Escape from Elba

Arts => Television => Topic started by: Admin on April 16, 2007, 08:44:00 PM



Title: Television
Post by: Admin on April 16, 2007, 08:44:00 PM
Discuss your favorite - and not so favorite - television programs.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Chakotay on April 27, 2007, 12:32:14 PM
They have now come out with the DVD collection for this series.


Has anyone else become captive of Planet Earth?  I find watching it puts me in what I would in old hippie days have called an altered state.  True, they get a bit self-laudatory about the film/footage they managed to get, but damn, with good reason. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: thanatopsy on May 01, 2007, 08:07:39 PM
I'm not a big TV fan but do enjoy PBS programming. It is by far the most informative and entertaining.  Bill Moyers Journal recently presented a hard hitting show on the controlled media's failings in the leadup to Bush's war on Iraq. A very striking presentation it was.

Aside from that I usually only watch sports on TV, especially international football (soccer), WTA tennis, and road cycling. Occasionally, I watch an old movie on TCM.

Otherwise, I only watch local news.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: JL...W on May 08, 2007, 01:33:38 PM
Television Review | 'Grey’s Anatomy'
The New Modern Woman, Ambitious and Feeble


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/05/05/arts/television/05grey.html?em&ex=1178769600&en=ee28fa33c7ec0a75&ei=5087%0A

I was pleased to read this review as I felt like hurling something at my TV after watching this episode. It's pitiful what they've done with the women characters on this show and the spin-off looks to be even worse.

JL


Title: Re: Television
Post by: fartonbink on May 11, 2007, 01:49:22 PM
I am a captive of planet Earth (gravity, and all that) but not of "Planet Earth."  The only sci-fi I currently watch is "Lost" and that mainly because it's not so much straight sci-fi as it is a blend of allegory and magical realism with flawed and fascinating characters.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on May 11, 2007, 02:03:45 PM
It's official, I'm confused.  Is this Planet Earth the nature-y series, or the schlocky John Saxon/Diana Muldaur ABC '70s TV-movie (he goes into the future a la Planet of the Apes, and the world is ruled by women)?  I like 'em both, just wondering.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on May 12, 2007, 09:07:08 AM
"Planet Earth" is/was a series that ran on the Discovery Channel just recently.  I think some portions of it are in rerun now.  A documentary five years in the making, it is well worth your time to sit through it although if you have the DVD I would say to break it up into several sittings.

I'm watching the "green" stuff on Sundance--varied docu's long and short about how we humans are in relation to the ecosystem in which we reside.  These run on Tuesday's, I think, but I generally wait till I have some time and bundle a few getting them On Demand on cable (I guess everyone has the On Demand feature that has cable.)  These segments are free of charge and are up to view late for X period of time.

The film on what's in our water and what happens to the sludge will make you want to get a ticket on the next rocket going to another planet.  The fact that in the year 2007 cities and towns (even in Canada) are still dumping raw sewage into lakes and streams just blew me away.  That's not to even start on manufacturing still polluting merrily away . . . .


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on May 13, 2007, 08:59:14 AM
I've caught some of the green stuff on Sundance, too -- it's hard to stick with, though, because it's so depressing. 

Plus, I've become a little jaded about Redford since reading the book on the emergence of independent cinema which paints him not so flatteringly.  Not in a gossipy way, but that he runs the whole Sundance entity in a way that's really difficult on the underlings, ie it's impossible to get a green light while a project is still alive.  So the fact that the green stuff actually got made must mean he's extremely committed to it; so at least "yay" for Redford on that front.

These days I'm mostly watching escapist fare -- Heroes and Lost -- and unfortunately, the Sabres circling the drain.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on May 13, 2007, 09:00:42 AM
And supposedly I have On Demand for free, but I haven't a clue how to use it.  I'd imagine there's a fair number of us out there.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on May 14, 2007, 11:17:38 AM
Harrie, I hear you on the depression part.  Me, too.  Plus I read books like that, also.  It's enough to test the mettle of an old fart like me.  However, I must be the only person on the planet who has never seen a single episode of the "Sopranos" or any of the "reality" shows, or Lost, Survivor, Funniest . . . , any of the "crime", Dr/hospital, nannies, wife swapping, or dancing, oh me, you get my drift?.

I HAVE watched every episode of "Deadwood", "Big Love", and most of "Desperate Housewives" and "Brothers and Sisters", except where something like a rerun of "Bleak House" on PBS interferred (I'm a sucker for period pieces where people like Lady Deadlock breathes in once at the beginning and never breathes out after that--O her lovely neck, so strained and vulnerable.)  So you can see I AM part of the unwashed who wallows, somewhat, in such dreck.

On Demand is accessed by the number 1 on your remote that goes to your cable unit (not your TV remote) and learning to use it is, well, a 5 on a 1-10 scale.  Some stuff is cashed in categories that don't make all that much sense.  Like the Sundance Channel's green stuff is under Free Movies (scroll till you come to Sundance).  I wouldn't think of the "green" episodes as "movies", myself.  One thing, I'm hard-of-hearing and stuff without closed captioning is hard for me (none of the green stuff has it,) especially if the sound track has "soaring music" overwhelming everything.  But badly done CC is worse than none at all--where the captioning lags behind the speakers.

Yes, Robert Redford is "difficult" I hear.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on May 15, 2007, 11:50:08 AM
Thanks for the OnDemand tips -- will have to give that a try. 

Also big fans of Deadwood at my house -- we get the season on DVD, rather than pay the HBO ransom (my personal hangup).

But we did watch last night's 2.5 Men, and Robert Wagner was great.  Holland Taylor is always wonderful, but she was great too.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on May 16, 2007, 04:23:05 PM
I saw a few minutes of the "Planet Earth" documentary on the Discovery Channel (in HD!), and they were showing these ginormous great white sharks eating seals in super-slo-mo.  I'm still a little shaken by it, and that was like 2 weeks ago.

All you see is this seal swimming in the ocean, then suddenly (well, not suddenly, exactly, because it's shown in super-slo-mo, but still) the shark comes from below with his mouth wide open.  The shark must have been swimming vertically really fast because it busts out of the water, catching the seal in its mouth, and flies out of the water like 20 feet.

I remember in "Jaws" (which I loved, it's my 9th favorite movie of all time) when the shark jumps on the back of the boat, you're like, yeah right, a shark can't do that, but you say, well, this is a great movie, so I'll forgive it that little artistic license, etc.  But this footage on "Planet Earth" confirms that, not only could a shark do what the shark did to the boat in "Jaws", but it could actually jump OVER the boat if it wanted to. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on May 16, 2007, 04:30:22 PM
"Jaws" (which I loved, it's my 9th favorite movie of all time)

You mean you have JAWS over Open Water?   j/k
Any Sopranos watchers? 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on May 16, 2007, 06:11:26 PM
Donotremove, I must thank you for the OnDemand info.  I checked it out a little, and there's a pretty good selection of free stuff.  A bunch of movies, of which a handful are pretty good -- some Hitchcock, some Woody Allen -- plus other neat stuff.  But best of all -- karaoke!!!!   Pity the hubby.  Guess who's getting industrial strength earplugs for his birthday?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: prairiepop on May 16, 2007, 09:32:51 PM
Since we live out in the woods miles from the nearest cable access, we got a satellite TV--which offers far too many channels for these old eyeballs to keep up with.  Highly recommend Turner Classic Movies [TCM] which provides tons of the old great noir flix...last night's was "The Killing", with Sterling Hayden.  Also, the Documentary channel, which has some really assorted goodies...juxtapose these, pilgrims: an hour of old Russian newsreels from WW-II, followed by something in the way of experimental dance theatre from Brazil and a Greenpeace boat excursion.  Truly like Mister Gump's box o' chocs.

Now call me an Ancient Quivering Wreck if you will, but somehow there's something therapeutic about following Wolf 'n Lou with a whole hour [2 half-hour stories] of "The Rifleman" on the Westerns channel...gee that nice Luke McCain and his splendid lad Mark...Mark doesn't shoot dope, goes to school every day, minds his Pa, and Luke may give his sideways grin at the schoolmarm and the shop lady, but nobody gets nekkid.

Have a hunch that for most of this Election Cycle, I'm gonna be hanging with Luke and the kid just to keep from sharpening my pitchfork and heading for Washington.  Ou sont les pickiteurs d'antan?  To paraphrase Winston C., clop-clop is MUCH better than war-war.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 23, 2007, 11:08:52 AM
Seeking surcease of newbie status,

I fill these boxes with cerebral flatus,

If these reflections do offend,

Let me know and I'll amend,

With words of insight, wit, and relevance,

I'll banish unicorns and pink elephants.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: weezo on May 23, 2007, 01:43:43 PM
Prairie,

We are also on Satellite, but I tend more to favor the SciFi channel, which is about to bring me a couple of ours of the variations of Star Trek. I also watch old JAG, and this morning a bunch of Air Wolf, tho I was doing some accounting on the computer while I watched Air Wolf.  I can watch the tv when I turn my head from my computer screen, which gives me a quick fix of reality when the tv lapses into commercials.

Do you do any of the movie channels? We do Starz, and have for a number of years, even tho we keep promising to alternate from time to time. But, Starz seems to change movies just as we are totally bored with what they have been showing.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 24, 2007, 10:53:08 AM
Lost fans -- you have eight months to gnaw on who's in the casket and just who was Naomi and what did Jack do that was so awful he wants to kill himself in the future.

Going to half-seasons is sad.  That much of a hiatus and you start to lose people.  This sort of downsizing seems premature, given the show's success so far.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on May 24, 2007, 04:11:16 PM
Lost fans -- you have eight months to gnaw on who's in the casket and just who was Naomi and what did Jack do that was so awful he wants to kill himself in the future.

Going to half-seasons is sad.  That much of a hiatus and you start to lose people.  This sort of downsizing seems premature, given the show's success so far.



Gotta be Ben. 

Second choice: Locke.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on May 24, 2007, 07:54:15 PM
The hubby first thought maybe Sawyer was in the box, but the way Kate said "I've got to get back to him" we kind of discounted that down the line.   Or maybe not, because you just never know.  Maybe Kate's back married to Nathan Fillion.

I took Jack's attempted suicide by recklessness as not so much the consequence of having done something specific as a general regret after realizing, once he got back to mainstream life, that he was happier on the island. I'm saying this without knowing what transpires on the island between last night's events and the rescue, so am probably way off.  Being an out of control idiot doesn't necessarily originate from a specific event, though. Signed, One Who Knows     But I did almost laugh out loud when Jack told Kate "The Golden Pass they gave us...I fly every weekend......" 

I think the flashes might have been a combination of forward and backward.  At one point, he tells the doctor to get his dad, and if Jack's drunker than him, he'll leave.   We were thinking about whether this means the flashes went both ways, or if Jack was just so out of it, he forgot his dad was gone.  Or if the writers just slipped; but that's a big one, and I don't think it would get by.

And Charlie's finally gone -- unfortunately, right before he died, he became so much more likeable than usual, and it's like "Damn, don't die now, you're interesting."  But if you've got to go, I guess that's the way.  Though I couldn't help thinking that if he'd thought about it for a second, Charlie could have watched the water gushing in, timed it to take a huge breath at the last second, and once the water pressure equalized, squirm out the window and swim upward.

And I couldn't help noticing that Hurley seems to have escaped that black cloud of doom, and is no longer handicapping himself through self-doubt.  Which is why I was sure he was going to get shot through the windshield and die, since he seems redeemed, or at least well on the way.  (I just choose not to address the way a VW microbus would probably really handle on a sandy beach.)

And -- Lost doesn't have to mean stranded on a desert island.  Perhaps the coming three mini-seasons will do some dealing with the fact that even though these people are rescued, they are still... well, Lost.  (See Jack's behavior.  See Kate still coming when Jack calls, even though her future clearly isn't with him.)  If the show goes all soapy like Gray's Anatomy or Brothers & Sisters, I'm outta here.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on May 24, 2007, 08:43:31 PM
The synopsis Comcast had on screen indicated Jack was having constant flashbacks, so the bearded, drunken and angst-ridden Jack was in the past. 

Bearded Jack who was gonna kill himself was in the future.. the whole flashback was in the future.  He said the thing about his Dad probably while too messed up to remember he was dead.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on May 24, 2007, 08:45:03 PM
Re Who's in the casket:


Gotta be Ben. 

Second choice: Locke.

I had those as my top two choices also, but in reverse order.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 25, 2007, 10:30:12 AM
I doubt it's Ben.  There is something about Ben that suggests the perennial survivor.
Locke would be my guess, as well.  I even wondered if, in the process of rescue, and some inquest into the death of Naomi by the shadowy whoevers on the ship, Jack gave Locke up.  But that's speculating with very thin material.

Jack was definitely in the future.  Note that he meets up with Kate and she makes a remark, regarding his rescue of people in the burning car, something like, "Back to pulling people out of burning wreckage, eh?"  And, then, just in case you didn't pick up on that, there's Jack crying, "We have to GO BACK TO THE ISLAND."  Whatever synopsis placed him in the past, may have been written by someone who didn't actually watch the show.  Unless one conjures flashbacks and flashforwards interspersed, and with amazing Identical Beards and Forehead Bandaids.







Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 25, 2007, 10:48:25 AM
In the interests of continuing the ascent to Hero Member, I'll add that Richard Alpert, Ben's childhood mentor and later subordinate, is also the name of Timothy Leary's famous research partner at Harvard, and later a promoter of eastern thought and psychedelia who took the name Baba Ram Dass.

I like the way the writers screw around with names.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 25, 2007, 10:53:24 AM
BTW, if Kate was rescued, then she has somehow eluded identification by the authorities and somehow settled into some kind of fugitive status.

Yet, when she is talking with Jack in the flashforward, Jack says something about "the free flight passes they gave US...."  I'm pretty sure he was saying "us" as in, you and me, but this is problematic.  The only free pass Kate would receive, were she to step forward, would be a go directly to jail pass.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on May 25, 2007, 12:24:06 PM
Locke would have had some more people show up to his funeral, no?  Thats what made me think Ben.  Unless Locke becomes a Marlon Brando figure from Apocalypse Now.  Maybe this season marks the beginning of Locke replacing Ben as the top bad guy.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 26, 2007, 12:43:42 PM
I do see Locke has heading in a Kurtz-ish direction, so I can well imagine him not having anyone show for the viewing.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 26, 2007, 12:44:44 PM
At least, that's the opinion of this Junior Member.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on May 26, 2007, 02:46:35 PM
I do see Locke has heading in a Kurtz-ish direction, so I can well imagine him not having anyone show for the viewing.

In the first season when I first started watching Lost there was a scene in which Locke was whittling in the jungle. I recall wondering at the time how many ways a bald guy can be filmed whittling in the jungle without it reminding one of Brando in Apocolypse Now. To take the Brando comparison further, wasn't there a scene in the pilot in which John put an orange peel in his mouth?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on May 26, 2007, 04:26:04 PM
Earl, I think you're right about the orange peel scene.

Re Who's in the box -- the hubby thought it might have been Michael (Walt's dad) at one point, but I accused him of racial profiling.  His thinking was Michael would probably have died poor, and a lot of people didn't like him by the time he "left" (because who knows if he really did leave or not?).  But in addition to Michael's alienating the general island public by selling them out, he killed Libby, thereby alienating the one guy who'd go to anyone's funeral, Hurley.

Supposedly there's a screenshot out there somewhere of the newspaper clipping -- which by the way, I found myself craning my neck to try and get a better angle on, as if I could, and that's exactly what the producers/writers wanted me to do, damnit! -- that shows the letter "J" in the name.  But there are a lot of "J"s out there; and if I recall, Ben isn't necessarily Ben's real name, is it?  And I'm not thinking about Henry Gale.   Will have to do some poking around when I get back to the world of DSL.

barton, you're just a status whore.  And I mean that in the nicest possible way.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on May 26, 2007, 07:19:15 PM
Supposedly there's a screenshot out there somewhere of the newspaper clipping -- which by the way, I found myself craning my neck to try and get a better angle on, as if I could, and that's exactly what the producers/writers wanted me to do, damnit! -- that shows the letter "J" in the name.  But there are a lot of "J"s out there; and if I recall, Ben isn't necessarily Ben's real name, is it?  And I'm not thinking about Henry Gale.   Will have to do some poking around when I get back to the world of DSL.

My decent into the blogs has already paid off. Here is something:

http://bp3.blogger.com/_RrObyQ3XzcY/RlaLOVYihnI/AAAAAAAAFnY/eCfTeGbNkYY/s1600-h/paper1.jpg

I don't see a date on the page, but the place where I found that link says that the date of that newspaper was 05April2007.

Another tidbit for the more paranoid viewer: In the hospital scene between Jack and his pregnant ex-wife, she asks him if he's drinking and he says he isn't. Then she presses him with, "Are you, Jack?". But what if the comma were removed from that sentence? Could "Are you Jack?" be what she is really asking him? Is it possible he is not really Jack? Hmm? Well?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on May 26, 2007, 08:10:08 PM
Actually, I think this...

http://www.lostpedia.com/images/d/d4/Newspaperclipping2.jpg

...may be the screenshot you meant.

From what I can tell, it looks like the person mentioned in the obit is from New York.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on May 26, 2007, 09:04:30 PM
Or there is this:

http://losteastereggs.blogspot.com/2007/05/newspaper-through-looking-glass.html

Stop me before I blog post again!

Come to think of it, I'll stop myself. It's Saturday night and there are gin-and-tonics to be enjoyed.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 27, 2007, 02:23:33 PM
Harrie, you don't want to know the things I had to do to achieve Junior Member status so swiftly.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 27, 2007, 02:38:05 PM
The clipping looks like it reports the death of "Jo...(folded area)...antham."   If we eliminate islanders who probably did not have an alias, that would reduce the possibles to a small group.  It also eliminates anyone who died on the island whose body might have been returned stateside after the rescue.  If it's Ben, then I think Ram Dass would have showed up, assuming he survived.  OTOH, that would suggest such interesting turns of plot and character, if it were Ben --- i.e. Ben would have to have revealed a really different side of himself, such that Jack would be able, at a later time, to actually shed tears for his demise.  Or is Jack actually shedding tears for the loss of whoever is in the clipping? --- perhaps the death, even of someone he hated, would bring up memories of terrible happenings on the island and bring guilt and grief rushing back. 

In short, we must wait.  But I get a chuckle at the intense scrutiny brought to bear on single frames of video and millions of bytes of speculation generated therefrom.




Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on May 28, 2007, 10:59:45 AM
Earl, thanks for those links!

barton (though I miss your old name), I think EyelinerGuy/BabaRamDas/Richard "Don't Call Me Herb" Alpert might be the power behind the throne, so to speak.  He mentored Ben in the beginning, then gave him the reins; but he's always around, cleaning up loose ends (ie, giving Locke the folder on his dad and planting the idea that Locke doesn't personally have to kill him), and quietly running things in his own indirect way.  So if Ben gets taken out and you think you're going to leave the island unopposed, I'd definitely watch out for EG/BRD/RA; but I don't know that any of the Flight 815 people realize this.  Locke may, but he's not on their side.  So it could get interesting. 

Off to look for John/Joseph/Jordan Lanthams....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 29, 2007, 11:22:15 AM
Harrie, as you have no doubt discovered, a search on "John Lantham" will only yield about forty quadrillion hits of "Lost" blogo-mania.  The name doesn't ring any bells with me -- it's similar to Jonathan Lethem, a writer once known (before he went all mainstreamy and Brooklyn-nostalgic) for his penchant for bent-reality and surrealist stories in which people find themselves stuck in alternate realities.  I wouldn't be surprised if "Lost" writers are Lethem fans, and maybe giving him a little salute. 

I think Jack's tears for whoever died might be due to their being someone who could implement a return to the island.  Their death would lead to his suicide attempt because he feels his last hope of return has been dashed. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 29, 2007, 11:31:38 AM
Benjamin Linus =

Bums Alien Jinn



Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on May 29, 2007, 12:37:20 PM
... a search on "John Lantham" will only yield about forty quadrillion hits of "Lost" blogo-mania. 

Yeah, I know.  But for some reason, the name "Lantham" sounds so familiar to me.   Maybe it's the fact that I've been muttering "John Lantham...Joseph Lantham....Joshua Lantham...Jordan Lantham..... Jonas Lantham..." to myself for several days.

Not totally Lost-related, but not entirely not either -- on our flight back, there was a guy one row up who had on shades, headphones, the updated grunge clothes, and he was bopping furiously to his iPod or one of those gadgets.  So we started calling him Mr. Driveshaft as in, "Hey, check out Mr. Driveshaft."  Also on the flight, though not a Lost character, was Indiana Joan -- gray leggings, a safari-looking rain coat, and a safari hat.  She looked kind of like she'd shopped the J. Peterman clearance pages and decided to wear it all together.  The lesson here:  Don't get on a flight with me and the hubby.  We'll pick you to pieces.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 29, 2007, 01:19:30 PM
Being something of an aesthete, I understand.  My observation is that most men do not know how to dress or coif themselves.  Here are things I will view with great sadness in my fellow XY'ers:

Facial hair (except for the 5% of men who ACTUALLY look nice with a beard or 'stache)

Shaved head (ditto)

Combovers (the proto shaved head)

Shirts with logos, brands, aphorisms, slogans, mottos, quips, etc.

Untucked oxford shirts that are meant to be tucked

Tucked-in tees or polos that are meant to be untucked.

Indoor wearing of sunglasses

Most Hats (unless you play baseball, herd sheep or cattle, or are religiously bound to cover your head)  -- not looking stupid in a hat is an art, and not one to be undertaken lightly by amateurs....and PLEASE REMOVE THEM INDOORS, MORON.

Sagging pants  (the triumph of style over one's normal capacity for disgust)

Clothing that pretends to be scuffed, worn, and torn.  It always looks fake, somehow, and is the essence of form spitting on function.



best,

Fellow Picker-Aparter








Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on May 29, 2007, 08:24:51 PM
But for some reason, the name "Lantham" sounds so familiar to me.

Allow me to suggest a possibilty:

"Ladies and Gentlemen, please rise for the singing of our Nationa..."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on May 29, 2007, 10:32:32 PM
But for some reason, the name "Lantham" sounds so familiar to me.

Allow me to suggest a possibilty:

"Ladies and Gentlemen, please rise for the singing of our Nationa..."

THAT'S IT!!!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on May 30, 2007, 11:40:59 AM
Earl, that was painful. 

LOL



Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 01, 2007, 12:20:36 PM
I'm glad i finally peeked into Television

My wife finally got me to check out Lost after buying the DVD of the first season and i was hooked.  I haven't known anyone else that really watches the show, so it is fun to read all your comments.

I really only make an effort to watch two other "series"  and those are  Monk and Psyche.  but only two eight week seasons a year so that's not a lot of TV watching...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 01, 2007, 12:24:12 PM


Gotta be Ben. 

Second choice: Locke.


Could be Sawyer.  There is nothing saying that Kate wound up with him.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 01, 2007, 12:26:14 PM
Anyone else find it odd that Charlie locked himself in the flooding hatch, when all he had to do was run out and grab the scuba gear?

My wife and i keep speculating that they are going to pull a switch and somehow save him at the last minute when the new season starts...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 01, 2007, 01:20:09 PM
Well i assume Charlie shut the door to save Desmond from the station getting flooded.  So Desmond could tell the others that it wasn't Penny's boat.  But what i could see is Charlie taking a deep breath as the waters were rising and swimming through the hole where the grenade went off and up to the surface.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 01, 2007, 01:20:20 PM
Anyone else find it odd that Charlie locked himself in the flooding hatch, when all he had to do was run out and grab the scuba gear?

My wife and i keep speculating that they are going to pull a switch and somehow save him at the last minute when the new season starts...

I see the Charlie thing this way -- anyone who played Combat as a kid knows you have 'til the count of five once the pin is pulled on a grenade. Whether this is true in real life, I don't know, but it's one of those rules you don't mess with.  At least I don't. 

So I'm figuring Charlie thinks he has five seconds or less, depending on whether the pin was pulled.  I don't recall whether it was, but I have the episode recorded since we were out of town and I didn't know if I'd be able to catch it, so I should double-check it.   The no-time factor, plus Charlie's being kind of convinced that he's going to die here anyway -- plus Monaghan's starring in a flick that's in pre-production -- elicited the response that it did. Plus, who doesn't want to be a hero?  (tongue in cheek)

Personally, I wondered why he didn't hold his breath, wait for the water pressure to equalize, squirm out the window and float to the surface.  I don't think getting the bends is a big issue or anything. I mean, while he was touring with Driveshaft, if he caught Dateline, 20/20 or the local news at all, he'd pretty much have had to see the story they do about what to do if you drive into a body of water.

Also in the finale, I found that Jack reminded me of Joe in Say Anything  (that would be Joe who is the subject of "Joe Lies" and 60-odd other songs by Lili Taylor) when he tells Kate he did or said something "because I love you, Kate."  WTF mister???  You're doing Juliet and practically joined at the hip with her; and you tell this other girl who's been kind of pining after you and you've been studiously ignoring something like that??  The bedside manner definitely needs work.   

Anyway, just my two cents.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on June 01, 2007, 02:46:47 PM
Someone "quoted" me as saying it had to be Benjamin Linus, or Bums Alien Jinn, in the casket.  Wasn't me.  Besides, there is the whole John Lantham thing, which resonates too much with John Locke, especially since another British philosopher was named Bentham and combining them --- AHA! -- produces "Lantham" -- well, or "Benthocke" or what have you. 

I thought Jack's "because I wuv you" line clanked horribly, for the same reason as Harrie.  You don't get to trade fluids with Juliet and say stuff like that.

I've seen a lot of speculation about Charlie and the porthole.  Wasn't it a bit narrow for him to wiggle through?  I think that is the reason he didn't take that option, though I'm not sure why he couldn't close the bulkhead from....the other side.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 01, 2007, 04:18:17 PM
Perhaps it could only be closed from the inside--which is of course how "no" boat or water vessel is actually constructed, but we'll give them artistic license there.

I just don;t think he needed to worry about closing it at all.  Even with the water pouring in, there was plenty of time for both he and Desmond to run over and grab the scuba gear and swin out the same way they came in.  A vessel that size would take a long time to "sink."

So even though he locked himself in AND the porthole is too small to swim through...consider this:   The grenade weakend the structure surrounding the pothole sufficiently so that Charlie can kick a wider hole open (or use a crow bar or whatever) and then swim through.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 01, 2007, 04:20:52 PM
Someone "quoted" me as saying it had to be Benjamin Linus, or Bums Alien Jinn, in the casket.  Wasn't me. 

Yeah...no...sorry...

It was Kam.  who apparently had one of your quotes in his/hers.  I try to delete everything that is not specific to the point and missed your additional inserted name...


