist who continually overlooks the disgusting immoral record of the Catholic Church.

While he gets himself into a lather over a movie, he stays mum on the rape and sexual abuse of women and children.

Sad.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on March 04, 2019, 05:45:47 PM
I can't find a sentence, or even a clause, in your post that seems true. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on March 04, 2019, 06:26:27 PM
I can't find a sentence, or even a clause, in your post that seems true.
I would not worry about it. There is no one whose opinion of me means less to me.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on March 04, 2019, 10:21:47 PM
I can't find a sentence, or even a clause, in your post that seems true.
I would not worry about it. There is no one whose opinion of me means less to me.

Though likely a couple of folks occupying the same prime real estate.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on March 04, 2019, 10:29:04 PM
You're shifting the topic.  I didn't say the film was racist.  I said I understood that some argued that it had a racist cliche or two, and that this opinion was part of their basis for asserting it wasn't best picture.  All you argue, so far, is that anyone who has that opinion and not yours, is an idiot.  That argument is only persuasive if you are somehow sovereign over all our movie viewing and how we may react. 

Nor does informing me that Spike Lee looked angry give me a detailed understanding of his opinions.  Maybe you can make fun of his clothes again or call him a twelve year old girl having a hissy fit.  That'll convince me!


Did you see the fucking movie?

Apparently, not. There's no White Savior in it.

Shockingly enough, I will take the dozens of African-Americans' opinions on this over yours.

One of many articles on the topic.
https://www.salon.com/2018/12/30/hollywood-still-loves-a-white-savior-green-book-and-the-lazy-feel-good-take-on-race/
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on March 06, 2019, 10:10:01 PM
You're shifting the topic.  I didn't say the film was racist.  I said I understood that some argued that it had a racist cliche or two, and that this opinion was part of their basis for asserting it wasn't best picture.  All you argue, so far, is that anyone who has that opinion and not yours, is an idiot.  That argument is only persuasive if you are somehow sovereign over all our movie viewing and how we may react. 

Nor does informing me that Spike Lee looked angry give me a detailed understanding of his opinions.  Maybe you can make fun of his clothes again or call him a twelve year old girl having a hissy fit.  That'll convince me!


Did you see the fucking movie?

Apparently, not. There's no White Savior in it.

Shockingly enough, I will take the dozens of African-Americans' opinions on this over yours.

One of many articles on the topic.
https://www.salon.com/2018/12/30/hollywood-still-loves-a-white-savior-green-book-and-the-lazy-feel-good-take-on-race/

So you did NOT see the movie.

The end.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on March 07, 2019, 10:47:32 PM
You're shifting the topic.  I didn't say the film was racist.  I said I understood that some argued that it had a racist cliche or two, and that this opinion was part of their basis for asserting it wasn't best picture.  All you argue, so far, is that anyone who has that opinion and not yours, is an idiot.  That argument is only persuasive if you are somehow sovereign over all our movie viewing and how we may react. 

Nor does informing me that Spike Lee looked angry give me a detailed understanding of his opinions.  Maybe you can make fun of his clothes again or call him a twelve year old girl having a hissy fit.  That'll convince me!


Did you see the fucking movie?

Apparently, not. There's no White Savior in it.

Shockingly enough, I will take the dozens of African-Americans' opinions on this over yours.

One of many articles on the topic.
https://www.salon.com/2018/12/30/hollywood-still-loves-a-white-savior-green-book-and-the-lazy-feel-good-take-on-race/

So you did NOT see the movie.

The end.

So, I saw the movie - and I understood the movie. But I still defer to the judgment of others over yours.

And had I thought as you thought and they had chimed in as they did, I would have reassessed my opinion.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on March 08, 2019, 04:57:22 PM
Well, you are easily influenced by others. Perhaps some day you'll learn to think for yourself.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on March 08, 2019, 05:32:40 PM
Well, you are easily influenced by others. Perhaps some day you'll learn to think for yourself.

You are still a bigot and as far as I can tell there is zero chance that you will learn to listen to those who know more than you.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on March 08, 2019, 06:54:40 PM
Because you know more than me, right, Professor? Naaah....you just like to threaten to ban people for telling the truth.

Bite me.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on March 08, 2019, 07:20:12 PM
Because you know more than me, right, Professor? Naaah....you just like to threaten to ban people for telling the truth.

Bite me.


No, Piggy. Because they know more than either of us.

But I figured that would be too subtle for you, in your haste to defend your bigotry.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on March 09, 2019, 09:45:44 AM
Taking a page from Lazy AZ Steve? Can't win an argument on it's merits? Label your opponent as a racist or bigot.

So, tell us, Joshie. Why did your wife leave you?
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on March 09, 2019, 12:09:17 PM
Taking a page from Lazy AZ Steve? Can't win an argument on it's merits? Label your opponent as a racist or bigot.

So, tell us, Joshie. Why did your wife leave you?
It is merits? What is that supposed to mean, you fucking racist troll.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on March 09, 2019, 02:29:43 PM
Taking a page from Lazy AZ Steve? Can't win an argument on it's merits? Label your opponent as a racist or bigot.

So, tell us, Joshie. Why did your wife leave you?

Changing your argument, since you lost your way on the last one?

Piggy, you should stick to simpler questions like "when did you stop beating your wife?"

The argument about whether there is a white savior character in Green Book is the basis for the immediate observation that you are a racist, but you've been demonstrating that for years, now. It's not a new observation relative to this argument, merely one you illustrate anew.

Your decision to pretend that Michael Jackson is relevant to the discussion is just further proof.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on March 10, 2019, 08:28:48 AM
See? Joshie. Your "arguments" always boil down to the same concept. If one doesnt "get" or agree with you, they are a racist/bigot.

How sad that you lean on such a worn out crutch.

But again, why did she leave? Was it the scruffy, greying, beard that was perpetually reaking of the scent of Fritos? Was it the craft beer gut that seemed to grow larger with each successive day? Or was it the pictures she found in your phone that bankshit accidentally forwarded to you?

It's okay. You can share with us. We are here to support you.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on March 10, 2019, 09:35:05 AM
Consider for a moment the possibility that the reason people call you a racist or a bigot is not because you disagree with them, but that over the roughly 20 years you have been posting here or the NYT you have demonstrated again and again 5hat YOU ARE A RACIST AND A BIGOT. It is not the one thing. It is the dismal tide.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on March 10, 2019, 01:39:05 PM
Consider for a moment the possibility that the reason people call you a racist or a bigot is not because you disagree with them, but that over the roughly 20 years you have been posting here or the NYT you have demonstrated again and again 5hat YOU ARE A RACIST AND A BIGOT. It is not the one thing. It is the dismal tide.

He's rejected that.

His opinions are all well-founded, in his opinion, and he is better able to judge if a movie is about a white savior than any number of African-Americans are. Just ask him.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on March 10, 2019, 01:48:15 PM
See? Joshie. Your "arguments" always boil down to the same concept. If one doesnt "get" or agree with you, they are a racist/bigot.

How sad that you lean on such a worn out crutch.

But again, why did she leave? Was it the scruffy, greying, beard that was perpetually reaking of the scent of Fritos? Was it the craft beer gut that seemed to grow larger with each successive day? Or was it the pictures she found in your phone that bankshit accidentally forwarded to you?

It's okay. You can share with us. We are here to support you.

You think that shifting to fake personal attacks is better?

You make up stories about us, then spread them as if they were true.

You are a bigot, but you are also a liar, Piggy. And the day anybody here except Bambi would expect you to provide emotional support to them during a trying time would be shortly after Donald Trump admitted he is mentally ill, Putin apologized for taking over Crimea and returned it, and Kim Jong Un renounced his current form of government and strong arm tactics and stepped down after converting his country to a democracy.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on March 10, 2019, 01:59:31 PM
Go fuck yourself, Joshie.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on March 10, 2019, 02:15:39 PM
Go fuck yourself, Joshie.

Zzzzzzzzzz
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on March 13, 2019, 01:58:14 PM
"Ma'am, I answered your question! I answered the darned... I'm cooperatin' here!"   

Quote
Huffman posted a $250,000 bond after an appearance in federal court in Los Angeles. Her husband, actor William H. Macy, has not been charged, though an FBI agent stated in an affidavit that he was in the room when Huffman first heard the pitch from a scam insider.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on March 16, 2019, 12:28:50 AM
DREAM FACTORY

How Women Built Early Hollywood – And Transformed Los Angeles

Hilary A. Hallett  

November 7, 2017 

https://www.kcet.org/shows/lost-la/how-women-built-early-hollywood-and-transformed-los-angeles

----------

Women make up a huge percentage of people in the entertainment industry. And when I worked at Universal, a woman hired me, and a woman was my boss.

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on April 28, 2019, 02:34:23 PM
Anaheim needs to have a film and television industry, we have the Dodge Film School at Chapman, and we need for the film students to be able to work in Anaheim after they graduate.

And a good place for a studio in Anaheim is by the Julianna warehouse, the only bad thing is the proximity of the railroad tracks. There can also be filmmaking equipment rentals, etc, etc, etc. 

The city of Anaheim also needs to make it easy to get permits for filming. 

Southern California has some great film schools, and some great acting schools, etc, and we need for the students to be able to find employment after they graduate.

Anaheim needs to have an entertainment industry, and we need a studio, and equipment rentals.

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on May 03, 2019, 09:11:34 AM
"Still" is a 2018 indie film shot in Georgia and set on a remote farm near the Appalachian Trail.  Very atmospheric but you can see the "mystery" of the farmer couple coming a mile away.  Diverting bit of allegory, but sort of clunky and annoying in the way characters decline to ask obvious questions that real people ask in those situations. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on May 14, 2019, 04:18:27 PM
Tim Conway was great, "The Apple Dumpling Gang" was some of my favorite work that he did.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFv57wptS38

May he rest in peace.

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on May 17, 2019, 05:48:14 PM
The Cannes Film Festival is going on right now.

https://www.festival-cannes.com/en/

The first Cannes Film Festival was on my Mother's Birthday.

I went to the Cannes Film Festival in 2000, a film titled "Dancer in the Dark" won the Palm d' Or that year.

I stayed at the Hotel Mondial, it was great, I could see the ocean from my balcony, the hotel is owned by Best Western now, I am not sure who owned it then.

http://www.hotellemondial.com/en/

I would love to go to the Cannes Film Festival every year.

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on June 11, 2019, 05:48:20 PM
Someone tell me this is actually happening:

https://www.imdb.com/title/tt10095582/
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on June 12, 2019, 06:40:02 PM
A Joel-Ethan bifurcation?  Zounds!

The project's but a walking shadow, a poor player that struts and frets his hour upon the pages of Variety... and then is heard no more.   

Of course, I might have doubted once the fast food version with Christopher Walken. 

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on June 13, 2019, 01:09:25 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/may/26/rocketman-review-right-spectacle-elton-john

Good biopic/musical.  And the second movie I've seen that uses "Tiny Dancer" to good effect.  (gold star, if you can guess the other one)  As well as deftly weaving in other selections from the John/Taupin playlist, perfectly capturing the mood.



Title: Re: Movies
Post by: whiskeypriest on June 13, 2019, 01:44:31 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2019/may/26/rocketman-review-right-spectacle-elton-john

Good biopic/musical.  And the second movie I've seen that uses "Tiny Dancer" to good effect.  (gold star, if you can guess the other one)  As well as deftly weaving in other selections from the John/Taupin playlist, perfectly capturing the mood.
Almost Famous.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on June 13, 2019, 08:01:02 PM
"My son has been kidnapped by rock stars."

