Escape from Elba

Arts => Music => Topic started by: Admin on April 16, 2007, 08:42:35 PM



Title: Jazz
Post by: Admin on April 16, 2007, 08:42:35 PM
This is the place to discuss jazz and standards.


Title: Bill Charlap Trio
Post by: chipstern on May 28, 2007, 08:03:56 AM
Brrrrrr...I feel a breeze.  


Oh, well, let me break the ice here in this den of inertia by offering a listening suggestion. 

I heard the Bill Charlap Trio at Dizzy's Coca Cola Room on Sunday evening the 27th, with Peter Washington on bass and Kenny Washington on drums. 

It was a dazzling performance, refreshing for its originality and lack of flummery or artifice.  Pianist Charlap's toucn and harmonic sensibility is especially engaging considering how many pianists wallow in cliches, and the two Washingtons, brothers in spirit if not parentage, play with grace, power and sensitivity.  Together they are a juggernaut. 

But it was Charlap's arranging perspective which really knocked me out.  The trio's rhythmic and harmonic variations on a medley of themes from "West Sdie Story" was inspirational, particularly his treatment of "There's A Place For Us", a tune which has the potential for vast expanses of bathos and cheap sentimentality in lesser hands. 

On Tuesday evening, the trio opens their second week of a two week engagement, and anyone who loves jazz, needs to check it out.  This is exceptionally classy trio work at the highest levels of elegance and swing. 


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on May 28, 2007, 09:06:35 AM
Nice to see you around Chip.  I recently saw Charles Lloyd in Vilnius, with Jason Moran filling in for Geri Allen.  Nice fit.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: chauncey.g on June 12, 2007, 05:02:08 PM
Just got back from a trip to Denver and found this great station. It's a great stream

http://www.kuvo.org/


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: lulu on June 14, 2007, 04:37:09 PM
chip:

I've fallen in love with Dianne Reeves and only have her recordings on "Good Night and Good Luck" s/t.  Only album I have so far.

And Eva Cassidy, Live at the Blue Note, with a great jazz band (sounds like jazz to be).


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on June 18, 2007, 07:08:04 PM
Just got back from a trip to Denver and found this great station. It's a great stream

http://www.kuvo.org/

FEMI KUTI & THE POSITIVE FORCE
Tuesday, July 31; Door Time: 7:30 pm
Music: Venues, Clubs and Concerts
Boulder Theater, Boulder

I didn't know that he ever left Senegal. Maybe Paris.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: chauncey.g on June 18, 2007, 08:00:05 PM
Seems like the Denver area has a pretty happenin' jazz scene. That station I referred to has played several cuts from locals or former locals as well. I'd consider a move but ain't a cold climate kinda guy. Woke up one day last week and found frost on my brother's back porch. Freezing overnight temps in June won't cut it. Damn.


Title: Denver
Post by: chipstern on June 19, 2007, 11:17:15 PM
Denver has some great modern jazz musicians...

Tenor Saxophonist Fred Hess

Trumpeter Ron Miles


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: chauncey.g on June 26, 2007, 08:38:59 PM
And Denton has Snarky Puppy...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=l9ivLYq2nM4


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on July 15, 2007, 12:12:28 PM
http://www.lincolncenter.org/show_events_list.asp?eventcode=14622

Play the clip


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: lulu on August 02, 2007, 01:28:20 PM
Has anyone seen Dianne Reeves live?  I just bought a ticket to her concert in October at the Met Museum of Art in NY.  I loved her performance in Good Night and Good Luck and bought the cd which I immediately fell in love with (I also want to buy more of this great lady).

I know very little about her.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on August 07, 2007, 02:19:43 AM
It has been a while since I last listened to Dianne Reeves.  I have her "Quiet After the Storm" CD which I have enjoyed. 


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on August 14, 2007, 03:05:54 AM
The recent Joshua Redman CD is good.  While others have gone funk, Redman sticks with the basics in Back East,

http://www.amazon.com/Back-East-Joshua-Redman-Trio/dp/B000N4S95Q/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-5791205-4542015?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1187075005&sr=1-1

He goes with bass and drum on this one, with some guest horns like that of Joe Lovano.  I like the way Redman has matured over the years.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on August 17, 2007, 05:37:28 AM
A tribute to Max Roach:

http://www.searchforvideo.com/watchclip.php?title=Max+Roach++++Abbey+Lincoln&link=http%3A%2F%2Fwww.youtube.com%2F%3Fv%3D4AGQQhFSy5g&description=Roach%26%23039%3Bs+Freedom+Now+Suite&source=YouTube.com&image=http%3A%2F%2Fimg.youtube.com%2Fvi%2F4AGQQhFSy5g%2Fdefault.jpg&category=directory&searchterm=%2Fmusic%2Fm%2Fmax-roach%2F


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on August 18, 2007, 02:09:39 PM
Dzimas

http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/player/popup/?rn=952695&cl=3738603&src=news


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on August 24, 2007, 09:41:39 AM
I picked up a collection of early sets of Max Roach at amazon.co.uk,

(http://www.dustygroove.com/images/products/r/roach_max~~_maxroachs_101b.jpg)

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Complete-Studio-Recordings-Max-Roach/dp/B000JBWWJW/ref=sr_1_11/203-2286297-0228752?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1187962784&sr=1-11


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on August 24, 2007, 10:06:18 AM
It must have been hard filling Clifford Brown's shoes.  He was much too short on this earth,

(http://store.acousticsounds.com/images/as201JPG/AMER-36037.jpg)


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on August 24, 2007, 12:29:57 PM
Dzimas,
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/24/arts/music/24park.html?