Title: Charlie's death
Post by: Earl on June 01, 2007, 10:42:48 PM
An important factor in Charlie's motivation for doing the diving stunt was Desmond's prediction (courtesy of the vision thing) that if Charlie did it, Claire and Aaron would board a helicopter and be rescued. Charlie likely believed that if he messed with the scenario Desmond described, then the rescue would be scuttled. (The precedent for that had been set in a previous episode, the one where Charlie was supposed to get an arrow in the throat.) Charlie could have gotten out and probably knew it; but he willingly sacrificed himself.

That's my take, anyway.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 02, 2007, 11:20:58 AM
There's been a lot of conjecture on that as the End came down on Grey's Anatomy. The haggling had been about the actor Isaiah Washington; who pulled off a contract for another project after another award that he received from the NAACP.

Nontheless, matters of poliltics aside, what the heck Shonda Rhimes eventually did, as her end piece for the series as it has originally been, really put in the last nail!  Many of us were shocked by the particularly
calloused emotion which was chosen as a final comment on the depth of human nature.  It was as if the writer had said,"Okay, guys...this has been fun but here's what I really think!"


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on June 02, 2007, 11:24:23 AM
Earl, just to play devil's advocate, I will point out that Charlie managed to kick his drug addiction in spite of the island throwing a whole planeful of heroin at him -- this, to me, doesn't suggest the kind of fatalistic personality that would willingly drown just so someone's dream of rescue came out correctly.  Plus there's that thing called a will to live, survival instinct, or whatever.  My feeling is that if he manages to shut down the jamming signal, he would feel he's done his part and would then take a practical approach to survival.  Then again, maybe all those years of doping have taken their toll.

And perhaps there is a rather Buddhist sense of personal unimportance in the Driveshaft song lyric, "You are everybody!"  (sincerely hoping I have not misheard this....)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 02, 2007, 02:25:33 PM
My hubs and I play a game involving any character who seems about to be written out of a script/series, it's called "Guess whose contract's up!"

We do the same thing; but because Matthew Fox (Jack) is playing Racer X in the upcoming Speed Racer movie, we thought he might be biting the big one in the finale.  In one way, because I find his character so frustrating at times, I was kind of hoping he'd get it.  But he didn't.  Yet?

To go the purgatory/redemption route, if Charlie believes that his dying will save Claire and Aaron -- which is  what Desmond indicated to him, and Desmond's visions have proven close enough to true in the past that one probably wouldn't totally ignore them -- I could understand him overriding the will to live/survival instinct.  By sacrificing himself to their benefit, he's redeemed himself and dies/goes to heaven or the next plane of existence/leaves the island/whatever you want to call it. Since this theme has been rearing its ugly head throughout the past three years, I don't have too much problem buying into it.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on June 03, 2007, 02:46:30 PM
Yeah, it's funny, how the creative staff of "Lost" will always take time to offer firm denials that the island is Purgatory.   I think their idea is that the island offers a form of purgatory that these troubled characters can experience during their lifetime and, possibly, find some redemption before they return to the mundane world.  Or don't return, as in the case of Eko, Shannon, Boone, Libby, Anna Lucia, Federal Marshal Guy, et al.   Most of the island deaths are straightforward, in the sense of "once you're dead on the island, you are really dead," but the ones that aren't, such as Demond's blowing up and then somehow emerging unscratched, or Locke's miraculous rising from the corpse heap, tease at us. 



Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on June 04, 2007, 12:24:12 PM
Are there any Sopranos fans here?  the pace is getting quicker and things are really going downhill from here fast.  I think that was the first whack job I saw Silvio do.  Lost of surprise here and I will miss the series even though some seasons were less memorable than others.

As for Dr. Melfi, her current moralistic take on Tony is pretty hypocritical.  Her treatment of Tony this week was abominable. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 04, 2007, 12:56:35 PM
They are revealing Melfi to be a 2nd-rate psych.  Notice the derision and mockery she felt at the dinner table from her colleagues.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 04, 2007, 05:38:33 PM
Yeah, it's funny, how the creative staff of "Lost" will always take time to offer firm denials that the island is Purgatory.   I think their idea is that the island offers a form of purgatory that these troubled characters can experience during their lifetime and, possibly, find some redemption before they return to the mundane world.  Or don't return, as in the case of Eko, Shannon, Boone, Libby, Anna Lucia, Federal Marshal Guy, et al.   Most of the island deaths are straightforward, in the sense of "once you're dead on the island, you are really dead," but the ones that aren't, such as Demond's blowing up and then somehow emerging unscratched, or Locke's miraculous rising from the corpse heap, tease at us. 



I don't think it's purgatory, although I can see your point.  When Locke's father was there and was convinced that he was dead, there were actually enough clues there as to what really happened...

The people in the ambulance drugged him (just like they did to Julie) and then shipped him to the island...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 04, 2007, 07:43:32 PM
One mystery i want to have some light shed on is how ben and the others know so much about the losties.  Did they (Ben, Jacob) have advance knowledge flight 815 was going to crash, or did they gather this intel only afterwards and see the connections between Locke and Sawyer.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 04, 2007, 07:44:56 PM
And was Naomi lying about there being a funeral for Charlie and the wreckage of 815 found.  Or did that really occur.  Was it a cover-up by Ben and the others to fake the discovery of the flight wreckage?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 04, 2007, 08:34:30 PM
they did not know the jet was going to crash.  There was an episode that showed the Others in their camp when the plane came down and Ben thinking on the fly about planting some of their people in along with the survisors to get names and details.

The others have contact with the outside world and seem to continue to move people and things back and forth. At least until the submarine was blown up.  But I have a feeling they can still transport back and forth although very few people may know that now.

So after they had people's names they could do their homework on them.


At least, that's my take...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 04, 2007, 08:42:46 PM
And was Naomi lying about there being a funeral for Charlie and the wreckage of 815 found.  Or did that really occur.  Was it a cover-up by Ben and the others to fake the discovery of the flight wreckage?


Would guess that the others planted something about the "wreck" so that people would not come looking for the survivors...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 04, 2007, 10:04:02 PM
One mystery i want to have some light shed on is how ben and the others know so much about the losties.

I took that to be one of the big questions of Lost, and therefore one with a convoluted, not too soon to be divulged resolution, as it probably ties in with the larger scheme of how/why things are done on the Island, why it exists, who's in charge (if anyone) here, etc.  I always figured the plane crash was unexpected; but judging from the organization and scope of the data (individual, thick folders containing detailed information) and how quickly it was assembled, I also thought someone with massive resources was behind the scenes.  You know, with a big IT room and a staff and everything.

Someone with that kind of money, resources, and apparent motive could probably plant false information about Flight 815 fairly easily.  (Penny's dad?  Alvar Hanso?  Someone else entirely?  I dunno.)

I'm probably sooooo wrong.


Title: Lost Questions
Post by: Earl on June 04, 2007, 10:37:33 PM
It's a good thing we have some time to sort these issues. Until February 2008, to be exact. Here's a Summer time waster we could have a little fun with before the Fall season begins and we start discussing those shows: Let's list every "Lost" question/riddle/dilemma/mystery/enigma that, after three full seasons, remains un- or partially answered/resolved.

I'll get things going with an appetizer:

Who or what is the smoke monster security system? What is its nature and purpose? Is it a sentient being or is it being controlled by some other sentient being? Or both? Discuss.

Did the producers just decide to drop the tantalizing plotline involving Libby's character (i.e., the revelation that she was a patient in the same facility as Hurley) after the actress playing her was arrested for driving drunk? Discuss.

Why is Rose suddenly OK with the idea of a rescue? Wasn't she of the same mindset as Locke about that?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: thanatopsy on June 05, 2007, 12:03:07 AM
Commenting on television is a rarity for me. But I just watched a movie that damn near moved me to tears --- "Exit Smiling" {1926} starring beautiful Beatrice Lilllie with Jack Pickford was hilarious but filled with pathos as well. The bad guy gets his retribution, the good guy gets his girl, but (alas!) the heroine went home alone.

Ah, they just don't make them like they used to. :'(


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on June 05, 2007, 10:39:12 AM
This "Lost" thing.  I've never watched but reading all these posts about the show makes me wonder if the writers had first seen the episodes of "The Prisoner"?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 05, 2007, 10:43:17 AM
Don't know whether it's the general consensus, but there's always been discussion about Lost writers borrowing from a number of sources, both moving media and print; The Prisoner is often mentioned.  If you're going to steal, borrow, or whatever you choose to call it, why not from the best?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 05, 2007, 11:13:55 AM
One mystery i want to have some light shed on is how ben and the others know so much about the losties.

I took that to be one of the big questions of Lost, and therefore one with a convoluted, not too soon to be divulged resolution, as it probably ties in with the larger scheme of how/why things are done on the Island, why it exists, who's in charge (if anyone) here, etc.  I always figured the plane crash was unexpected; but judging from the organization and scope of the data (individual, thick folders containing detailed information) and how quickly it was assembled, I also thought someone with massive resources was behind the scenes.  You know, with a big IT room and a staff and everything.

Someone with that kind of money, resources, and apparent motive could probably plant false information about Flight 815 fairly easily.  (Penny's dad?  Alvar Hanso?  Someone else entirely?  I dunno.)

I'm probably sooooo wrong.



oooohh, Penny's "dad"   I think you're on to something there...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 05, 2007, 11:16:16 AM
This "Lost" thing.  I've never watched but reading all these posts about the show makes me wonder if the writers had first seen the episodes of "The Prisoner"?

The Prisoner was a great show.  I hadn't noticed the similarities until you mentioned them...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on June 05, 2007, 11:26:42 AM
As Harrie noted, Lost fans often see hommages, references, etc.  to The Prisoner.  Which brings up Earl's study question about the smoke monster, which of course reminds of "Rover" (the big angry balloon) on The Prisoner.  I take the Smoke Monster to be part of the central mystery of the island which was, somehow, already there and was essentially discovered by some group of people in the past and then that discovery led to the Dharma project, the secrecy, the shadowy cabal of wealth and power that is keeping the place secret and so on.   I take the Smoke Monster to be something beyond human science, something that is an anomaly of nature and very much part of the magic of the island.   What is most intriguing about the SM is that it has some kind of moral imperative -- it's not just an unsentient destructive force that will tear apart whoever comes along.  It looks over a person and makes some kind of decision, based on who that person is.

   


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 05, 2007, 12:06:58 PM
yes, no doubt, there are some things on the island that are not in any human's control...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 05, 2007, 03:10:16 PM
they did not know the jet was going to crash.  There was an episode that showed the Others in their camp when the plane came down and Ben thinking on the fly about planting some of their people in along with the survisors to get names and details.

At least, that's my take...

I rememeber that scene, but couldn't shake the feeling that Ben was perhaps acting a little in front of his troops.  If he had the knowledge that the flight would crash, he would have to at least pretend its a surprise when it happens. 

The smoke monster's morality is odd.  Nearly every "lost" member has some guilt to deal with.  Infidelity from Sun. Michael has killed. Sawyer and Kate have killed.  Jack is an MD so he may have made mistakes in his past.  Sayeed killed and tortured.  Hurley's bad luck killed off a few people too...  But the smoke monster chooses to off ecko after he had pretty much (aside from self-defense) turned away from his murderous past.  I guess thems the brakes though, when you're dealing with a nebulous smoke monster.... remember it tried to attack Kate's group...  Maybe it skips over the innocent.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 05, 2007, 04:04:19 PM
Are there any Sopranos fans here?  the pace is getting quicker and things are really going downhill from here fast.  I think that was the first whack job I saw Silvio do.  Lost of surprise here and I will miss the series even though some seasons were less memorable than others.

As for Dr. Melfi, her current moralistic take on Tony is pretty hypocritical.  Her treatment of Tony this week was abominable. 

Silvio killed a guy by beating him to death and then they had to cut the guy up, if I remember correctly.

Tony is all alone. Ironic that he is back in his mother's house in his bedroom, watching the door---probably like he was when he was a kid--waiting for the bad news to come walking through it.

I think that he is not necessarily going down for the count next week. There's a possibility he talks to the feds still---and I am amazed that Paulie is still alive.

And for some reason, I think Meadow will be having a big role in what happens to T.

I will say this...the end for Bobby was a beautifully and artistically well done shooting---and I mean by the cameras, not the guns. how about the little figurine with its hand over its mouth, and him crashing down on the railroad, with the building that said "Newark" falling down next to him.

REally going to miss this show.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 05, 2007, 04:08:56 PM
So...

we figure Paulie flipped, right?  Or was it Patsie?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 05, 2007, 05:18:34 PM
Paulie was the guy who called the guy who called Italy for the hit.... but then the hit went down all wrong.  So on one side, you think he's with Tony, on the other hand Phils still breathing and Paulie takes responsibility.  All we know is Tony considered killing Paulie but offed Christopher instead in the next episode.

Vito, Ralphy, Christopher, now Bobby and Syl...  this "glorified crew" is gone and Tony is responsible for personally killing half of it. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 05, 2007, 05:20:42 PM
What we don't know is who was responsible for the wrong address.  Was Patsy or Paulie, as far as I can tell from the episode.

If Paulie, he did a great acting job on Sil.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 05, 2007, 05:22:59 PM
Was that the correct address of Phils Gooma?  Wasn't she the woman that got killed?  Or were they totally unrelated?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 05, 2007, 05:25:01 PM
I figured unrelated


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 06, 2007, 11:17:08 AM
Well, I read in the Star-Ledger, yesterday, that it was Phil's mistress, and it was her dad, who unfortunately, looked like Phil.

I also read that the house is NOT Livia's, but another storage house they happened to keep. I'll see if I can find the article and I'll post it for you.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 06, 2007, 11:30:33 AM
Okay, go here and read the last three entries:  http://blog.nj.com/alltv/the_sopranos/


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 06, 2007, 12:34:58 PM
Okay, go here and read the last three entries:  http://blog.nj.com/alltv/the_sopranos/


Thanks for the link.  Nice to see more Soprano talk.


Title: From the Earth to the Moon
Post by: Dzimas on June 07, 2007, 08:14:22 AM
I couldn't resist the box set of HBO's From the Earth to the Moon,

http://www.amazon.com/Earth-Moon-Signature-Mason-Adams/dp/B000A0GYD2/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1/002-9042347-4177625?ie=UTF8&s=dvd&qid=1181218346&sr=1-1

I noticed Criterion had also repackaged For All Mankind,

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0780022319/sr/ref=pd_cp_d_3/002-9042347-4177625?ie=UTF8&qid=1181218346&sr=1-1&pf_rd_m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pf_rd_s=center-41&pf_rd_r=1CWVFBBEQTWYNE2BTYKH&pf_rd_t=201&pf_rd_p=252362301&pf_rd_i=B000A0GYD2

but I would say you get much more with the HBO mini-series.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on June 07, 2007, 12:50:38 PM
HBO's "Big Love" starts its new season on June 11 at 9 PM Eastern.  I wonder how Mitt Romney feels about this slice of Morman life being right out there and subject to water cooler talk?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on June 07, 2007, 01:46:46 PM
this Sunday is the final Sopranos episode and I'm feeling bereft already.  I hope it won't disappoint (but probably will).  I was somewhat disappointed at the end of Rome, a series I loved as much as Sopranos.  I am admittedly a history buff and love series that take place in the past (let's say from the 16th and earlier).

I'm hoping Harry Potter won't disappoint either and I'm finishing a reread in time for the last book.

guess all good things come to an end.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 08, 2007, 05:34:11 PM
However it ends, there will be disappointment for lots of people because it won't end the way they thought it would or should.

There's one theory that Dr. Melfi is the one that takes out Tony.

Who knows??

But, I'll be watching, that's fer sure!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: bankshot1 on June 10, 2007, 09:49:40 AM
I heard the Melfi ending-IMO way too contrived-

there's no way the Soprano "family"- either one ends up in a good place

the two "realistic" endings are:

1-Tony, cornered, with clearly the "B" team, gets whacked in the war with Phil... see below post-Tony scenario

2-Tony, already a cornered rat, turns informer, turns to FBI agent Harris, probably Tony's most honest relationship, drops dimes all over the place, ends up in witness protection in AZ and starts doing peyote in the desert.

less realistic ending-Janice who got more notchs on her belt that Tony, takes him out-kind of a revenge of the Soprano's females.
Phil the old school guy install Jr., the senile head of the family as the Don of the family, and then proceeds to run NJ as he sees fit. 
Meadow marries Patsy's kid and never really escapes the "life". 

Carmela and AJ? They live in the house she built and in a terrible thunderstorm, Carmela and her "baby" get crushed as the house bulilt with shoddy materials disintegrates.

or Tony wakes up next to Suzanne Pleshette and, says "I had the weirdest dream"

the Bobby/train scene was riveting stuff.




Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 10, 2007, 04:10:33 PM
Nah

Tony'll survive

And he'd never turn rat


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 10, 2007, 10:18:05 PM
Well, most of the people over at TWP are a little miffed with tonight's episode of The Sopranos.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 10, 2007, 10:30:15 PM
FUCK EM


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 10, 2007, 11:58:48 PM
That was a brilliant final scene... my heart was beating so fast in anticipation.

the bashing that people are doing is just the noise of the dim crowd expecting a finale to be shrink wrapped for them. 

in my opinion, phil getting his was the feel good hit of the series.

tony getting his (?) at the end or not.. well... just cuz you don't get it you shouldn't bash it.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 11, 2007, 12:16:26 AM
the fade to black makes sense when we realize the series has been shown through Tony's eyes, and if everything is black.. well that says it all.  Remember Bobby Bacala telling Tony "You probably don't even hear it when it happens huh?"  Tony was likely knocked off.  Perhaps AJ and Carmela too as Meadow stumbles in on the entire scene...

Question: Didn't Patsy Parisi know that Tony and Carm were going to Halstons?

Remember the uncomfortable scene with Patsy and wife at the Sopranos?  The wife fingering the fine china.

Patsi did him in!

A couple of folks on nj.com point out one of the suspicious characters in the restaurant:

gacboy says...

I advise everyone to watch the last scene closely. Look at the patron in the trucker hat. It was David Scantino (Robert Patrick) from season 2 - the owner of the sporting goods store that Tony busted out and left despondant. He clearly has a reason to do harm Tony, having lost his life to Tony's lifestyle, and he looked awful shifty. Coincidence that he was in the diner at the same time? I think not.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 11, 2007, 12:54:48 AM
Actually.. i'm wrong It wasn't a FADE to black. It was an abrupt cut.  You can take from it what you will...

Theory A) Life goes on for the Sopranos but the audience was whacked
Theory B) Tony got whacked, thus the series fittingly is over

Lot of people are wondering why would Tony get killed?

Why not?  NY remnants and or Carmine Lubertazzi might want him gone.  Patsi parisi may have done it. Paulie was acting suspicious the whole show.  Or it could be that a lone gunmen (the shifty looking guy in halstons who some say was the sporting goods store owner from season two).


Title: Re: Television
Post by: bankshot1 on June 11, 2007, 07:47:37 AM
 I thought I lost my cable signal, its as if the life were snatched from my tube

I was confused then I laughed, my wife was pissed.

one could over-analyze this thing, but the best I got is:

we're watching a guy with his family in a run of the mill diner wondering if in the next second they get blown away or if the the onion rings were good. Its the constant threat to this guy's life that he has chosen. The paranoia/fear they all must accept and incorporate, which most normal people would find crushing (phil's head says "hello").

I'm leaning towards the ultimate family hit.

but....

great series, had me hooked Sunday's at 9 for 8 years




Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 11, 2007, 01:02:56 PM
I liked the end (though the "tense" cross-cutting between the family eating onion rings and Meadow parallel-parking was a little silly) but question the choice of Journey's "Don't Stop Believin'"--it seems like Chase was intentionally going with a kind of open-ended joke ending, I mean, as good as the song choice on The Sopranos has been, Chase going for a cheesy Journey song to end it was a pretty good joke. 

On the other hand, "John from Cincinnati" was fucking horrible, terrible concept, terrible casting, terrible acting, HBO's worst decision since Stuart Pankin.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 11, 2007, 01:36:07 PM
Sopranos ending was a riot! I laughed out loud when AJ set his SUV on fire,, and the gruesomeness of "Grandpa" Leotardo saying "good-bye" to  the twins who moments later take a short ride over his head was classicly dark, dark Chase.

The ending made total sense to me. The title of the episode being "Made in America" and the gathering at the fractured Norman Rockwellian painting of a small town restaurant replete with young lovers, cub scouts, et alia with the sociopathic crime boss and his family sitting in its center...the little bells jingling a warning to Tony or sounding a tiny knell for the viewer each time the door opened...the tension building with Meadow parking her car...will she get there before he gets his...will she get there and see it all happen...and the final cut to black and to silence with the last words heard being "Don't stop"!

Brilliant! Once again we fall for the big idea that everything that ends must make sense to us all---and why is that, when life itself makes so little sense to most everyone?

I absolutely loved this show and will miss it, but I don't regret not knowing Tony's ultimate fate.

The cynic in me says that I'll see that when the movie comes out.

The artist in me says that I can create my own final chapter--and that's okay.

A gift of sorts from the writer/producer.

take the ending of the classic movie,  "Casablanca", when Rick and Captain Renault go off together with the line, "This could be the beginning of a beautiful friendship".

 I've often wondered what actually happened in that friendship as the world war heated up and eventually drew to its own conclusion. What ever happened to those two? Do I need to know for sure? Not really.

Do I need to know for sure what happens to Tony Soprano? Not really...and that, I find is refreshing, in a way.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 11, 2007, 01:45:53 PM
Well said, MrUtley.  Especially when on other boards there are so many loud folks who feel they got cheated by Chase.  Oft repeated:  "that ending sucked. i wasted 8 fuckin years of my life"



Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on June 11, 2007, 02:11:59 PM

I advise everyone to watch the last scene closely. Look at the patron in the trucker hat. It was David Scantino (Robert Patrick) from season 2 - the owner of the sporting goods store that Tony busted out and left despondant. He clearly has a reason to do harm Tony, having lost his life to Tony's lifestyle, and he looked awful shifty. Coincidence that he was in the diner at the same time? I think not.

Didn't he hang himself in his basement, ashamed at having gambled his family's savings away, etc.?

Robert Patrick is great, and I'm hoping it was him, and when I see it again I'll look very carefully, etc.  But I'm pretty sure the David Scatino character was RIP in Season 2 or 3.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on June 11, 2007, 02:18:48 PM
I loved the ending, once I got over the shock of the screen turning black.  I thought "what the fu*k?"

But then I realized, life doesn't come in neat endings.  I just assume Tony's life would continue to spiral downhill and he continues to lose control of his gang, due to deaths, incapacitation (Silvio).  the marriage is held together with spit (Tony and Carmela will stay together, barely); AJ is a lost soul; Meadow turned out not to be the sharp one we thought.  She became a lawyer after floundering around, going to defend mobsters, probably.

Probably Tony will go to jail under the RICO law rather than as a mobster.  We've watched the family go downhill and we've seen Tony as the cold blooded killer he really is (gone is the fuzzy warm feeling we got watching him with those ducks in his pool).

If you've seen enough French movies, you know that tidy neat endings don't often show up there.  Chase did the same: he gave you a glimpse into mafia life and it wasn't pretty.  No glorification there.  These mobsters are losers.

I wonder what will Chase come up with next, if anything at all.  What can he possible do to top this and I hope he doesn't give in and go for a full-length movie.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on June 11, 2007, 02:20:31 PM
I'm a "Sopranos" addict, and I liked the last episode, thinking about what happened after the cut, etc., but what always had me thinking was the whole Livia thing.

Nancy Marchand was a great actress.  She has a long list of acclaimed performances, of which I have only seen a few.  All I know is she was hilarious as the police commissioner in the "Naked Gun" movie, and as the rich old lady in "Brain Donors".   As far as "The Sopranos", the show was never more interesting than when she was on the screen, and no character since has ever been as funny or as creepy as she was.

I can only imagine what they had in mind for where "The Sopranos" was heading in terms of the ongoing story, etc., that they had to change when she died.







Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on June 11, 2007, 02:30:41 PM
Once again we fall for the big idea that everything that ends must make sense to us all---and why is that, when life itself makes so little sense to most everyone?

Word, but you can still gripe.  I'm not griping, but I can see how one might.  A TV show isn't life, it's a TV show, and people feel like they've given their time, made the investment, and they deserve a payoff, etc.  In my opinion, the payoff was great, even if it left unanswered questions, but that's just my perception.

I'm more miffed about the "Pine Barrens" episode than I am the finale.  How do you just drop the whole Russian mafia story-line and not ever address it ever again?  What happened to that big crazy Russian "interior decorator"?  What happened to Paulie's car, etc.?  I've heard all the, "Well, the show doesn't gift-wrap things or spoon-feed you, etc.," and I buy that to an extent.

For me, dropping the Russian mafia thing without any explanation is like it would be if the finale episode opened with Tony and Phil having lunch and talking about some new project, with no mention of the previous episode in which war was declared and Phil and Tony went into hiding.  Sure, you can always say, "Well, the show doesn't gift-wrap or spoon-feed," but that doesn't help when you're scratching your head saying, "Yeah, but I thought Tony and Phil were at war... did I miss something?"



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on June 11, 2007, 03:28:16 PM
Life doesn't come with neat endings....yeah, but this isn't life, it's television.  No wonder the cast kept their traps shut about the ending.  Most of em probably would like to forget they were part of the con. 

Perhaps they should have paid their writers more...then they would have been willing to actually write an ending to the series.  They could have at least taken a page from the writers of Newhart

I give it  ??? ??? ??? ??? ???


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on June 11, 2007, 03:31:45 PM
Life doesn't come with neat endings....yeah, but this isn't life, it's television. 

Were you listening to the Dude's story?



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 11, 2007, 03:35:17 PM
A con?  I don't feel conned out of anything.  I feel like they've given me something i can think about for years to come. "Don't Stop... believing"

AJ: You always told me to remember the good times.

Tony: I said that?

Livia: Its all a big nothing.

This isn't like Sports where we expect there to be a winner and a loser at the end.  This show was a form of entertainment yes, but a form of art in its own right.  Not sport entertainment.  Art entertainment. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 11, 2007, 03:42:04 PM
I'm a "Sopranos" addict, and I liked the last episode, thinking about what happened after the cut, etc., but what always had me thinking was the whole Livia thing.

Nancy Marchand was a great actress.  She has a long list of acclaimed performances, of which I have only seen a few.  All I know is she was hilarious as the police commissioner in the "Naked Gun" movie, and as the rich old lady in "Brain Donors".   As far as "The Sopranos", the show was never more interesting than when she was on the screen, and no character since has ever been as funny or as creepy as she was.

I can only imagine what they had in mind for where "The Sopranos" was heading in terms of the ongoing story, etc., that they had to change when she died.


I agree with you. Her surviving would have changed everything--and while the character of Janice made the clear link to Livia, she was more distraction than attraction to the show.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on June 11, 2007, 03:43:05 PM
Art?  Last thing I saw on television that even resembled art was Carnivale.  It's television....