I liked EJ lyrics partly because they are distinctive....I often have trouble remembering rock lyrics exactly, but there are a dozen John songs I can easily recall in their entirety.   Even ones that got little airplay like "Grimsby. "
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on June 19, 2019, 12:24:00 PM
JOSH,

The Third Eye film forum might be closing, and archiving itself (with the Wayback Machine or whatever), and some there wondered if Elba could accommodate them (it's about six active members left).  That would involve adding a couple more film threads (but wouldn't need to transport any posts, just start fresh ones). 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on June 19, 2019, 12:57:58 PM
JOSH,

The Third Eye film forum might be closing, and archiving itself (with the Wayback Machine or whatever), and some there wondered if Elba could accommodate them (it's about six active members left).  That would involve adding a couple more film threads (but wouldn't need to transport any posts, just start fresh ones).
Wait... they let you in?
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on June 19, 2019, 04:09:49 PM
Hahaha!  I'm "Knox" over at Elba, where I peek in intermittently.   Last I heard, the real OCB was raising four kids and busy with career and all.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on June 19, 2019, 06:38:50 PM
Who is there who is not here? Billy? Syd?

Current Film
Couch With a View

We already have trivia, Lobby is basically the rest of Elba. What else.gets used?
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on June 19, 2019, 08:16:05 PM
Bill, Syd, Carol, Ghulam, Befade.  Grace stops by semiannually.   Yambu has vanished.

Bo, Oil, me,  Mr. Ferris Wheeler, already here. 

Yeah, Couch and Current should cover it.   

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on June 26, 2019, 06:45:46 AM
"An American Woman". Oscar nomination for Sienna Miller's performance is due.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on June 26, 2019, 11:54:08 AM
Haven't yet had the pleasure, but you had me at "Sienna Miller."  She's been terrific in everything I've seen her in.


Rewatched Sita Sings the Blues, again.  Damn I love this film.  The Ramayana, and the bluesy torch songs that Annette Hanshaw sang in the 20s/30s, dovetail perfectly.  Superb and whimsical animation, great music, witty voiceovers from Indian-Americans who were steeped, or at least briefly dunked, in the Ramayana growing up, and a sad but redemptive breakup story - movies don't get more watchable, or rewatchable, than this gem.  Seen it four times now, and plan to see it four more at least before they apply my toe-tag. 

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on June 26, 2019, 03:25:06 PM
Haven't yet had the pleasure, but you had me at "Sienna Miller."  She's been terrific in everything I've seen her in.


Rewatched Sita Sings the Blues, again.  Damn I love this film.  The Ramayana, and the bluesy torch songs that Annette Hanshaw sang in the 20s/30s, dovetail perfectly.  Superb and whimsical animation, great music, witty voiceovers from Indian-Americans who were steeped, or at least briefly dunked, in the Ramayana growing up, and a sad but redemptive breakup story - movies don't get more watchable, or rewatchable, than this gem.  Seen it four times now, and plan to see it four more at least before they apply my toe-tag.
Still fully and freely downloadable.  Still my favorite animated film this century, if not of all time.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on June 26, 2019, 03:28:44 PM
Assemble the Monkey Warriors!

https://youtu.be/cgbp6AtU8Hw
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: HamiltonIII on June 26, 2019, 03:54:57 PM
Haven't yet had the pleasure, but you had me at "Sienna Miller."  She's been terrific in everything I've seen her in.


Rewatched Sita Sings the Blues, again.  Damn I love this film.  The Ramayana, and the bluesy torch songs that Annette Hanshaw sang in the 20s/30s, dovetail perfectly.  Superb and whimsical animation, great music, witty voiceovers from Indian-Americans who were steeped, or at least briefly dunked, in the Ramayana growing up, and a sad but redemptive breakup story - movies don't get more watchable, or rewatchable, than this gem.  Seen it four times now, and plan to see it four more at least before they apply my toe-tag.

It's her best performance, evvahh!
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on July 11, 2019, 01:05:47 PM
Burn After Reading - saw this again, and had that mixed feeling of laughing really hard while feeling pretty bad for most of the characters, especially the lovelorn Richard Jenkins (as the gym manager).  Nothing makes sense, as Greek chorister JK Simmons notes, and there is no justice, and no one seems to learn anything useful.  Most are dead, or embedded in a paranoid shell in Argentina.  The fact that the Coens can make this so entertaining, and poke some fine fun at American narcissism and body-image obsessions, speaks to their skill as filmmakers.  And how can one not love that Brad Pitt, who usually plays fairly savvy fellows, here embraces and owns the role of absolute knucklehead. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on July 11, 2019, 01:52:29 PM
Burn After Reading - saw this again, and had that mixed feeling of laughing really hard while feeling pretty bad for most of the characters, especially the lovelorn Richard Jenkins (as the gym manager).  Nothing makes sense, as Greek chorister JK Simmons notes, and there is no justice, and no one seems to learn anything useful.  Most are dead, or embedded in a paranoid shell in Argentina.  (Venezuela) The fact that the Coens can make this so entertaining, and poke some fine fun at American narcissism and body-image obsessions, speaks to their skill as filmmakers.  And how can one not love that Brad Pitt, who usually plays fairly savvy fellows, here embraces and owns the role of absolute knucklehead.
JK Simmons is high on my list of great Coen brothers minor characters who run off with all or part of the movie. Right up there with the noir cops in Barton Fink. I would recommend the movie just to watch him in his two.scenes. That, and the way the photo of Putin looks over the shoulder of the Russian Embassy functionary.

I don't think the movie means much, but it is a hoot. Great performances. (According to Pitt, he told the Coens he was not sure he could play a character so utterly clueless. There response: a brief pause, and then, You'll be fine).

Though I would dispute one thing: the only person I felt any sympathy for.was Jenkins's character.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on July 12, 2019, 12:26:34 PM
" I have a drinking problem? Fuck you, Peck! You're a Mormon! Next to you, we all have a drinking problem!"

Still haven't seen Dermot Mulroney in "Coming Up Daisy."  On my must-see list....right next to "Home for Purim." 

Jenkins was the only truly sympathetic role, for sure, and is great off the blocks with his "I'm not comfortable with this" scene.  His axing, at the end, is your pure anti-Hollywood gesture - the one decent human being obliterated by Cox who, at that point, seems to be part of the machinery of an absurd universe with a god that is looking the other way. 

Simmons is one of those character actors who can arch an eyebrow, frown skeptically, and put the audience in stitches.  Not that I didn't also like him as a total bastard in "Whiplash." 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on July 12, 2019, 02:25:08 PM
Having heartily disliked his BFF Oscar Winner Ida, I approached Pawel Pawelkowski's Cold War with some trepidation. What I got was a beautiful (B&W, academy ratio, interesting changes in contrasts and background focus as the move progressed), passionate, musical and lyrical story of ill-matched obsessed love. Great acting - Joanna Kulig is a force. Loved it.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on July 13, 2019, 04:36:44 PM
JOSH,

The Third Eye film forum might be closing, and archiving itself (with the Wayback Machine or whatever), and some there wondered if Elba could accommodate them (it's about six active members left).  That would involve adding a couple more film threads (but wouldn't need to transport any posts, just start fresh ones).

Sorry! I missed this.

By all means and let me know what you need added, okay?
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on July 15, 2019, 07:12:34 PM
Thanks.   I passed along your welcoming words to Third Eye.   They seem to be still unsure what they're doing.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on August 15, 2019, 01:04:49 PM
USC film school is rated as the best film school by the Hollywood Reporter...

https://www.hollywoodreporter.com/lists/top-25-american-film-schools-ranked-1231343/item/2019-top-25-film-schools-usc-1231345

NYU came in second.

And Chapman should be third, but instead they put Chapman as seventh.

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on August 17, 2019, 03:50:49 PM
RIP Peter Fonda.   His passage sadly noted here in the Black Hills.  He often showed up at the bike rally in Sturgis.  In many films I didn't see, but also in films I did see and liked, like Ulee's Gold, The Limey, and of course ER. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on September 13, 2019, 03:07:53 PM
I noticed that Disney has made a new film, "Maleficent, Mistress of Evil," and there is a new film "Joker," and I wonder why they are all focusing on the villains instead of focusing on the good heroes like the old days.

Films are supposed to bring out the best in us, and they are supposed to give the kids good role models to look up to, like Roy Rogers, and the Lone Ranger, etc.

I need to start making movies, so that I can make movies my way.

Although, my film "Echo, A Rock and Roll Tragedy" will not be a good film for children, and will be rated "R."

I want to make a bunch of love stories. And really, "Echo" is a love story.

And I may make a movie about Lech Walesa, who is a hero.

We will see what I can do...

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on September 13, 2019, 03:13:24 PM
The late, great Andrzej Wajda beat you to it.

https://m.imdb.com/title/tt2113820/
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 21, 2019, 11:20:25 PM
Lolita

Though I read the novel eons ago, I realized neither of us had seen the movie.   Despite some mixed feelings about the sanitizing process Kubrick was forced into by production codes, the quality of the performances make it worth seeing, with memorable swerves between creepy and comedic.   Shelley Winters is amazing as usual  -- predatory, pretentious, volatile, and whiny.   Though looking a bit run down at the end.

Given that Sue Lyon was 15 by the time production ended, and easily passed for 17 (movie Lolita is in high school, not the 11 year old of the novel), the pedophile aspect is considerably watered down.   

Some reservations about Sellers in this - his "Quilty" often has the feel of an actor amusing cast and crew with over-the-top riffs on other movie roles where he does funny accents, rather than something that really belongs in the film.   That Humbert can't recognize Quilty when he impersonates Dr. Strangelove a German psychologist is a bit improbable, and pulled me out of the movie a little.   The scene where Quilty poses as a state policeman is just annoying and ridiculous.   

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on December 29, 2019, 11:53:06 AM
RIP Lolita.  Sue Lyon just died. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on December 29, 2019, 12:14:51 PM
I'm thinking of aurochs and angels, the secret of durable pigments, prophetic sonnets, the refuge of art. And this is the only immortality you and I may share, Sue Lyon.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on December 29, 2019, 01:49:42 PM
One of the great closing paragraphs of modern literature.  Up there with the final line of Joyce's "The Dead."   

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on December 29, 2019, 06:38:33 PM
  There, in front of us, where a broken row of houses stood between us and the harbour, and where the eye encountered all sorts of stratagems, such as pale-blue and pink underwear cakewalking on a clothesline ... it was most satisfying to make out among the jumbled angles of roofs and walls, a splendid ship’s funnel, showing from behind the clothesline as something in a scrambled picture – Find What the Sailor Has Hidden – that the finder cannot unsee once it has been seen.   

You really can't have too much Nabokov in a forum.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on December 29, 2019, 11:31:53 PM
  There, in front of us, where a broken row of houses stood between us and the harbour, and where the eye encountered all sorts of stratagems, such as pale-blue and pink underwear cakewalking on a clothesline ... it was most satisfying to make out among the jumbled angles of roofs and walls, a splendid ship’s funnel, showing from behind the clothesline as something in a scrambled picture – Find What the Sailor Has Hidden – that the finder cannot unsee once it has been seen.   