Thanks to you, I discovered the location of the downtown house Ave B which I had to pass when walking to The Five Spot (on the "Bowerie");when walking from Avenue D, one normally passed Tompkins Square, while previously the group-walk of ladies who listened was from  mid-block east of 2nd.Avenue where Grizzuti and I had the apartment immediately next to what was then the Polish Clinic and in those days was staffed completely with doctors who were women arrived from Poland after the war. But I do recall Mal Waldron (Billy Holiday's drummer) walking me back to Avenue D, where I relocated to stay with friends once parting company with book-reader Barbara G.

It was only when finding the on-line bebop Bentley, and pictures of the funeral, at least one of the funerals considering the three-wives,with Charlie Mingus looking beleaguered at the door of the funeral home as he gazed toward Bird's coffin which was finally sent off to Kansas because Parker's Mom was a shrewder woman than any of "the wives", that I read further details about the Stanhope death scene and the continual wrangling about who sits where at Bird's funeral, and the consequent thefts of grave decor,etc., admittedly offset by the charming Ted(or,Tad) Jones* story.

This Jones was, as far as we know, never Diane Di Prima's lover; that was Leroi. But as you probably know part of the route to the Bowery from either Second Avenue or Avenue D involved a little something known as Great Jones Alley (offset by, Little Jones Alley) and both were a source of amusement for what they implied when you consider the drug habits of musicians in that era. In fact, this was precisely the point in time when Billie Holliday was in the hospital dying but "naturally" being supplied with the usual stuff by her impenitent visitors.

Thus I ran across the story of the house on record for all time(and Max Roach's comments, while going home to his mother and getting clean) as the house where Bird lived according to the wishful thinking and delusional notion of the little woman who conceived that they were living the middle-class life and that Charlie Parker was just your average middle-class but very dark brown soul.  Because of the cabaret-laws, I heard more of these top musicians out of town on the road because they were not performing in Manhattan, they didn't have a card; but I did go up to mid-town Birdland for one of the big band performances (Junior's Bar remained a Lounge)yet it no longer comes back to me exactly who was going for that sound again which you no doubt would recall era winter '58 into ongoing '59 when things slipped a notch into The Sixties!

Be back later to listen. I'm behind schedule.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on September 14, 2007, 01:58:09 PM
I promised myself no more epitaphs, but it was sad to hear Joe Zawinul passed away,

http://www.iht.com/articles/2007/09/12/america/obits.php

Not too long ago he was in Vilnius.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on September 22, 2007, 03:39:23 AM
Heard Richard Bona and Bobby McFerrin the other night on Mezzo,

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iimMKWF7SK0

very nice.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: ponderosa on September 24, 2007, 01:39:59 AM
Heard this guy tonite paying tribute to Miles Davis.

http://www.myspace.com/jeffloftonquartet

Very nice, indeed. Solid band.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on October 03, 2007, 03:26:59 AM
Speaking of Miles,

(http://image.listen.com/img/170x170/9/9/6/9/569699_170x170.jpg)

http://www.amazon.com/Complete-Corner-Sessions-Miles-Davis/dp/B000TLMWMO/ref=sr_1_4/105-5791205-4542015?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1191396233&sr=1-4


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on October 03, 2007, 05:26:22 AM
Was a bit disappointed in McFerrin's Beyond Words after seeing the clip from his concert in Montreal.  I would buy the DVD if it didn't come with such an outrageous price,

http://www.amazon.com/Bobby-McFerrin-Live-Montreal/dp/B000AANBJM/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/105-5791205-4542015?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1191403502&sr=1-1

I guess some DVD's are now considered collector's items until a reissue comes out.



Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: rmdig on October 06, 2007, 01:03:22 PM
dzimas

I found two jazz cds recently that I like!  One is a double cd issued on Riverside of Thelonious Monk with John Coltrane.  Very cool multiple takes of "Crepescule with Nellie" and one of my favorite Monk songs, "Well You Needn't."

The other is an ECM recording from 1978 of Keith Jarrett with Jan Garbarek, Palle Danielson and Jon Christensen, My Song.  The music on this cd is beautifully played.  It's also a little more commercial than I remembered it being -- I owned it in vinyl ages ago.