Don't stop believing....when a television show becomes self-referential, it's a sure bet the writers have long since stopped taking their job seriously. 



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 11, 2007, 03:44:02 PM
Once again we fall for the big idea that everything that ends must make sense to us all---and why is that, when life itself makes so little sense to most everyone?


I'm more miffed about the "Pine Barrens" episode than I am the finale.  How do you just drop the whole Russian mafia story-line and not ever address it ever again?  What happened to that big crazy Russian


Sometimes a Cigar is just a Cigar.

I always thought that was a filler episode anyway.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on June 11, 2007, 03:45:16 PM

Quote
I always thought that was a filler episode anyway.

Exactly!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 11, 2007, 03:45:26 PM
Life doesn't come with neat endings....yeah, but this isn't life, it's television.  No wonder the cast kept their traps shut about the ending.  Most of em probably would like to forget they were part of the con. 

Perhaps they should have paid their writers more...then they would have been willing to actually write an ending to the series.  They could have at least taken a page from the writers of Newhart

I give it  ??? ??? ??? ??? ???

Well, no, it's not television---and that's what made the show successful all along--because it wasn't the usual predictable fare. And it stayed that way all the way through.

Toss your cynicism aside---you and others were disappointed because you never really understood the show in the first place.

I give it a  ;) ;) ;) ;)  ;D


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on June 11, 2007, 03:49:16 PM
Utley...I understood the show perfectly.  I had no expectations of it other than entertainment...and it was entertainment. 

And I did enjoy the self-referential fade to black..and the "what did my TV die?"  as if the end of the Sopranos equates with the end of television as we know it.....Today is truly a black day.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on June 11, 2007, 03:59:18 PM

I always thought that was a filler episode anyway.

Really?  I always thought the "Pine Barrens" episode was seminal, vis a vis Cristufuh's relationship with Paulie, Tony's doubts about Paulie's competence, etc.

It's probably my favorite or 2nd-favorite (the other being "University") episode, BHWDIK?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on June 11, 2007, 04:15:55 PM
But, even the Pine Barrens had an aura of camp about it.  Where to dump the body, Valery chewing through the carpet and getting re-hit, Tony's girl trouble, the sharing of the catsup in a beat up van...  If not, why no resolution?

The series started out as a joke....a guy walks into a psychiatrists office....  As the series progressed, Tony's character became progressively darker, and Antony Jr. became the joke.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on June 11, 2007, 04:24:51 PM
But, even the Pine Barrens had an aura of camp about it. 

Without some camp, it wouldn't really be a "The Sopranos".  Look no further than the great exchange, after Paulie learns from Tony (on a bad cell phone connection) that the crazy Russian is actually a former A-team commando who worked for the Ministry of the Interior and killed 8 Chechnyans by himself:

PAULIE
He says this guy killed 18 Czechlozovakians... and he's an interior decorator!

CRISTUFUH (confused)
Jesus.  His apartment looked like shit...



Now that's some good "Sopranos" stuff, and most definitely camp...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 11, 2007, 04:26:48 PM
Anthony Jr seems to have been having a turnaround in his life.  The writers took him from despair to hookin up with hottie rather quickly. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 11, 2007, 04:30:19 PM
I find it interesting that Tony felt like he had to get rid of Christopher ... his protege.. who had gone into the movie biz... and now here he is with his son, encouraging him to go into the movie biz.

Its like in some odd way, Tony was redeeming Christopher's career choices through his own son.  Giving AJ the life Christopher would have wanted.

While for himself, he keeps his son out of the family business where he had to off his adopted son who had strayed too far.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 11, 2007, 04:42:46 PM
But, even the Pine Barrens had an aura of camp about it.  Where to dump the body, Valery chewing through the carpet and getting re-hit, Tony's girl trouble, the sharing of the catsup in a beat up van...  If not, why no resolution?

The series started out as a joke....a guy walks into a psychiatrists office....  As the series progressed, Tony's character became progressively darker, and Antony Jr. became the joke.

You are truly a moron


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on June 11, 2007, 04:46:50 PM
Kid...I suspect you have issues with your own lack of intelligence...maybe if you start reading you can get it up to your age.







Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on June 11, 2007, 04:48:39 PM
The Sopranos was nothing is not high camp....and some of its high points were the blatant send ups of "family values!"   

I'd rate that  ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on June 11, 2007, 04:48:51 PM
You are truly a moron

That would be me....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on June 11, 2007, 04:51:31 PM
Anthony Jr seems to have been having a turnaround in his life.  The writers took him from despair to hookin up with hottie rather quickly. 

LOL


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 11, 2007, 05:00:46 PM
Kid...I suspect you have issues with your own lack of intelligence...maybe if you start reading you can get it up to your age.







How is it, aside from, "Mommy...", that you find A.J. a joke?  The attempted suicide?  His want to defend his nation?

Sick.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on June 11, 2007, 05:08:21 PM
How is it, aside from, "Mommy...", that you find A.J. a joke?  The attempted suicide?  His want to defend his nation?

The way he switched so easily from wanting to defend his nation to being okay with foregoing army enlistment to take a movie-related job (the opportunity for which being due to his father's "business" contacts and influence) was pretty funny.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 11, 2007, 05:20:54 PM
I thought it was funny how the new shrink looked like Katie Couric.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on June 11, 2007, 05:49:26 PM
There's also something Charlie Brownesque about the make-out scene where his car blows up.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 11, 2007, 08:57:22 PM
I thought it sucked how "John from Cinncinnati" sucked.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 11, 2007, 10:45:05 PM
kam,

I just spent the ultimate 12 hour day with the Sopranos,their fans,and the disgruntled.

After  somewhere a bit short of 600 posts, only two of us mentioned that,no,the scene was not from Tony's point of view; go back over the camera work and you realize we were all there observing  so there is kind of an omni view rather than the story being told from his take.

lulu:

Meadow has always  directed her education toward Law (you may have gotten thrown for a loop recently when at a dinner at Artie Bucco's, other couples come up to Carmela and Tony about the news of Meadow and the Parisi kid being engaged. Carmela has built up some lines in a scene at Meadow's bedroom door where she finds Meadow has a dormitory chum visiting and the dialogue fills us in that this young woman with a medical career orientation kind of bleeds into a mistep in the dialogue, whether or not Carmela is improvising(?), which infers Meadow dropped out of medicine. Not that I recall. Meadow worked in a community based law program, which led to the episode about the black boyfriend, which everybody has preferred to forget, totally erased from memory by the time that A.J. acquires a girl-friend while on one of his rare jobs.

oilcanboyd,

I think you are on about  Marchand, great actress, consensus of opinion today came back with this. The reason that Tony gives A.J. such a hard time will amaze you, now that psychiatrists have been changed. The theory goes that Tony was like A.J. is now, and the excuse, as you've heard given to the new psychiatrist(Couric or not), is because Livia was such a passive-aggressive that's  why Tony turned out as he did. Carmela, as apparently quite the opposite of her mother-in-law Livia, was a very comforting supportive mother to A.J.  but what do you get? Same thing.   

Posters predict A.J. will have a great career in the mob by the time that Tony thinks that running North Jersey was as Corrado said," I did. Think of that...". 

One patron went so far as to describe what happens when Meadow enters the restaurant, the man at the end of the counter, who went to men's room(much talk whether bathrooms still have cabinet-tanks on the wall above the toilet, for the second replay of historical Sparks Restaurant when Gotti had Catalano shot) is taking aim at Tony, Meadow throws a tackle at her father and Tony gets off with a flesh wound in the shoulder, A.J. is under the table, and Carmela grabs the gun from the floor and takes aim at the assassin to defend her family. Putatively, what we didn't see last night.  By the way, the diner is in no small town, it is in Bloomfield. I did not get this off of HBO.com because they took so many hits today that they crashed.

People were overly concerned about the identity of the cat.

I can't remember what I was going to tell Lhoffman now! If I have mixed up any of either kam and/or oilcanboyd's remarks with my responses, will try to untangle it later or by and by.

Oh, yeah, one more thing, a couple of guys read the credits very closely last night, I never can read them that fast, and the name of the actor(theoretically) who played the man at the end of the counter who goes to the men's room -- Nate Leotardo. (" Phil's nephew?")

Sometimes people think that now the Jersey mob, like the New York mob, of the Five families, is pretty much out of the picture. Somehow, I don't feel that way, the guys that I have to talk with in passing when in North Jersey talk pretty much as on camera, as far as aspects of being knowledgeable about anything on the other side of the river; the guys that I'd rather not talk with,are obviously shrewder. One doesn't want to be misconstrued because they can be drastically superstitious in their interpretation of things as well as temperamental.  So this is the way I feel when I hear (in the plot-line) something like, "Little Italy used to be at least 40 blocks square and now is one street of shops and cafes...."

I feel sad.    Then I kick myself. Because all the people I know from there live in the suburbs. This was progress. The other is nostalgia.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 11, 2007, 11:58:43 PM
I thought of David Chase's sort of lack of comfort with being the beacon of post-millennial malaise when he retreats to comfort food, the onion ring, the zero, I'm giving you people zero, I'm giving you Journey, I gave you a journey, but I'm not giving you an end. 


Title: The Sopranas
Post by: Dzimas on June 12, 2007, 05:18:31 AM
If nothing else I liked the theme song of The Sopranas.  It is one of those shows which I missed out on for the most part here in Lithuania.  They started showing it last year on LTV, but I have no idea from which point, and I don't try to follow along, but my daughter has gotten caught up in its spell.


Title: The Sopranos
Post by: Dzimas on June 12, 2007, 05:21:31 AM
Sopranos, sorry. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 12, 2007, 09:22:41 AM
I've been meaning to ask you whose movie is that(?) as, from the insignia to the right of Cabeza de Vaca, I realized it was not a book that you were reading (and then realized the reason it was under your name might be more fundamental but, hey,each to his own taste in signifiers).

It's one of those  heroic names that I recall sounds familiar but haven't a clue after 58 years what were the extent of his accomplishments in the "new world"(of course little did we know at the time that along would come a president who decided to think of us in that way again!)

If your daughter is in that ingenue age group, I can not remember in any detail the more insidious plots for the teenage group a la Sopranos other than one of Meadow's first "true loves" in the neighborhood (of community) gets knocked off. Very likely David Chase could not resist borrowing themes evident in such works of art as Romeo and Juliet as remarked by the greats of Italian cinema.

The actors involved in a production such as the Sopranos, with an extremely long run to boot, love it when their show goes into European distribution. It's a little like collecting retirement benefits since, you get paid for work you have done, while not working at present.  It's one of the ingenious achievements that agents (or the union,itself) have worked into the contracts via SAG(the screen actors guild).


Title: Cabeza de Vaca
Post by: Dzimas on June 12, 2007, 09:53:35 AM
Cabeza de Vaca

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0101529/

I selected him since he came up in the chapters on Spanish expeditions in American Colonies.  One of the few truly heroic figures of the time.  The movie is well worth watching.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 12, 2007, 09:59:45 AM
kam,

I just spent the ultimate 12 hour day with the Sopranos,their fans,and the disgruntled.

After  somewhere a bit short of 600 posts, only two of us mentioned that,no,the scene was not from Tony's point of view; go back over the camera work and you realize we were all there observing  so there is kind of an omni view rather than the story being told from his take.

lulu:

Meadow has always  directed her education toward Law (you may have gotten thrown for a loop recently when at a dinner at Artie Bucco's, other couples come up to Carmela and Tony about the news of Meadow and the Parisi kid being engaged. Carmela has built up some lines in a scene at Meadow's bedroom door where she finds Meadow has a dormitory chum visiting and the dialogue fills us in that this young woman with a medical career orientation kind of bleeds into a mistep in the dialogue, whether or not Carmela is improvising(?), which infers Meadow dropped out of medicine. Not that I recall. Meadow worked in a community based law program, which led to the episode about the black boyfriend, which everybody has preferred to forget, totally erased from memory by the time that A.J. acquires a girl-friend while on one of his rare jobs.

oilcanboyd,

I think you are on about  Marchand, great actress, consensus of opinion today came back with this. The reason that Tony gives A.J. such a hard time will amaze you, now that psychiatrists have been changed. The theory goes that Tony was like A.J. is now, and the excuse, as you've heard given to the new psychiatrist(Couric or not), is because Livia was such a passive-aggressive that's  why Tony turned out as he did. Carmela, as apparently quite the opposite of her mother-in-law Livia, was a very comforting supportive mother to A.J.  but what do you get? Same thing.   

Posters predict A.J. will have a great career in the mob by the time that Tony thinks that running North Jersey was as Corrado said," I did. Think of that...". 

One patron went so far as to describe what happens when Meadow enters the restaurant, the man at the end of the counter, who went to men's room(much talk whether bathrooms still have cabinet-tanks on the wall above the toilet, for the second replay of historical Sparks Restaurant when Gotti had Catalano shot) is taking aim at Tony, Meadow throws a tackle at her father and Tony gets off with a flesh wound in the shoulder, A.J. is under the table, and Carmela grabs the gun from the floor and takes aim at the assassin to defend her family. Putatively, what we didn't see last night.  By the way, the diner is in no small town, it is in Bloomfield. I did not get this off of HBO.com because they took so many hits today that they crashed.

People were overly concerned about the identity of the cat.

I can't remember what I was going to tell Lhoffman now! If I have mixed up any of either kam and/or oilcanboyd's remarks with my responses, will try to untangle it later or by and by.

Oh, yeah, one more thing, a couple of guys read the credits very closely last night, I never can read them that fast, and the name of the actor(theoretically) who played the man at the end of the counter who goes to the men's room -- Nate Leotardo. (" Phil's nephew?")

Sometimes people think that now the Jersey mob, like the New York mob, of the Five families, is pretty much out of the picture. Somehow, I don't feel that way, the guys that I have to talk with in passing when in North Jersey talk pretty much as on camera, as far as aspects of being knowledgeable about anything on the other side of the river; the guys that I'd rather not talk with,are obviously shrewder. One doesn't want to be misconstrued because they can be drastically superstitious in their interpretation of things as well as temperamental.  So this is the way I feel when I hear (in the plot-line) something like, "Little Italy used to be at least 40 blocks square and now is one street of shops and cafes...."

I feel sad.    Then I kick myself. Because all the people I know from there live in the suburbs. This was progress. The other is nostalgia.



You spent 12 hours talking about a television show?

And A.J. needs help??????





Title: Re: Television
Post by: whiskeypriest on June 12, 2007, 10:01:46 AM
Kid...I suspect you have issues with your own lack of intelligence...maybe if you start reading you can get it up to your age.






After years of posting with the guy, I can tell you "Moron" is simply kid's way of saying "I disagree."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 12, 2007, 10:05:44 AM
Funny saying bloomfield is no small town. Ever been there?

Geeze.

Exclusive interview with David Chase on what the last episode all means and other important (to some)  stuff on "Made in America" episode:

http://www.nj.com/columns/ledger/sepinwall/index.ssf?/base/columns-0/1181623651270570.xml&coll=1


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 12, 2007, 10:59:42 AM
"You spent 12 hours talking about a television show?

And A.J. needs help???"

Mr. Utley,
re:#136
You might call it,"cultural studies" research.  As far as we know,A.J.'s Ilyer reality need's no help whatsoever, although the public seems to have some disagreement whether the show ran for five years or was that nine years?

Yes, I figure that I must have passed through Bloomfield along the way, the "ice cream parlor"(diner) looks much like others although my favourite was in Pennington.   I've lived in nearby North Jersey communities, to the W. Caldwell location mentioned as an "inspiration"(?), in my "yout", as a well known orator once conveyed on screen. 

But I had just moved from New Jersey at the point when The Sopranos was about to make its tv debut. I was boarding a flight to L.A. at the time but, I made absolutely clear through appropriate channels, that someone had better phone and subscribe to HBO before I returned the Sunday of the opening show!

Unfortunately, a  great many residents back in Jersey had likewise done the same, exactly the same. As of yesterday, they phoned HBO to cancel.

I shall now continue reading your thoughtful inclusion of local opinion, in the Star Ledger.  Thank you!


Ps. One carrier provided a web-site as of last night had upwards from 7000 hits, but the communications level was not up to the par of the nytimes.com for instance.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 12, 2007, 12:06:52 PM
Most of the response (enough i suspect to generate 6000 of those 7000 hits) is on the loudmouth dimwit level.  A few may be justifiably miffed but to read the opinions i can only assume most are frankly not intelligent viewers or simply not very intelligent to begin with.

My father who is a film critic understood the ending right away, he then proceeded to cite to me a french film that ended in a similar fashion (i forget the name of the film) where people are stranded on an island and the last scene shows a helicopter coming for them but you don't know if its coming to rescue them or kill them.. and then cut to black. 

The American audience is not cultured enough to appreciate (the irony is Chase was hiding out in France) non-traditional endings where the viewer is challenged as to what they expect should happen.

Its funny so many are pining for an ending where you see Tony get whacked or go to jail or turn informant.  What gives?  You can still have those endings... we just don't get to watch it on screen.  And any ending that they might have given us would have satisfied some craving of the ID and thats all. 

There is so much more to discuss with this ending that with any sort of 'traditional' one.  I can't thanks Chase and co. enough for their brave decision to take this kind of heat from the public in order to put out a superior piece of work.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 12, 2007, 12:19:52 PM
I'm with you, kam.

The problem for many Americans today is that they are pining for some kind of certainty in their lives.
They expect it from their art. From their food. From their supermarket. From their president.

I think it was no accident of Chase's to have the Iraq war enter the script, either.

Anyone here want to write that ending??? :o


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 12, 2007, 12:34:43 PM
Wow, you step away for a few days and there are a hundred new posts -- many of which are very emotionally charged -- about a fictional family that is dealing with emotionally charged issues every day.

I guess it's not too hard to figure out how the violence gets started...

everyone's still entitled to their "opinion" aren't they?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 12, 2007, 01:03:35 PM
I thought you got whacked, horse.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on June 12, 2007, 01:05:37 PM
everyone's still entitled to their "opinion" aren't they?

I'm entitled to my opinion, and to the opinions of 4-8 others.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 12, 2007, 01:09:41 PM
I'm with you, kam.

The problem for many Americans today is that they are pining for some kind of certainty in their lives.
They expect it from their art. From their food. From their supermarket. From their president.

I think it was no accident of Chase's to have the Iraq war enter the script, either.

Anyone here want to write that ending??? :o


Sure - why not?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 12, 2007, 01:15:33 PM
AJ: Not Iraq -- Afghanistan!



Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 12, 2007, 01:20:46 PM
have at it, kid.

Can't wait to see the script.

Meanwhile, in other news...Rather Not Thrilled with Katie C.

 


NEW YORK (AP) - CBS Corp. Chief Executive Leslie Moonves shot back at former CBS news anchor Dan Rather on Tuesday, saying remarks Rather made about his successor, Katie Couric, were "sexist."
Rather, speaking on MSNBC by phone on Monday, said CBS had made the mistake of taking the evening news broadcast and "dumbing it down, tarting it up," and playing up topics such as celebrities over war coverage. The comments appeared in blogs and in a story published Tuesday in the New York Daily News.
While referring to Couric as a "nice person," Rather said "the mistake was to try to bring the 'Today' show ethos to the 'Evening News,' and to dumb it down, tart it up in hopes of attracting a younger audience."

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=2007-06-12_D8PNCSB01&show_article=1&cat=breaking


Here’s the article from the Daily News:

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv/2007/06/12/2007-06-12_dan_would_rather_not_see_katies_changes.html


I like that.

sing along now to Neil Young's Hey, Hey, My My (Out of the Blue and into the Black)

 Hey, hey, my my.
CBS News made Rather Cry,
"Dumbing it down, and tarting it up".
We give you time, and you screw it up.
There's more to the news biz than what you wear,
When you're "dumbing it down, and tarting it up."



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 12, 2007, 01:32:12 PM
have at it, kid.

Can't wait to see the script.

Meanwhile, in other news...Rather Not Thrilled with Katie C.

 


NEW YORK (AP) - CBS Corp. Chief Executive Leslie Moonves shot back at former CBS news anchor Dan Rather on Tuesday, saying remarks Rather made about his successor, Katie Couric, were "sexist."
Rather, speaking on MSNBC by phone on Monday, said CBS had made the mistake of taking the evening news broadcast and "dumbing it down, tarting it up," and playing up topics such as celebrities over war coverage. The comments appeared in blogs and in a story published Tuesday in the New York Daily News.
While referring to Couric as a "nice person," Rather said "the mistake was to try to bring the 'Today' show ethos to the 'Evening News,' and to dumb it down, tart it up in hopes of attracting a younger audience."

http://www.breitbart.com/article.php?id=2007-06-12_D8PNCSB01&show_article=1&cat=breaking


Here’s the article from the Daily News:

http://www.nydailynews.com/entertainment/tv/2007/06/12/2007-06-12_dan_would_rather_not_see_katies_changes.html


I like that.

sing along now to Neil Young's Hey, Hey, My My (Out of the Blue and into the Black)

 Hey, hey, my my.
CBS News made Rather Cry,
"Dumbing it down, and tarting it up".
We give you time, and you screw it up.
There's more to the news biz than what you wear,
When you're "dumbing it down, and tarting it up."



It's already writing itself

3 Democratic candidates  have such a great opportunity, what with the war being so unpopular

Yet they can't impress - one failing to gain ground on his "I voted against the war from the outset", even though one of the other candidates constantly praises him for it - one going the apology route, the third clinging to "THEY LIED TO US"!!!!!!

How presidential.

Meanwhile poor ol' antiwarmom has to sell the land she purchased in aq silly maneuver, finally packing her bags and realizing she has a life to live.

And the current regime, so unpoular, continues to keep our land safe after 9/11.  We can only hope the next administration follows suit



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 12, 2007, 01:40:12 PM
Oh......

thanks for the Ledger link to Chase, by the way


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 12, 2007, 09:05:26 PM
everyone's still entitled to their "opinion" aren't they?

I'm entitled to my opinion, and to the opinions of 4-8 others.

You certainly are! I'm with you there...

Nonetheless double and triple scoops of ice-cream from Holsten's to Mr.Utley whom I can not thank enough for posting the link, I finally stumbled into the midst of the Star-Ledger in some god-forsaken place in North Jersey and had all my questions of the universe answered by people who post under exceptionally creative names for New Jersey.  Apparently they've been hard at work on this topic all along; for years.

I must say, however, that they are far more thorough in analysis of their chosen topic as literature than we ever were  in the nytimes.com Book Forums about any books we were reputed to have read. So, no wonder Phil got whacked. New York mob against North Jersey crew, no way!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 12, 2007, 10:09:03 PM
When does Psyche start up again???

I don't have any shows on now that I can watch...   :(


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 13, 2007, 06:47:26 AM
everyone's still entitled to their "opinion" aren't they?

I'm entitled to my opinion, and to the opinions of 4-8 others.

You certainly are! I'm with you there...

Nonetheless double and triple scoops of ice-cream from Holsten's to Mr.Utley whom I can not thank enough for posting the link, I finally stumbled into the midst of the Star-Ledger in some god-forsaken place in North Jersey and had all my questions of the universe answered by people who post under exceptionally creative names for New Jersey.  Apparently they've been hard at work on this topic all along; for years.

I must say, however, that they are far more thorough in analysis of their chosen topic as literature than we ever were  in the nytimes.com Book Forums about any books we were reputed to have read. So, no wonder Phil got whacked. New York mob against North Jersey crew, no way!


The New Jersey motto: "New Jersey; where only the strong survive."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on June 13, 2007, 10:51:36 AM
It seems that all new television dramas will now be compared to The Sopranos.  I don't think this much excitement had been generated about a drama since Twin Peaks. It has been fun watching Twin Peaks again on DVD.  It took them forever and a day to come out with the second season. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 13, 2007, 10:59:11 AM
Dzimas,

Here is the dvd cover done by Annie Liebovitz for the fifth season that was compared to the Delacroix that I mention in the Art forum


http://www.lbracco.com/images/sopranosseason5poster.jpg


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 13, 2007, 11:02:22 AM
It does make them look like some cross between a Gothic music group with a modern day Vampire fashion.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on June 13, 2007, 11:05:59 AM
Dzimas,

Here is the dvd cover done by Annie Liebovitz for the fifth season that was compared to the Delacroix that I mention in the Art forum


http://www.lbracco.com/images/sopranosseason5poster.jpg

Nice cover!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on June 13, 2007, 04:27:55 PM
the name of the movie was Limbo (a John Sayles movie, not French) in which Straitharn and McDonnell (I think) are left on the island waiting for Kristofferson to pick them up.  The ending is loaded (1) whether KK will return or (2) if he does, will he kill them?

Maddening as hell.  But the ending of the Sopranos was not maddening.  It made perfect sense.  Tony's life is basically over and when Meadow walks through that door, it's to a dysfunctional family.  A father who's a mobster who may go to jail or not; a brother who is simply lost and will probably never amount to anything; a marriage barely hanging together and Meadow herself delusional about her father and the mob (and will probably end up defending mobsters).  Do we need to know what happens.  For years we've seen Tony disintegrate and both families come apart.  The story is over to all extents and purposes.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 13, 2007, 05:18:00 PM
Thanks Lulu.  Limbo... i've got to check that ending out.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 13, 2007, 06:05:42 PM
Ambiguous endings archive:

http://thisdistractedglobe.com/category/ambiguous-endings/

Enjoy!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: cincy--man on June 14, 2007, 10:02:31 AM
Did anyone bother to watch Lil Bush last night on Comedy Channel? I really detest Bush, but this was really one HORRIBLE attempt at political satire. The only good part of it was how the cartoon of Condi Rice was drawn.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 14, 2007, 01:18:36 PM
Found out about it too late! I opted to catch up on the opener (stashed) for -- Big Love -- before Sting (part of whose program was shot out in California,another part in Italy,etc.).

Ps. Propriety in using quotations marks is always advisable, since people are following "the Lede"(sic) tracking down info on wha' happen while wrestling with their Jones. Someone might stray through anything labeled Television and recognize their own posting at another venue.

The funniest story heard in that category was the family who hurried to Holsten's to check it out and found there were no juke-boxes on the tables (strictly a period decor from another era incorporated as "production values")and that the murals had been changed for same reason.  But the place was packed and the kitchen had run out of onion rings about noon time so they all had to make do with French fries. Strangely enough, the menu still current, never listed an onion rings at all. Must  have been more "production values".


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 14, 2007, 03:00:20 PM
The intro of that scene where Tony walks through the door, looks at the place and the murals, then you see him at the door again looking at the place, then cut to actually seeing Tony sitting down waiting and futzing with the Jukebox was odd.  It seemed like the writers were trying to mess with us.

But then the rest of the scene is just a perfectly normal one. The guy at the counter who walked in when AJ walked in and who got up to use the restroom didn't look menacing at all upon further review.   