You really can't have too much Nabokov in a forum.
FIFY.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on December 30, 2019, 01:02:47 PM
Heh.  I don't disagree. 

This last lines should be Nabokov, but it's Milan Kundera....

"Up out of the lampshade, startled by the overhead light, flew a large nocturnal butterfly that began circling the room. The strains of the piano and violin rose up weakly from below."


Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on January 05, 2020, 12:59:27 PM
Watched On the Beach,  due to current events and curious how it held up some 55 years after its premiere. 

The film is stiff and clunky in places,  but it has its thought-provoking moments.  The Rube Goldberg thing with the window shade and coke bottle was ridiculous but I have to give credit for a sort of existential joke there, as in we're all looking for signals of civilization in what can be random beeps. Ava Gardner, as always, mesmerizing, here as a hot mess who struggles with self loathing and Peck's shell of denial that his family is gone. Peck seems to have trouble, as an actor, hitting his marks, and somehow never fully grapples with the awfulness of what is coming down. Also, why must Australia must be represented by one song that is surely one that even tavern drunks have grown tired of? I would have enjoyed a scene where a bunch of roughnecks set upon the trout fishing crew that keep drinking and singing it endlessly.

Astaire's acting is underwhelming, though he does offer some ruminations on the folly of humankind and our penchant for wars that nobody really wants...his words still seem applicable. The Grand Prix race is rather hokey, and we are supposed to believe an egghead professor, if dropped into a well-tuned Ferrari, will emerge victorious. It's oddly dull and would have done no harm to the film if left in the cutting room. The film raises so many interesting possibilities of what people might do at the end of the world which are mostly unexplored. Maybe, in a sad way, that's the point: most opt for meekness and denial.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on January 06, 2020, 11:56:56 AM
The Real Lolita
The story of 11-year-old Sally Horner’s abduction changed the course of 20th-century literature. She just never got to tell it herself. (https://hazlitt.net/longreads/real-lolita)

Interesting read which offers some analysis of the novel Lolita as well.  I'd heard about this case which inspired Nabokov, but didn't know the full details or recall that it had occurred in NJ.

The read kind of makes you appreciate the Amber Alerts and priority put on child abduction these days.

It also put me in mind of the film An Education, though the girl there is 16 or 17, and not the 11 year Sally Horner of Camden or 13 year old Delores Haze of imaginative legend.

I should read Lolita again.  This would probably be the 5th time, but when you know it so well, you can focus on the language or the unreliability of Humbert or the parenthetical asides, etc. without worrying about the narrative thrust (mild pun intended).
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on January 07, 2020, 12:43:32 PM
Thanks, I plan to read The Real Lolita, and maybe reread the novel.

And this is worth breaking through a paywall for:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/style/people-are-seeing-cats-while-high-out-of-their-minds-these-are-their-stories/2020/01/05/d0ebfb3a-2beb-11ea-bcb3-ac6482c4a92f_story.html

This promises to be my favorite news story of 2020, unless a pretty powerful contender manages to usurp it in the next 11 months, 24 days. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on February 05, 2020, 09:04:24 PM
Farewell Kirk Douglas.  First sighted by this film fan impaled on a hay bailer in the mid sixties.   He was,  that is.   I was sitting in a comfortable chair.   Watching The List of Adrian Messenger. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on February 05, 2020, 10:40:39 PM
One of my heroes died today, Mr Kirk Douglas. He attended the same acting school that I attended, The American Academy of Dramatic Arts. Lauren Bacall, who attended the AADA with Kirk helped him to get his big break. Spartacus is my favorite movie. Rest in Peace Mr Douglas, you live forever in your work.

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on February 05, 2020, 10:50:54 PM
Ace in the Hole is great.  Kirk's best imo
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on February 11, 2020, 12:40:34 PM
Just moving the Parasite Won Lady Wakasa Would Be Happy chat out of Trump Admin and over here, where it belongs. 

I have seen neither Parasite nor Marriage Story, nor Judy, but already am convinced that Laura Dern deserved her win in MS.  She was so outstanding in Big Little Lies, as the sympathetic neurotic bitch, that I've come to assume there is little she cannot do. 

The main rumble I'm hearing from film buffs is that Hollywood will lay laurels on an Asian film, but it won't actually recognize Asian actors.  I'm not sure that's racist so much as simple lack of name recognition (which, sadly, is sometimes paired with difficulty of face recognition) 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on February 11, 2020, 01:08:10 PM
Just moving the Parasite Won Lady Wakasa Would Be Happy chat out of Trump Admin and over here, where it belongs. 

I have seen neither Parasite nor Marriage Story, nor Judy, but already am convinced that Laura Dern deserved her win in MS.  She was so outstanding in Big Little Lies, as the sympathetic neurotic bitch, that I've come to assume there is little she cannot do. 

The main rumble I'm hearing from film buffs is that Hollywood will lay laurels on an Asian film, but it won't actually recognize Asian actors.  I'm not sure that's racist so much as simple lack of name recognition (which, sadly, is sometimes paired with difficulty of face recognition)
I have seen Marriage Story and without judging it comparatively to performances I have not seen - actually, will not see: I have 0 interest in the movie Joker or performances by Squnty McPigface - Driver and ScarJo would have been deserving of an award. First Noah B movie I have watched all the way through.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on February 11, 2020, 10:25:20 PM
Seems like a fairly weak year.   I was much underwhelmed by Once Upon a Time.   And admittedly haven't seen a fair amount.  But I'm not interested in Joker or Parasite. And don't think Marriage Story or Jo Jo Hitler are going to make a major difference,  though plan to see them.

American Factory was good, mainly because of the access and issues (culture clash,  union busting),  but there were also areas where it skimmed over things and didn't get into details.  For example, worker safety issues.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on February 17, 2020, 10:29:48 AM
...or performances by Squinty McPigface...

I understand a man's need to lay down a smokescreen for the wife.    No need for her to know of your secret infatuation with the lovely and talented Renee.   Nobly,  you cast yourself as a disdainful bachelor in an Austen novel, ever contemptuous of the heroine's charms...it almost convinced me!
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on February 17, 2020, 12:37:54 PM
...or performances by Squinty McPigface...

I understand a man's need to lay down a smokescreen for the wife.    No need for her to know of your secret infatuation with the lovely and talented Renee.   Nobly,  you cast yourself as a disdainful bachelor in an Austen novel, ever contemptuous of the heroine's charms...it almost convinced me!
I call her Squinty McPigface because she squints. And has a pig face.

I note for the record you knew exactly who I was referring to.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on February 17, 2020, 05:46:41 PM
When Hairy Met Squinty

Boz, everyone knows who you mean because you've been calling her that for years.   

Check out Rose Williams in "Sanditon" -- those squinty pig-girls are hot!   

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on February 24, 2020, 12:46:01 PM
Netflix is officially evil.

https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rebecca_(upcoming_film)
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on February 24, 2020, 04:04:12 PM
Which version do you prefer?   

Or is this about Nutflux's thing about limiting theatrical release?
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on February 24, 2020, 04:07:00 PM
It's a Hitchcock thing,  isn't it?   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on February 24, 2020, 04:48:11 PM
It's a Hitchcock thing,  isn't it?
it is a destroy your own history thing.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on February 29, 2020, 11:36:00 AM
Roman Polanski rakes in awards at the Cesars (French  Oscars).   Not sitting well with many,  including Me2 folk.  Some actresses walked out of the ceremony. 

Rose Williams is my favorite squinty pigface.  I suspect therell be a second season of Sanditon.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on March 02, 2020, 02:29:02 PM
James Lipton died, that is sad, he was great. I attended an interview that he did with Clint Eastwood, I went with my Uncle Dennis, we went down from Lancaster to Los Angeles in my motorhome, and James interviewed Clint for about 7 hours at the Geffen Playhouse. Our seats were right behind Clint's wife and family who were there. It was awesome. Then, after watching James interview Clint, we took the motorhome to the beach and we spent the night at the beach, it was great. So that is my memory from the time that I saw James Lipton do an interview, it is a good memory. May he rest in peace.

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on March 09, 2020, 12:12:45 PM
Max.von Sydow loses at chess.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/03/09/entertainment/actor-max-von-sydow-dead-scli-intl/index.html
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on March 09, 2020, 01:03:55 PM
Maybe he should have exorcised more?
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on March 23, 2020, 08:54:39 PM
Midsommar

What a waste of talent to put Florence Pugh in this inept pastiche of Nordic legends, folk tales, Bergman, and The Wicker Man (the 1973 one). It is relentlessly grindingly soul-numbingly weird, as it seems to plumb dark depths of the Swedish psyche that, really, should be allowed to fester in peace. In this modern-but-ancient-rooted commune in central Sweden, a midsummer Festival happens every year, but this year's is one they only do every 90 years when they go all out on ritual suicides, human sacrifices, sex with strangers, putting your pubic hair in a pie for that special fellah you're interested in, guzzling hallucinogens, and gutting bears so they can stuff bad boyfriends into the sticky remains before setting them on fire and having a nice group wail (think of that eerie wailing scene in Persona multiplied by several hundred.). That's just a small sample of what goes on, as our American heroine does her level best to not be a party pooper and navigate the awkward social situations which, as you might imagine, arise frequently.

Anyway, I hate this movie, hate that I felt some fascination and even some titillation as I watched, and hope all of you can watch it too so that we can all join together in hating it. I also hate that the land of my ancestors (central Sweden) was played by some fields in Hungary. That's just not right.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on April 15, 2020, 06:48:42 PM
So... "Contagion" worth a re-watch?   

What are your favorite pandemic movies?   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on April 15, 2020, 07:16:26 PM
Never watched in the first place.

Not sure about the movie, but Poe's Masque of the Red Death makes for interesting social distancing reading.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on April 15, 2020, 09:04:18 PM
Heh.  Poe folks should pay heed.

I watched "Contagion" because Marion Cotillard.   Spoiler:  it's the bat's fault.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on April 16, 2020, 11:43:14 AM
Right.   Bat drops banana.   Pig eats banana.   Chef slaughters pig then doesn't wash,  and shakes hands with Gwyneth Paltrow.  Who goes back to US home and dies, transmitting all along the way.   Say what you will,  Soderbergh knows how to shoot movies with neck-wrenching scene changes.  I even liked Haywire,  which is a guilty pleasure.   

Anyway,  the moral is Wash your goddamned hands.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on April 28, 2020, 12:21:30 PM
The many deaths of Sean Bean (a propos of a digression in the Trump thread)....