The death of Joe Zawinul has had me listening to some old jazz fusion stuff like Weather Report's Mysterious Traveler and others like Chick Corea's Return to Forever album, Hymn of the Seventh Galaxy, featuring Bill Connor on electric guitar.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on October 07, 2007, 01:52:34 AM
Rmdig, great choices!  Another great album is Brilliant Corners with Monk and Sonny Rollins.  I've been doing a Max Roach retrospective myself, including a very nice 2-CD package of Roach with Kenny Dorham and Sonny Rollins,

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Complete-Studio-Recordings-Max-Roach/dp/B000JBWWJW/ref=sr_1_1/202-0132640-8479059?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1191736227&sr=1-1



Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: rmdig on October 07, 2007, 09:51:31 AM
dzimas

Thanks for those recommendations.  As it turns out my local library has the Brilliant Corners cd, and I've also put a borrower hold on a Max Roach/Clifford Brown double cd, Alone Together.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on October 10, 2007, 01:36:08 AM
You should see if your local library has We Insist! - Freedom Now Suite by Max Roach, which features Coleman Hawkins, Abbey Lincoln and Baba Olatunji to name a few.  Or download the MP3,

http://www.amazon.com/We-Insist-Freedom-Now-Suite/dp/B000QZUOAK/ref=sr_1_2/002-4086232-9828850?ie=UTF8&s=dmusic&qid=1191994351&sr=8-2

I recently picked up Time and Time Again with Motian, Lovano and Frisell.  A bit reserved perhaps, but a very fine trio,

http://www.amazon.com/Time-Again-Paul-Motian/dp/B000LSA84E/ref=pd_bbs_10/002-4086232-9828850?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1191994458&sr=8-10


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: rmdig on October 10, 2007, 12:29:44 PM
I look for that Max Roach/Abbey Lincoln cd. 

Paul Motian has always been a little too arsty-fartsy for my taste.  His drumming never seems to go anywhere.  And yet his discography is huge!  Someone likes him.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on October 10, 2007, 03:12:32 PM
Motian is very highly regarded, but I can understand your view.  I bought the CD mostly for Lovano, curious to hear what he has been doing recently.  Lovano's From the Soul is hard to beat,

http://www.amazon.com/Soul-Joe-Lovano/dp/B000002V10/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2/002-4086232-9828850?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1192043494&sr=1-2


Title: Motian
Post by: chipstern on October 11, 2007, 04:10:46 PM
Motian was the drummer in Bill Evans premier trio with Scott LaFaro.  "nuff said. 

Playing goes nowhere?  Might more poetically talk of how he is a jazz impressionist, able to play the pulse as well as in a more time-oriented manner, creating a free-flow of colorations and accents and rhyhmic signposts and milestones without necessarily having to commit to straight-time patterns.  Paul can swing and state the One with the best of them; he can also demarcate a pulse without locking the improvising ensemble into any discernible groove.  One always has a feeling of a flow, of tensiona and release, but the time is more implied than stated in a marvellously personal style of broken field running. 

He is immensely musical.  Check out his work on the recent Nonesuch release Bill, Frisell, Ron Carter, Paul Motian.  Musicians love to play with him for the manner in which he HEARS THE MUSIC.  Paul does not have the most eleaborate floor routine or employ a lot of technical flummery--he is like a modern jazz Baby Dodds, and a great listener.  Pauls's work on pianist Frank Kimbough's Palmetto release, Play, with bassist Masa Kamaguchi, is also superb. 

I once characterized Paul's avant garde stylings by dubbing him "...the patron saint of spastics."  He has a way of playing free form that is completely unique.  Again, a great listener, who lets the music happen all around him, with unpreditable syncopations and punctuations that break up the flow into odd little groupings and build tension without stepping on anyone's toes.  A great orchestrator and colorist. 

If you want to hear Paul rock out as it were, in a more groove-oriented manner, he comprises a pretty interesting power trio with Jack Bruce and John McLaughlin on Carla Bley's Esacaltor Over The Hill, and his work in the Keith Jarrett Quartet with Charlie Haden and Dewey Redman was quite powerful. 

Paul is also a very fine composer and has led a number of original ensembles, including his multiple guitar Electric Bebop Band and his longstanding trio with Joe Lovano and Bill Frisell.

No Paul's playing is not to everyone's taste, but he is an original stylist and a great listener with his own sound who does not indulge in any discernible rhythmic cliches. 

Not your bag.  Cool.  Somebody must like him. 

Fucking A: 

(http://home.comcast.net/~douglasbass/PaulMotian.jpg)

Bill Evans Trio
Pierre Favre
Fredy Studer
Nana Vasconcelos
John Gilmore
Gary Peacock
Charlie Haden
Carla Bley
Keith Jarett
Paul Bley
Electric Bebop Band
Geri Allen
Joshua Redman
Kurt Rosenwinkel
Joe Lovano
Bill Frisell
Oscar Petitford
Thelonius Monk
Zoot Sims
Lennie Tristano
Sonny Rollins
John Coltrane
Charlie Haden
Keith Jarret
Ed Schuller
Electric Be Bop Band
Trio 2000
Tony Scott
Gil Evans
Art Farmer
Lee Konitz
George Russell
Stan Getz
Coleman Hawkins
Roy Eldridge
Scott LaFaro
Chuck Israel
Paul Bley


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: rmdig on October 11, 2007, 04:50:59 PM
chipstern

As I said, his discography is huge.  But I don't like the way he plays the drums.


Title: Paul
Post by: chipstern on October 11, 2007, 05:50:38 PM
That fact did not elude me. 

Not trying to change your mind. 

Just stating the case for his eminence among musicians and fellow drummers, such as moi. 

Who do you like on drums?  I'm sure we can agree on several. 


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: rmdig on October 11, 2007, 06:21:02 PM
You mentioned Motian drumming for Bill Evans.  I like Marty Morell's work with Evans.  I also like Steve Gadd, Alex Acuna, Bill Bruford, Herlin Riley, and others. 