The other Journey song on the Jukebox that Tony didn't choose?  Any way you want it


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on June 14, 2007, 04:41:45 PM
I don't suppose anyone out there with HBO watched a series called "Epitafios," created by HBO in connection with a South American television studio (I think Argentina but not sure).  It was aimed for a Hispanic audience and then thrown onto HBO with subtitles.  It was one great series, very addictive and I miss it.  I watched Episodes 9-13 on Tuesday and wanted more.  I will miss this series more than the Sopranos.  And the ending was so tragic.

Oh, well, no one to talk about regarding this wonderful series.  Maybe HBO will show all the episodes again.  I think in september it will come back.  If so, check it out.  I think the first season is on dvd so it could be rented.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 14, 2007, 09:59:52 PM
kam re:#160

"The guy at the counter who walked in when AJ walked in and who got up to use the restroom didn't look menacing at all upon further review."

It's all in the social perspective. After Mr. Utley posted a heads-up to me about the Star-Ledger, I was truly amazed at the difference in outlook, as everyday, so matter of fact, within Jersey, as compared to what had been posted in nytimes.com blogs following what could only be described, among their readership, as overwhelmingly offended.

Back in North Jersey, the readers/viewers/posters were calm, cool, and collected. About your above comment -- here is what one North Jersey resident cool as a cucumber matter of factly remembered about that situation. He described the arrivals of the immediate family members as well as the other customers, and when A.J. arrives, he gives the details of A.J. mannerisms and body language;and, then goes on, without batting an eyelash to describe the man you are talking about in the above quote from your post, by saying, "...and the body guard who came with him." --then going on to describe his positioning and movements from then on.

Which made perfect sense to me.  I hadn't picked up on it when A.J. arrived, since I wasn't looking for it and was concentrated on how "our happy little boy" melded into the scene and what was his dialogue, and how was he received. Never in a million years would I have looked for that discreetly accompanying figure who enters incognito; because we are used to seeing A.J. at home or on his own turf.

But I immediately got the sense of the ordinariness of his perspective and it was a lot less than a million years for me. It was more like approximately 18 years ago.  I was living in what used to be called West Jersey (Colonial period,17th.century) and today is geographically mostly west central Jersey, when I went up to North Jersey for a concert and kind of stood back and observed how the Jersey fans did behave quite differently than people in Illinois, or Philadelphia, for instance. Upon reflection, I had to admit how ubiquitous the body-guard actually is in reality and how after you get used to that concept -- how quickly you accept it as taken for granted.

The clincher was how long ago the scene was shot and how much earlier the candidate for the role was noticed by a talent scout who keeps an office in the immediate area where I had been living at the time that I attended the concert. Good reason for that as well, because she will circulate in an area which has been producing the creme de la creme of both trained actors --and unknowns who pour into the prep-school year after year. On the particular occasion of her find, she went slightly further afield on some business or other and stopped for pizza on the other side of the river and found "a virgin", a non-actor who qualified by dint of looking Italian which he certainly was. And, that is why he did not look menacing, as you said; not because he is Italian but because he runs a business in which hospitality is everything.  The "looking Italian" was merely a necessity of the setting in which, if he was a hit man or if he was a body guard,he would fit right into the neighborhood.  I think that's what you would be going for  in hiring either one; that they fit in, unobtrusively.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 14, 2007, 10:12:31 PM
I was with you except for this line

Upon reflection, I had to admit how ubiquitous the body-guard actually is in reality and how after you get used to that concept -- how quickly you accept it as taken for granted.

You saw bodyguards at a concert 18 yrs ago in NJ? 

On the particular occasion of her find, she went slightly further afield on some business or other and stopped for pizza on the other side of the river and found "a virgin", a non-actor who qualified by dint of looking Italian which he certainly was. And, that is why he did not look menacing, as you said; not because he is Italian but because he runs a business in which hospitality is everything.

And are you saying you know the person who found that actor?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 15, 2007, 01:23:14 PM
kam

Re: Television
« Reply #162 on: June 14, 2007, 09:59:52 PM

"....the candidate for the role was noticed by a talent scout who keeps an office in the immediate area where I had been living "

in response to:

kam   
Re: Television
« Reply #160 on: June 14, 2007, 03:00:20 PM

"...The guy at the counter who walked in when AJ walked in and who got up to use the restroom didn't look menacing at all upon further review."
 
followed by kam   
« Reply #163 on: June 14, 2007, 10:12:31 PM » "And are you saying you know the person who found that actor?"

Madupont, here:
No, I'm not. I thought someone, perhaps you, had mentioned reading the Star-Ledger reprint on the identity of  "the guy at the counter who walked in when AJ walked in and...".  I don't know the agent; I am aware of  the casting agency situated in a prime location for the reasons specified. About six months prior to the shooting, she went from Lawrenceville to the other side of the Delaware River on business, perhaps to Philadelphia who knows,and stopped at Penndale Pizza to eat when she looked at the proprietor's photo on the wall and thought, perhaps, I've  found the " Italian looking guy" that I'm supposed to come up with for casting the final episode. 

Enough said, he was not  Phil Leotardo's nephew, as far as I know today, although we saw quite a bit of that character in a number of episodes toward the end of this short season as well as earlier in other season because he has a face not easily forgotten and the delivery of his dialogue in character is a memorable individualistic style as well although I haven't the faintest idea of the name of the actor who played Phil Leotardo's nephew.   (by the way, much is made of the fact that Phil did not have a family. Thus, I'm waiting on pins and needles for anyone to tell me their interpretations of just who were those people when Phil steps outta-da-car and was blown away just for starters to set you up psychologically for where this finale will be going.)

This is what has led a number of posters in various places to construe that differing versions by Chase-- were
shown in different parts of the nation.  I'm keen to have a minute to go back, and look On Demand to see how my perceptions were working and when they were not, after a week like this.

As to your other question,re:#163

"You saw bodyguards at a concert 18 yrs ago in NJ?"  Certainly. You probably could at a concert today, there or anywhere, as well as forty-years ago.  Or, as said originally:
"...how ubiquitous the body-guard actually is in reality and how after you get used to that concept -- how quickly you accept it as taken for granted.

Particularly, if you are in North Jersey.  Many of the story-lines for the series dealt with normal things in Jersey, starting with the Bear in the Back Yard, which authenticated things to me, and then went on to how Tony and crew high-jacked -- which led to exemplary imitations by civilians copy-catting by grabbing your car from a shopping-mall. At which time, I was glad that I no longer lived in the vicinity. But, hey, just a new set of problems traded into from the old.


Title: Bodyguard
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 15, 2007, 03:31:15 PM
Even though I was not then nor am I now a huge Whitney Houston fan...I thought The Bodyguard was a pretty good movie.   Especially though opening scene...

:)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 15, 2007, 03:57:44 PM
Ok... so the so-called hitman in the members only jacket who walks into the restroom in the final scene is purportedly working for Tony Soprano as a bodyguard?

Hmmm.... interesting theory. This would be the first time that Tony felt the need to have one in public, no? Who is Tony afraid of all of a sudden?  Retribution from NY was not forthcoming for Phil's execution. 

The “Members Only” guy was played by the owner of a real-life pizza parlor, Paolo Colandrea.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 15, 2007, 04:18:03 PM
kam

Re: Television
« Reply #162 on: June 14, 2007, 09:59:52 PM

"....the candidate for the role was noticed by a talent scout who keeps an office in the immediate area where I had been living "

in response to:

kam   
Re: Television
« Reply #160 on: June 14, 2007, 03:00:20 PM

"...The guy at the counter who walked in when AJ walked in and who got up to use the restroom didn't look menacing at all upon further review."
 
followed by kam   
« Reply #163 on: June 14, 2007, 10:12:31 PM » "And are you saying you know the person who found that actor?"

Madupont, here:
No, I'm not. I thought someone, perhaps you, had mentioned reading the Star-Ledger reprint on the identity of  "the guy at the counter who walked in when AJ walked in and...".  I don't know the agent; I am aware of  the casting agency situated in a prime location for the reasons specified. About six months prior to the shooting, she went from Lawrenceville to the other side of the Delaware River on business, perhaps to Philadelphia who knows,and stopped at Penndale Pizza to eat when she looked at the proprietor's photo on the wall and thought, perhaps, I've  found the " Italian looking guy" that I'm supposed to come up with for casting the final episode. 

Enough said, he was not  Phil Leotardo's nephew, as far as I know today, although we saw quite a bit of that character in a number of episodes toward the end of this short season as well as earlier in other season because he has a face not easily forgotten and the delivery of his dialogue in character is a memorable individualistic style as well although I haven't the faintest idea of the name of the actor who played Phil Leotardo's nephew.   (by the way, much is made of the fact that Phil did not have a family. Thus, I'm waiting on pins and needles for anyone to tell me their interpretations of just who were those people when Phil steps outta-da-car and was blown away just for starters to set you up psychologically for where this finale will be going.)

This is what has led a number of posters in various places to construe that differing versions by Chase-- were
shown in different parts of the nation.  I'm keen to have a minute to go back, and look On Demand to see how my perceptions were working and when they were not, after a week like this.

As to your other question,re:#163

"You saw bodyguards at a concert 18 yrs ago in NJ?"  Certainly. You probably could at a concert today, there or anywhere, as well as forty-years ago.  Or, as said originally:
"...how ubiquitous the body-guard actually is in reality and how after you get used to that concept -- how quickly you accept it as taken for granted.

Particularly, if you are in North Jersey.  Many of the story-lines for the series dealt with normal things in Jersey, starting with the Bear in the Back Yard, which authenticated things to me, and then went on to how Tony and crew high-jacked -- which led to exemplary imitations by civilians copy-catting by grabbing your car from a shopping-mall. At which time, I was glad that I no longer lived in the vicinity. But, hey, just a new set of problems traded into from the old.

Dude, you're doing a great job of perpetuating the myths of Jersey. Keep it up. ONly thing missing from your overgeneralizations is "What exit?"

Seriuously, I hate when people actually know what a great place it is to live, because then they might want to come here. Can you imagine some Colorado schuck coming here and not knowing where to get the best bagels? Or not even knowing what a bagel was?

Keep it up. YOu're very amusing!!!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 15, 2007, 06:18:29 PM
"nerve"  <----touched


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 15, 2007, 06:51:03 PM
Ok... so the so-called hitman in the members only jacket who walks into the restroom in the final scene is purportedly working for Tony Soprano as a bodyguard?

Hmmm.... interesting theory. This would be the first time that Tony felt the need to have one in public, no? Who is Tony afraid of all of a sudden?  Retribution from NY was not forthcoming for Phil's execution. 

The “Members Only” guy was played by the owner of a real-life pizza parlor, Paolo Colandrea.

1. Yes. because 3. If you are aware of the name of the person who never planned to be an actor but played the role, then why ask?  "zillions" of people, by which I mean that I don't recall whether they were in the hundreds or beyond that, lined up for a chance of being hired from the beginning of the "concept" on this show. Reminds me, someone was confusing Aida Turturro with her role as Janice in a subtle ragging but the way that I see it having watched her crazy-in-a special-way brother, John, extend his development role after role, that seems to be a potentially heavy acting family.

As to the meat in this sandwich between 1.and 3.  No theory. Once you know why a particular type of actor was requested to be cast for the role, it is no longer theoretical. He does his test, he is hired, the footage is shot, they keep it and it is aired. Finito. He plays the role of A.J.'s body-guard (so that raises other possibilities doesn't it? or does it?).

Perhaps, to be considered, why Tony never needed someone, was that we really don't know, whether, before the charge for which he was brought in, did he actually "carry".   "...all of a sudden", more than anything has to do with a diminution in the size of his crew; you could say, he cut back. When not alone, he was accompanied by crew or with crew; whereas, at home, you already got  some insight, from "Bear One", what kind of arsenal that he maintains.  Granted, some people are not used to that; but,then, some people are.  Some people get offended. I don't.




Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 15, 2007, 06:58:53 PM
Well just cuz the guy didn't plan to be an actor doesn't mean he's a bodyguard for Tony Soprano.  He could still be a hitman out to kill Tony, couldn't he? 

I'm not sure what connections lead you to believe that he is a bodyguard... however, I could askmyself the same question why I think he could have been a hitman.  In the end, he was probably nobody.  "But the fact he was cast in the first place..."  is the point i'm not getting.

I also don't understand your point about there being bodyguards all over NJ from concert you went to once. Forgive me for not understanding, but i'm not trying to be obtuse. I just don't get the picture you're painting. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 15, 2007, 07:12:30 PM
Mr. Utley!

"Dude, you're doing a great job of perpetuating the myths of Jersey. Keep it up. ONly thing missing from your overgeneralizations is "What exit?"

Seriuously, I hate when people actually know what a great place it is to live, because then they might want to come here."

First of all, I'm not a Dude. There are no myths about New Jersey. I never felt it was a great place to live and why would anyone want to come there to live unless they were hired to work there and find themselves living there because of their profession or vocation as the case may be. In which case, they move on.

Bagels are probably not that unknown in Colorado or am I thinking of Utah?
But frankly, I know a lot of places in this great nation of ours where you can't get a decent pizza. So the first time that I came back from New Jersey, I immediately made my brothers pizza but that was a long time ago. To this day, I look back on being able to walk up to the corner bakery in my home-town on a summer morning and buy a Sicilian breakfast of a thick pizza about ten inches in diameter that had been baked with just enough sauce and a sprinkle of cheese, for 50 cents. You grab a pepsi and you are all set.


Why would you worry about people coming from "out there"?  Isn't it more likely they would come from Nevada?  Considering the direction.

So what's new?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 15, 2007, 07:14:59 PM
Well just cuz the guy didn't plan to be an actor doesn't mean he's a bodyguard for Tony Soprano.  He could still be a hitman out to kill Tony, couldn't he? 

I'm not sure what connections lead you to believe that he is a bodyguard... however, I could askmyself the same question why I think he could have been a hitman.  In the end, he was probably nobody.  "But the fact he was cast in the first place..."  is the point i'm not getting.

I also don't understand your point about there being bodyguards all over NJ from concert you went to once. Forgive me for not understanding, but i'm not trying to be obtuse. I just don't get the picture you're painting. 

Nor I your's.  But, I'm leaving to see a movie. Have fun.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Detective_Winslow on June 15, 2007, 07:27:07 PM
Any South Park fans in the house?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 15, 2007, 08:15:09 PM
yeah...let's change the subject and diffuse the tension...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 15, 2007, 08:22:38 PM
"defuse"


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 15, 2007, 09:03:24 PM
de plane


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on June 15, 2007, 10:22:02 PM
My favorite TV shows ever are:

1. Get A Life
2. MXC
3. The Sopranos


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 16, 2007, 12:40:09 AM
1)  Charlie's Angels

2)  The Dukes of Hazzard

3)  Incredible Journey

4)  Far Out Space Nuts

5)  Ark 2000

6)  Quark

7)  Cheers

8)  Three's Company

9)  Barnaby Jones

10) S.W.A.T.

11)  Alf

12)  Magnum, P.I.

13)  Riptide

14)  Freaks and Geeks

15)  Good Times



Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 16, 2007, 12:48:29 AM
I don't understand why a smile came up with 3C, I didn't intentionally do that all on my own.

This guy, from "Fantastic Journey," cancelled abruptly, 1977, was Brian DePalma's roomate for a while at Columbia University, which is fucked up.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 16, 2007, 12:49:03 AM
Oh, right:

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0552474/bio


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 16, 2007, 07:19:34 AM
Mr. Utley!

"Dude, you're doing a great job of perpetuating the myths of Jersey. Keep it up. ONly thing missing from your overgeneralizations is "What exit?"

Seriuously, I hate when people actually know what a great place it is to live, because then they might want to come here."

First of all, I'm not a Dude. There are no myths about New Jersey. I never felt it was a great place to live and why would anyone want to come there to live unless they were hired to work there and find themselves living there because of their profession or vocation as the case may be. In which case, they move on.

Bagels are probably not that unknown in Colorado or am I thinking of Utah?
But frankly, I know a lot of places in this great nation of ours where you can't get a decent pizza. So the first time that I came back from New Jersey, I immediately made my brothers pizza but that was a long time ago. To this day, I look back on being able to walk up to the corner bakery in my home-town on a summer morning and buy a Sicilian breakfast of a thick pizza about ten inches in diameter that had been baked with just enough sauce and a sprinkle of cheese, for 50 cents. You grab a pepsi and you are all set.


Why would you worry about people coming from "out there"?  Isn't it more likely they would come from Nevada?  Considering the direction.

So what's new?



Apparently, you don't do sarcasm, do you, Dudette????




Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 17, 2007, 03:16:45 PM
Nope.

The mob justice of psychoanalysts

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/index.php?storyID=7308


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 18, 2007, 10:51:28 AM
Is it possible that off the top of his head, the poster of this statement meant to say something else? Is he among the ranks of the people who simply does not believe there is a Mafia?

"Dude, you're doing a great job of perpetuating the myths of Jersey."

Or, does this mean,he just doesn't know any Italians?  I did make the on-line acquaintance of a very friendly woman with a lovely personality(she was the moderator of the Western European forum, but not at this venue, until she retired)who was from one of the upper northeastern states facing out along the Atlantic, if I recall correctly. What we had in common was that while she was at university in my home-state, she met and later married a man from my home-town.

Another mutual friend at some point mentioned by e-mail that the former moderator did not think there was any longer a Mafia as far as she had noticed thus far in our home-town in common. I  answered our mutual friend's e-mail letter that it was actually nearly impossible not to meet "connections" when you really stop to think about it and, that over the years , one thing leading to another,  you accumulate a rather large "acquaintanceship" for a lifetime.

I then explained to her what you work out for yourself as the social-conventions  required,  your  own personal requirements as a concession in which you retain an acknowledged status of never having been informed of anything that should have remained private during any other kind of personal transaction, until such time as it is entirely a matter of public knowledge anyway; which is always years down the line.

But that's all right, I certainly have met  'Medigani who moved from elsewhere to my home-town and thought that all those tv shows and movies were made up because there really wasn't a Mafia.

Here is some future material that we can look forward to being adapted to the screen without a doubt.

http://www.nytimes.com/aponline/us/AP-Mob-Trial.html

Updated:2007-06-17 20:37:06
Chicago's Biggest Mob Trial in Years Set
By MIKE ROBINSON
AP


                                 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 18, 2007, 11:10:26 AM
Continued from above.

I think that I should include a few excerpts of interest from the article that begins:

CHICAGO (June 6)
..."U.S. Attorney Patrick J. Fitzgerald"...(for those of you who recognize the name but can't quite place it, he prosecuted the Scooter Libby indictment. I was particularly crestfallen to find James Carville among those writing in favor of Libby copping a pardon).

"...14 mob murders including that of Tony "The Ant" Spilotro, known as the Chicago Outfit's man in Las Vegas. Spilotro, who inspired the character played by Joe Pesci in the movie "Casino," and his brother were beaten to death and buried in an Indiana cornfield in 1986."

"... Crime buffs speculated that Lombardo was hiding out in the hills of Sicily or enjoying a life of ease in the Caribbean. In fact, after nine months on the run, FBI agents nabbed him in a suburban alley one frosty night in January 2006."

"In the 1980s, Lombardo was convicted in the same federal courthouse, along with then-International Brotherhood of Teamsters President Roy Lee Williams, of attempting to bribe Sen. Howard Cannon of Nevada."

"Experts say the Chicago crime syndicate is so deeply entrenched that it won't be decapitated even if the government gets a clean sweep of convictions."

Enough said.






Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 18, 2007, 12:06:45 PM
So, you are biased against Italians.


I get it.

Now come back to reality.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 18, 2007, 01:53:21 PM
"John From Cinncinnati" continued to suck last night as the acting and writing are terrible and there's no reason to like any of the characters.  Sure, they are all quirky, I'll grant you that, but breaking the kids neck in the second episode is about as gimmicky as it gets, hell we don't really even know him that well yet.  I'm now engrossed for all the wrong reasons:  I have to see if it continues to suck harder every week, Ed O'neill, who normally acquits himself well, looks like a fool in this one, but I'm along for the ride and will be amazed if I begin to like it in earnest.  "Entourage" started out pretty lousy and then in the second season the writers started to get their footing and realize that Ari and Kevin Dillon were the stars and the humor of the show.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on June 18, 2007, 02:54:02 PM
There is a wonderful pbs channel in Virginia that shows European mystery series and a few are from Italy and the Italians definitely do shows on the Mafia.  Nearly every detective show from Montalbano and Beretti (I think that's his name, from Donna Leon books) deal sooner or later with the Mafia.  The Italians even did a series on the Mafia and attempts to deal with them.

If the Italians know there is a Mafia, there is no sense in denying it.  The time has long since gone when Americans confuse Italians with Mafia.  The Mafia is Italian but Italian doesn't mean Mafia. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 18, 2007, 08:00:49 PM
lulu

"(I think that's his name, from Donna Leon books)"  I gather you have read some of her mysteries.  They are mind benders. I think that I first saw her reviewed in maybe Bas Bleu? (Not sure.) The rumor is that she never leaves Venice; but she fills you in on a lot things you will never suspect in your imagination of what the place is like -- especially if you just go by the film version, Henry James, Wings of the Dove, which shoots minimal exterior setting, conventional:Bridge of Sighs;possibly Murano, to indicate how burials/funerals are handled in Venice.

For instance, although I have forgotten what title it was where she developed this scene, it is uncanny how she develops the feel of a local so that you get the dimensions and the atmosphere and learn that actually there is a train-station which is very involved or rather the depot is with tracks coming in and going out  to and from all parts of Italy. From there, she has her detective go to a very arid, drab, working class area outside the city where he goes to a working-class bar to see if he can pick up information about a truck load of dead women that went off the road descending from a mountain pass from the war areas around the curve on the other side of the Adriatic.


As to the other films being made, I recently saw some remark re: the past week, that we have Mussolini to thank for booting out the people from the South with his version of Socialism but I think that may be an exaggeration given the timing for two reasons, one, I had a neighbour in Princeton where I lived in the old east side Italian quarter where they first came when they did the stone-work for the buildings on Princeton campus.  He told me quite clearly that he came over between 1921 and 1923 as a stoker on trans-Atlantic voyages. Twenty years ago,he was still mowing  the lawn of his "rental property ( he referred to my land-lady as "your Boss", in English, by which he meant my patrone, so I knew he came from the south); and the topper was when on occasion, I would catch a glimpse of him walking down the slope from the sidewalk, in his cap and jacket (of the kind worn in the country), on his way back from the "men's business association meeting in town where you went down an alley and then down to a basement restaurant.  He would pick up a loaf of long bread on his way home, and he carried it cocked in the crook of his arm as he came down hill. You had to look twice to be sure of what you were seeing, as it is the usual carriage when you disengage the barrel of a gun from the stock in hilly terrain.

Two, I had a landlady in New Orleans many years ago who came as a bride from Italy and eventually told me the story of how she was widowed.  Her husband kept a stable up Rue Ursulines, and she explained to me how he dressed when he went out to a meeting, same time period back in the Twenties, then he didn't come home. Only in those days, they still referred to it as "the Black Hand" rather than ma-fia.

I would tell you how this all got started in my own life, but I have probably timed out. It was at that age when you develop a crush and... I decided to develop a case of hero worship on the most unlikely to be found.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 18, 2007, 11:58:38 PM
Most of my favorite TV shows of all time were cancelled in the first season...some lasted a few more.

Representative Examples:
Q.E.D.
Max Headroom
Briscoe County Jr.
Sledge Hammer

Lately I think my sense of humopr is becomeing more popular -- or there is just more room on cable.   Monk is now 5 seasons old and it is a show that I actually like.  Last season, Psyche came out -- in the same vein...also excellent


Except of course when I was young and all I knew were the shows that were hits - of those the ones I would still stop to watch...

Alias Smith & Jones
Wild Wild West
Get Smart
Gilligans's Island
I dream of Jeannie
Bewitched


I do like Magnum PI also - which someone else mentioned...though it is nopt holding up as well as I would have hoped...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 19, 2007, 12:00:20 AM
I forgot

The Munsters
Adams Family



Did you ever notice how shows used to do that..  One would come out and be successful and another network woudl immediately rip themn off...

Boy, I'm sure glad they don't do that any more...   ;>


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 19, 2007, 12:55:22 AM
I always thought that there was an uneasy connection between "Cop Rock," and "Manimal," in that sort of "ah, fuckit, let's go for it..." in a sort of perverse Kenny Loggins way, but, it's hard to find confirmation from the management, etc.


Title: The Addams Family
Post by: Dzimas on June 19, 2007, 03:53:35 AM
I recently bought the two seasons of The Addams Family (1964-66) on DVD, which is nicely boxed and great fun to watch.  The kids are enjoying the show immensely.  I did this after they started showing a more recent television version on Lithuanian TV which was truly horrible:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0172031/


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on June 19, 2007, 04:01:18 AM
Speaking of having fun with feuding Italian families:

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0087072/

There was also an amusing episode in the final season of Northern Exposure about rival Italian familes in Cicely.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on June 19, 2007, 10:45:38 AM
Poor Cicely!



Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on June 19, 2007, 10:50:09 AM
Trojan, I was also one of the few, the proud, the viewers of Max Headroom.  I got a chuckle from learning that the series title resulted from one of the writers being in London and noticing a sign in the tube station that said "Max. Head Room...."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 19, 2007, 10:50:23 AM
"John From Cinncinnati" continued to suck last night as the acting and writing are terrible and there's no reason to like any of the characters.  Sure, they are all quirky, I'll grant you that, but breaking the kids neck in the second episode is about as gimmicky as it gets, hell we don't really even know him that well yet.  I'm now engrossed for all the wrong reasons:  I have to see if it continues to suck harder every week, Ed O'neill, who normally acquits himself well, looks like a fool in this one, but I'm along for the ride and will be amazed if I begin to like it in earnest.  "Entourage" started out pretty lousy and then in the second season the writers started to get their footing and realize that Ari and Kevin Dillon were the stars and the humor of the show.

Continued to suck?

Jeez - let it evolve.  The story's not even begun yet.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 19, 2007, 11:18:46 AM
Trojan, great list.   

I loved Briscoe County, Jr. too.  My favorite scene was in the episode with the bumbling lady sheriff; they riffed on the Psycho shower scene, the "blood" being a spilled cup of coffee swirling down the drain.  Or maybe it was when Briscoe rode the giant rocket in a mock-up of Dr. Strangelove.  That show was great.   

Trivia:  A featured character from Briscoe County Jr. showed up as an eventually  regular character on Lost.  (Both produced by Carlton Cuse)  Anyone care to name the actor, or which character he played on either show?

I don't know which came first, but I prefer The Addams Family to The Munsters.  The Addams humor is more pointed, less broad - and some of it stands up remarkably well.  I still like that show - love their Christmas episode.