(https://mymodernmet.com/wp/wp-content/uploads/2019/09/sean-bean-dies-every-film-3.gif)

(if that gif doesn't load,  it's in this article)

https://mymodernmet.com/sean-bean-dies-in-every-movie/

As the article reports,  he LIVES in "World on Fire. " 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on May 11, 2020, 06:17:38 PM
Planet of the Humans

Free,  on YouTube.  Nuanced contrarian look at alternatives to fossil fuel,  and at "greenwashing. " 

Michael Moore's new film (though not directed by him).   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on June 13, 2020, 12:44:19 PM
I guess The King of Staten Island has gone to VOD,  and won't be in theaters,  but I'm hoping the distribution co will rethink this in a few months.  Theaters are partly opening here and I've really missed seeing current releases.  TKoSI sounds pretty good to me.   I notice one of the firefighters in the film is played by Steve Buscemi,  who was an actual firefighter prior to his acting career.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on July 26, 2020, 02:31:26 PM
Olivia de Haviland dies at 104. Reportedly her last words were "At least I outlived that bitch by six years."
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on July 26, 2020, 03:46:00 PM
A stupid petty grudge.   Fontaine won for "Suspicion" and beat out Olivia, who'd been nominated for "Hold back the Dawn. "    And was, at that time, the big star in the family.   So Joan went and messed up the pecking order.   I've read elsewhere (probably back in 2013, when Fontaine died) that the sisters never got along all that well,  but that it was the Hitchcock film that really broke them up.    Probably further chapped Olivia's ass, later,  that nobody much remembered HBtD while Suspicion is a classic.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on July 26, 2020, 05:57:29 PM
She always has Melanie. Cancel culture notwithstanding.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on July 27, 2020, 02:56:47 PM
If you want to watch a good Christian movie, I recommend "The Scarlet and the Black" starring Gregory Peck as a priest at the Vatican in Rome who saves allied soldiers and Jews from the Nazis during World War II. It is a great movie, and it was shot on location in Rome. I highly recommend the film. Maybe you can find it on Netflix or other network.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Scarlet_and_the_Black

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on July 27, 2020, 10:24:29 PM
Words cannot explain how much I adore every single frame of Knives Out. From the almost imperceptible barking of the dogs over the March of the Logos to Don Johnson's black eye, to the coffee mug as a framing device to  Chris Evans's perfect line reading of the single word "Shit".
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on July 28, 2020, 11:55:23 AM
The sigboth and I both loved it.   I could have said we hated it,  but then I would have had to involuntarily vomit up breakfast.  I'm going to watch it again.   Sounds like there's a sequel greenlit, in which Foghorn Leghorn Benoit Blanc will solve another mystery. 

Not sure a sequel can succeed at so many things... a pitch-perfect eccentric whodunit,  a superb sendup  of the classic twisty plotted mystery,  a clever metaphor of the sclerotic and racist subcultures of America,  the brilliant cinematographic rendition of a house as America,  the final take-down and exorcism of all things Trumpian,  and as you note the clever framings... including the most literal sense of framing as Harlan's portrait is altered at the end to a bit of a smirk.   I liked the "something is afoot" double entendre, the plot trajectory of a baseball,  every family member naming a different SA country of origin for Marta, the donut analogy...and others that will come to me on a repeat viewing.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on July 28, 2020, 12:45:15 PM
All those things. Plus the very first thing Blanc looks at when he meets Marta, which explains why he keeps her close in his investigation: he needs her to determine the arc. And Michael Shannon's alternating whipped and intense performance ("I am not.eating one iota of shit!" "Have another cookie! Maybe Harlan left you a cold glass of milk in his will!"). And the way Meg's betrayal causes Marta to toss in with Ransom. And Chris Evans's sweater. And the titles of Harlan's novels. And Lakieth Stanfeld's response to Noah Segran's fan boy moments. As an aside, I will never, for the rest of his career, not notice whenever Stanfeld's character tells someone to get out. And Walt and Linda both claiming they were outvoted about inviting Marta to the funeral. And the way the movie goes from Whodunnit to Crime Drama in a flip of a coin. And then back.

I think Johnson can fashion a clever and entertaining whodunnit but I doubt he can totally recapture the magic, especially without Ana de Armas. She worked so well with Craig. If only someone would pair the two in a blockbuster movie franchise... I would die for such a movie, if I had the time for that.

Actually, why not include her? Every Holmes needs a Doctor Watson. Or Nurse Watson.

Streaming on Prime, everyone. Watch.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on August 03, 2020, 09:51:34 AM
RIP to my doppelganger Wilford Brimley.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on August 03, 2020, 03:25:01 PM
Yes.   He was 50 when he played a senior in Cocoon.   Somehow,  maybe the gravitas of the gray moustache, allowed him to look seventyish for nearly four decades of his career.   That dip in the Antarean life energy pool probably gave him a few extra years.

My doppelganger has become a plucked chicken,  which makes me wonder if a moustache would help much.   Perhaps a goatee,  to cover the wattle. 

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Echo4 on August 06, 2020, 01:26:20 AM
Yes.   He was 50 when he played a senior in Cocoon.   Somehow,  maybe the gravitas of the gray moustache, allowed him to look seventyish for nearly four decades of his career.   That dip in the Antarean life energy pool probably gave him a few extra years.


I'd had no idea he was so young when he played that part!

But he'd have been well over 100 now had he been as old as he played.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Echo4 on August 06, 2020, 01:27:21 AM
Apparently, in the 60s the Beatles wanted to do The Lord of the Rings.

They wanted to cast Paul, Ringo, George, and John as Frodo, Sam, Gandalf, and Gollum, respectively.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on August 08, 2020, 04:02:37 PM
Finally saw Dunkirk, which I liked more than most Nolan movies. My biggest problem, every time there was a new Britisb soldier, I would think, "That's Benedict Cumberbatch". It turns out none of them were.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on August 09, 2020, 10:39:25 AM
Hahaha.   

Sometimes have the reverse problem,  as when we watched The Death of Stalin and I kept thinking the guy who played Molotov looked a bit like Michael Palin.   But it turned out to actually be Palin.   

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on August 09, 2020, 11:50:17 AM
I watched all of Light Between Two Oceans thinking it starred Jude Law, who turned out to be Michael Fassbinder.

Death of Stalin is by far the funniest movie that ends with one of its leads being shot in the head, his body drenched in gasoline and and set afire. But it was Beria, so, cool.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on August 10, 2020, 12:39:55 AM
Yep.  One of the best films of 2017, and somewhat underrated.   Aside from the terrific screenplay,  and no-weak-link ensemble (no idea why they would cast Buscemi as Krushchev,  but he absolutely killed it),  I was also impressed by the soundtrack which I spent most of the film thinking was excerpts from Shostakovich, or Prokofiev,  but was in fact original composition by some Brit I'd never heard of.   

And it also had flawless timing,  every comic beat,  every good line,  lands at just the right moment.    I remember we watched it without pausing,  because there was simply no place for that,  it was unstoppable.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on August 10, 2020, 06:25:04 AM
Almost as good as Iannucci's previous In the Loop. Makes me wish I had access to whatever Veep was on.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on August 10, 2020, 07:15:43 AM
Hmm.  Death of Stalin kind of happened without me.  I was a distant spectator.  There were one or two scenes I liked, and most of the rest just kept me waiting for something to like/engage with.  I should rewatch it, if I can dredge up the dvd. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on August 10, 2020, 11:18:34 AM
I liked TDoS.    My guess is you have to be in the mood for relentless mockery of power, for seeing the men who chase after power as buffoons.   My second guess is that three years of Trump and ilk will render the movie more accessible.   The overall tone seemed Melbrooksian to me, with the same sharp jabs to vanity and dignity.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on August 17, 2020, 08:57:59 AM
I read a tweet about a New Yorker article about you. 

Knives Out is indeed worth a second viewing.   As with many twisty plots, the second viewing is one where you enjoy the ride even more when you know where the road is going.  And there are there pleasures of a fine script,  savoring lines you may have forgotten or which weren't quite absorbed the first time around.   I liked the bit about the cops being truffle pigs while Benoit boasts of a technique of anticipating the terminus of Gravity's Rainbow, a book he hasn't read ("nobody has").   And then the recurring references to this arc,  to the Newtonian/Pynchonian physics of a flying droplet of blood or hurled baseball or flung Go board or,  finally,  a projectile of truth-vomit impacting the guilty.   

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 01, 2020, 10:22:38 PM

Ianucci has done it again. Creator of "Veep" and Alan Partridge, director of the wickedly funny The Death of Stalin, and In the Loop, and now a delightful reinvention of Dickens that seems faithful to the spirit of the original classic. Fine performances from an ensemble that includes Ben Whishaw (as the humble and oily Uriah Heep), Hugh Laurie (he IS Mr Dick) , Tilda Swinton, Peter Capaldi, and Dev Patel.

An odd experience attending a theatrical showing. We were the only audience at a late afternoon showing on a Tuesday, and other rooms I peeked in (to see a baffling three minutes of "Tenet" among others) were similarly sparse. Signs instructed us to remain masked during the film, unless we were consuming refreshments. Given the empty seats around me, I decided to define air as a refreshment and happily slurped it up throughout the show.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on September 06, 2020, 07:23:24 PM
Watched I'm Thinking of Ending Things on Netflix. Or started to, before I thought of the title half way through and decided that the title was an apt suggestion and did.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 06, 2020, 09:04:30 PM
Ha.   Not every rock that's tossed in a Charlie Kaufman lapidary tumbler is a diamond.   I was going to watch because Jessie Buckley,  but then someone described the film as "Lynchian" and I backed away.   Still,  Ms Buckley has been terrific in everything of hers I've watched - she broke my heart in "Chernobyl."   Into small pieces that squidged around on the floor whimpering and leaking fluid.   

Which reminds me it's time to feed the cats.   

Watching "Adrift" tonight,  because I can't say no to anything with maritime misadventures or catastrophes.   

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on September 06, 2020, 10:09:18 PM
Ah. That is where I saw her. We also have Joni Thrombey and Knox Harrington. But the acting is irrelevant.

Lynchian. Ah, that explains my utter distaste. An accurate description.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on September 07, 2020, 10:27:52 AM
Looking forward to I'm Thinking of Ending Things.
No interest in Mulan.
And pretty apathetic about Tenet, which I'll likely get around to at some point next year.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 09, 2020, 12:27:38 AM
IToET (ok,  I was a little curious,  so I started watching)

 I had to bail when the woman turns into Pauline Kael in the car driving home,  starts ranting about Gena Rowlands.   Meaningless grotesquerie -- seems to be self-indulgently bent on  subverting any connections we viewers might start to make.  Quasi-humorous moments that don't really amuse but rather steal uneasy laughs from you. 



Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on September 09, 2020, 12:34:20 AM
IToET (ok,  I was a little curious,  so I started watching)

 I had to bail when the woman turns into Pauline Kael in the car driving home,  starts ranting about Gena Rowlands.   Meaningless grotesquerie -- seems to be self-indulgently bent on  subverting any connections we viewers might start to make.  Quasi-humorous moments that don't really amuse but rather steal uneasy laughs from you.
You made it further than I did.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 09, 2020, 09:51:50 AM
I was being stubborn,  kept thinking there was some reason Jessie and Jesse were a couple (aside from being two actors with homophonic names).   The only way a breakup story makes sense is if you have some understanding of why they're a couple in the first place.   

And you can't have a film where every moment is a "meta" one, where you are standing outside of the film.   That's why,  as you said,  the acting is irrelevant. 

What a sad misfire for Kaufman.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on September 10, 2020, 04:20:22 PM
The Oscars will require films seeking to qualify for Best Picture to meet new diversity standards in order to be considered, the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences announced Tuesday. The new rules are aimed at increasing representation for underrepresented groups in the film industry.

Starting in 2024, Best Picture nominees must feature women, people of color, LGBTQ+ people or people with disabilities in prominent roles both in front of and behind the camera. The Academy created four representation categories that will gauge the level of diversity in a film’s cast, its production crew, its marketing team and the opportunities it provides young filmmakers. To qualify, a movie must satisfy two of the four categories.


https://news.yahoo.com/oscars-diversity-rules-progress-or-patronizing-140825533.html (https://news.yahoo.com/oscars-diversity-rules-progress-or-patronizing-140825533.html)


Remember, film-makers, it's only ART if it meets the political standards of the Academy.