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on October 12, 2007, 01:36:40 AM
Interesting that Motian is what drew you back into the jazz forum, chip.  It would be nice to revive this forum, and am glad to see you making comments rmdig.  It has been a long time since we have had any life in this forum, including the NYTimes.  Of course, Motian was on Bill Evans classic recordings, Waltz for Debby coming to mind.  The On Broadway series is a good one.  Sound of Love.  Misterioso. 


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: rmdig on October 12, 2007, 09:47:00 AM
I have a CD (had it on vinyl) of one of the few recordings Bill Evans did on Columbia -- The Bill Evans Album.  This was one of the first jazz albums I ever bought -- I would have been about 17 at the time the album was released.  If I remember correctly, Bill, Eddie Gomez and Marty Morell performed on Johnny Carson one night - the album had won a Grammy and I guess Helen Keane, who produced the recording, had Bill milking that for all it was worth.  My father used to let me stay up and watch Carson with him until midnight.  He didn't like the performance at all; I seem to remember thinking the music sounded really weird to my ears.  Since I was into "weird" sounds in those days, I immediately bought the album and listened to it a lot.  When I listen to it now I have no idea why it might have sounded weird.  I know Marty Morell didn't like the album or the album cover and maybe he also didn't think much of Helen Keane.  He also didn't think his play was all that great. 

At about the same time or maybe a few years later I was staying up to watch Hugh Hefner's late night show that often featured the Modern Jazz Quartet.  I bought a lot of their records, too.   


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: chipstern on October 12, 2007, 02:46:46 PM
I have a CD (had it on vinyl) of one of the few recordings Bill Evans did on Columbia -- The Bill Evans Album.  This was one of the first jazz albums I ever bought -- I would have been about 17 at the time the album was released.  If I remember correctly, Bill, Eddie Gomez and Marty Morell performed on Johnny Carson one night - the album had won a Grammy and I guess Helen Keane, who produced the recording, had Bill milking that for all it was worth.  My father used to let me stay up and watch Carson with him until midnight.  He didn't like the performance at all; I seem to remember thinking the music sounded really weird to my ears.  Since I was into "weird" sounds in those days, I immediately bought the album and listened to it a lot.  When I listen to it now I have no idea why it might have sounded weird.  I know Marty Morell didn't like the album or the album cover and maybe he also didn't think much of Helen Keane.  He also didn't think his play was all that great. 

At about the same time or maybe a few years later I was staying up to watch Hugh Hefner's late night show that often featured the Modern Jazz Quartet.  I bought a lot of their records, too.   

On those Columbia recordings, Bill played with A Fender/Rhodes, did some charts by George Russell...

I was never crazy about Marty Morrell or Elliot Zigmund.  Good drummers, but a little...mmmm, chattery and bizzzzee for my tastes, least ways with Bill.  I liked Bill's odd latter recordings with Philly Joe Jones and the Verve bit with Shelly Manne. 

I lurk around this Forum from time to time, but not too much action.  I just happen to have a passion for Motian, who many fans and drummers can't abide with because of what they preceive to be his lack of technique or clunkiness.  For me, the quality of expression and the overall arc of the music is more vital than the sheer technical aspects.  Paul is not not technical, he is musical. 

If you want a good piano trio more  or less in the classic vein, with some drumming we can all agree upon, get a copy of The Essential Jo Jones on Vanguard.  Has a nice Basie-like session, and an amazing trio with brother Ray and Tommy Bryant on piano and bass.  The Bryant brothers' nephews in Philly are guitarist Kevin, trombonist Robin and trumpeter Duane Eubanks.  Ray still with us, and brings a lovely element of gospel and blues into apowerful pianistic conception.  Their set features Ray's lovely "Cubano Chant" and Papa Jo's great drum feature on "Old Man River" which was his showpiece, and among the best, if not the best, drum solos I've ever heard--a great storytelling vehicle. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrKShqNkcnI (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GrKShqNkcnI)

Here is a miniature version of it (with Roy Eldridge, The Oscar Peterson Trio and JATP in a 1957 broadcast from the Nat "King " Cole Show...magical.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeYXfmgHU9c (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LeYXfmgHU9c)

And here is Max Roach at his creative zenith doing three of his drum compositions in 1968

There is a recent release, EB3, which features a CD and DVD of the same live performance, I am reviewing for Playbill featuring Robin Eubanks on trombone and electronics, with Kenwood Dennard, a simply astonishing drummer of great rtehnical and imaginative skills, who herein often plays drum kit with one hand and both feet, while using his left hand to play bass lines on a keyboard synth.  Sheeeeeet...I told Kenwood he needs to pee into a cup. 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLxNIMeaq_k (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VLxNIMeaq_k)

Here is him on a much more elaborate electro-acoustic kit than the minimalist kit he now employs doing a one-man band thang, rapping, singing, playing synth and grooving at a Zildjian Clinic.   

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecjYZ-7VQkU (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecjYZ-7VQkU)

Finally here is some really cool footage of Big Sid Catlett and Gene Krupa.  Doesn't get any cooler than Big Sid.  Like he was walkin' the dawg.  Ho Hum. 



Title: Re: Motian
Post by: madupont on October 12, 2007, 03:08:11 PM

Motian was the drummer in Bill Evans premier trio with Scott LaFaro.  "nuff said. 