Alias Smith and Jones should have an asterik, though -- in our house, anyway, the Peter Duel episodes are the "real" ones.  Any of the post-suicide, Roger Smith as Hannibal Heyes episodes are bogus; and I think the actors even thought so.  They just seem to be going through the motions to get paid. Maybe the same things is true of the Peter Duel episodes -- because it is just 1970s television after all -- but I just don't notice it as much. Unfortunately, AS&J hasn't held up well over the years.  Now if we catch it, it's mostly to rag on for a few minutes before continuing flipping.

Get Smart is just genius.  If I come across an episode, which doesn't happen much any more -- I will drop what I'm doing to watch it.  Even when I know the lines and can say them along with the characters, it just doesn't get old.

I would add Rocky and Bullwinkle and WKRP in Cincinnati to my list of favorites.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 19, 2007, 11:27:24 AM
I stopped watching television altogether when there was nothing on last Sunday night, haven't seen a thing since.

I may pay the box for a few movies that didn't seem to appear locally according to stringent community mores which prefer that all theatres in a radius of twenty miles show exactly the same mediocre selections.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 19, 2007, 01:34:20 PM
Next Sunday, watch "John from Cinncinnati" if you like to catalogue the decline of Western Civilization.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on June 19, 2007, 02:12:55 PM
madupont

Yes, I read a few, including Death at La Fenice, being an opera lover.  I think that was made into a movie.  The funny part of these movies is they are filmed in Venice by a gGerman company with a completely German acting crew speaking German and after awhile you don't even notice because they look Italian and act Italian.  Italians couldn't do it better if they tried.  Her books are extremely popular in German, that's why.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on June 19, 2007, 04:48:18 PM
http://www.tvalterego.com

get this book now!!!

the mysterious authors behind the nom de plume are members of the law120b family of stellar achievers.




Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on June 20, 2007, 09:50:55 AM
http://www.tvalterego.com

get this book now!!!

the mysterious authors behind the nom de plume are members of the law120b family of stellar achievers.




Funny, law, but while I feel a bit Shaggy I don't seem like one, and while I might want to feel Meridith Grey, I don't seem like her either.

Good book promo, though.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on June 20, 2007, 01:01:32 PM
Harrie, I believe that would be M.C. Gainey, aka Tom Friendly, aka the angry truck driver (Cammi's husband) running after Paul Giamatti naked in "Sideways."  AKA the demented henchman of J.T. Walsh in Breakdown or whatever that was called with Kurt Russell and Kathleen Quinlan AKA a zillion other shady characters.   I can't remember his role's name in Brisco County, but I did like that show.  Bruce Campbell and John Astin -- how can you go wrong? 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 20, 2007, 01:07:12 PM
I just caught John from Cincinatti on Demand.  There aren't enough bright spots to overwhelm the unintentionally funny dialogue.  And its very contrived.  Will keep watching to see how it goes...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on June 20, 2007, 01:12:50 PM
"Big Smith" was Gainey's name in Brisco Cty.  BTW, happy birthday to Michael Connor Gainey, who just had one on the 15th.

"Swamp Thing" was his pilot in Con Air.

"Earl" was his menacing yokel in Breakdown.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 20, 2007, 04:42:33 PM
Yippee barton, you win!!  MC Gainey is great, IMHO of course. 

I took the quizzes, and I'm Velma and George O'Malley.  I don't know if being George O'M is good or not, since I don't do Gray's Anatomy. Hope he's not a serial killer or something.  Oh -- and I'm picking up the book for sure; I love that stuff.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on June 20, 2007, 04:51:42 PM
on behalf of 'noah lusky,' thanks, harrie.  i will be amazonning one for mrs. law tonite, who tried the online questions last night under the tutelage of 'noah' themselves.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 20, 2007, 09:13:24 PM
Yippee barton, you win!!  MC Gainey is great, IMHO of course. 

I took the quizzes, and I'm Velma and George O'Malley.  I don't know if being George O'M is good or not, since I don't do Gray's Anatomy. Hope he's not a serial killer or something.  Oh -- and I'm picking up the book for sure; I love that stuff.


George O'Malley is the guy whom Isaiah Washington supposedly outed;who then went on the Ellen DeGeneris Show, to prove it. Latest word, I.W. was let go. Another version is that Washington is doing a movie.  (?)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on June 20, 2007, 09:16:47 PM
CANNED

Character sucked anyway


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 20, 2007, 09:23:04 PM
And the character who was following him, what was his name? Wet Blanket?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 21, 2007, 04:05:36 PM
They fire that guy for saying "faggot," which the guy admits to being, but when Rosie O'Donnell says "ching chong, ching chong" you get nothing, which she gets away with on account of being lesbo.  Then you get the whole Imus "nappy ho" thing which, if not that funny, was a harmless comment on the common vernacular that black people, particulary those in the "hip hop community" frequently use.  And yet, Fred Funk does a pink-skirted dance of misogny when outdriven by A. Sorenstam, demeaning the accomplishments of female atheletes everywhere, and he is supposedly a "good sport."  Why wasn't Imus being a good sport???  Why isn't Isiah Washington making a bad joke?  "The Big Show" or whatever out of Charlotte, NC, is always doing patently racist material in blackvoice, but [crickets].  I was once accused of making a demeaning roid rage slur and was labeled as "anti-personal trainer," I mean, why can't we all just bang a gong, get it on, and all just get along???


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 21, 2007, 04:36:58 PM
"The Big Show" or whatever out of Charlotte, NC, is always doing patently racist material in blackvoice, but [crickets]. 

That's the one with John Boy and Billy, isn't it?  When I worked at the radio stations, one of them carried the feed.  JB&Bwere just awful, not even funny in any kind of "I shouldn't be/don't want to laugh at them, but I can't help it" way -- just not funny at all.  I liked to think the [crickets] was because nobody was listening; but since I was in SC close to 10 years ago and they're still around, I guess that's not the case.

Signed,
Captain Janeway with a little bit of Spock


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 21, 2007, 05:40:39 PM
They fire that guy for saying "faggot," which the guy admits to being, but when Rosie O'Donnell says "ching chong, ching chong" you get nothing, which she gets away with on account of being lesbo.  Then you get the whole Imus "nappy ho" thing which, if not that funny, was a harmless comment on the common vernacular that black people, particulary those in the "hip hop community" frequently use.  And yet, Fred Funk does a pink-skirted dance of misogny when outdriven by A. Sorenstam, demeaning the accomplishments of female atheletes everywhere, and he is supposedly a "good sport."  Why wasn't Imus being a good sport???  Why isn't Isiah Washington making a bad joke?  "The Big Show" or whatever out of Charlotte, NC, is always doing patently racist material in blackvoice, but [crickets].  I was once accused of making a demeaning roid rage slur and was labeled as "anti-personal trainer," I mean, why can't we all just bang a gong, get it on, and all just get along???


Well, jbottle, that was what life was like at nytimes.com, the one exception being the Film Forum, of course.  I can never forget the day in discussion of Philip Roth's,The Human Stain, as a book that is, that the usual contenders were all into Politically Correct simply referred to as PC -- I thought they were talking about "personal computer", so I asked the moderator exactly how do you define PC?  Then I thanked him and told him that I seemed to have missed that era; I tuned in late or something. I think you have to be referring to someone's politics, if you are going to designate it as either PC or not PC,which automatically makes it predominantly Republican or vice-versa Democrat.

I learn today that is a problem, I have. The French do not  accept politically correct as a concept, it is not a part of their baggage, as non-evident in their language or how their thinking is formed, even if I am only partially entitled to think that way.  I understand that to be Politically Correct around here,"entitlement" is out.

So then, the moderator says to me, after I've described that Roth's designated hero--Anatole Broyard decided that when anybody asked what race he was that he would say he was Jewish, taking note of his nappy hair on humid days, after all, he thought, some Jews also have nappy hair and New York is pre-eminently Jewish(okay, so maybe I said Predominant!), I can pass for that, and the moderator says, "What do you mean "Jewish"? (defined more like predominantly than pre-eminently).

I answered, "Which New York, are we talking about? Because I'm talking about living off of Second Avenue near Rattner's (which no longer exists).

He never forgave me for that. Began figuring out clandestine moves in other forums to blacken my name.  Eventually, I just went to another editor down the street and told him the story; he liked it as he couldn't stand the dude. They were competitors in the on-line field of editing, knowledgeable about what tricks you can pull with a computer when editing.

So, that's how I HAPPENED to drop in here for the nonce.

Ps. You guys had in made in Film Forum.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 21, 2007, 05:55:09 PM
Don't know the Janeway joke, but yeah, same guys, painfully unfunny redneck fake good 'ol boy accents from typical radio jerks and often sprinkled with NASCAR and black charicature humor.  I only listen some mornings just as a flip around from ESPN or NPR--still have terrestrial radio, embarrassing, but true, keep meaning to trade in the Pathflounder and get a real system complete w/IPOD READY and SATELLITE FRIENDLY, but I kind of like the non-format format of Alternative, or Soft Rock, or ROCK ROCK, or POP, I mean I like to see what bleeds into the other and, as much as I like some of the satellite channels, I mean, I don't want to hear Beck, and then Frank Black, and then, etc., I mean, I LIKE ROCK, and I don't want to hear a mix tape of all YOUR FAVOURITE ALT ROCK, etc., and then I get to listen to something like Peter Frampton "Woke up this morning with a wine glass in my hand/What wine?/  Whose wine?/Let's do it again..." that kind of shit is just too hilarious to pass up, and you love it, and then I find like "Black Hole Sun" which is also so funny as a ROCK ANTHEM and as a legitimate rocker where you're singing along, I like formatted radio, plus we have one decent station in Charleston, SC, 96Wave, which combines hippie, subaru, alt, reggae, basically pothead with a little punk, but anyway, yeah, I hate morning shows, even the ESPN one because Mike and Mike are such morons, anyway, I'm going on psychological vacation for about three weeks, so be prepared for non seq. and incoherency boy, including lies about films like "Alabama Slammer" being greenlighted by Fox Searchlight and other delusions and fabrications...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 21, 2007, 06:00:56 PM
Yeah, the NYTFF never even put me on probation or moderated, though I was cozy with the Girls of Sysops and almost released a calender for '02 of semi-nude and scantily clad female moderators, the idea was for a tasteful exploration of the female form by pictures and then assigning one picture to each month, in other words Melanie Franklin was wearing what amounted to a fishnet bikini and was set for June when the money caved, but anyway, no, I had a very fluid and genial relationship with the SYSTEM OPERATORS, no prob.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 21, 2007, 09:01:40 PM
jbottle,

No big joke on the Janeway thing - I picked up bux's book, and that's my Star Trek TV alter ego. (part shameless plug for the book, part utter relief I didn't come out as Data, a Klingon, or Frank Gorshin)

You're not alone in terrestrial radio world -- I like it, though.  If I just listen to stuff I already know I like, how do I hear any new stuff to like or hate?  So I like to hear what's out there, even the crap.  Plus around here, you need the local traffic report. But I have to agree, a lot of morning drive radio just stinks.

Who is the NYTFF people keep referring to?  Sounds vaguely familiar, but just can't seem to place it....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 21, 2007, 11:09:13 PM
Oh, I misquoted Peter Frampton, "where the hell did I dine" should have been included in the joke, so for purists, no need to argue.  For scumbag lurkers, no need to persist.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on June 22, 2007, 10:21:31 AM
Someone wants "Senior Member" really bad.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 22, 2007, 11:49:10 AM
Well, the race is on and here comes Pride up the backstraigt, My Heart is going for the inside...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on June 22, 2007, 12:10:36 PM
Derrida is throwing out text without "received meaning"!

Foucault is....oh my god ladies and gentlemen! he just typing random sentences!  There went another one! 

And here come the chimpanzees with typewriters on the outside....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on June 22, 2007, 12:12:01 PM
....and the big chimp in the middle of the pack has just typed Wittgenstein's Tractatus with only fourteen typos!  What are the odds?



Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 22, 2007, 12:16:32 PM
Trojan, I was also one of the few, the proud, the viewers of Max Headroom.  I got a chuckle from learning that the series title resulted from one of the writers being in London and noticing a sign in the tube station that said "Max. Head Room...."

Absolutely.  And in fact they used that in the premiere episode.  It's been too many years and I don't remeber the "human" character's name anymore, but he had some sort of head trauma and that was the last thing He saw - A sign that said Max Head Room... (6ft or whtaever)  and that last site traslated into the online character's memory and he kept repeating it in a daze and they assumed that this was his name and then it became so...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 22, 2007, 12:18:48 PM
Trojan, great list.   

   

Trivia:  A featured character from Briscoe County Jr. showed up as an eventually  regular character on Lost.  (Both produced by Carlton Cuse)  Anyone care to name the actor, or which character he played on either show?


Great trivia - I didn;t know it was the same producer.   I don;t remember the episode - but it had to be the guy that plays "Locke" now.  He has done soooo many cameo's and bit parts over the years - and many, many Westerns...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 22, 2007, 12:20:59 PM
I don't know which came first, but I prefer The Addams Family to The Munsters.  The Addams humor is more pointed, less broad - and some of it stands up remarkably well. 

As an adult, I agree 100%.  BUt when I was watching those shows originally, I was just a little kid and I think the Munsters was the rip off (made entirely for TV) and directed more at children...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 22, 2007, 12:21:53 PM
Next Sunday, watch "John from Cinncinnati" if you like to catalogue the decline of Western Civilization.

what network?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 22, 2007, 12:36:07 PM
Next Sunday, watch "John from Cinncinnati" if you like to catalogue the decline of Western Civilization.

what network?

HBO -- it's the new one from David Milch, I believe.  Which is too bad if it really does suck, because I like a lot of Milch's stuff. 

Apropos of almost nothing -- I met Fred Gwynne (Herman Munster) once.  He was visiting someone who lived at a private beach where I worked, and I had to find him parking on a Sunday afternoon.  (talk about a horror story!)  But he drove up in a VW bug convertible, not the Munstermobile, with a wife and semi-grown son.  Mr. Gwynne recognized me as the right age group to know and love Herman, so he let out a Herman Munster "Ha-ha-ha" -- I smiled and pretended to like it because I was afraid to tell the guy I really hated his show. He himself was very nice, and I appreciate his, uh...relating or whatever that was.  Just one more wacky beach story from the archives.

And even though I like Munsters better now than I did when I was a kid -- and mostly for Grandpa -- I still like the Addamses better.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 22, 2007, 12:36:30 PM
Harrie, I believe that would be M.C. Gainey, aka Tom Friendly, aka the angry truck driver (Cammi's husband) running after Paul Giamatti naked in "Sideways."  AKA the demented henchman of J.T. Walsh in Breakdown or whatever that was called with Kurt Russell and Kathleen Quinlan AKA a zillion other shady characters.   I can't remember his role's name in Brisco County, but I did like that show.  Bruce Campbell and John Astin -- how can you go wrong? 


Ok...that's a real possibility also...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 22, 2007, 12:42:44 PM
Someone wants "Senior Member" really bad.

I'm not judging anyone...particularly in this particularl back and forth...but this made me smile.  I've seen that much more with certain others on the forum...

I'm just happy to get an hour or two a week of gree time where I can banter a little--so you guys will have no difficulty passing me by and leaving me far in the dust...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 22, 2007, 12:44:23 PM
and obviously I shouldn't type as fast as I try to...  that was "free" time


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 22, 2007, 12:47:03 PM
Oh, you'll just do anything to get in an extra post.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 22, 2007, 12:55:10 PM
harrie,

I preferred The Adams Family (The Movie) lest we forget Raul Julia. And, look what happened to Wednesday! That girl turned out to be a real killer and was certainly precocious back then.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 22, 2007, 12:55:24 PM

Alias Smith and Jones should have an asterik, though -- in our house, anyway, the Peter Duel episodes are the "real" ones.  Any of the post-suicide, Roger Smith as Hannibal Heyes episodes are bogus; and I think the actors even thought so. 

Sort of like Bewitched...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 22, 2007, 01:12:51 PM
harrie,

I preferred The Adams Family (The Movie) lest we forget Raul Julia. And, look what happened to Wednesday! That girl turned out to be a real killer and was certainly precocious back then.

madupont, I'm very confused.  Do you mean Lisa Loring, the original Wednesday Addams?  As far as I know, she married a porn star and did a soap but hasn't killed anyone.  Or do you mean Christina Ricci, who has a fine acting career; and how does that make her a killer?  Or does killer = good actress?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 22, 2007, 01:13:16 PM

Alias Smith and Jones should have an asterik, though -- in our house, anyway, the Peter Duel episodes are the "real" ones.  Any of the post-suicide, Roger Smith as Hannibal Heyes episodes are bogus; and I think the actors even thought so. 

Sort of like Bewitched...

Exactly!!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 22, 2007, 02:23:54 PM
Nobody could beat Ricci in "the movie" from somewhere between 1991 and, 1994 is too late actually, as I recall. I knew right then we had a winner of the spunk awards. She is strangely a forerunner of little Bobby Ilyer who played AJ with the same attitude for The Sopranos.  It's those cute little square heads and the disdain in the eyes and the lip.

I thought she was a winner with Johnny Depp as, The Man who Cried, where she plays a young Russian from the shtetl who has survived a pogrom and meets up with Cate Blanchett in an Italian Opera company run by John Turturro either in Paris or on her way to Paris where the gypsies discover she has a voice and sings in "their key". It is performed with a lot of zest. Depp is the guy who rents out his horse and leads it on stage for the performances at Turturro's opera company where the horse authentically takes a dump on stage.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kitinkaboodle on June 22, 2007, 02:36:23 PM
The Man Who Cried did have another memorable moment when Ricci's character is furiously pedalling past the Eiffel Tower glowing in the night when suddenly gypsies appear on horseback...

A few moments of interest, but otherwise, not all that.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 22, 2007, 04:49:45 PM
I much prefer the original Darren on "Bewithed," and Elisabeth Mongomery was really hot especially as the evil twin, same way with Jeannie's doppelganger, throw in all the Angels ever, Suzanne Somers, and you've got a pretty good jbottle TV fantasy girl list.  And of course the four way with Heather Locklear, Shatner, and Zmed.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 22, 2007, 04:50:54 PM
"bewitched," naturally, and closer to 200 posts, a personal landmark regardless of the status it will officially bestow...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on June 22, 2007, 05:01:28 PM
I like Munsters better now than I did when I was a kid -- and mostly for Grandpa  

grandpa al lewis ran for governor of new york as green party candidate.  by now, the old loudmouth socialist has had the good wisdom to STFU and drop dead, as i had long wished him to do.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 22, 2007, 05:50:24 PM
Speaking of NYC, now that Bloomberg is launching a Third Party Challenge as an Independent, what if he ran with the understanding that he would pick Fred Thompson as VP, disaster or genius? 

That could be interesting, Hilary/Richardson, Bloomberg/Thompson, and Romney/whomever...

Actually, Romney/Thompson could work pretty well as a moderate ticket with a Southern strategy, I think that's the sweet math for the Republicans.

Anyway, off topic, but the TV will be innundated with this shit for the next 15 months so I guess it's of fair relevance.

I'm planning on voting Dem., but think Hilary's negatives are too difficult to overcome and feel that she is a spineless politico without even the conviction of her nearly equally calculating and poll-sensitive husband. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on June 22, 2007, 06:23:45 PM
Gosh, jbottle, and someone just asked me why not vote for her when I said I wish someone would tell me why we should.  If only you'd been around. My thoughts exactly, but instead I had to make up some positive excuses like whom she has not done anything for where she could have in Arkansas and New York state; starting off  however with the miserable  teasing the public with her plan for a health care program at the time of her husband's campaign for the presidency which I knew right then was a put on.  it's still a put on, plus she had gotten --well, "dumber" ?  I didn't even mention her bad manners towards her opposition within in her party.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 22, 2007, 07:31:04 PM
She's a wimp on the war stance; you know she is actually against the war and so when she voted to fund it, unlike Obama, that it was a political rather than personal decision.  I mean, what if the war had been a success???  Where will I be then?  Somebody needs to run on being a straight-shooter, hell, that's the only reason Bush had a chance, as weak as he was intellectually, he wasn't completely full of shit on every decision, he's a decider, a bad decider, but still...Obama needs to keep talking the talk and test it out and see if it works and go for broke.  When the Gore and Kerry campaigns failed to punch back like fighters--ultimately all Gore had to do was say "Okay, yeah I admit it, I didn't invent the internet, but ask George Bush about his DUI that disappeared, you ask him about his military records that disappeared and you'll figure out who's got something to hide..."  all Kerry had to do was call George Bush a coward for hiding behind Swift Boat ad campaigns when he was the one who actually served his country by going to war.  Ultimately, I was against the war, but you can look at my military record and nobody can find George Bush's service records and that's non an accident.  The plain fact is that I went to war and he went to vacation in Texas and never even showed up for Guard Duty."

I wanted to slap Kerry in the face and tell him to get good and mad, it's exactly that measured boring tone when somebody called you a liar that made you look weak.  If Al Gore had been more of the funny sarcastic guy instead of the professor guy, he would've cleaned up.  I still think he won anyway, I mean when you've got 20,000 retired Jews voting for Pat Buchanan in FLA, it doesn't take a scientist to figure out that was a good old fashioned screwing...

...but ultimately the Supreme Court was the most spineless of all electing to punt instead of examine the damn evidence, you want to put war dead on someone's doorstep, try the Supreme Court if your going to trot out Nader as a scapegoat, trot out the lack of courage and counter-punching by the candidates themselves...

...as much as Hilary lacks moral courage to stand by what we know to be her actual convictions, maybe she can only win by being moderate after all, but I have no respect for her, and will vote for her because at least, like her husband, she know how to punch back, that in itself will be a pleasant surprise...the frustration of watching Gore and Kerry fail to defend themselves was like watching someone drown and while holding a life saver thinking that, oh, he has people paid to throw twenty of those...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 22, 2007, 08:35:38 PM
I like Munsters better now than I did when I was a kid -- and mostly for Grandpa  

grandpa al lewis ran for governor of new york as green party candidate.  by now, the old loudmouth socialist has had the good wisdom to STFU and drop dead, as i had long wished him to do.

Guess we'll have to agree to disagree, because I liked that old loudmouth socialist for being exactly that.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 23, 2007, 01:20:29 AM
Why are we having a political discussion on the TV topic?


Title: Best cable network original programing
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 23, 2007, 01:23:33 AM
So...overall...which cable network do you think has the best original programming and why?

I'm actually going to go with USA #1

and History Channel #2

(passing by the obvious HBO and Showtime...because to me, their shows are more like regular network programming)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Detective_Winslow on June 23, 2007, 01:39:49 AM
Comedy Central is #1


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 23, 2007, 03:11:56 AM
What original programming do you like on Comedy Central?

There was an ESPN sort of comedy that I think was on Comedy Central for awhile that I really liked, but alas, again it was cancelled after a season or so...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on June 23, 2007, 08:51:24 AM
Comedy Central ran a censored version of "The Big Lebowski" in which Walter (John Goodman) screamed at Little Larry Sellers:  "Do you see what happens, Larry?! Do you see what happens when you MEET a STRANGER in the ALPS!!"


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 23, 2007, 04:20:57 PM
meeting people in the Alps has become quite popular over the last 10 years or so for people from all socio-economic classes...of course the alps have been there a lot longer than that...Western Literature has Alps references going back at least 2500 years or so...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on June 25, 2007, 04:20:33 AM
Speaking of censorship, it seems that the late night versions of The Daily Show are uncensored, at least the international version I saw last night with Angelina Jolie on CNN.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on June 25, 2007, 03:48:41 PM
harrie, without capitalism, there's ne xscape from elba and there's no elba, and there's no decent television either.  ask anyone who watched tv back in the good ole soviet union.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 25, 2007, 03:55:43 PM
The kid surfer on John from Cincinnatti must be the worst actor ever.  Keanu can breathe easy now.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 25, 2007, 03:57:11 PM
buxlaw, I'm sorry, I love Grandpa.  No logic involved, thus I can't argue intelligently.  Not that I could in the first place.  

Speaking of capitalism, still having fun with the book. My biggest fear -- that I would be George Costanza -- was allayed.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 25, 2007, 04:28:47 PM
"John From Cincinnati" continues to circle the drain, surf meet turf and put it "Six Feet Under" ASAP.  Even WKRP in Cinncinnat looks like Shakespeare compared to this collosal brain fart of a series.  How do I loathe thee?  Let me count the ways, from Rebecca DeMornay's shrill mom to basically ever actor on the show.....

If the opposite of intrigue is WTF, I guess the identity of John and his connection to God, real or imagined, is more WTF for me, particularly when he gave the lesbian a heavengasm...sounds like some tweekers on the writing staff have "spun" this series out of control.

I've decided to wear my tinfoil hat for next Sun. to see if that helps...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on June 25, 2007, 04:32:34 PM
she was a lesbian?  i liked her line of trying to get one over "on a hot slow guy".


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on June 25, 2007, 04:36:30 PM
harrie, did you ever listen to al lewis's saturday radio show on pacifica [wbai in NY]?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 25, 2007, 04:56:02 PM
harrie, did you ever listen to al lewis's saturday radio show on pacifica [wbai in NY]?

Can't say that I did.  I mostly read about his gubernatorial campaign in the tabloids - and enjoyed it mostly from an entertainment point of view, rather than a "Go, Grandpa" pumping fist in the air point of view.  So yeah, I'm being pretty free with the word "love" and stuff, but I can't help it.  I like an old codger who won't quit, sometimes even ones with whom I might disagree on some points.