Saving Private Ryan? No LGBQT, no women, no people with disabilities, no people of color! What a terrible movie!!!


A Beautiful Mind? No LGBQT, no people of color...women, but the main character is schizophrenic, so that checks 2 of the 4 boxes!

But wait We have to look off camera....directed by Ron Howard. And though based on a book written by a woman, the screenplay was written by a man. Music by a man, produced by a man, edited by two men, cinematography by a man...

Sorry. You don't qualify for Best Picture.

Terrible movie by the new standards.

 

Gladiator....All Quiet on the Western Front...Casablanca...

See how this works?

Fuck off, Academy.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 10, 2020, 05:17:18 PM
More generally,  it seems contrary to whole idea of art as a free and unfettered exploration of the human experience.   Such specific requirements seem to be antithetical to creativity.   I mean,  sure there should be ethnic minorities and people all over the gender spectrum and so on,  working in film,  and unhindered in pursuing film careers,  but this seems too formula driven.   How would this work with,  say,  a period drama about a time and place where some of those groups were simply not there?   Would a producer now require that Scott's failed South Pole expedition be rewritten with a lesbian,  a person of color,  and towing someone in a wheelchair?   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on September 10, 2020, 07:50:05 PM
More generally,  it seems contrary to whole idea of art as a free and unfettered exploration of the human experience.   Such specific requirements seem to be antithetical to creativity.   I mean,  sure there should be ethnic minorities and people all over the gender spectrum and so on,  working in film,  and unhindered in pursuing film careers,  but this seems too formula driven.   How would this work with,  say,  a period drama about a time and place where some of those groups were simply not there?   Would a producer now require that Scott's failed South Pole expedition be rewritten with a lesbian,  a person of color,  and towing someone in a wheelchair?

Agreed.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on September 10, 2020, 08:18:34 PM
More generally,  it seems contrary to whole idea of art as a free and unfettered exploration of the human experience.   Such specific requirements seem to be antithetical to creativity.   I mean,  sure there should be ethnic minorities and people all over the gender spectrum and so on,  working in film,  and unhindered in pursuing film careers,  but this seems too formula driven.   How would this work with,  say,  a period drama about a time and place where some of those groups were simply not there?   Would a producer now require that Scott's failed South Pole expedition be rewritten with a lesbian,  a person of color,  and towing someone in a wheelchair?
I think your last part is silly - even from the blurb the off screen roles for inclusion are pretty broad. The onscreen inclusion parts probably aren't going to be uniform and should include some recognition of the needs of the story being told. Or else the Gettysburg remake will wind up featuring an all transgender wheelchair brigade taking part in Pickett's Charge.

They are not applying the rules for four years, and there are at least two years of preliminary data being collected. I suspect we are dealing with reasonable people and the final rules will take artistic vision into account. No.reason to get one's.panties in a bunch quite yet. It is a commendable goal. There is time for the details.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 10, 2020, 08:48:02 PM
I was being silly,  for rhetorical purposes, and I do take your point re "reasonable people," even if I'm never sure where Hollywood keeps them.   I confess I skimmed and missed the four years,  which does somewhat de-elasticize my panties.  I think if they would focus on that one bit about enhanced opportunity for young filmmakers,  you'd get quite a ways towards demographic broadening and some of the other aspirations would follow.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on September 11, 2020, 05:05:42 AM
Of course they are not forcing anyone to do anything or impeding folks from making whatever art they want.  They are simply saying if you want an award from our org, you'll need to be inclusive.  Not many films are actually vying for a Best Picture Oscar.
It's aspirational and trendsetting.  I don't know the process, but I suspect this was voted on by industry insiders and filmmakers/actors who make up the Academy and make films.
Title: Re: Movies-Almost Famous
Post by: bankshot1 on September 14, 2020, 10:40:01 PM
Almost Famous-Anita's Albums

I posted this elsewhere about 2 months ago and am importing it to Elba's shores for SnG.

So I'm re-watching Almost Famous, for the gazillionth time, a really good coming of age movie, about a 15 year old wannabe rock critic to be and his life on the road and adventures with a rock n roll band. Most of you folks probably know the movie, if you don't, watch it, most won't be disappointed. Its sweet and funny, has a pretty good cast, and has pretty good sound track.

But as to the thread title, watch this brief scene (below) as William (the kid writer) says good-bye to his older sister (Zooey Deschanel) as she needs to break away from her mom, (Frances McDormand) leave the nest, and literally flies away. She becomes a stewardess.

in any case, sis, a somewhat free-spirit, tells William, to look under his bed and

"it will set you free"

ANITA SAYS GOODBYE SCENE-SAFE

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmVaCbxkd34 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vmVaCbxkd34)

After she bolts with a young Tom Brady look-a-like, William goes to his bedroom and finds a bag filled with albums. and he starts to flip through Anita's stash.

Listed below are the albums we see (in order)

Pet Sounds, The Beach Boys
Sweet Baby James, James Taylor
High Tide and Green Grass The Stones
Get Yer Ya-Ya’s Out! The Stones
Zep II, Led Zeppelin
Axis Bold as Love, The Jimi Hendrix Experience
Wheels of Fire, Cream
Blue, Joni Mitchell
Blonde on Blonde, Bob Dylan
Tommy, The Who

After getting to Tommy he opens it up and finds a note from Anita which reads,

"Listen to Tommy with a candle burning, and you will see your entire future"

For the record (heh) I had all this vinyl WBW, new with cellophane, WITH the exception of Joni Mitchell's Blue.

After watching and saying, had it, had it, had it, etc, my first thought was there's no Beatles.

No Beatles?

No Beatles-Cameron are you shitting me?

Everyone had a Beatles album, in particular as these albums were from roughly 1965-1973, everyone had Sgt Peppers.

And there was no Motown.

No Aretha, no Smokey, no Marvin

Cameron, what's going on?

In any case, it got me to thinking, if you had to represent the 10 albums from the period, as the director Cameron Crowe did, to help young William see the future, which albums from this list would you keep and which would you swap out and for what?

To keep it simple, and keeping with the movie which is set in 1973, let's say you need to keep at least 5 of Crowe's albums (fuck it, if you really want an original 10 album playlist -feel free I guess) but keep it in the approximate time period of 1965-1973.

Since everyone had Sgt Peppers this will be a freebie bonus for everyone

I'm going to swap 5 albums

Doors (1) IN--
Blue OUT (I didn't have it any way)

Live at Fillmore East Allman Bros in
Sweet Baby James OUT

Are You Experienced IN
Axis out (Hendrix for Hendrix swap)

Let it Bleed IN
Get Yer Ya Yas OUT (Stone's swap)

Aretha I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You - IN
Zep2 OUT

So I have
1-Doors 1
2-Allman Bros-LAFE
3-Hendrix Are you Experienced
4-Stones-Let it Bleed
5-Aretha I Never Loved A Man The Way I Love You
6-Beach Boys Pet Sounds
7-Stones-High Tide and GG
8-Cream Wheels of Fire
9-Dylan-Blonde on Blonde
10-Who-Tommy

Bonus track
11-Sgt Pepper

I'm not sure this is the stash I'm going to leave young William, as there are so many great albums to choose from. (Who's Next, Layla, Cheap Thrills, Janis and Big Brother, Otis Redding, Iron Butterfly) But its what I came up with on the fly.


What albums would you leave young William to broaden his horizons and to set him free?


As an aside, yesterday I gave my collection of vintage '60s and 70s albums to my kid.





Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on September 14, 2020, 11:04:54 PM
A young woman from that era would definitely have had Tapestry.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bankshot1 on September 14, 2020, 11:25:20 PM
As I recall boz-you had a close relationship with Zooey

Anita probably would have had Tapestry

and maybe the Monkees too

But Anita was pretty cutting edge, so maybe not

I was a Stones guy, but still can't get over 2 Stones albums and no Beatles in Anita's stash.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on September 15, 2020, 05:39:11 AM
I like the selection Cameron uses.  It's not the optimal set of albums (many better Stones than Get Yer Ya Ya's out), so it seems more authentic, more like the random collection of albums someone would genuinely own. 

And between my brother, my sister and myself about 3 or 4 years later, our house had exactly 1 Beatles album, as my brother own the White Album.  We weren't Beatles fans, and besides you heard their songs on the radio all the time anyway.

As for your Q.
Carol King was huge.
Then again so was the 5th Dimension in 1973.
Elton John was huge, but I guess his breakthrough Goodbye Yellow Brick Road just came out in '73.
Alice Cooper's School's Out (1972) was big (and '73's Billion Dollar Babies -- two of the first albums my older brother ever owned)

I'll think of more when I get back later.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: Hairy Lime on September 15, 2020, 09:28:59 AM
As I recall boz-you had a close relationship with Zooey
Time and multiple TROs have taken their toll.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bankshot1 on September 15, 2020, 10:03:49 AM
As I recall boz-you had a close relationship with Zooey
Time and multiple TROs have taken their toll.

what was the deal she couldn't get within 50 ft of you?
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 15, 2020, 10:07:04 AM
In a minimalist buddhist phase,  I parted with most of my vinyl and around a thousand volumes,  some of the proceeds helped pay for grad school.   I can still flip through some of the LPs mentally.   Some would more likely have been (as far as the movie cache is concerned) bequeathed by a brother than a sister,  e. g. Deep Purple,  "Machine Head, " or Zep IV.    But,  yes,  I can see The Doors in there (the keyboard intro of RotS lives in my head), the Moondance album of VM,  "Tapestry" absolutely, some Dylan,  "Disraeli Gears," maybe "Cosmo's Factory" for some CCR, and the White Album.   And,  based on sisters I knew in 1973, have to add Maria Muldaur.  Cactus is our friend. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 15, 2020, 10:09:52 AM
As I recall boz-you had a close relationship with Zooey
Time and multiple TROs have taken their toll.

what was the deal she couldn't get within 50 ft of you?

He was required to wear clothes under his raincoat.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bankshot1 on September 15, 2020, 10:18:26 AM
I like the selection Cameron uses.  It's not the optimal set of albums (many better Stones than Get Yer Ya Ya's out), so it seems more authentic, more like the random collection of albums someone would genuinely own. 

And between my brother, my sister and myself about 3 or 4 years later, our house had exactly 1 Beatles album, as my brother own the White Album.  We weren't Beatles fans, and besides you heard their songs on the radio all the time anyway.

As for your Q.
Carol King was huge.
Then again so was the 5th Dimension in 1973.
Elton John was huge, but I guess his breakthrough Goodbye Yellow Brick Road just came out in '73.
Alice Cooper's School's Out (1972) was big (and '73's Billion Dollar Babies -- two of the first albums my older brother ever owned)

I'll think of more when I get back later.

I think Crowe's construction of Anita's portfolio is fine, but a little curious.

in that regard, I'm not sure what optimal is, they may have been his favorite albums as a 15 YO kid, or his sister's favorites, if he had a sister, who gifted him the records.
I got no idea.

I just thought no Beatles, no Sgt Peppers was interesting, as it was, and maybe stlil is considered one of the greatest, albums of all-time. (#1 on Rolling Stones 500 Greatest Albums).

He decided to give a sticky finger to the Fab Four.