Playing goes nowhere?  Might more poetically talk of how he is a jazz impressionist, able to play the pulse as well as in a more time-oriented manner, creating a free-flow of colorations and accents and rhyhmic signposts and milestones without necessarily having to commit to straight-time patterns.  Paul can swing and state the One with the best of them; he can also demarcate a pulse without locking the improvising ensemble into any discernible groove.  One always has a feeling of a flow, of tensiona and release, but the time is more implied than stated in a marvellously personal style of broken field running. 

He is immensely musical.  Check out his work on the recent Nonesuch release Bill, Frisell, Ron Carter, Paul Motian.  Musicians love to play with him for the manner in which he HEARS THE MUSIC.  Paul does not have the most eleaborate floor routine or employ a lot of technical flummery--he is like a modern jazz Baby Dodds, and a great listener.  Pauls's work on pianist Frank Kimbough's Palmetto release, Play, with bassist Masa Kamaguchi, is also superb. 

I once characterized Paul's avant garde stylings by dubbing him "...the patron saint of spastics."  He has a way of playing free form that is completely unique.  Again, a great listener, who lets the music happen all around him, with unpreditable syncopations and punctuations that break up the flow into odd little groupings and build tension without stepping on anyone's toes.  A great orchestrator and colorist. 

If you want to hear Paul rock out as it were, in a more groove-oriented manner, he comprises a pretty interesting power trio with Jack Bruce and John McLaughlin on Carla Bley's Esacaltor Over The Hill, and his work in the Keith Jarrett Quartet with Charlie Haden and Dewey Redman was quite powerful. 

Paul is also a very fine composer and has led a number of original ensembles, including his multiple guitar Electric Bebop Band and his longstanding trio with Joe Lovano and Bill Frisell.

No Paul's playing is not to everyone's taste, but he is an original stylist and a great listener with his own sound who does not indulge in any discernible rhythmic cliches. 

Not your bag.  Cool.  Somebody must like him. 

Fucking A: 

(http://home.comcast.net/~douglasbass/PaulMotian.jpg)

Bill Evans Trio
Pierre Favre
Fredy Studer
Nana Vasconcelos
John Gilmore
Gary Peacock
Charlie Haden
Carla Bley
Keith Jarett
Paul Bley
Electric Bebop Band
Geri Allen
Joshua Redman
Kurt Rosenwinkel
Joe Lovano
Bill Frisell
Oscar Petitford
Thelonius Monk
Zoot Sims
Lennie Tristano
Sonny Rollins
John Coltrane
Charlie Haden
Keith Jarret
Ed Schuller
Electric Be Bop Band
Trio 2000
Tony Scott
Gil Evans
Art Farmer
Lee Konitz
George Russell
Stan Getz
Coleman Hawkins
Roy Eldridge
Scott LaFaro
Chuck Israel
Paul Bley


Had to print out all of this as I just didn't know where to draw the line in order to get the quote! But my comment has to do mostly with what you express in first paragraph after your opening lines and again in your third.

You see, I used to have this argument regularly with Dave Bailey, when I was in the city to study at Martha Graham and my idea of "jazz dancing" was at variance to line dancing, probably because in this newly Nina Simone period, "Downtown", the class that I really enjoyed was Talley Beatty where we got to work with at least three women drummers, with three different sizes of drums in the Haitian tradition, mambo,papa,and boulie.

The object is to dance as you are describing Motian but it is the old chicken and egg thing, knowing we get it from the drummers, do they also catch it from us?


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: rmdig on October 12, 2007, 04:15:43 PM
"On those Columbia recordings, Bill played with A Fender/Rhodes . . ."

You're right, half way at least.  He either begins on the Fender/Rhodes and then switches to acoustic midway through a song or the other way around.   

I've been listening to a Clifford Brown/Max Raoch recording on EmArcy -- Clifford Brown and Max Roach at Basin Street.  The liner notes seem to suggest that these are live performances but I'm not so sure they are.  The takes date from 1956 and feature at least three long Max Roach solos.  Also features a young Sonny Rollins on tenor.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: chipstern on October 12, 2007, 05:17:35 PM
"On those Columbia recordings, Bill played with A Fender/Rhodes . . ."

You're right, half way at least.  He either begins on the Fender/Rhodes and then switches to acoustic midway through a song or the other way around.   

I've been listening to a Clifford Brown/Max Raoch recording on EmArcy -- Clifford Brown and Max Roach at Basin Street.  The liner notes seem to suggest that these are live performances but I'm not so sure they are.  The takes date from 1956 and feature at least three long Max Roach solos.  Also features a young Sonny Rollins on tenor.

They are not live recordings, but they certainly are A-LIVE.  Fantastic music on every level. 


Title: Maud
Post by: chipstern on October 12, 2007, 05:22:16 PM
There most certainly is a give and take between drummers and dancers, dancers and drummers. 

Not necessarily tap or popular dance, either. 

Papa Jo Jones used to show me all sorts of references he adapted to his drum routines, that derived directly from tap routines, particulary an ending he used to employ, to wrap up a solo turn or a break, that he took from Bill "Bojangles" Robinson. 