Now....what did he do on the radio show?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on June 25, 2007, 05:18:45 PM
mostly, he cussed out callers who disagreed with him, particularly on terrorism-related issues, fought the ny prison system as the 'gulag', tried to get people to write to prisoners, hung up on anyone who was an identified jew supporting israel--as opposed to what he was, a self-hating jew who supported anyone who opposed israel [hence my profound dislike], and bellowed endlessly for the day when the 'progressives' would take power in america and rebuke the entrenched ruling classes who controlled the media and prevented the progressives from being heard.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on June 25, 2007, 06:41:51 PM
Yeah, I think that the actress is probably a lesbian, but I think her character was just testing the guy to see what he was about--that was the first time it had occurred to me that she could be heterosexual, but maybe I am just mixing up the "butch" fascade or identity with the "punk" fascade or identity.  Her acting sure was terrible in that scene--"...[furrows brow] don't do that again..."
or maybe just the writing, but as I recall when you "see God" it's a lot like shackles and hot, or whatever she said, which seemed a lot more like hell, but anyway, I still maintain that "...if heaven ain't a lot like Dixie, I don' wanna' go..."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on June 26, 2007, 11:17:23 AM
Hey law, thanks for the information.  (Sorry I didn't get back sooner, but last night was our annual observance of the Battle of Little Big Horn.)   My take on it is....

mostly, he cussed out callers who disagreed with him,  - standard talk radio procedure

particularly on terrorism-related issues,  - optional talk radio procedure

fought the ny prison system as the 'gulag', - I may not totally disagree with him here, depending on circumstances

tried to get people to write to prisoners,  - I may not totally disagree with him here either, depending on certain circumstances

hung up on anyone who was an identified jew supporting israel--as opposed to what he was, a self-hating jew who supported anyone who opposed israel [hence my profound dislike],  -- okay, that's not cool

and bellowed endlessly for the day when the 'progressives' would take power in america and rebuke the entrenched ruling classes who controlled the media and prevented the progressives from being heard. - I may not totally disagree on this point either, except that "progressives" sounds like just another group who wants control of the media, rather than providing some sort of availability and/or control of said media to the general citizenry


I'm not trying to be stubborn, difficult, stupid, obstinate or whatever, but nobody's perfect and everybody has faults.  So in spite of my disagreeing with (probably) many of Grandpa's points of view, and despite the fact that I was lukewarm on The Munsters to begin with, I have a tough time hating the guy in the basement laboratory who took advantage of his right/opportunity/you name it to voice his views.  Wrong, politically and/or morally as I may think some of them are.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on June 26, 2007, 02:04:59 PM
totally no problem, because i was just sharing my own dislike for the old coot and not lookong for anyone to agree.  i felt like i knew the guy well, because i listened to his program every saturday for years on the drive back from my tennis, which was indoors from september to june and about 20 minutes of al lewis away from my home.

i have a compulsion to tune to radio at the extremes, to people i can't stomach, like the pacifica leftists and the radio fundamentalists who want me to clearly understand that i'm headed straight for an eternity of unspeakable horrors if i don't take the offer jesus is making to me to cover me on my sins.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: sugarblues on June 26, 2007, 03:24:24 PM
Military Wives - Caught this show over the weekend.  I enjoyed the story lines and the actors.  It sure beats the reality shows!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: cincy--man on June 26, 2007, 04:24:31 PM
Military Wives - Caught this show over the weekend.  I enjoyed the story lines and the actors.  It sure beats the reality shows!

sugar--what channel is that on?  Is it good? My daughter-in-law is a military wife.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on July 01, 2007, 02:02:40 PM
Tuned in last night and CBS seems to be running something with Tom Selleck (big city cop flees problems to be small town cop) sort of along the lines of the Mystery Movies they ran when I was a teen and young man, e.g. McCloud, Columbo, McMillan & Wife.   Somewhere in the usual tv movie bilge (he can talk to alienated teenagers, he has an old dog that dies, etc.) Selleck manages to create a somewhat conflicted and boozy cop who wears his imperfection with some charm.  Not great, but watchable if you're stuck at home with a sprained ankle and you're fresh out of reading material.

 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on July 01, 2007, 03:24:04 PM
I could see Tom Selleck in a reprise of McMillan and Wife, although I have to admit to liking NBC's Mystery Theatre at the time.  It was a rather novel idea of having alternating shows each week, each running 90 minutes I believe.  But, somehow Hec Ramsey lost me.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on July 01, 2007, 03:25:14 PM
BTW, Barton, welcome to the club.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 01, 2007, 03:28:58 PM
barton

One would never run out of reading material at my house; I am considerably back-logged; but I did catch Selleck playing the ghost of the father of the family known as, Brothers & Sisters, this last season(that is before summer started, if it has?).

They tried very hard to come up with every contemporary probability that can happen to one family at one time with that many family-members, starting with the premise that Dad had afflicted them with the current problem that kicks off the show.  They become filthy rich because he was messing around.   It's got a little bit of everything, including a still hanging in there Peter Coyote trying to seduce Mom who is taking writing classes from him.  Rachel Griffith is fascinating to watch, as now almost a normal wife and mother,less makeup does the trick,following her long run in, "Six Feet Under". There are lots of new faces in the cast as the children of Sally Fields, one of whose daughters is Ally McBeale to Rob Lowe as a Republican Senator -- this is to make Republicanism look good and conservative.  Strangely, however, we have not seen anyone looking even vaguely attractive as Rob Lowe anywere on the national political scene in the last 6 and 1/2 years! You can't take this real seriously; think of it as entirely just entertainment with Patricia Wettig as the "other woman", which is food for thought, but what did Tom Selleck ever see in her?

INTERESTINGLY, BECAUSE HE IS ACTUALLY DEAD, in this series, he has a way of popping up, at the dinner table when they think fondly of him, although one begins to suspect that it is because they think fondly of him that he is able to appear to us, the audience; they don't see that he is here, although they have brought him here.

This ingenious dodge has allowed him to do whatever else he had to do, possibly the series that you saw last night? And all he had to do was put in an appearance at the end of the dinner table, strictly from the script, on camera to be recorded and edited into the series, for several occasions when he has something to say  and have the last word on whatever situation they have gotten themselves into and are squabbeling about.

You will have to look for this under re-runs, as the summer "progresses"?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 01, 2007, 06:33:27 PM
Quote
Tuned in last night and CBS seems to be running something with Tom Selleck (big city cop flees problems to be small town cop) sort of along the lines of the Mystery Movies they ran when I was a teen and young man, e.g. McCloud, Columbo, McMillan & Wife.   Somewhere in the usual tv movie bilge....


Hey, that's funny.  Yesterday I semi-watched a show that I can't justify in any way as being good, but I kind of liked. It was called Burn Notice, a USA original series. That's kind of a kiss of death, huh? 

Basic Plot:  An FBI guy realizes he's being booted from the agency; but they don't just let you leave, they strip you of everything you have because outside the agency, you're dangerous to them.  It would be better if they killed you, but they don't. So this guy takes on rinky-dink PI jobs to make some quick cash to try and get his life back, or some kind of life or whatever.

I don't like the gimmicky thing where they chyron a character's name and how he figures in the story when they introduce him/her; Burn Notice does this.  I don't like the use of interrmittent corny, hardboiled guy commentary; Burn Notice does this too.  Nevertheless, and not just necessarily because nothing else was on because I could always pop in a DVD or play music, I stuck with it and didn't hate it.  Maybe it was the bit part by Bruce Campbell.  Either way, I might check it out again.  Who knows? It might suck the next time around.

Hope the ankle feels better, barton.  Remember, RICE - Rest Ice Elevation Compression.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on July 01, 2007, 08:01:03 PM
barton

One would never run out of reading material at my house; I am considerably back-logged; but I did catch Selleck playing the ghost of the father of the family known as, Brothers & Sisters, this last season(that is before summer started, if it has?).

They tried very hard to come up with every contemporary probability that can happen to one family at one time with that many family-members, starting with the premise that Dad had afflicted them with the current problem that kicks off the show.  They become filthy rich because he was messing around.   It's got a little bit of everything, including a still hanging in there Peter Coyote trying to seduce Mom who is taking writing classes from him.  Rachel Griffith is fascinating to watch, as now almost a normal wife and mother,less makeup does the trick,following her long run in, "Six Feet Under". There are lots of new faces in the cast as the children of Sally Fields, one of whose daughters is Ally McBeale to Rob Lowe as a Republican Senator -- this is to make Republicanism look good and conservative.  Strangely, however, we have not seen anyone looking even vaguely attractive as Rob Lowe anywere on the national political scene in the last 6 and 1/2 years! You can't take this real seriously; think of it as entirely just entertainment with Patricia Wettig as the "other woman", which is food for thought, but what did Tom Selleck ever see in her?

INTERESTINGLY, BECAUSE HE IS ACTUALLY DEAD, in this series, he has a way of popping up, at the dinner table when they think fondly of him, although one begins to suspect that it is because they think fondly of him that he is able to appear to us, the audience; they don't see that he is here, although they have brought him here.

This ingenious dodge has allowed him to do whatever else he had to do, possibly the series that you saw last night? And all he had to do was put in an appearance at the end of the dinner table, strictly from the script, on camera to be recorded and edited into the series, for several occasions when he has something to say  and have the last word on whatever situation they have gotten themselves into and are squabbeling about.

You will have to look for this under re-runs, as the summer "progresses"?

Skerrit, genius


Title: Twin Peaks
Post by: Dzimas on July 02, 2007, 12:25:51 AM
I can see now why so many Twin Peakers were furious with Lynch when he came out with "Firewalk with Me," essentially going back to the beginning of the series rather than take a stab at resolving the many cliffhangers left at the end of the series, not least of all Agent Cooper's lamentable visage in the mirror.  It was fun watching the series all over again, because Twin Peaks really did become the template for a new era of television viewing.  Without it, I don't think we would have gotten the creative zeal that infected television from time to time over the past 15+ years.  Not to mention the quantum leap in production values.  Unfortunately, seeing it all over again leaves more questions than it does answers.  The first 18 episodes (including the pilot) were tightly wound and pretty easy to resolve in one's mind, like the first two-thirds of Mulholland Drive, but the next 12 episodes ventured into another realm all together, presaging the eeriness of X-Files and the warped suburban bliss of Picket Fences and Desperate Housewives.  The series began to spin out in all sorts of directions.  Apparently, Lynch never wanted to resolve the death of Laura Palmer, but rather leave it hanging as he explored the recesses of his dark Peyton Place in some mystical corner of the state of Washington.  But, ABC was hungry for resolutions so Mark Frost provided one in the case of Laura Palmer, after which it was no holds barred, and I guess TP lost a lot of viewers with its unresolved chess matches; the sadistic brutality with which Windom Earl treated his charge Leo, almost making you feel sympathetic for the poor oaf who seemed to discover a love for his bride which he didn't exhibit before; and Agent Cooper's complete inability to foresee a crime taking place even when the giant emphatically waves his hands NO to the idea of his beloved Annie competing in Miss Twin Peaks.  In this memorable set of closing events we do come to understand how Cooper let his once dear Caroline slip away from him.  About the only resolution that takes place in the hallucenogenic final episode.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 02, 2007, 02:06:39 AM
 kidcarter,#569

Yes, Skerritt. But does it matter?  As long as you are enjoying yourself, you didn't even notice the obvious "oh,oh" that amounts to Callista Flockhardt opposite Rob Lowe.

Well, of course, it matters.  Tom Skerritt has the attractive mustache which conveys warmth without stale tobacco; whereas Tom Selleck has the moustache that isn't without, especially conveying the impression of the supercilious egotist.

But who cares when I go from "Mow-ron" to "genious" almost overnight.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on July 02, 2007, 09:51:30 AM
I didn't really run out reading material.  We're talking more intellectual laziness here.  One reason I don't have cable is to help reduce temptation and keep the boob tube off as much as possible.



Title: Twin Peaks
Post by: Dzimas on July 03, 2007, 05:01:49 AM
Quoting Shelley (Satan Broken Loose) was one of the many wonderful conceits of Lynch in Twin Peaks, along with the interplay between Windom Earl, Leo and Shelly Johnson.  It seemed that Windom was hoping to take Shelly with him to the Red Room, which appeared to jog some latent love in Leo for his betrothed.  The whole thing had the feel of Mary Shelley's Frankenstein, which supposedly revolved around the menage a troi between the Shelleys and Byron as played out in Gothic.  I suppose to many things to think about for the average television viewer, which was why Twin Peaks so quickly came to its untimely end.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: cincy--man on July 05, 2007, 10:42:43 AM
On PBS tonight:  special on Lucille Ball: "Finding Lucy". She was one of a kind and we will never see her likes again!  What great memories Lucy brings to me!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on July 06, 2007, 09:35:35 AM
Chew got some splainin' to do.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 06, 2007, 06:18:44 PM
despite the fact that I was lukewarm on The Munsters to begin with,



So does this mean you like The Munsters now?  :)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 06, 2007, 06:21:33 PM
a USA original series. That's kind of a kiss of death, huh? 



Not at all Harrie...

I think USA has some of the best stuff runnning...

Did you catch "Psyche" at all last season?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 06, 2007, 08:35:34 PM
And for you Sopranos fans...here is yet another review of the final episode...

http://author.nationalreview.com/latest/?q=MjE0Ng==


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 06, 2007, 08:40:01 PM
despite the fact that I was lukewarm on The Munsters to begin with,



So does this mean you like The Munsters now?  :)


No, I just never liked them.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 07, 2007, 03:20:12 AM
And for you Sopranos fans...here is yet another review of the final episode...

http://author.nationalreview.com/latest/?q=MjE0Ng==




This is exactly what I meant, over in Movies.
"There was no pictorial, no dramatic end to The Sopranos because its point was to depict life (a) as practiced by the Mafia, and (b) as tolerated,..."

What Buckley does here is inexcusable. When he gets to (b) as his raison d'etre for feeling as he does about the production he reviews, you might as well skip this last after thought of his because he infers for you that there is something obviously more wrong about the Mafia(as practiced, as tolerated)
 
"...and in fact swooned over, by the viewing public.",

than there is about the whole criminently of our involvement in Iraq.

One is fiction (no doubt about a fact); the other is reality.

We have this whole class of intellectuals who have to repress this reality because of their political convictions.




Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on July 07, 2007, 09:01:08 PM
"Flight Of The Conchords"

I didn't think for a minute that I'd like this show, but as it turns out I like it a lot.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on July 07, 2007, 11:42:48 PM
Yeah, the songs are funny, in a Bee Gees, white funk kind of way, it's not perfect, but it doesn't make mistakes of doing something really clanging too often, a good balance of laughs and some uncomfortable moments where you are at the edge of cringing just when they pull back and put in another good joke.  Agree.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on July 08, 2007, 09:29:35 AM
Seems like there is much a Plasma v. LCD competition going on as there is a Blue-ray for HD DVD competition. I was pricing plasma and LCD tv's today and it seems you get more for your money with a plasma television.  They are heavier and run hotter, but there appears to be better overall picture quality.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on July 08, 2007, 10:18:20 AM
Yeah, the songs are funny, in a Bee Gees, white funk kind of way, it's not perfect, but it doesn't make mistakes of doing something really clanging too often, a good balance of laughs and some uncomfortable moments where you are at the edge of cringing just when they pull back and put in another good joke.  Agree.

The central joke is the whole "Bret and Jemaine are fishoutofwater New trying to make it as musicians in NYC" thing, and for some reason that really works for me.  It sets the stage for the whole self-deprecation thing, what with their pathetic "gigs", their one-person "fan base", the crappy apartment, etc.

The kicker for me is the clueless "band manager," who has a desk job with a small desk in a small office working for the NZ tourism commission or something like that.   Some of the best jokes are when he imparts advice to the two guys, because he's been there longer than they have, about how to succeed/survive in NYC. 

I can see how the whole non-stop deadpan thing might get tiresome, but they address that in the 3rd episode ("Mugged"), when they eulogize Jemaine, mistakenly thinking he was killed by a mugger.  They recall and laugh at how he used say "Wot" ("what") and "Win" ("when") in monotone all the time. 

The whole "song interlude" thing is something I thought might suck, but I've actually liked all of the songs.  I can't recall any specific lyrics, but I remember several times thinking "that was pretty clever" about one line or another. 

Anyways, I'm hooked... New episodes Sunday nights at 10:30 - I'll try to report back as soon as it's done.








Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 08, 2007, 10:59:06 PM
I was hit with a flash about eight minutes into Big Love (HBO) tonight, that Twin Peak -ers are of a fantasy appreciative mindset; and if they looked at Big Love, they might flash on  the similarity.  Once again making fun of the folks who live in rusticated oblivion -- that there is the least thing a little strange about them. In fact, in  Big Love  they accept that God wants them to live as they do; and, the irony of it, in our day and age, is how closely it approximates Muslim beliefs, without ever trying to be like them in the least. Just doing what God wants them to do.  It's endlessly fascinating; and I'm sure the quirkiness of the
personalities will be recognisable to fans of Twin Peaks.

Harry Dean Stanton, Mary Kay Place, Grace Zabriskie, Jeanne Tripplehorn,Chloe Sevigny,Bill Paxton, all excellent comedians, and dozens of other people their best in a funny situation,


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 11, 2007, 06:19:33 PM
I didn't really run out reading material.  We're talking more intellectual laziness here.  One reason I don't have cable is to help reduce temptation and keep the boob tube off as much as possible.



Then you're not going to be especially helpful contributing to the Television section, eh?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 11, 2007, 06:30:00 PM
I didn't really run out reading material.  We're talking more intellectual laziness here.  One reason I don't have cable is to help reduce temptation and keep the boob tube off as much as possible.



Then you're not going to be especially helpful contributing to the Television section, eh?

Hey, barton watches the tube a bit -- LOST and House come to mind, I'm sure there're more. It being rerun season, I'm not even watching much TV -- mostly movies.  And one of my nicknames is Mike TeeVee, so that's something! (no, I'm not really pretending to be some kind of authority) 

Even though off-season original series are available -- like Rescue Me, the Glenn Close one, Monk, Burn Notice -- none of them are looking that interesting to me. 

And so ends my official dashed-sentence post.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 11, 2007, 06:36:52 PM
I love Monk.   It's ok if everyone else hates it -- I'm used to it...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 11, 2007, 10:00:45 PM
No, we all love Tony Shalub.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on July 11, 2007, 11:08:21 PM
Not that much.

I've been watching the art series on PBS, some British guy is talking about Rembrant, and the other great masters, it's really good, and really funny:  "Ever the clever one, Rem-brant was happy to take the coin of the merchants of Amsterdam toward his own betterment, careful to clothe them in opulent cloth and just enough esteem not to belie their humble servant of God faces..."

That's a poor approximation, but the writing is really funny and supercilious and gives you a decent eye into the soul of the artist, if possible in 60 min., and not, of course, without a lot of florid prose and whoever the straight faced host delivering the lines is...



Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 11, 2007, 11:30:21 PM
I like Tony Shaloub, and I used to like Monk okay, too.  I don't usually last with a show for its whole life, though; and the way they first had it on all the time, and then made it hard to find....well, I just stopped looking for it.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 12, 2007, 01:12:17 AM
I think that was what they wanted to achieve.

Seems that I have the same habit that you mentioned toward viewing. You probably recall that Monk had a lot of PR post-9/11.  I don't doubt at all that there were some people who responded by telling the sponsors what they thought. Usually that's the kind of thing that causes the switching around of time-slots, etc.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on July 12, 2007, 03:52:28 AM
Monk is on USA Network on cable television on Fridays.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on July 12, 2007, 09:01:55 AM
Shaloub was terrific in "Barton Fink".


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on July 12, 2007, 10:08:24 AM
What does Monk have to do with 9/11?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on July 12, 2007, 10:09:33 AM
By the way, the Networks might be showing re-runs but HBO is still strong Sunday nights with Entourage followed by Flight of the Conchords.  I've been catching up with FOTC on demand.  Its good.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 12, 2007, 10:23:45 AM
I like Tony Shaloub, and I used to like Monk okay, too.  I don't usually last with a show for its whole life, though; and the way they first had it on all the time, and then made it hard to find....well, I just stopped looking for it.

It's not that they've moved it around...they just have a wierd deason.   They do eight or so episodes and then they break for several months and then they do eight new episodes.

It starts again this Friday  (13th) at 9pm on USA.   Psyche follows immediately after that.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 12, 2007, 10:28:36 AM
season not deason...


not sure if it's 9pm in every time zone -- I suppose cable channels could do a better job of that than broadcast, but I notice HBO only has two feeds -- East Coast and West Coast.  So I guess the people in the middle get whatever...   Of Course Central Time ZSoners are already used to one hour earlier and Moutain time zoners are already used to nothing making any sense...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on July 12, 2007, 10:55:16 AM
By the way, the Networks might be showing re-runs but HBO is still strong Sunday nights with Entourage followed by Flight of the Conchords.  I've been catching up with FOTC on demand.  Its good.

I've seen all of the FOTC episodes twice, and I am completely hooked.  I'm dreading the day, which I hope will never come, when it starts sucking. 



Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on July 12, 2007, 11:18:25 AM
T-Horse -- Harrie is right, I do watch a bit of the old boob tube -- Lost, House, original CSI, and Bones.   Others I watch sporadically -- Numbers (not about a team of anesthesiologists) and 2 1/2 Men.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 12, 2007, 03:45:31 PM
Trojanhorse, re:#298

East and West HBO and the people in between.

They get it in Spanish language version.  As well as HD.

One of the funniest programs, I caught in passing, the other night was the Spanish Language channel doing  one of those Tibetan lama wandering in the lanscape things when a flying Taoist shaman shows up to talk with him. Both had exaggerated black fake eyebrows as part of their makeup while talking in menacing Spanish about things not occidental. I was about to turn it off and go back to this or whatever until I realized that my cat was in the official television viewing chair with her ears perked up alert and taking it all in as if it was the most interesting thing in the world. So I left it on for her and went on to mind my own business. We all have our viewing habits.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: liquidsilver on July 12, 2007, 03:58:50 PM
Well I'm kind of annoyed.  I got into Lost recently and finished NetFlixing the second season only to find out the third season isn't going to be available until December.  I believe the fourth season starts in January.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on July 12, 2007, 04:03:18 PM
The Lost hiatus (doesn't resume until February, actually) is a bit painful, but the finale of Season Three gives you plenty to ruminate over.  Why they are holding it until December is beyond me.  Are there any episodes available on the ABC website, that you could download?



Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 12, 2007, 04:06:37 PM
Over at IMDB, one of today's links is "The 10 Best Actors on TV"  -- one of them is Michael Emerson (Lost's Ben) and another is Hugh Laurie.  Of course.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 12, 2007, 04:14:47 PM
He gets your attention.    But, one night, I TURNED him off and, since, realize he just overacts.  He is a nice pleasant man when you catch his interviews about his career. But his character for House is more energy you wish might go to the energy-crunch instead of overplaying the part.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: liquidsilver on July 12, 2007, 04:18:02 PM
The Lost hiatus (doesn't resume until February, actually) is a bit painful, but the finale of Season Three gives you plenty to ruminate over.  Why they are holding it until December is beyond me.  Are there any episodes available on the ABC website, that you could download?



They have the final four episodes of the season but that doesn't help me any since I haven't watched any of them from that season yet.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 12, 2007, 09:00:25 PM
Trojanhorse, re:#298

One of the funniest programs, I caught in passing, the other night was the Spanish Language channel doing  one of those Tibetan lama wandering in the lanscape things when a flying Taoist shaman shows up to talk with him.

I was on a cruise a few years back and when the boat passed below a certain latitude, it started picking up the Central American ESPN feed...  Most of what I wanted to watch was not available -- USC football game news, but there were a few things that were interesting.  Commercials were VERY different...

When I was a youngster, my family went to Europe and I recall the German TV being very, very different back then.   There were no commercials interupting the programs and most of the commercials were little animated deals...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 13, 2007, 11:34:22 AM
Okay, so Comcast finally took over my local cable TV franchise, fired almost all my friends who worked there, and is now taking down channels but not replacing them with anything.  So now I, like most other Americans, really hate my cable provider. 

My question is:  Are DirecTV, Dish, or whoever any better?  Or is it all the same essentially -- lots of money, no customer service?   Dumb question:  we have two TVs, do they have to be watching the same thing all the time? Or can you, with one subscription (and maybe a splitter or AB switch) watch different things at the same time?  Legally, that is. 

If anyone has satellite service and would like to clue me in as to the real pluses and minuses -- not just the endless pluses that are advertised --  I'd greatly appreciate it.   Thank you!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 13, 2007, 11:36:01 AM
And thank you, nytempsperdu, for supplying the name of the art show.  I mightily enjoyed jbottle's description, and now know what to look for.   


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on July 13, 2007, 12:45:35 PM
Oh, it's really funny, and intentionally funny, but the guy's voice is hilarious, and the real kicker is that the series is also engrossing and good.  I had like one art class in college and have been to a few museums like I saw the Degas exhibit at the Tate in London this one time and have been to the Louvre, but I don't know anything about art, really, so for me the show is easily digestible and for the most part wholly new information regarding anything but say their supposedly greatest few paintings.

But mainly it's the host who kills me, he never smiles and his humor is completely in how he says things.  Dryly funny, I guess, but also a full-fledged knowledgeable art snob that is proud as a peacock of that fact. 

I suggest you catch it, harrie, and all, the Rembrant one was really good, and again, to me, funny.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 13, 2007, 01:17:25 PM
Oh, it's really funny, and intentionally funny, but the guy's voice is hilarious, and the real kicker is that the series is also engrossing and good.  I had like one art class in college and have been to a few museums like I saw the Degas exhibit at the Tate in London this one time and have been to the Louvre, but I don't know anything about art, really, so for me the show is easily digestible and for the most part wholly new information regarding anything but say their supposedly greatest few paintings.

But mainly it's the host who kills me, he never smiles and his humor is completely in how he says things.  Dryly funny, I guess, but also a full-fledged knowledgeable art snob that is proud as a peacock of that fact. 

I suggest you catch it, harrie, and all, the Rembrant one was really good, and again, to me, funny.

You betcha.  The Rembrandt episode shows this Sunday at 9pm here.  Consider it marked.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 13, 2007, 01:48:33 PM
Unless white folks are going to support network "Gray's Anatomy", to keep Shonda Rimes viable, the black community has told her to shove it.

Some blog host who insipidly wanted to find out with whom would the ladies replace Dr.Preston Burke  blew it, despite shuffling the posts around in hopes of a consensus on likeable studs to compare with his own specifications, when his blog column morphed into a protest movement  against the firing of a decent actor who kept everybody tuning in.  The television viewer who happens to be black has decided they will not be watching Gray's Anatomy for the nonce; which probably means Shonda Rimes will take at least a 10% cut in take-home pay, while they boycott the sponsors as well.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 13, 2007, 01:49:43 PM


If anyone has satellite service and would like to clue me in as to the real pluses and minuses -- not just the endless pluses that are advertised --  I'd greatly appreciate it.   Thank you!

I think it is basically comparable with "Digital Cable" service.  These two services seem to have similar features now -- like you can still watch your current show while you are scanning to see what else is on.   Not sure on the DVR for satelitte service, cable obviously has this as an option.

Satelitte service can suffer a bit  in bad weather -- though I've had cable go completely out when it rains hard before...

With Satelitte you "can" take the dish with you for camping or whatever also -- that's the main plus for that one I would say...and this is probably the only reason I would switch back.  Watch ESPN at the USC tailgates!

I have an unused dish from several years ago outside as I switched back to digital cable with DVR and am very satisfied with it.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 13, 2007, 02:08:42 PM
In my area, things could be worse than rain.  In order to catch up to the program shown at 9pm in your area, In Pursuit of Art, I have to get up before 5am showing tomorrow. I hadn't even realized Schama was on. Just want to look at the author of so many once avante garde books.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 13, 2007, 05:14:37 PM
The beauty of DVR...

Last Friday, I forwarded to Saturday Morning on the channel guide and selected the prologue of The Tour de France.  I clicked on record the entire series;

then, record first occurance only;

then, since the first showing in the morning is essentially a "live" sporting event, I program to record one hour beyond scheduled event time.