In any case doing a little internet sleuthing I found some interesting factoids.

the album scene is 1969, Ya Yas came out in 1970, and Blue didn't come out until 1971.

as to the Stones, having a 2nd Stones album in Anita's collection, (Get Yer Ya Yas) , which seems to fall slighly outside the story timeline, but may have been a nod to Lester Bangs, who in his Rolling Stone review of the album wrote, (from wiki) "I have no doubt that it's the best rock concert ever put on record."

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bankshot1 on September 15, 2020, 10:34:19 AM
In a minimalist buddhist phase,  I parted with most of my vinyl and around a thousand volumes,  some of the proceeds helped pay for grad school.   I can still flip through some of the LPs mentally.   Some would more likely have been (as far as the movie cache is concerned) bequeathed by a brother than a sister,  e. g. Deep Purple,  "Machine Head, " or Zep IV.    But,  yes,  I can see The Doors in there (the keyboard intro of RotS lives in my head), the Moondance album of VM,  "Tapestry" absolutely, some Dylan,  "Disraeli Gears," maybe "Cosmo's Factory" for some CCR, and the White Album.   And,  based on sisters I knew in 1973, have to add Maria Muldaur.  Cactus is our friend.

bart-there were so many great albums in that time period its about impossible to have the definitive list of 10 that perfectly capture the era or the memories or whatever. 

I had my last "album-flip" a couple of days ago as I wanted to say good-bye to some dear old friends who were off to a new home. 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on September 15, 2020, 01:11:45 PM
The Beatles became a studio band and the film is about touring and concert-going, so maybe that's why the Beatles were left off.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bankshot1 on September 15, 2020, 01:20:15 PM
The Beatles became a studio band and the film is about touring and concert-going, so maybe that's why the Beatles were left off.

That's the only reason I came up with, same reason the Berry Gordy "produced" Motown sound doesn't show-up either.

Still its hard to imagine that in '69 when Anita gifts her albums to William, she (Crowe) might not have one Beatle album (Revolver, Rubber Soul, Abbey Road) in the stash.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 15, 2020, 01:49:11 PM
Then there were bands that, as I remember them, toured endlessly but I don't recall seeing in anyone's LP portfolio - e.g. Moody Blues.  I know they were very successful and popular, but somehow I only remember them for Nights in White Satin.  You heard them on the radio, that was it. 

Jefferson Airplane - Surrealistic Pillow would be plausibly in the portfolio.
The first CSN and CSNY album, ditto.

As you say, Banks, there's no definitive list of ten.  Especially in a genre exploding in all sorts of directions. 

Dark Side of the Moon would have just been out.

Jethro Tull - Thick as a Brick (a little sorry I didn't keep that one, just for the entertaining album cover and inside "newspaper")   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bankshot1 on September 15, 2020, 02:37:15 PM
Then there were bands that, as I remember them, toured endlessly but I don't recall seeing in anyone's LP portfolio - e.g. Moody Blues.  I know they were very successful and popular, but somehow I only remember them for Nights in White Satin.  You heard them on the radio, that was it. 

Jefferson Airplane - Surrealistic Pillow would be plausibly in the portfolio.
The first CSN and CSNY album, ditto.

As you say, Banks, there's no definitive list of ten.  Especially in a genre exploding in all sorts of directions. 

Dark Side of the Moon would have just been out.

Jethro Tull - Thick as a Brick (a little sorry I didn't keep that one, just for the entertaining album cover and inside "newspaper")

I had Days of Future Passed and saw the Moody Blues in concert with The Steve Miller Band in '68. IMO Steve Miller, who I was less familiar with, stole the show.

with Anita's affinity for the harmony of Simon & Garfunkle and with Joni Mitchell in the portfolio, CSN would make sense for her sensibilities.

I wonder whether Anita was into the Airplane or the SF acid-rock, I see her more smoking pot and getting off to Buffalo Springfield.

i saw Jethro Tull in concert and they sucked. (had the Aqualung album)
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on September 15, 2020, 02:59:18 PM
Should have some Sly & the Family Stone.
&
Marvin Gaye What's Going On

But I guess music was still pretty segregated then.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bankshot1 on September 15, 2020, 03:22:40 PM
Should have some Sly & the Family Stone.
&
Marvin Gaye What's Going On

But I guess music was still pretty segregated then.

From OP

And there was no Motown.

No Aretha, no Smokey, no Marvin

Cameron, what's going on?


I saw Sly etal at Woodstock-they were jaw dropping great

that Saturday night-Sunday AM is arguably the greatest night of rock n roll ever

Sly, Santana (who I did not see) and Cocker gave electrifying career jumping performances 
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on September 15, 2020, 10:45:18 PM
1973? Got to have some Bowie on that list. Good question, though. Have to think this one through.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on September 16, 2020, 10:29:16 AM
Steve Miller,  early phase,  when Boz Scaggs was with the band.   

I was at Woodstock,  too.   I remember getting my diaper changed while Santana played Soul Sacrifice.   Seriously,  that's pretty cool,  Banks.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bankshot1 on September 16, 2020, 10:43:35 AM
Steve Miller,  early phase,  when Boz Scaggs was with the band.   

I was at Woodstock,  too.   I remember getting my diaper changed while Santana played Soul Sacrifice.   Seriously,  that's pretty cool,  Banks.

OCB-the line "somebody get me a cheeseburger" is one of my favorite RnR lyrics

Woodstock-Saturday afternoon I was having a cook-out, met a girl, went skinny-dipping, got high. bought a shit load of cheap wine and didn't get to the concert until about 8pm and missed Santana. I'm kind of pissed about that, but the lake felt great and the girl was pretty. 

After sobering up I saw an awesome concert for about the next 8 or so hours.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 17, 2020, 06:06:30 PM
(sister's vinyl in Almost Famous chat cont.)

I was reading something about Yusuf Islam today,  and was reminded that Tea for the Tillerman and/or Teaser and the Firecat would be sighted in many record collections in those days.   The jacket art for those is as clear in my visual memory as the guy with sticks on his back on the Zepp album. 

I was thirteen the year of Woodstock and wasn't quite at the cheap wine skinny dipping with girls phase though I'm sure I would have polled YES!! on all of those at the time.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bankshot1 on September 18, 2020, 01:50:57 PM
(sister's vinyl in Almost Famous chat cont.)

I was reading something about Yusuf Islam today,  and was reminded that Tea for the Tillerman and/or Teaser and the Firecat would be sighted in many record collections in those days.   The jacket art for those is as clear in my visual memory as the guy with sticks on his back on the Zepp album. 

I was thirteen the year of Woodstock and wasn't quite at the cheap wine skinny dipping with girls phase though I'm sure I would have polled YES!! on all of those at the time.

And I left out the good part!

Cat Stevens TFTT was a great album. I bought it upon the recco of a record store owner who said, "bankshot-you got to hear this" and I did and bought it and turned a lot my college buddies on to it.

And in the original Anita's Album thread, either I or someone else brought it up for young William to listen to.

Edit-one of my posts from that thread (re Cat S)

I think Anita's 10 (Crowe's) are mostly representative of the time and gives William a pretty good guide to an intro to 60s rock and popular music. I didn't expect Zappa and the Mothers or Bowie , but Joplin might have made the cut, or Aretha, Cat Stevens, The Supremes, or the lads from Liverpool.

Digging into my memories from 50+ years ago, even growing up in Boston, which with all the colleges was a center for music experimentation, most popular music was available on very mainstream WMEX, or WRKO in a pop 40-ish format. A lot of stuff wasn't readily available. It wasn't until early '68 when BCN went on air that my musical bar mitzvah took place and heard a lof stuff that wasn't played in more commercial venues.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on September 19, 2020, 05:22:32 AM
In the late 70's and 80's music was still fairly regional, except for the major national acts like Journey.

Sometimes I would make the effort to tune into a Philly station late at night in the late 70's and they were playing a lot of different music than NYC.  Philly turned me on to George Thorogood, from Delaware, who you never heard on a NYC station.  Another example, I barely knew Al Green and had barely heard of the Hi Records stable of soul until I moved to Chicago in 1988.  There it was standard stuff.

These regional cocoons were kind of odd.  I can understand it for small local indie bands (NJ had lots of them), but a lot of record labels mostly had regional sales back then.
Title: Re: Movies-Almost Famous
Post by: josh on September 19, 2020, 02:05:18 PM
Almost Famous-Anita's Albums


As an aside, yesterday I gave my collection of vintage '60s and 70s albums to my kid.

Wish I had a kid to give such things to. I am envious of those of you who do.

In 1971, I got my first album at all. Before that, it was all radio or older sibs' music. And at that, I have no memory of my older brother's having played music at all at home. If he did when at prep school or college, it would be news to me, if not shocking news. He was 5 years older and I was pretty much no longer around him from when I was almost 9.

My sister was only a couple years older. Even then, while I knew what 45s she had (and I have those, now), no memory of her playing them - though she must have.

My memories of music, instead, came first from listening to what the camp counselors would play over summers from 65-69, then off to prep school myself (til they invited me to leave), and college, where my musical tastes got educated.

In 1973, I would have listed:
Blood, Sweat, and Tears 3
Yes - Close to the Edge
John Denver - Rocky Mountain High
Don McLean - American Pie
Chicago - Chicago at Carnegie Hall --> I know, not the same thing, but it's what I got and loved.
Partridge Family - The Partridge Family Album

Neil Young - Harvest --> didn't own it, but it was on my top ten of things listened to
Carole King's Tapestry --> another I didn't own, but knew by heart at the time

I think the other album that would have shown up on my top ten most listened to that I can still come up with is not this genre:
Stravinsky's Firebird Suite, 1919 version, on the same Bernstein album with Rite of Spring and some Prokofiev. Not my favorite Prokofiev. I also listened to a ton of Petrushka.

And Pat Paulsen for President.
---------------

Now? Yes, almost all the albums you named would have shown up in a collection, had I had a stereo to play them on before I was 17, instead of a tinny cassette player. But I had no Beatles. No Stones. No Who.

I'd have had Let It Be and Sgt. Pepper. Tommy. Wildflowers (Judy Collins). Sounds of Silence. PPM's The Best of Peter, Paul and Mary: Ten Years Together. Many, many others I didn't know about then but do, now. King Crimson. Moody Blues... I could go on.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 19, 2020, 05:36:10 PM
It's funny how little Yes was recognized in the 70s in my neck of the woods.   The tranformed 80s Yes was more popular.   All I remember of 70s Yes was "Roundabout."

Stravinsky is a great one to have in any collection.   My parents loved Russian composers generally,  and that torch passed successfully to me.   

Partridge Family -- well,  you seem to have survived, reasonably intact.    Was more of a Monkees man meself,  so far as tv show bands go.   

BS&T -- some good covers of other bands/artists -- they incorporated some Prokofiev into their own songs,  too.  Very wide ranging in their motifs,  genres.    I didn't learn until recently,  when playing Erik Satie ("Gymnopedie") on the piano,  that they had adapted the Trois Gymnopedies  on an album.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on September 19, 2020, 08:26:16 PM
It's funny how little Yes was recognized in the 70s in my neck of the woods.   The tranformed 80s Yes was more popular.   All I remember of 70s Yes was "Roundabout."

Stravinsky is a great one to have in any collection.   My parents loved Russian composers generally,  and that torch passed successfully to me.   