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on October 12, 2007, 06:29:32 PM
That's funny, i was just posting donotremove the other night about The Village Gate (and the Village Vanguard) back in the days when Toots Thielemann went back and forth from there to Hamburg where John Lennon tried to figure him out on the lunch set. But, at the VG, Toots would lead or follow Sonny Terry and Brownie McGhee. Then the forum crashed.

Bojangles was my childhood at the movies but I did not grow up to be Shirley Temple. That was the style of dance that they did bring back to the Gate in the late Fifties, before Savion Glover,  but because of the Hines brothers and called it "Jazz Dancing", although that is not what I had in mind when speaking of the percussive possibilities of counter-rhythmic flow, a little more on the lines of Gil Evans, Bill Evans, and Monk's Crepescule.


Title: Drummerworld
Post by: Dzimas on October 23, 2007, 04:41:50 AM
Nice site for anyone into drumming,

http://www.drummerworld.com/drummerchoice.html

includes some great videos of most drummers at the peak of their abilities. 

I was impressed by Brian Blade, when I saw him in Vilnius with Wayne Shorter last year,

http://www.drummerworld.com/drummers/Brian_Blade.html

Looks and sounds like a young Max Roach.  Sadly, Wayne Shorter has seen better days.




Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: rmdig on October 26, 2007, 05:02:26 PM
I got my copy of the Clifford Brown/Max Roach Compilation -- Alone Together: The Best of the Mercury Years.  My this is good.  A little bit of everything.  Hard to believe that two great trumpeters -- Clifford Brown and Lee Morgan -- didn't make it out of their 20s. 


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on October 27, 2007, 11:55:55 AM
I would never have guessed that Lee Morgan was only in his twenties when I knew him. He seemed much more mature. But of course he wasnt; that's why he died so early.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: lulu on October 27, 2007, 07:46:18 PM
I saw Dianne Reeves at the Met Museum of Art last night and it was a thrilling experience.  For one thing, the venue there is pretty small and intimate (even with a balcony).

I only knew Reeves through Good Night and Good Luck and that was enough.  What a personality, not to mention, voice.  She adlibbed, and communicated really warmly with the audience.  Natural talk; not stilted like many singers do between songs.  I haven't seen a singer this connected to an audience since Frank Sinatra.  She was accompanied by two fantastic (and I mean fantastic) guitar players: Russell Malone (who was awesume) and Romero Lubambo, who excellent.  And what a job she did on James Taylor's "You've Got a Friend."  At times she sounded "gospel" and reminded me of Morgana King.  I usually dislike scat but in Reeves' case, I'll make an exception.

I might go see her again when she appears in DC at the Kennedy Center.  I didn't find out about that until  after I sent for my ticket from the Met.

A really great experience. 


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on October 28, 2007, 04:24:25 AM
Real treat next month in Vilnius, the Leaders,

http://www.vilniuscityjazz.lt/?pid=the-leaders

along with Joe McPhee.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on October 28, 2007, 04:28:51 AM
Lee Morgan was 33 when he got shot to death in between sets at Slug's by Helen Moore, apparently over another woman, according to Billy Hart,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lee_Morgan

Morgan is probably best remembered for Sidewinder, a great album, not to mention a frequently overdubbed track by Hip Hop singers.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on October 29, 2007, 08:09:46 AM
Dzimas, this was very hard to take, reading the account and listening to the tape. Lee was all of twenty years old when I last saw him in Chicago,summer of 1959. He was there with Hank Mobley, who was also on the way out and died at home with his parents in Philadelphia. I keep recalling what Art Blakey said one winter night on the way uptown to Smalls in a tax-cab, when he noticed some kid on the street walking diagonally in front of us,  "...my people. They have a real death urge."

The details accounted, took me right back, unsurprised that this scene never changed. Yes, everyone of those clubs were little bitty places, holes in the wall but famous, as Max Gorden's wife says about the Vanguard(I never had an office, just a desk in the kitchen [where the musicians sat around between sets...]. I don't think that I ever walked into a backroom in my life; one just knew not to.  These were places where you couldn't even turn around in the bathroom or just barely. The only time,you saw a larger club was with the formation of a larger group to play it, when Birdland still existed; or, maybe out on the road, someone sat in and these new combinations happened. I think, I did know everyone of those musicians, with the exception of some of the younger guys who had come up by the time of that shooting; and, whomever said it,that scene is classic,never changes, it's haunting, and you really can't believe it happens in every detail like something handed down from the past, as if it didn't matter where you came from and you might as well never had to leave because it caught up with you anyway.

At first reading and listening to the account, I couldn't imagine the person being described could have been Lee who was always neat as a pin, never laid back but showing up righteous copping an attitude like,"what's wrong with you people. I know, what I'm doing."


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on October 29, 2007, 08:21:01 AM
Maddie, I think people forget that these clubs were holes in the wall, since many of these musicians couldn't play anywhere else.  The clubs have become immortalized, so I think a lot of persons have grand images of clubs like the Vanguard, but this picture presents a very real portrait,

(http://image.blog.livedoor.jp/geeeeeeeeeenta/1d5f476c.jpg)


Title: Lee Morgan and the Roll Call of Fallen Young Trumpeters
Post by: chipstern on October 31, 2007, 05:18:03 PM
I would never have guessed that Lee Morgan was only in his twenties when I knew him. He seemed much more mature. But of course he wasnt; that's why he died so early.