Then each evening, after the 5 year old is down, I can run through 3+ hours of programming in a little over an hour and feel like I haven't really missed a thing.

a perfect tool for a busy life...


say, why don;t we have cycling in the sports forums anyway?  or even just "misc"


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on July 16, 2007, 11:08:30 PM
So, "John From Cincinnati" last night hinted at a cacophany of characters as jazz instruments, if chaos is elemental and communication rare and fleeting or misunderstood or misinterpreted, then ordinary drama is only a product of people seeking things, whereas, in "John," all of the characters on some level are seeking redemption, so I guess if you were a fan you would call "John From Cinncinnati, a human jazz song about the possibility of redemption from what appears like certain chaos and meaningless effluvium.....

So, I don't like JFC, but it's kind of like the album of a band you like, where you are listening and giving them the benefit of the doubt, so that when you ultimately make the decision that, yeah, the album DOES SUCK, you know in excruciating detail exactly why.  You just have to know.  I was such a fan of "Deadwood," and the humor, that I thought that David Milch was capable of anything, but it seems so far as if the object of his affection is not within his reach, at least with this cast and unfortunately, the words in their mouths.

For a second because we haven't seen Bruce Greenwood I was wondering if all of the characters were a brain lesion dream or something, last night's episode was especially weird where I was trying to imagine order out of the, you know, cacophany, but when the writers don't lead you there they aren't telling a story anymore, in my opinion, but opening up a sort of high-school diary of insecurity and fear:  I don't want to know about it, LA, sorry.  I'm not on meth, not schizophrenic, and don't live among burnouts and marginal hippie types, not that I don't have my own peculiar menagerie to deal with but it's not that, and that doesn't resonate. 

Unfortunately other than the meth dealer there's not a single character who I care to watch, which would be interesting in a way if the writing staff is as "spun" as they seem to be......

Maybe I've just ritualized the time slot.....I need my HBO Sunday, but sheesh.....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 17, 2007, 10:03:22 AM
So my local PBS station lied, and the Rembrandt episode of the art show didn't run Sunday night.  Last night was David's "The Death of Marat."  I may have mauled the painting title -- sorry.  The host was a little wiggy, but we actually liked the show a lot and will probably make a point of catching the last couple of episodes - I think that's all that's left.  Thanks, jbottle!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on July 17, 2007, 12:31:40 PM
Harrie, I, too, watched the David pbs episode strictly because of the noise generated here about the series, and I am now sorry that I haven't been watching the while.  "The Death of Marat" is haunting, isn't it.  I loved the way they kept going back to it over and over.  Of course, some of the program was lost to me as I kept nodding off--as is my wont--not from lack of interest (I don't even know I'm doing it) but from a slowed heart rate causing lack of circulation.  Hopefully the series will run again.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 17, 2007, 05:07:46 PM
You won't believe this but I gave Schama a bad review over in Art.

Although the program is very good, art is not his forte, as a cultural historian. 

The production that they did on PBS of the, Power of Art, previously--
about Rembrandt was the most magnificent television video-shoot of Amsterdam ever, although Schama was more into the secret sex-life of Rembrandt van Rijn, the work of the crew made you want to run right out and go to Amsterdam, oh,well, maybe go by ship? What is a safe way to travel these days?


Title: Its Business Time
Post by: Kam on July 17, 2007, 05:17:01 PM
FOTC still hasn't gotten old on me, although some themes are already being re-cycled.  You gotta wonder how often the Girlfriends will be replaced.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 17, 2007, 05:46:43 PM
donotremove
"some of the program was lost to me as I kept nodding off-"

I do that at times but it wasn't POA, because I caught Rembrandt which means that for once I agree with jbottle!

Since I have the same problem as somebody else around here who has been conditioned for the 9:00pm fix on Sundays, I lost poor Ms.Marple at some point although I notice Julian Sands is making auditions to work at something,anything, again to earn a living.  That was just enough snooze so that I could zing back to HBO and and catch the whole extensive family of Big Love, who are finally getting down to the nitty-gritty from their writers.

Rhonda screaming tantrums at her sleep-over until she gets her way, after a week of sleeping on the street as a runaway from "the compound".

Joey sleeping on the couch at the home of his brother, whose first wife covers him with a throw and then tip-toes away because he is her number One admiration society as she is beginning to notice.

Jeanne Tripplethorn then goes to visit his wife at the mental hospital where Grace Zabriskie has had her committed before planning a second wife for Joey as there is a new widow available  on, "the compound".
(only to learn that Joey's wife, who is getting well prefers it that way)

And Chloe Sevigny going through a religious crisis because she has an arrangement as second wife of Bill Paxton that one of their little blond boys will go to Catholic School so that her husband can be seen "somewhere" with her in public as his wife.   (Got that, or was it too complex for you, non-viewers out there(?), as I know donotremove understands completely who these people are.)

This is the first we've heard that Margie, or Marjean, or Marjo also went to Catholic school (or her mother was a Catholic,whichever) but years before that baptism  "in our swimming pool" as Chloe sums it up.

Best acting, Harry Dean Stanton picking up a phone in what seems the dark of night as he putters with his many ventures from his lonely desk. He does this slowly, listens carefully and asks, "Rhonda?" before the phone is hung up by Chloe Sevigny, his daughter recently disowned by her mother, Mary Kay Place.  This man deserves an acting award with the highest honors for this series, if he hasn't won one already.

This is Sunday night Prime Time soap opera as it should have been when it was strictly a day time feature at the beginning of television. Back when we were too sophisticated to watch anything of the kind!


Title: Re: Its Business Time
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on July 17, 2007, 05:49:18 PM
FOTC still hasn't gotten old on me, although some themes are already being re-cycled.  You gotta wonder how often the Girlfriends will be replaced.

I am totally hooked.  I'm really hoping it doesn't get old, because you gotta have a Sunday night ablution or whatever, and "John From Cincinatti" is not so good, AFAICT.

I'm not much of a "Big Love" fan, but that Serbian waitress is amazingly cute.


Title: Re: Its Business Time
Post by: Kam on July 17, 2007, 06:06:08 PM
FOTC still hasn't gotten old on me, although some themes are already being re-cycled.  You gotta wonder how often the Girlfriends will be replaced.

I am totally hooked.  I'm really hoping it doesn't get old, because you gotta have a Sunday night ablution or whatever, and "John From Cincinatti" is not so good, AFAICT.

I'm not much of a "Big Love" fan, but that Serbian waitress is amazingly cute.


I don't like Big Love and JFC took a turn for the worse last week... (thanks for ruining Rebecca DeMornay for me forever, is there not ONE scene where she doesn't look like someone shoved a broomstick up her ass?) ... the acting is either horrible, or barely good enough to disguise the horrible writing.  Ed O'Neill is the only reason to watch.

FOTC seems like they're going to run out of material soon.  Gigs and Girlfriends drive those two.  You can make a pretty entertaining series for a little while with that much to work with, but what else can happen week to week to keep the show fresh?


Title: Scrubs
Post by: aeaton on July 18, 2007, 12:11:07 AM
I've never posted here before.  Hello.

Anyone watch Scrubs?  I never did until this summer, and reruns are on all the time, so I'm enjoying a huge dose of it.  I love the mix of over the top humor and pathos.  The acting is wonderful, especially the older doctors, Cox and Kelso.  Hilarious.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: elportenito on July 18, 2007, 12:30:24 AM
Hi, I'm not that new, I used to be at the old NYT forums as fetuciniconalio, fasulo1,elportenito and bocajuniors. My question is:

Does anyone know how and where to get DVD's (or even old videos) of the series Route 66, the first series with Martin Millner and George Maharis?


Title: Re: Its Business Time
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on July 18, 2007, 08:02:40 AM
...but what else can happen week to week to keep the show fresh?

The "fish out of water in NYC" thing and the "dedicated/diligent yet ineffective band manager" thing are both good for a few seasons at least.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 18, 2007, 01:27:38 PM
Zut, kam. I hope you are not voting for Romney.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on July 18, 2007, 01:36:54 PM
I dont vote unless i get time off from work. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on July 18, 2007, 01:48:13 PM
i was walking through the rain from 11th and 56th to my office at 53rd and 5th this morning, after dropping off the car for service, and happened upon the letterman street, 53rd between 8th and broadway.  there in the deli next to the sullivan theater was the deli guy behing the counter!  here i thought he was a professional and the deli was a prop, because anytime i'd ever been down that block before, the deli was closed.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 18, 2007, 02:23:31 PM
Law120b

New ownership?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 18, 2007, 02:26:54 PM
kam re:#329,

Maybe you are working for the "wrong employer", if they don't provide the opportunity for you to vote.  But then, a job is a job. The last people who suppressed the vote during the last two elections, had their reasons for designing the work situation that prevails today with no time off for less pay during inflation as well.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on July 18, 2007, 03:17:15 PM
no, the guy behind the counter was the little asian guy with the embarrassed smile who's always on the show.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on July 18, 2007, 03:56:39 PM
I saw the end of that show last night with one of the N'Sync or Backstreet boys hosting some kind of karaoke singing competition. It was horriful.  I blame this obsession with reality TV on three shows.

Real World
Survivor
AMerican Idol

Those three shows by themselves might be all right, but the legion of "me-too" offerings make me want to do something crazy like turn off the TV and pick up a book. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 18, 2007, 06:48:31 PM
no, the guy behind the counter was the little asian guy with the embarrassed smile who's always on the show.

AKA Rupert Jee?  A celebrity sighting, you lucky dog.  Years ago, we went to a Letterman taping, and the deli was open; maybe for some reason he keeps hours around the show.  Though from a business point of view, that makes no sense.  

We saw Jerry Orbach that day, too.  Plus the people who were on the show, of course.


That Singing Bee show -- I think that's the name -- is pretty horrible.  After a few G&Ts it's pretty funny though.  We've had a local access show for a couple years now called Karaoke in the Valley; it's taped footage of people in various stages of drunkenness doing karaoke at local watering holes. Now, that's entertainment!


Whoever watches Scrubs, I like it too. Gets a little preachy sometimes, and I could actually live without Zach Braff.  But I love John McGinley; despite the fact that he's in freakin' everything, somehow he never  gets too close to "overexposure" on my personal meter.   In real life, Dr. Kelso is married to someone that surprised me.  Now I can't remember who.  And maybe I don't know anything, which wouldn't surprise me, but I think Sarah Chalke is slightly underrated as a comedic actress.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 18, 2007, 07:46:27 PM
Quote
In real life, Dr. Kelso is married to someone that surprised me. 


It's Katharine Houghton, Katharine Hepburn's neice and the daughter who's going to marry Sidney Poitier in Guess Who's Coming to Dinner?.   Dr. Kelso (real name Ken Jenkins, not to be confused with Jeopardy whiz Ken Jennings) is also a dog trainer; and when Dr. Kelso's dog Baxter is on the show, that's Ken Jenkins' real dog.  Thank you, IMDB.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 18, 2007, 10:22:32 PM
harrie, re:#335

"We saw Jerry Ohrbach that day, too."     By a very weird coincidence, just a day or two ago, Bob at American History posted about Trinity Cemetery on Wall Street and happened to mention that  there is an additional cemetery uptown(after the old Colonial cemetery had no more space). On the link which has a web-site for the rectory office, the list of the famous interred at the new location included Jerry Ohrback who died  two years ago. I was willing to watch endless Law & Order just to see him be Lenny Brisco again. The New York Times had a special page remembering him with parts that he had played as a song and dance man on Broadway that included excerpts of him singing, Try to Remember when....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 18, 2007, 10:51:48 PM
harrie, re:#335

"We saw Jerry Ohrbach that day, too."     By a very weird coincidence, just a day or two ago, Bob at American History posted about Trinity Cemetery on Wall Street and happened to mention that  there is an additional cemetery uptown(after the old Colonial cemetery had no more space). On the link which has a web-site for the rectory office, the list of the famous interred at the new location included Jerry Ohrback who died  two years ago.

Well, when we saw him, he was alive (rimshot).  Sorry, I couldn't resist.  He was walking along -- probably lunch break -- and if you could catch up to him, he'd shake your hand and talk, but keep walking.  Very nice guy; I liked him a lot, too.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 19, 2007, 01:32:10 AM
nytempsperdu, re:#339

What? You didn't show your son the Gerard Depardieu and son extravaganza that was on tv? It took me all these years to finally understand the import of the story. As I  viewed the film, occasionally one of those big balloons with striping decor would occasionally float by my windows which were also heavily draped with stripes to match. The best time to view the balloons popular with tourists, or the people who want to entice tourists up into the sky sufficiently enough to look over the landscape, is on a quiet Sunday morning when you open your front door and look out through the screen at the weather.

Then you catch sight of the  ballon as it approaches, descending lower and lower as it drifts toward the barn and you go, oh,my god, what if the basket hits the barn, what if it starts the field on fire?

One day, one eventually came down right outside my striped drape windows as I was sitting on my love-seat reading The New York Times. It was in the field that had already been harvested but still could present a hazard; and I was not suprised when my landlord who rents out the land to tenant farmers streaked toward his alley of maples, cut across the green, and under the pine acreage line into the field with his pickup truck to try and bring down that monster and weight it down before it drifted on the wind but at ground level possibly causing an inflagration or some other accident to a barn or--his precious airplanes in his airplane hanger.    He's gone now but the balloons are not, you can expect one inevitably will show up at some time because some fool has to see what things look like from up there. But I must confess that I completely forgot at one time and mistakenly referred to them  as a consequence of the "Montpellier brothers".


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on July 19, 2007, 09:31:56 AM
We saw Jerry Ohrbach that day, too. 

Jerry Orbach was to "Celebrity Jeopardy!" as Michael Jordan was to basketball.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: aeaton on July 19, 2007, 10:38:10 AM
harrie, thanks for the Scrubs info.  I adore Ken Jenkins.  He's brilliant.  I just googled "Scrubs" and "emmy" and was disappointed to see how little attention the show has gotten.  Jenkins should definitely get an emmy for his performances.  I know what you mean about Zach Braff, but he has his moments, and he's willing to humiliate himself, which counts for something.  Is John McGinley Dr. Cox?  He's also brilliant, going seamlessly from comedy to deep pathos in seconds.  Sarah Chalke is also the bomb.  She was on Roseanne briefly; I caught a clip the other day and her performance was pretty tame.  But she was replacing another actress and must have been quite young.  She is hilarious in Scrubs.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on July 19, 2007, 03:34:45 PM
what's jerry orbach doing being dead in an episcopalian cemetary?  i wouldn't be caught dead there.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 19, 2007, 03:57:33 PM
No, as you will notice from the Colonial origins, it is a High-Anglican cemetery,northern branch, and one of the first considerations for their finding a space for you is how your ratings are.  Now Jerry is the guy who would be my suggestion, as harrie said(rimshot) if only he were alive, rather than Fred Thompson for President. But then, Orbach did not strike me as a New York Republican type either.  I just simply adored his rejoinders. He reminded me of the guys who would take you to Times Square, if you let them. Television viewing kind of sets you up that way,so you better watch out if you are the least impressionable to a good con job, which acting is by the way.

I also think from what I've observed about show-business, that is a very nice concession to make, to having attained Fame, and space is hard to find in Manhattan, you know.  Jerry had previously married to a woman who I noted was Italian, and I can not for the life of me imagine many who opt for Anglicanisation.  Although I had a magazine-article -eventual book-writing room-mate from Lower Greenwich Village East
Side who had too perfectly good Italian parents(from Puglia, if I remember correctly)living in Brooklyn who turned Jehovah's Witness, so stranger things have happened. Because once she went to Rome and wrote a Holiday Magazine article or something, and went to trace where her parents came from in Apulia, she turned on a dime and converted to Catholicism just like that.

So what I'm really saying is that many people, where one is in show business and the other was used to a different life style, usually try to meet somewhere in the middle about all major decisions in life; or, in death for that matter.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on July 19, 2007, 03:58:44 PM
i thought he was jewish, no?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on July 19, 2007, 04:00:18 PM
Jew actor converts
Nope - not so strange.


Title: Re: Scrubs
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 20, 2007, 04:01:22 PM

Anyone watch Scrubs? 

Saw it a few times when it first came out and I recall liking it, but fror whatever reason I guess not enough to go our of my way to catch it and I never seem to. 

Sort of the same thing with a few other shows.   The Office...   My Name is Earl...  Both pretty good shows, but I just never seem to know when they are on and can't quite get the energy to spend the time looking for them...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 20, 2007, 04:04:54 PM

Does anyone know how and where to get DVD's (or even old videos) of the series Route 66, the first series with Martin Millner and George Maharis?

Great Show.

They later cut that series in half and called it "Then Came Bronson."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 20, 2007, 04:07:32 PM
<knee slap>... <gufaaw>

you see, Then Came Bronson was basically the same show but only had "one" guy (instead of two)  and he only had two wheels (instead of four) as they had him on a motorcycle...


I'll be here all week...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 20, 2007, 04:43:35 PM
I liked Then Came Bronson -- but it was on past my bedtime, and it only ran a year or two, no?  Every once in a while Michael Parks shows up in a flick -- I think QT likes him -- and I'll say "Look! It's Michael Parks!"  And the hubby is all "Who the..? Wha the...? Michael Who?"   So I guess Then Came Bronson wasn't exactly a timeless classic of episodic television.

"Takin' a trip?"


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 20, 2007, 06:26:10 PM
Goin' down that long lonesome Highway...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 20, 2007, 08:12:39 PM
I didn't realize at the time that Then Came Bronson was sorta like  Kerouac Lite, or Kerouac for the Masses.  I just liked the scenery -- some great shots on that show -- and my brother was all amped up about the Harley.

Madupont, I know you had a problem with the last YouTube link I posted, but see if this one works.  It's a younger Jerry Orbach singing Try to Remember. (sniffle)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=huUmENpJ8p4 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 20, 2007, 10:02:06 PM
Thanks,HARRIE,

It appears that this might be a concert version.  I had honestly known nothing about his career in musicals at the time of his death three years,four months ago until suddenly the reprise of his musical experience showed up in the pages of the nytimes covering his death.

Although I would have been very interested in this:
"On different evenings as a young man, sitting in the Theater de Lys on Christopher Street, I saw Orbach as the Street Singer in ''The Threepenny Opera'' and as Mack the Knife."     (from one of the remembrances)

http://tinyurl.com/37pepg

http://tinyurl.com/293s5b

Mr. Orbach lived off Eighth Avenue in Hells Kitchen near the Midtown North precinct. ''He'd be walking down the block, and he'd always stop by and say hello,'' said James Heaphy, 41, a recently retired detective with 20 years on the job. ''He was a really nice guy. I didn't even realize he was ill.''
 
Jerome Bernard Orbach was born in the Bronx on Oct. 20, 1935, the only child of Leon Orbach, a restaurant manager with some experience in vaudeville, and the former Emily Olexy.

The Orbachs moved to Waukegan, Ill., when Jerome was in the seventh grade. In 1952, after graduating from Waukegan High School, he attended the University of Illinois, but stayed only a year. He transferred to Northwestern, where he studied drama. He remained there for about two years, but left without earning a degree.

Mr. Orbach did menial work for stock companies before being awarded small parts; later, he said that the stock experience helped him learn to control his voice and ''not to do too much with my eyebrows.''

In 1955 Mr. Orbach headed to New York and found a job almost immediately as the understudy for the role of the Street Singer in an acclaimed Off Broadway production of ''The Threepenny Opera.'' He remained with the company for three years, eventually taking on Scott Merrill's role of Mack the Knife. He studied acting with Herbert Berghof, Mira Rostova and Lee Strasberg. After leaving ''Threepenny'' in 1959, he worked with stock companies in Ohio, appearing in ''Mister Roberts,'' ''The King and I'' and ''Harvey.''

But it was the now-fabled ''Fantasticks'' that established Mr. Orbach as a star. Soon after, he moved on to Broadway in ''Carnival!'' The critic Frances Herridge called him a ''rare combination of powerful male actor and singer.''

Mr. Orbach remained busy with varied stage work in New York, including ''The Cradle Will Rock'' (1964), revivals of ''Carousel'' and ''Annie Get Your Gun'' in the mid-1960's, Bruce Jay Freidman's comedy of neurosis ''Scuba Duba'' (1967) and ''6 Rms Riv Vu'' (1972). His films include ''Brewster's Millions'' (1985), ''Dirty Dancing'' (1987) and ''Last Exit to Brooklyn'' (1989). On television he appeared on ''The Shari Lewis Show,'' ''The Jack Paar Show,'' ''The Nurses'' and ''Bob Hope Presents.''

Mr. Orbach married Marta Curro in 1958. They were divorced in 1975. In 1979 he married Elaine Cancialla, who survives him. He is also survived by his sons by his first marriage, Anthony, of New Jersey, and Christopher, of Manhattan; and two grandchildren.

After appearing in ''The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight,'' Mr. Orbach received a call from Joey Gallo, the mobster. ''A cop that he knew had met us and told him that he'd met the guy who supposedly played him in the movie, that he was a nice guy, not like an actor,'' Marta Orbach recalled shortly after Gallo was gunned down in 1972. Through the Orbachs, Gallo briefly became one of the stranger fixtures of the showbiz social scene in Manhattan and was working on a memoir with Marta Orbach at the time of his death. Gallo lived in the Orbachs' Chelsea brownstone for a month and was married there a month before his murder.

With his portrayal of Lennie Briscoe on ''Law & Order,'' Mr. Orbach achieved a worldwide fame that had previously eluded him. He became the face of a typical New York cop, and the police liked what they saw. Mr. Orbach took the role seriously, so much so that he appeared in 2001 at a demonstration in which police officers demanded higher wages from Mayor Giuliani's administration.

''All I can do is try and represent you guys on a TV screen and make you look as good as I can,'' Mr. Orbach was quoted as saying in Newsday. ''I could never go out and not know if I'm coming home that night the way you do.''

Mr. Orbach lived in a high-rise off Eighth Avenue in Clinton and was a fixture in that Manhattan neighborhood's restaurants and shops. His glossy publicity photo hangs in Ms. Buffy's French Cleaners, and he was a regular at some of the unpretentious Italian restaurants nearby.

Besides the ''Law & Order'' reruns that appear in an endless cycle on cable television, Lennie Briscoe lives on in several episodes of ''Trial by Jury,'' scheduled for broadcast in the spring. 

Jerry Orbach, who died in 2004, made a Tony-winning splash in ''Promises, Promises,'' then went on to originate roles in ''Chicago'' and ''42nd Street.''


Here are the Balloons:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/20/travel/escapes/20Ahead.html?_r=1&8dpc&oref=slogin


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 21, 2007, 10:25:09 AM
Quote
Here are the Balloons:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/20/travel/escapes/20Ahead.html?_r=1&8dpc&oref=slogin

Oooohhh, pretty!  Thanks, madupont.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on July 21, 2007, 10:43:08 AM
Whoa, hadn't thought about Then Came Bronson in a while.  It wasn't past my bedtime, so I might be a bit older than thou, Harrie.  "Kerouac Lite" is a good description, and I dug the scenery, too.  I bought a little Suzuki 180 shortly thereafter and learned that contact lenses and motorcycling don't mix well.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 21, 2007, 11:08:22 AM
How long was that show on?  I thought it maybe had two programs and disappeared; really can't remember that far back. But I did have the biggest Michael Parks interest in the short term as a possible Jimmy Dean substitute but I don't remember if Michael could act? As time went on, I wasn't too sure James Dean had been able to act either, when I looked carefully at that first movie about the high-school field trip to the Observatory.  It was just awful with him screaming at his father, like a young Leonard di Caprio, in the living room no less. What would the neighbours say? Oh, we were hell on wheels as adolescents back in the 1950s.

I think what happened was that James Dean really impressed Broadway when he played a seductive Arab boy in a play about a French auteur after the manner of Marlon Brando, moody,seductive, sultry. From then on he had lots of help, particularly from the ladies, in important films. Michael Wood didn't get that far.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on July 21, 2007, 11:29:00 AM
So now we have "reality" shows with Chachi and the two Coreys.  Just when you didn't think television could stoop any lower, dredging up these former teen actors, and having them reflect on their lives in the fast lane these past 20+ years.  I suppose Chachi must feel a bit shortchanged, given that his "squeezes" have done better than he has over the years.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 21, 2007, 12:26:08 PM
Here's the rundown on Michael Parks.    Quentin Tarantino does like him, thinks he's a great actor.  I can't find the thing where I'd first read that, but there is this:

Perhaps then it's no surprise that no less than Quentin Tarantino refers to parks as the world's greatest living actor. In fact, the longtime appreciator of treasures forgotten or undiscovered has devoted a significant chunk of his filmography trying to win the actor the recognition he deserves. After writing the character of Texas Ranger Earl McGraw in Robert Rodriguez' From Dusk Till Dawn, Tarantino enlisted him to reprise the role in both Kill Bill films as well as his latest opus Grindhouse.

That's part of an intro to an interview with Parks that appeared here:  http://dvd.ign.com/articles/778/778116p1.html

Wherever I read it, I thought QT said Parks was the most naturalistic actor he'd ever seen work, and he greatly admired that in him.  Personally, I tend to consider the source when it's someone like QT; which may be fair or not, because he's done a hell of a lot more than I ever have.  But I think he even admits he's .... quirky; so his assessment of Parks' talent may not be the mainstream perception.

Parks himself has actually had a pretty interesting life, according to the IMDB bio -- lots of odd jobs, turning down an offer to play baseball because he made more money working on caskets, stuff like that.  So maybe he was a natural for TCB-like parts, rather than turning into, say, George Hamilton when the director yells "cut."

Then Came Bronson ran for a year, according to IMDB, and I was eight.  I'm pretty sure it ran Wednesdays at 10, and it was already a neighborhood scandal that I was allowed to stay up 'til 9 at the time.


We caught part of the Chachi show while flipping, and it qualifies for "like watching a train wreck" viewing.  He's sitting there smoking cigars with his buddies and wondering why he's never been married.  Well, you could put out the cigar for one thing.....  It's produced by the guy who played older brother Wayne on The Wonder Years, Jason Hervey.   IIRC, he's kind of a producer or business whiz, but I don't recall what else he's done.  As the hubby noted, well the Bonaduce show is done, will the next loser please step up?  Which would also explain the show about the Coreys, I guess.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on July 21, 2007, 03:37:47 PM
I caught part of one of those VH1 celebreality shows while in Seattle a few years back.  It included Flavor Fav and Brigette Nielsen, which evolved into one of the most surreal screen romances I had ever seen. It was so pathetic that I was drawn into it like a train wreck, as you note Harrie.  I suppose if given the choice between total nobodies or washed-up actors, the second holds more appeal because they appeal to one's curiosity, if nothing else.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on July 21, 2007, 03:41:22 PM
I thought Tarrantino was maturing into a seasoned director when I saw Jackie Brown, but then he came out with Kill Bill and totally lost me.  It was the kind of movie he fantasized making as a teenager.  I don't have any patience for him anymore.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 21, 2007, 06:34:47 PM
Exactly.