Partridge Family -- well,  you seem to have survived, reasonably intact.    Was more of a Monkees man meself,  so far as tv show bands go.   

BS&T -- some good covers of other bands/artists -- they incorporated some Prokofiev into their own songs,  too.  Very wide ranging in their motifs,  genres.    I didn't learn until recently,  when playing Erik Satie ("Gymnopedie") on the piano,  that they had adapted the Trois Gymnopedies  on an album.   

Thinking on this (and being a Satie fan), I realize I could not do 10 bands, let alone 10 albums.

Byrds, ELP, Cream, Dr. Hook, The Band, CCR, CSN, etc.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on September 20, 2020, 05:55:36 AM
Circa 1977, as a pre-teen, some of the first albums I owned were Yes and ELO.  Then I think the Stones compilation High Tide and Green Grass.  I did get Some Girls when it was first released in Summer of '78.  And from there more classic Stones, Doors

My older brother had Alice Cooper's School's Out and Billion Dollar Babies circa '72/73, but then an inexplicable lull without albums for a few years until circa 1976/77, when he got on a big Aerosmith kick, along with The White Album, Dark Side of the Moon, Are You Experienced? and Lynyrd Skynyrd.

My brother was more selective than I was, with a much smaller collection, but fairly well chosen. 

I got both Goat's Head Soup and It's Only Rock and Roll (Xmas presents I asked for) before getting to the classic Stones period.  Basically a lot of guesswork and fumbling around and winging it.  I actually borrowed a cassette of Sticky Fingers from the library, and taped it to 8 track using microphones, but was too dense to realize that the basketball game I was watching in the same room was easily picked up in the background.  So I wound up with the Magic-Bird NCAA Final audio behind the Stones.  So March 26, 1979 was when I decided to pirate the library cassette copy of Sticky Fingers before I had to return it. 

Wish I kept that 8 track, it would be a very weird late 70's artifact.  I could probably sell it for thousands of ... pennies.  Maybe.  So people could laugh at what retards and technological doofuses folks were back in 1979.  8-tracks!
Title: Re: Movies-Almost Famous
Post by: bankshot1 on September 20, 2020, 04:53:04 PM
Almost Famous-Anita's Albums


As an aside, yesterday I gave my collection of vintage '60s and 70s albums to my kid.

Wish I had a kid to give such things to. I am envious of those of you who do.

I'd have had Let It Be and Sgt. Pepper. Tommy. Wildflowers (Judy Collins). Sounds of Silence. PPM's The Best of Peter, Paul and Mary: Ten Years Together. Many, many others I didn't know about then but do, now. King Crimson. Moody Blues... I could go on.

It was a good feeling to give my daughter something tangible that hopefully she will enjoy for years long after I've departed this mortal turntable.

I hadn't seen her in about 3 months, she's in NYC, me in Jersey, and we had brunch last Sunday and post-brunch we spent some time going through my albums, mostly circa '65-'75, and they've been in storage for years . I made no promises or guarantees for these vinyl treasures but hoped they held up over the years.

There were about 300 albums and almost all had personal back stories and memories, where I bought them, concerts that inspired the purchase, friends I got high with listening to them, girl friends, some loves of my life, some loves for a night, and some heart-breakers, and yet with a happy heart, and a brief tutorial on album handling and hygiene, I passed on my mini-treasure trove of 12" good good good vibrations for the next generation to groove to.

She was a finance major in school but minored in music and loves 60s music. As we were flipping through the albums, many of which she knew from car trips with me, youtube or spotify, she was getting off on the covers (including King Crimson's scream album-what an iconic cover) and my running commentaries and critiques of the albums. I felt like a cross between Anita gifting her albums to William, and one of those old-farts on American Pickers selling their priceless artifacts, rusted junk, and ephemera to Mike Wolfe who promises to find it its next loving home.

I think I found them a good home.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 23, 2020, 12:55:41 PM
Read your post that day but neglected to reply how it resonated.   My daughter (music major) took some of our old LPs (son is less collector,  more minimalist) though often with less backstory.   She had heard a lot of old tracks on the web,  too,  and would startle me in her coffee shop performances with some oldie I'd had no idea she was aware of. 

As far as owning collections,  I have sort of come to the Marie Kondo paradigm,  that your stuff doesn't have to be about who you were so much as about who you are becoming.   It's like,  if you had a chunk of rose quartz when you were a kid,  and a hundred pounds of other rocks,  then either it's a part of who you became (like a spelunker or a rockhound or a geologist)  or it isn't  (just a brief phase, then it all went into a basement crate).   Either way,  one choice specimen reminds you who you became,  or didn't become.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bankshot1 on September 23, 2020, 05:01:15 PM
if you had a chunk of rose quartz when you were a kid, 

Bart-ironically it was quarts of Rose that I imbibed on that fateful Woodstock Sat. afternoon...

the folly and excesses of youth

re daughters and our music- it would absolutely astound and delight me when I heard my kid sing along to oldies she realistically should be clueless about, with that perfect timing that we develop from hearing those songs over and over again.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on September 24, 2020, 11:09:19 AM
I've hooked my niece (now 25) on to lots of old music.
She seems to have pretty eclectic taste and not into any one set style of music.

My theory is that there's 100 years of recorded music out there, so why not listen to stuff that is great, classic, enduring.  I'm also interested in finding recent recordings that will or should be listened to 20 or 50 years from now.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 24, 2020, 11:59:57 AM
LoL at that bit about recording Sticky Fingers/NCAA onto 8-track. 

Weirdly 8-track somehow passed me by.   Had vinyl,  and a cassette player,  but never had a car with 8t.

Yeah,  it's great how your niece and all the young ones range so freely through a century of recorded music.  And further,  thanks to piano rolls that someone with a player piano will upload, that kind of thing.   (not that piano rolls are fully "recordings" since dynamics and inflection is lost)
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on September 28, 2020, 09:59:00 AM
The Trial of The Chicago 7 (Netflix) Friday, Oct.16

Quote
Aaron Sorkin's stuff tends to be really good (The West Wing) or really annoying (The Newsroom). His latest is a film about the trial of the "Chicago Seven" after the 1968 Democratic National Convention. With a fascinating cast (Joseph Gordon-Levitt, Michael Keaton, Yahya Abdul-Mateen II, and ... Sacha Baron Cohen?), it's a project Sorkin has apparently been working on for years, and because of the pandemic, it's landing on Netflix instead of in theaters.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on September 30, 2020, 12:34:08 PM
Got round to seeing Isle of Dogs.  (say the title aloud without imaging the words as written - there you go)  Absurdly talented voice actor cast which includes Bryan Cranston,  Edward Norton, Liev Schreiber, Bill Murray, Bob Balaban, Jeff Goldblum, Scarlett Johansson, Tilda Swinton, Ken Watanabe, Greta Gerwig, Frances McDormand, F. Murray Abraham, Fisher Stevens, Yoko Ono, Harvey Keitel, and Frank Wood.  I confess I was so busy recognizing famous voices that it may have clouded my ability to judge the film as a whole.  Which is okay, because this is really just a bit of fun, some funny lines, much doggy drollery, with a sprinkling of lite political satire.  I'm not sure if there was any subtextual reference to the actual Isle of Dogs, which Londoners will know is the location of their financial center, aka Canary Wharf.  This one's basically a garbage dump off the coast of Japan, full of dogs exiled due to some sort of canine virus that can spread to humans.  As is typical of Wes Anderson, it just starts there and gets more ridiculous.  The artwork is beautiful, btw.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on October 01, 2020, 06:45:06 PM
So, going back to that Cameron Crowe album list.

Here's a different take on it.

I'm going to limit the ten records to just the year 1973. And I think that a list from that year alone competes with just about any other list that fit the span of 1965-1973.

Here's the list, again taking albums only from 1973. (But not in any ranked order.)

And the best song on that album, IMO.

Stevie Wonder: InnerVision "Living For the City" https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=ghLWjyOOLno&list=RDAMVMghLWjyOOLno (https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=ghLWjyOOLno&list=RDAMVMghLWjyOOLno)

David Bowie: Aladdin Sane "Panic in Detroit" https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=CM3fCUmSheY&list=OLAK5uy_n6SqLC8xrc7tS5Cw9pDr7ECauksk3hgtQ (https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=CM3fCUmSheY&list=OLAK5uy_n6SqLC8xrc7tS5Cw9pDr7ECauksk3hgtQ)

Led Zeppelin: Houses of the Holy "The Ocean"  https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=H8bVaTW6UCU&list=RDAMVMH8bVaTW6UCU (https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=H8bVaTW6UCU&list=RDAMVMH8bVaTW6UCU)

Springsteen: The Wild, the Innocent, and the E Street Shuffle "Kitty's Back" https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=bLulUBjiIIc&list=RDAMVMbLulUBjiIIc (https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=bLulUBjiIIc&list=RDAMVMbLulUBjiIIc)

James Brown: The Payback "Shoot Your Shot" https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=r16GK_zm7sc&list=OLAK5uy_kHqKBd_z4X-Q9hLeX-Xzd1Juhqf2WqyVM (https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=r16GK_zm7sc&list=OLAK5uy_kHqKBd_z4X-Q9hLeX-Xzd1Juhqf2WqyVM)

Stones: Goats Head Soup

"Doo Doo Doo Doo Heartbreaker"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bs7kUlITjE&list=PLJNbijG2M7OzDI8QuzOBu4Tiv1nlwTfkF&index=7 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bs7kUlITjE&list=PLJNbijG2M7OzDI8QuzOBu4Tiv1nlwTfkF&index=7) Could be written today, and consider that the Stones just rereleased this album a few weeks ago.


Little Feat: Dixie Chicken "On Your Way Down" (later covered beautifully by Elvis Costello and the late, great Allen Toussaint, individually and then together) https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=dwk79zJFIGQ&list=OLAK5uy_l-TYojPQyprPCj3HspxS7F2DFLInFoMQQ (https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=dwk79zJFIGQ&list=OLAK5uy_l-TYojPQyprPCj3HspxS7F2DFLInFoMQQ)

Pink Floyd: Dark Side of the Moon "Breathe" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vddl9TK5RqU&list=PL3PhWT10BW3Urh8ZXXpuU9h526ChwgWKy&index=2 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vddl9TK5RqU&list=PL3PhWT10BW3Urh8ZXXpuU9h526ChwgWKy&index=2)

Queen: Queen "Keep Yourself Alive" https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=JofwEB9g1zg&list=OLAK5uy_lnE0PrQW4MK0wKfi0Yex2OSsC82M68Sqw (https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=JofwEB9g1zg&list=OLAK5uy_lnE0PrQW4MK0wKfi0Yex2OSsC82M68Sqw)

The Wailers: Burnin' "Get Up, Stand Up". https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=KP0V15PgFaQ&list=RDAMVMKP0V15PgFaQ (https://music.youtube.com/watch?v=KP0V15PgFaQ&list=RDAMVMKP0V15PgFaQ)


Special mention, because they certainly influenced a lot of artists after this album came out. New York Dolls: New York Dolls
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on October 01, 2020, 08:09:00 PM
Good broad sample of 73.  High school me might have picked Over the Hills,  on Zepp V,  over The Ocean.   That Wailers track is fresh as ever!   Queen may not have been much on the radar yet in 1973 out in the plains states.  Not sure I ever heard their debut album.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on October 02, 2020, 01:45:08 AM
Good broad sample of 73.  High school me might have picked Over the Hills,  on Zepp V,  over The Ocean.   That Wailers track is fresh as ever!   Queen may not have been much on the radar yet in 1973 out in the plains states.  Not sure I ever heard their debut album.