Lee Morgan debuted with the Dizzy Gillespie Big Band when he was 18.  He was shot down by the common law wife he had abandoned at Slugs (now NEW RICAN VILLAGE) when he was 33.  He had a bad heroin habit, she helped him through it, and after kicking and resuming his career, he left her.  She did not do jail time. 

Bunny Berigan, of "I Can't Get Started" fame, had a problem with alcohol, and passed at 33. 

Bubber Miley, father of the Ellington jungle sound trumpet growl, succumbed to TB (complicated by his alcohol abuse) at 29. 

(http://www.redhotjazz.com/bubber.jpg)

Bix Beiderbecke always had a weak constitution, even as a boy, and succumbed to alcoholism at 28. 

Fats Navarro passed away from TB (complicated by a heroin habit) when he was 26. 

Clifford Brown died in a car crash on the Pennsylvania Turnpike when he was 25. 

(http://www.jazztrumpetsolos.com/images/CliffordBrown22.jpg)(http://www.apoloybaco.com/bookerlittle.jpg)

Booker Little died of uremia when he was 23.  Both Little and Brown had established a dynamic working relationship with drummer Max Roach. 

(http://www.jazzfestivalbern.ch/media/press/Schuur_Terry/Terry_Clark.jpg)(http://www.aaregistry.com/eimage/DocChetham.gif)

Worth noting that the great Clark Terry is still with us, and performed regularly up through his 87th birthday before health concerns finally precluded public appearances, while Doc Cheatham did his best work after he was 70, and was an active performaer straight through his 91st birthday. 


Title: God Bless the Child/How Long Has This Been Going On?
Post by: rmdig on November 10, 2007, 12:13:26 PM
Question for jazz fans.  George and Ira Gershwin wrote How Long Has This Been Going On?  Arthur Herzog and Billie Holiday are credited with writing God Bless the Child.  Isn't the music identical in either case?


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on November 10, 2007, 02:25:52 PM
I don't think so, it sounds to me there is a difference in the key and besides,"How long has this been going on?" ends that phrase by coming down the scale in three notes, whereas Holiday's, God Bless the Child (who's got his own) rises on the first part of the phrase at slower intervals  and duplicates the next part of the lyric in the same direction  more definitively, perhaps slower, although God Knows,Billie Holiday could just slur it if that was what was happening or if she elongated  the "got", while the latter phrase is recapped by starting lower than before and enunciates at more deliberate intervals.

But heavens, it all depends on the arrangement. You could do most anything you please.  Ordinarily, the Gershwin has a jazzier tempo although it can do the refrain in a bluesier falling away almost lamenting not having known sooner.

Holiday, like a horn solo, where ever she slurs, is also blues, but after she chooses to either clip the sound or drawl, in the stanza:"Papa may have, Mama may have, but God Bless  the child  who's  got  his own,
who 'as got  his oww_n ",  she had taken the repeat in a descending mode.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: rmdig on November 11, 2007, 12:40:14 PM
I've been listening to a Ray Charles cover of the Gershwin song and it sure sounds almost identical to God Bless the Child, so maybe like you say it's all in the arrangement.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on November 11, 2007, 01:55:50 PM
Pst...the person whose records are less easily heard, I would imagine,rather than Charles who is made popular by film, would be Billie's which would be instructive as to how variable she could be. meanwhile, I put the tape of the interviews between Mailer and Grass, separately as well as together over in the Non-fictional forum, which are what led me to read the most recent Grass book, something the two writers discussed rather thoroughly comparing now with then.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on November 18, 2007, 12:49:07 PM
Saw The Leaders Friday night, and what a treat it was.  With a front line of Chico Freeman, Bobby Watson and Eddie Henderson you can't go wrong, but it was young (relatively) Fred Harris who really impressed me on keyboards.  That guy can flat out play.  Very nice rhythm section with the incomparable Billy Hart and Lonnie Plaxico filling in for Cecil McBee on bass.  They carried the load in this concert, as the frontmen took turns on horn and reeds.  I really like Bobby Watson.  I have his Love Remains, which is an excellent recording.  Of course, Eddie Henderson has one of the finest tones on trumpet, but at times he seemed odd man out.  Freeman apparently put The Leaders back together last year after a long break following Lester Bowie's death.  Chico, Bobby and Billy were nice enough to sign CD's after the show. 

http://www.amazon.com/Spirits-Alike-Leaders/dp/B000MTEDSE/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1195408088&sr=1-1

Eddie didn't want any part of it. Interesting reading that he had finished his medical studies but Miles Davis apparently convinced him to take up the trumpet professionally, earning his chops with Herbie Hancock.  Eddie shined on a lovely interpretation of On Green Dolphin Street.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on December 24, 2007, 09:38:53 PM
Dzimas,

http://news.aol.com/entertainment/music/music-news-story/ar/_a/jazz-great-oscar-peterson-dies-at-82/20071224141909990001





http://tinyurl.com/2f3tnl


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on December 25, 2007, 04:42:00 AM
I saw that the Big O had died, maddy.  I was sure Oscar Peterson was in the the photo, A Great Day in Harlem, but I see it was Oscar Pettiford,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A_Great_Day_in_Harlem

A few are still around like Sonny Rollins and Horace Silver, but the cast is thinning.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on December 25, 2007, 09:30:28 AM
Thus far, looking at that old familiar picture, I am able to spot only Gerry Mulligan standing next to the right hand rise of the brownstone and with Dizzy Gillespie to his Gerry's right in his usual pose with leg akimbo.

It will take me awhile, at that resolution, to make out who everybody else is, where they are.  I found it absolutely fascinating when I first became acquainted with it. It was like a "class picture" of the most unusual group of people in the history of the world of music; almost all of them from humble beginnings, had traveled wide and far, been celebrated by people far afield in foreign places, without thinking much about how unusual that had been.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: bodiddley on June 07, 2008, 03:29:05 PM
Nothing much to report, so I'll just mention that I saw a girl's shirt in the market in Shanghai which had written on the front:

Solar
Arkestra

Angels and
Demons
At Play

I imagine I'm one of the few who will see it and understand the meaning.
unfortunately it was a little thin and not the best quality, and my brother's daughters (and family) wouldn't understand it or care.

Ranks right up there with the cecil mcbee girl's t-shirt which was fairly common a few years ago.

Welcome to 2008 Jazz Fan(s).


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: barton on June 07, 2008, 04:28:42 PM
Sorry to hear of your recent death, Mr. Diddley.  And sorry that numbskulls keep thinking Who Do You Love is a George Thorogood song.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on June 08, 2008, 09:46:10 AM
Quote
I imagine I'm one of the few who will see it and understand the meaning.

I'm a fan of Sun Ra as well, and have a wonderful T-shirt a friend designed to commemorate the great one's passing to another galaxy,

(http://www.gearink.com/sites/gearink.com/files/images/products/302.jpg)


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on June 12, 2008, 06:39:32 AM
I know I'm talking into an echo chamber, but have been pleased as punch with the beautiful Miles Davis box sets that have come out in recent years.  The Miles Davis/Gil Evans set has to be the high point,

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/3182N3KJD8L._SS400_.jpg)

beautifully packaged and wonderfully packed with alternate takes, rehearsal sequences, and even studio discussions make this a collector's item to be treasured for years to come.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on June 13, 2008, 09:11:57 PM
I know I'm talking into an echo chamber, but have been pleased as punch with the beautiful Miles Davis box sets that have come out in recent years.  The Miles Davis/Gil Evans set has to be the high point,

(http://ecx.images-amazon.com/images/I/3182N3KJD8L._SS400_.jpg)

beautifully packaged and wonderfully packed with alternate takes, rehearsal sequences, and even studio discussions make this a collector's item to be treasured for years to come.


I like Gil Evans even more than Miles Davis.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: Dzimas on June 14, 2008, 03:47:47 PM
Nice to see someone else in here, maddy.  I've been turned onto Argentine jazz as of recent with the Buenos Aires version of Canonball Adderley,  Chivo Borraro.  You have to love someone who comes up with "Blues para un Cosmonauta" for an album title.

(http://cdbaby.name/c/h/chivo.jpg)

The music is from the 60s and is great fun to listen to.  It is put out on the "whatmusic" label,

http://whatmusic.com/

which has some pretty hip stuff from South America, including some killer bossa nova from Brazil.



Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: madupont on June 19, 2008, 11:00:26 AM
You might be interested in this as well, not technically jazz by our technique; it is however the blending of multicultural, including Rap as a complete culture introduced into Istanbul where I guarantee you that you won't understand a word of the Rap but will recognize that it absolutely is
without a doubt the real thing. This much too short film intends to show you as many eclectic forms now in existence where not only does East meet West but East is West and West is East ;with some  very pithy comments by local intellectuals and visiting musicians that the West is not something that ends in L.A. because the Bush administration said so,etc.

http://www.sundancechannel.com/schedule/

http://www.sundancechannel.com/films/500320105   

CROSSING THE BRIDGE: THE SOUND OF ISTANBUL

Filmmaker Fatih Akin (HEAD-ON) and Alexander Hacke, of the avant-garde German band Einsturzende Neubauten, conduct a magical musical tour of one of the world's great cities. Uniquely situated at the crossroads of Europe and Asia, Istanbul is home to sounds that mix cultures, religions and exotic musical instrumentation. Akin and Hacke sample everything from Turkish rap and Kurdish dirges to experimental music and street songs, and finish with two electrifying performances by Turkish musical legends Orhan Gencebay and Sezen Aksu.

http://www.crossingthebridge.de/

There's a clip and where to buy dvd

I haven't the faintest idea when this will show again included in schedule. I hope soon. They probably will go by comments/by people who caught this much of it.


Title: Re: Jazz
Post by: bodiddley on October 05, 2017, 08:13:56 AM
Nice to see someone else in here, maddy.  I've been turned onto Argentine jazz as of recent with the Buenos Aires version of Canonball Adderley,  Chivo Borraro.  You have to love someone who comes up with "Blues para un Cosmonauta" for an album title.

I thought there were some new Jazz posts.
But since I hadn't read this entry from 2008, it's pretty much just that.

Never heard of Chivo Borraro.
Looks promising.

Cannonball himself did some great So. American jazz, especially the song The Happy People.

There were a brief fad of space-related jazz in the late 50's and early 60's.  Sun Ra built a career on it.  But also Shorty Rogers' Martians Come Back! from 1955.
(https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/en/d/df/Martians_Come_Back%21.jpg)