Went to see Queen's first tour in the US, at a small theatre in Philly. Row 4, dead center, with Freddie Mercury as amazing then as he ever was later. But let me day, too, that the rest of the band were quite amazing themselves.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on October 02, 2020, 02:11:22 AM
Stones: Goats Head Soup

"Doo Doo Doo Doo Heartbreaker"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bs7kUlITjE&list=PLJNbijG2M7OzDI8QuzOBu4Tiv1nlwTfkF&index=7 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bs7kUlITjE&list=PLJNbijG2M7OzDI8QuzOBu4Tiv1nlwTfkF&index=7) Could be written today, and consider that the Stones just rereleased this album a few weeks ago.

There's so many of the early 70's protest and social consciousness songs that are perfectly relevant to today:

Marvin Gaye crooning about "trigger-happy policing"
The Stones Fingerprint File -- detailing FBI surveillance.
Steppenwolf's America/Suicide/Monster opus:
"we're fighting a war over there and no matter who is the inner we can't pay the cost"
Gil Scott Heron - Whitey on the Moon
Gene McDaniels entire Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse album -- but Supermarket Blues if I had to single out a single.
Dylan's Hurricane about criminal justice racism and unfairness.
and more ...

It's very notable how relevant these 1970's concerns are to today.  During Trump's farcical reinvention of Nixonia.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on October 02, 2020, 09:46:14 AM
Stones: Goats Head Soup

"Doo Doo Doo Doo Heartbreaker"
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bs7kUlITjE&list=PLJNbijG2M7OzDI8QuzOBu4Tiv1nlwTfkF&index=7 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7bs7kUlITjE&list=PLJNbijG2M7OzDI8QuzOBu4Tiv1nlwTfkF&index=7) Could be written today, and consider that the Stones just rereleased this album a few weeks ago.

There's so many of the early 70's protest and social consciousness songs that are perfectly relevant to today:

Marvin Gaye crooning about "trigger-happy policing"
The Stones Fingerprint File -- detailing FBI surveillance.
Steppenwolf's America/Suicide/Monster opus:
"we're fighting a war over there and no matter who is the inner we can't pay the cost"
Gil Scott Heron - Whitey on the Moon
Gene McDaniels entire Headless Heroes of the Apocalypse album -- but Supermarket Blues if I had to single out a single.
Dylan's Hurricane about criminal justice racism and unfairness.
and more ...

It's very notable how relevant these 1970's concerns are to today.  During Trump's farcical reinvention of Nixonia.

And this one: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBAwv49slC8 (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RBAwv49slC8)

"Tax the rich,
Feed the poor,
'til there aren't no rich no more"
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on October 02, 2020, 07:50:11 PM
https://www.theguardian.com/film/2020/oct/02/rick-moranis-punched-in-the-street-in-random-attack

The suspect list includes Gozer the Destructor and Zuul the Gatekeeper.   

I'm glad he's okay.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: UNO on October 02, 2020, 10:09:40 PM
Looks like a classic: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvPTCvUnNQA (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JvPTCvUnNQA)
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on October 03, 2020, 02:10:03 PM
If are have only one comedic gear, low gear make best - more traction making!

I am very much look forward to this cinema show! 

The upcoming Cronenberg film (Brandon, David's son) also looks interesting.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Possessor_(film)

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on October 10, 2020, 03:52:56 PM
Sarah Paulson stars in a recently released Netflix series "Ratched" about the villain Nurse Ratched from "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" and I just have to wonder why people keep making projects where the villains are the stars, there was "The Joker" and "Maleficent" and now "Ratched."

What is next, making a hero out of the King of England from the movie "Braveheart"? Having Scottish women raped by British men on their wedding night was really evil, and he did lots of really evil stuff, is he worthy of a new movie or series?
 
What about Hitler, killing Jews was pretty evil, are they going to make a movie about Hitler?
 
There is nothing cool about evil people, and evil people should not be the stars of the movies and series.
 
The GOOD people need to be the heroes. We need to see the Good people battle against evil.
 
Salute,
 
Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: FlyingVProd on October 10, 2020, 04:11:51 PM
I will never produce a movie where the villain is the hero. The people need to see the GOOD people fighting against evil, the good people need to be the stars.
 
And I will produce love stories.

Salute,

Tony V.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on October 10, 2020, 07:01:38 PM
Tony,  I don't believe having a major character be a villain means that said villain is being presented as a hero or heroine.   No one would confuse Gregory Peck in The Boys from Brazil with a hero.   Many movies have portrayed people like Hitler,  Stalin,  Caligula,  Jack the Ripper,  and all manner of serial killers and other miscreants both real and fictional -- in almost none of them are these malign figures drawn as heroes,  and in such films there are often good people who are,  sometimes heroically,  resisting their evils.   Relax,  I suspect Nurse Ratched will have an antagonist or dramatic foil who brings decency and virtue of some variety to all the darkness.   

That said,  you should avoid "Wuthering Heights" at all costs.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on November 19, 2020, 11:59:31 PM
11/19/1975

Quote
On this date in 1975, "One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest" was released.

Actor Kirk Douglas—who had originated the role of McMurphy in the 1963–64 Broadway stage version of the Ken Kesey novel—had purchased the film rights to the story, and tried for a decade to bring it to the big screen, but was unable to find a studio willing to make it with him. Eventually, he sold the rights to his son Michael Douglas, who succeeded in getting the film produced—but the elder Douglas, by then nearly 60, was considered too old for the McMurphy role, which ultimately went to 38-year-old Jack Nicholson. Douglas brought in Saul Zaentz as co-producer.

The film's first screenwriter, Lawrence Hauben, introduced Douglas to the work of Miloš Forman, whose 1967 Czechoslovak film "The Firemen's Ball" had certain qualities that mirrored the goals of the present script. Forman flew to California and discussed the script page by page, outlining what he would do, in contrast with other directors who had been approached who were less than forthcoming. Forman wrote in 2012: "To me, [the story] was not just literature, but real life, the life I lived in Czechoslovakia from my birth in 1932 until 1968. The Communist Party was my Nurse Ratched, telling me what I could and could not do; what I was or was not allowed to say; where I was and was not allowed to go; even who I was and was not."

Zaentz, a voracious reader, felt an affinity with Kesey, and so after Hauben's first attempt he asked Kesey to write the screenplay, and promised him a piece of the action, but it did not work out and ended in a financial dispute.

Hal Ashby, who had been an early consideration for director, suggested Jack Nicholson for the role of McMurphy. Nicholson had never played this type of role before. Production was delayed for about six months because of Nicholson's schedule. Douglas later stated in an interview that "that turned out to be a great blessing: it gave us the chance to get the ensemble right."

Danny DeVito, Douglas’ oldest friend, was the first to be cast, having played one of the patients, Martini, in the 1971 off-Broadway production. Chief Bromden, played by Will Sampson, was found through the referral of a used car dealer Douglas met on an airplane flight when Douglas told him they wanted a "big guy" to play the part. The dealer's father often sold cars to Native American customers and six months later called Douglas to say: "the biggest sonofab!tch Indian came in the other day!"

Forman had considered Shelley Duvall for the role of Candy; coincidentally, she, Nicholson, and Scatman Crothers (who portrays Turkle) would all later appear as part of the main cast of the 1980 film adaptation of "The Shining". While screening "Thieves Like Us" (1974) to see if she was right for the role, he became interested in Louise Fletcher, who had a supporting role, for the role of Nurse Ratched. A mutual acquaintance, the casting director Fred Roos, had already mentioned Fletcher's name as a possibility. Even so, it took four or five meetings, over a year, (during which the role was offered to other actresses such as Angela Lansbury, Anne Bancroft, and Geraldine Page) for Fletcher to secure the role of Nurse Ratched. Her final audition was late in 1974, with Forman, Zaentz, and Douglas. The day after Christmas, her agent called to say she was expected at the Oregon State Hospital in Salem on January 4 to begin rehearsals.

Speaking of the Orgon State Hospital, the producers decided to shoot the there, an actual mental hospital, as this was also the setting of the novel. The hospital’s director, Dean Brooks, was supportive of the filming and eventually ended up playing the character of Dr. John Spivey in the film. Brooks identified a patient for each of the actors to shadow, and some of the cast even slept on the wards at night. He also wanted to incorporate his patients into the crew, to which the producers agreed. Douglas recalls that it was not until later that he found out that many of them were criminally insane. (Wikipedia)
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: bodiddley on November 20, 2020, 02:16:53 PM
Three and half months later, my mother took me and a half dozen friends to see OFOtC for my 11th birthday.  Pretty bold call from mom.  I'm sure a lot of it went over our heads. 

Great film.  Terrific casting.
It's hard to get a crew of mental patients to play out convincingly.
Certainly glad we got Jack instead of Kirk.

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: barton on November 22, 2020, 12:06:52 PM
Yep.   I could see Angela Lansbury as Ratched,  however.   Not saying she'd have been better than Fletcher,  but it would have been nicely disturbing. 

Wonder how many parody scenes have been done of Chief Bromden yanking out the water taps and tossing it through the window.   I've seen a couple.   

Somehow I knew Fletcher was on Deep Space 9, which means I must have watched a few eps.  Had forgotten them.   
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on November 23, 2020, 10:26:29 PM
Speaking of movies...

https://www.cnn.com/2020/11/23/us/utah-monolith-trnd/index.html
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: oilcan on November 24, 2020, 12:54:15 PM
In the words of Fox Mulder:  "I want to believe."

Cue music:  Also Sprach Zarathustra

Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on November 24, 2020, 10:32:46 PM
In the words of Fox Mulder:  "I want to believe."

Cue music:  Also Sprach Zarathustra

I posted the link on FB mentioning the music.

I'd not remembered that that was just the first almost couple minutes of the whole 31-35 minute Strauss piece, however! It always struck me as a finale.
Title: Re: Movies
Post by: josh on November 26, 2020, 04:20:41 PM
Quote
Adam-Troy Castro
4 hrtsaSrpolnsoarredSs
When Steven Spielberg got the rights to SCHINDLER'S LIST, intending initially only to function as producer, one director who begged him for the gig was one to whom it was intensely personal, Billy Wilder. Wilder, one of the greats, had not been able to get a project going for many years, and he would made an entirely different masterpiece (whether or not you think the Spielberg version lives up to that descriptor). Alas, Wilder walked out without the job. A tragedy. I can't blame Spielberg. Maybe he perceived that Wilder really was too old. But maybe he wasn't. Wilder died with a dozen late-life scripts in the drawer, and those are tragedies too.

What happened is that Spielberg continued to try to make the project work, and at one point gave it to Martin Scorsese, who also would have made a masterpiece. But Spielberg ultimately decided he wanted to do it, and so he contacted Scorsese and said, tell you what, I'll trade with you the project I have in the pipeline, that you would likely make better, anyway: my remake of CAPE FEAR.

So, honestly, this one project has multiple maddening ifs. I love the films that got made, but I want to see Billy Wilder's SCHINDLER, I want to see Scorsese's SCHINDLER, and I want to see Spielberg's CAPE FEAR. I would watch all of those tomorrow