But Harrie, did you ever see the Tarantino HBO Iconoclasts with the little pianist in the green dress?   I could not watch it.  He's a very quirky guy and I still think the best thing he ever did was that strange duo or, The Jackson two,that included John Trovolta, and didn't Harvey Keitel do a "Cleaner" in that pic?

Unfortunately, Uma Thurman, who  could mesmerize any guy in that get-up and at that point in her career, was side-tracked into working for him again,and again.  She did much better for her rep when working for Merchant/Ivory.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 21, 2007, 07:50:56 PM
madupont,
We don't get HBO, but Iconoclasts also ran on Sundance, which we do get. That being said, I did not watch the one with QT and Fiona Apple (right?) because I'm not a big fan.  I absolutely love Reservoir Dogs, like Jackie Brown a lot, and can pretty much leave the rest, including Pulp Fiction.   I understand that Pulp Fiction is a highly thought of flick, a veritable piece of cinematic art; but I get annoyed by so many parts of it that I just don't watch it.  I accept my lack of appreciation for PF as my shortcoming, not necessarily QTs.

I very much liked the Iconoclasts episodes featuing Laird Hamilton and Eddie Vedder, and Newman and Redford (of course).


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 21, 2007, 08:29:13 PM
No wonder I kept picking up that signal, I almost described her dress as "apple" green, as I had no idea what her name  was; she was fair, he was a jerk. Perhaps under other circumstances, I could actually listen to her music without being annoyed at his Punchinello grotteries.

I can well imagine what you disliked about this film,PF.  The humor of Keitel came through, which was necessary; people would not have taken those sequences "seriously", if he had not signaled this is not real folks or I would not be here.  He did this, as I recall, with The Piano, as well, to lighten up the nudity. These are the odd things that he brings to his roles,including something he did with Sorvino who is an excellent "actress" as we used to say, in which he is a Greenwich Village Jazz musician and she is a girl whom he discovers by complete coincidence. I can not for the life of me remember that name either,"something On the Bridge", was it Lulu on the Bridge ? By Paul Auster, the rest of the cast was not memorable despite their fame. I vaguely recall  Gina Gershon as Mira's friend unless that has really escaped me too. I love her acting,Gina that is. Mira has done some  class French Theatre roles for film with Ben Kingsley as a lead but my mind has become over-taxed today explaining the deceptive ways of a no-good man. It will click on at some weird point,to which I'll respond,"Oh,yeah? Now you tell me."

Redford and Newman was a priceless take on the secret lives of old actors' relationships to each other; best part of which was sitting in Joanne's theatre discussing their memories of their experiences when they started out.

Did you get to see the Maya Angelou/Dave Chapelle visit? I am longing to get somebody else's take on this because it was hilarious to eavesdrop while entirely quaintly sweet but neverless funny in other ways.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 21, 2007, 10:03:00 PM
Quote
Redford and Newman was a priceless take on the secret lives of old actors' relationships to each other; best part of which was sitting in Joanne's theatre discussing their memories of their experiences when they started out.

Okay, here's where I have to point out that it's only been "Joanne's theatre" for a few years, while the Westport Country Playhouse itself has been around since the 1930s, IIRC.  An awful lot of actors have started (or re-started, or attempted to revive) their careers there over the years, and that rich history is documented photographically (and with posters - posterly?)  in the lobby. Or, it used to be -- I haven't been there since the renovation.

I did really enjoy the back-and-forth between Redford and Newman on their Iconoclasts episode -- even without a script, they just click.  I missed the Angelou/Chappelle one; but the show seems to come back periodically, so if I see it coming around, I'll definitely try to catch it.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 22, 2007, 12:57:43 AM
Here is the play that I was telling you about. Made by Bertolucci's Production company (meaning, he tinkered with the writing for the screen) be sure to click on: more
at any time for more interesting details. I was interested that this favourite of mine was placed with two other favorites also by Mr.B.
(most recently, Besieged; less recently,Stealing Beauty)

Also click Marivaux, for the creator's bio.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0253840/


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 22, 2007, 01:18:29 AM
harrie,

"and that rich history is documented photographically (and with posters - posterly?)  in the lobby. Or, it used to be -- I haven't been there since the renovation." re: Westport Theater

I had that kind of chagrin, when logically recalling that a repertoire theater where I spent a lot of time had of course moved on to bigger and better settings.  I heard about it last Spring over at the nytimes book forums in the midst of a non-fiction perusal of a poetry anthology when I was told that a theater restaurant and bar next to the Miller Theatre, and in which I'd spent some momentous occasions, was no longer there. Closed. Fini.

Then it occurred to me, where are all the drawings(ala Sardi's) that hung on the walls, depicting all the famous actors who had played the Miller Repertory Theater?  It took me awhile, to discover all the connections, but finding the cast lists for every single play performed there eventually led me to the information that the collection of every drawing,head-shot submitted, all applications to the company for employment, every bill, every program, had been put in boxes at the state University for the State Historical Society.   Oh, and their pay-check receipts as well, for every member of the company who had ever played there; do you suppose that included the "stars" too?

They inevitably had been people we watched in old movies at home on tv. Spring Byington, Shepherd Strudwick,Sylvia Sidney, Anthony Perkins,
...Anthony Perkins! Yes, that Tony Perkins aka Norman Bates.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on July 22, 2007, 01:28:34 AM
Speaking of Chappelle, I thought his shortlived show on Comedy Channel was riotously funny.  He has a razor sharp edge to his sketches that I can see would be difficult to sustain over the long haul. You look at how David Letterman has mellowed out to the equivalent of melba toast over time.  So, I guess I can understand why he wanted to pull away.  Cohen smartly signed only a two-year deal with HBO. Better to be remembered on DVD.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 22, 2007, 03:00:16 AM
That's exactly why I'm wondering who caught that Iconoclast number. Because he was riotious inside like he is on stage, whereas Angelou was  what some folk call,"hincty". She was quite condescending because of his "youth" and I have no idea how old this guy is!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on July 22, 2007, 11:57:30 AM
If it is Chappelle you are referring to, maddie, he's in his early 30s.  According to wikipedia, he's been doing stand-up since he was 14, making him a veteran. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 22, 2007, 12:44:49 PM
He's one of those non-age people who can do a routine anywhere between youth and old-age. For Maya Angelou, he did age 8.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 23, 2007, 11:48:13 AM
and my brother was all amped up about the Harley.



I thought it was a Triumph...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 23, 2007, 12:11:22 PM
and my brother was all amped up about the Harley.

I thought it was a Triumph...

I clearly recall the bro going on and on (and on and on) about the teardrop gas tank, how cooolll Bronson's Harley was, etc. -- but he could easily have been wrong.  However, these sources -- though I can't vouch for their credibility, they're consistent -- all say that it was a Harley.  So I'm stickin' with my story.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on July 23, 2007, 12:13:15 PM
I guess it would be helpful to actually provide those sources, huh? 

During his travels Jim drove a red Harley Davidson Sportster 883cc motorcycle with knobby tires [license: 723795]. The gas tank sported a triangle with an image of an eye [similar to the one the back of a dollar bill.]http://www.tvacres.com/motorcycles_bronson.htm 


The pilot featured a hill climb contest, which Bronson won (remarkable, considering he rode a street-equipped Harley-Davidson Sportster!). The most identifiable feature of the Bronson bike is the insignia on the gas tank, a triangle with an eye in the middle.http://tulsatvmemories.com/bronson.html


Bronson rides a Harley-Davidson Sportster motorcycle and, as such, was viewed by some as a modern version of the solitary cowboy meandering the American west.http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Then_Came_Bronson





Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on July 23, 2007, 11:15:32 PM
Pretty good artfart on Turner:  The devils in the details are truly haunting.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 24, 2007, 01:22:28 AM
You can say that again.  I thought of him as some middle-aged stodgy landscape artist that pleased my cottagey grandmother. 

But this made it a much more exciting story. If....

I think that they were hardpressed to find what else they could show.  He did an immense amount of paintings, as some do, and they are landscapes when not looking at a port or out to sea. He does just about every port on the Western Europe Coastline. That and an overmuch staring at the sun at a certain point in the mid-heavens made me began to wonder if the man was an epileptic. But,then, if that had been the case, they would have made rather much of it.   I think he was quite right about marriage and art.  I've known thousands of artists and they seldom keep it together, although while they do, have married lives, they do it rather better than the ordinary sort we are.  It is simply that it is "while".  I can only recall one marriage that stayed intact. That was a man who painted like Rembrandt.   He would look at me, and immediately put 40 pounds on me.  I'm not going to explain that.

Did you catch the part where they said he was 15 years old when they accepted his painting for the Royal Academy? I hadn't thought they said. Have known one of those too. Italian however, which made it less mysterious.  He was just the younger brother of every other painter in the studio and that seemed fine with everybody.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 25, 2007, 10:49:57 AM

 So I'm stickin' with my story.

You're probably right - I wasn't so much challenging you as just recalling that I was thinking it was a Triumph -- which was sort of the "it" bike back then.  If it was a Harley, then the writers were taking "painstaking" detail to create something very specific and I guess it is understandable why the public wasn't quite ready for it yet...

But all's well since they just brought it back a few years later--set in the 1800s as Kung Fu...  :)

Wow--from Route 66 to Kung Fu in only 2 degrees of separation


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on July 25, 2007, 11:03:35 AM
I watched the opening segment of the new series, Damages with Glenn Close playing the heavy.  Good start.  I hope it keeps up the nasty work it has started.  So far, not a good guy in sight.  Everyone is out for something, hidden or otherwise.

Damages is on Tuesday nights on the FX channel at 9 PM Central Time.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on July 25, 2007, 01:43:08 PM
I ran a Sportster 883 from LA to Tombstone Arizona once in the summer and it was a lesson in frustration.  That tank is so small, that I literally had to stop every 80 miles or so to fill up.  I carried a 1.5 gallon can on the back of the bike so I could at least extend my range between gas stations, but I still had to hold my buddy up by pulling over on the side of the road to refuel.

Back in the 60s there were a lot fewer gas stations and much longer stretches of road with no stations, so I’m not sure how that Bronson guy really managed…  :)

I used to have a Norton Interstate back in the mid 70s with a 300 mile cruising range, so it was a noticeable difference...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 25, 2007, 05:52:39 PM
donotremove « Reply #377

Shoot, I missed it. Do they have any re-runs like some of the other Comcast privileges?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on July 25, 2007, 06:01:50 PM
dnr,
I found it by momentarily discoverint the search feature. It replay at 11:06 on  FX tonight.  I'll watch it, if I can manage to stay awake?


Title: Re: Damages
Post by: lulu on August 01, 2007, 03:12:19 PM
Has anyone watched this chilling, enthralling, addictive new show on FX network with Glenn Close?  Absolutely riveting with wonderful performances by Close, Philiip Bosco (is the man ever bad?), Ted Danson, etc.  If you hate lawyers, you'll love this one.

And no one can do evil as Close can.  When she smiles, you just feel as if you have to run or look away.  Chilling to the bone.

But this series is so different.  You think one thing and then you discover it ain't what you think.  it's written by adults and for adults.

Sounds simple: Close a lawyer trying a class action suit against an executive who robbed his employees of everything when he sold his stock after encouraging them to buy it.  (sound familiar).  Sounds like Patty Hewes will be a heroine.

Welcome to the topsy turvey world of Damages.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on August 01, 2007, 03:35:41 PM
Lulu, I'm watching it.  Anyone who missed the first episode will be at a loss, I'm afraid.  The whole story line is what went before the beginning--the dead boyfriend in the tub.

Glenn Close, of course, is stunningly cunning.  And the smile?  Well, it will lower a room's temperature better than refrigerated air.  Thank goodness the show is closed captioned.  I wouldn't be able to keep up otherwise.

Maddie, I'm afraid you'll have to wait for reruns. No replays later in the week that I know of.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on August 01, 2007, 04:11:54 PM
donotremove:

Boy, when she smiles at you, run for cover or go into hiding.  I love Philip Bosco (in just about anything) and he brings class to whatever he does (not that Close doesn't either).  She is one first-rate actress who finally got a role worthy of her.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 01, 2007, 08:48:17 PM
donotremove and lulu,

No. I caught it last Wed.night at 11 plus pm last week ,which means there is a good chance I can again tonight, was afraid I missed that when i saw what you were posting in here.

I think perhaps the biggest contribution is what they are offering in the change of format by the sponsor.  Doing exactly what needs to be done about the lack of narrative continuity that was raised at the Gunter Grass and Norman Mailer interviews by O'Hagan at the New York Public Library for The Paris Review.  They brought up why younger people, kids in school don't read to the extent we liked to do, personally I used to think it was possibly our neurosis of the day; but the writers on this occasion seemes to agree that it is the result of television, which Mailer thinks was invented by the Devil who similarly took control of Hitler.


It is great to see Ted Danson back on the small screen (either the big screen is too much for him or he is too much for the big screen, haven't exactly figured that out.) because he is obviously one of the genre's better actors ever since he stepped on the set of Cheers.

As to Madame Glenney, why do you think I brought up the topic of Pierre Choderlos de Laclos, Liaisons Dangereuse, as a perfect example of belles lettres.(over in Fiction or somewhere)?  She immediately centered the camera upon herself and held it until she had defined who exactly her character was to this menage, or her director did and I never can remember which director it was, Stephen Frears or Milos Foreman?  Obviously, I like the other version almost as well because it had the lovely former Mrs. Peter O'Toole(Sian Phillips) as well as Annette  Benning. Although it was entirely missing the sinister gleefulness of John Malkovich who manages to get Keenu Reeves killed (at a time when I didn't even know who the kid was. Now, I know and I try to avoid aesthetic contact as much as possible).

lulu.  It helps if you just think of her as, "Sara Plain and Tall" with her delightful husband on the Plains. Once  you keep that image in mind, there is nothing Glenn Close can do to intimidate you. I like the nuances however of how she dismissed the other attorney in the dog-park with her own particular version of the New York exit popular in our day and age.  Is that Philip Bosco?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: elportenito on August 04, 2007, 06:46:22 AM
We finally got digital tv.....unless we keep one of our digits firmly pressing the channel button on the remote continuously, our analogue tv won't function anymore.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 05, 2007, 11:18:14 AM
Donotremove and lulu,

In light of my long praise at #384 for the sponsor's format on  Damages,whoa!

Upon last viewing, granted it was a repeat, I was treated to a whole bunch of commercials interspersed between the action or recall of the dialogue. Will hit the regular time of showing in hopes of avoiding this commercial interuption.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on August 05, 2007, 09:00:37 PM
Well, "John From Cincinatti" is on again tonight, and as long as the chaotic jazz clacking clears from the character's chops, I guess I'm in for a penny, in for a pound.  It's funny when what you thought was inferior to "Cop Rock" or "Manimal," only more embarassing by being better cast, turns out to be (gulp) compelling drama slash fascination.  I don't know if it makes you on crack or schizo when you watch it, but just in case I just put on my tinfoil hat and have made a secret prayer.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on August 06, 2007, 01:33:51 AM
JFC began to lose me the last two weeks.  In fact, i'm off it.  I didn't even have the curiousity to watch tonight.  I feel ripped off from having watched the first few episodes.

Entourage and FOTC are still repping HBO Sunday night.  But that 9-10 slot is a problem.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 06, 2007, 11:39:59 AM
Donotremove,

Jbottle and kam have just commented on John from Cincinnati. If I hadn't been doing something in between the end of Big Love and whatever last night, I never would have realized the Trixie signed on with those guys at JfC.  I think she should have stayed with her lover at the Dry Goods and Hardware in Deadwood.  But I guess that Trixie is just a character like the rest of us are in primetime tv comment,although she is actually Patricia Malcomson born in Ireland.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 06, 2007, 11:57:16 AM
Paula.  She also spent some time on the island in Lost.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 06, 2007, 12:03:01 PM
Whose Lost?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 06, 2007, 12:05:11 PM
And, in TV world, I saw that CBS is producing a childrens' version of Survivor, kind of.  Except they're not on an island, I don't think; but they're turning loose a bunch of kids to form their own society without adults, without supervision, etc.  (But with cameras and producers watching them, of course, so really, how do they make that claim?) 

Anyway, I don't watch much reality TV; the Gordon Ramsay shows and Top Chef are about it, and even then I'm not religious about it or anything.  But if these kids go all Lord of the Flies and start killing each other, I just may have to check it out.   


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 06, 2007, 12:05:58 PM
Whose Lost?

Try Hare Krishna.



Okay, Carlton Cuse's and Damon Lindelof's "Lost."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 06, 2007, 12:17:14 PM
I do that dropping a name, like Paula, sometimes when I'm angry how the vote turned out in the Senate this weekend. Not that anybody cares about censorship.  Paula Malcomson is sometimes credited as Paula Williams but forever known to me as Trixie, the hardest working actor of the fair sex, in the cast of Deadwood.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on August 06, 2007, 12:22:42 PM
I hate seeing Deadwood characters in other roles. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 06, 2007, 12:52:48 PM
Me too!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on August 06, 2007, 01:06:41 PM
It was painful to watch Timothy Olyphant play a bland, non-mustached, bad guy in the latest Die Hard flick.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 06, 2007, 01:26:56 PM
I think that I became very attached to the entire cast of Deadwood during the run which was possibly longer than I could keep track of because it wasn't until it was over that one day, while checking the location and bios of the historic characters that when looking down from Cemetery Hill at the actual town, I not only learned that people like the Bullocks are buried there on Cemetery Hill, but that I'd been to Deadwood in my childhood.

It's apparently on the way to Mount Rushmore, so it was more or less the standard tourist itinerary; and my father wanted to see everything before returning to the Midwest from Arizona by car sometime in 1938.

He returned to the  vicinity   in the upcoming decade because the region is particularly good for game-bird hunting. I think that he was looking for the ultimate pheasant.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on August 06, 2007, 05:40:20 PM
Maddy, I watched the first episode of JFC and decided I didn't care for it.  Right or wrong, I haven't watched another episode.

As for Trixie?  Well, that gal is the ultimate survivor as she proved on Deadwood.  I wish her well no matter where she ends up.

I don't mind actors showing up somewhere else after a long run in a part that almost chokes them with "type," but it does startle me sometimes.  I mean, hey, you gotta pay the rent (as Michael Caine is wont to say.)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on August 06, 2007, 09:33:03 PM
And, in TV world, I saw that CBS is producing a childrens' version of Survivor, kind of.  Except they're not on an island, I don't think; but they're turning loose a bunch of kids to form their own society without adults, without supervision, etc.  (But with cameras and producers watching them, of course, so really, how do they make that claim?) 

Anyway, I don't watch much reality TV; the Gordon Ramsay shows and Top Chef are about it, and even then I'm not religious about it or anything.  But if these kids go all Lord of the Flies and start killing each other, I just may have to check it out.   

Ramsay's a fraud - haven't you heard?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 06, 2007, 09:55:18 PM
And, in TV world, I saw that CBS is producing a childrens' version of Survivor, kind of.  Except they're not on an island, I don't think; but they're turning loose a bunch of kids to form their own society without adults, without supervision, etc.  (But with cameras and producers watching them, of course, so really, how do they make that claim?) 

Anyway, I don't watch much reality TV; the Gordon Ramsay shows and Top Chef are about it, and even then I'm not religious about it or anything.  But if these kids go all Lord of the Flies and start killing each other, I just may have to check it out.   

Ramsay's a fraud - haven't you heard?

Yeah, I've heard a lot about Ramsay. But I find him entertaining, even if just for the F-bomb count; and I believe there are always at least three sides to a story (his, hers, and the truth, as they say). 

For Hell's Kitchen alone, whether he's a fraud or not doesn't really come into play very much because it's about the contestants, not him.  As for the allegations of Ramsay's planting bad food in someone's kitchen in Kitchen Nightmares....well, that's why I'm not a fan of reality television in the first place: It's not very real. And I'll be honest -- while I wouldn't put it past anyone to pull b-s like that to "make" the show, I always wonder about the disgruntled factor on the part of the chef who is, when you get down to it, being shown up while his restaurant is (hopefully) being turned around.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on August 06, 2007, 10:00:00 PM
My father says all will be revealed on next week's JFC, the sigboth and I are getting a super-crunchy bucket of KFC and newly designed tinfoil hats just so we don't miss a thang.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on August 07, 2007, 10:39:52 PM
Yeah, I've heard a lot about Ramsay. But I find him entertaining, even if just for the F-bomb count; and I believe there are always at least three sides to a story (his, hers, and the truth, as they say). 

For Hell's Kitchen alone, whether he's a fraud or not doesn't really come into play very much because it's about the contestants, not him.

Maybe it's because it's Summer and nothing else is on, but I've gotten into Hell's Kitchen for some of the same reasons you mention. I didn't see either of the previous seasons or any other show with Ramsay.

My main nitpick with Hell's Kitchen is that Ramsay was forever stressing to the aspiring chefs the importance of teamwork in the kitchen, but the format of the show has the chefs in competition with one another. They have no real incentive to want the other chefs to do well.

For almost all of this season I've thought Rock would win. Then Bonnie had that moment recently when she was allowed to ream Ramsay a new one and I switched to her. (That's prediction, not preference.) It just seemed as if she was finally showing what she was made of. Ramsay said it best: "Bloody hell. Where did that come from?"


Title: Re: Damages
Post by: lulu on August 08, 2007, 03:17:32 PM
This show gets more addictive with each viewing.

However, you have to put reality aside.  last night when Hewes sent her young associate to file a brief with the judge and stay there, I laughed out loud.

For one thing, if you are a lawyer, you know that briefs are always filed with the Clerk of the court and not with a judge or his secretary.  Second, no one would sit outside a judge's office all night.  The whole scenario was too stupid to be believed.  I've worked for lawyers for many years and this one was too laughable to be believed.  Nowadays, most briefs are filed electronically.

However, Glenn Close is just brilliant as hewes and so is Danson.  Trying to figure out who is doing what (since both are criminals) is fascinating.   And since I DVR the show, I just fast forward during commercials but it's a brilliant show.  But expecting reality from television is very naive.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 08, 2007, 05:22:45 PM
lulu,

The scene you just described is where I decided Glenn Close is no longer
Plain and Tall; you are right, she is criminal.

After all, I think the reason that the scene was written that way, as you pointed out, the bottom line not exactly making any sense, was to clarify that Close was simply pulling her chain so she would be late. She's found this nice kid who is willing to please, all psyched-out from picking up on that family interaction and showing up at the wedding no less.  I am now convinced she is responsible for everybody's death in this one.

Although I loved the way her son knew how to retaliate. If you are going to be a high-powered mother, you are going to get whipped.

This is the ultimate sado-masochism show of the year.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 08, 2007, 05:26:35 PM
You know whom I can't stand, Ps....

The stupid blond who falls for going back to the guy who checked out of her life and nonchalantly shows up again as a killer for hire


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 08, 2007, 09:40:19 PM
My main nitpick with Hell's Kitchen is that Ramsay was forever stressing to the aspiring chefs the importance of teamwork in the kitchen, but the format of the show has the chefs in competition with one another. They have no real incentive to want the other chefs to do well.

For almost all of this season I've thought Rock would win. Then Bonnie had that moment recently when she was allowed to ream Ramsay a new one and I switched to her. (That's prediction, not preference.) It just seemed as if she was finally showing what she was made of. Ramsay said it best: "Bloody hell. Where did that come from?"

Hey, Earl.  I agree with you on the teamwork versus competition aspect of Hell's Kitchen; but I think that's sort of a given with reality shows (ie, Survivor and its alliances), and again, one of the reasons I usually don't care for them.  I do, however, enjoy watching the contestants work -- or not work -- together; what can I say, I enjoy a good train wreck.

I can't believe Bonnie will win, and don't think she will (BWTHDIK??). She's got the palate thing -- interestingly, a similar situation came up last year and the "amazing palate" person was the runner-up, I think -- but that's about it.  Without the other skills, which I believe Rock posssesses (along with your basic chef attitude) -- well, that palate will only get you so far.  But we will see -- I'm usually always wrong on these things.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on August 09, 2007, 02:26:54 PM
Oh, it was obvious she wanted her associate to be late.  But this associates seems more wimp that an aggressive, ambitious attorney.  How long can she stay so naive?? 

I believe Close's character more lifelike than her young associate.

However, Danson's character is not some innocent either.  He's perfectly capable of rough tactics too so it is hard to know who does what to whom.  They are both detestable people.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 10, 2007, 05:49:46 PM
lulu.#408

"How long can she stay so naive??"

Because this story uses flash-back sequences and warped time, we actually see how far she has gotten or the end of story from our view of her, except that we don't know what is now going down with our "Power attorney" (not power of attorney).  They will keep confusing us with more ramification, the art of soap-opera. I call these, "night time soaps" like using that stuff from Dove before you go to bed at night. The writer has to be so much more clever than the old soap writer to keep the ball bouncing.  It would be nice if every actor in the business had the option right up front in the contract to know how it ends?!!! If you have read an entire script, from episode A to Z as with a movie, until the rewrite starts up,you'd have a pretty good idea of where you are at in playing it. But very few actors turn down a special role as Danson and Close have here.

Television being what it is, they can sometimes find themselves surprised at the changes that occur to a director or producer that they then demand of the writer(s)and the actor has to be adaptable but most actors are afraid that they will be made to look like a fool; they go on the reputation of the producer and the director as to what they've shot before.

Neither one of these actors would likely go for something that didn't read as a piece of good writing, but as to movies-- I have read scripts to save time for the person whose agent had received them and sent them on because somebody perfectly lovely was going to be in it, that is somebody who was "happening" of the moment. They really believe that this particular talent will improvise and make the thing "happen" or work.  You can not figure out what the heck you are reading and what's to be done with it.  It goes on the scrap heap , however the agent or the personal representative never fails to not understand  why you would reject that part opposite, my god, "it's got Dana Carvey!".  Uh,huh....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on August 11, 2007, 06:37:51 PM
I thought for sure there was discussion in here of MadMen (or however it's rendered) but now can't find same--maybe it was another thread.  Saw an episode the other night and the interest factor of trying to spot the stylistic "done rights" vs. "anacrhronisms" held me for a while.  My mate seemed drawn into the ad guys' story but I thought the show pretty much sucked in the female dept.--hair & clothing styles and watching people smoke did not make up for ineptitude in the acting dept. (and in the smoking dept. for some of them.  I heard the producer in an interview say they use "herbal" ciggies and they did not make any actor smoke that had never done so before--like someone up for a role would never tell a lie!)  So far, the elements do not a gripping tv show make, but it might be worth one more viewing.  What say others?

On edit: Found the post re Mad Men in the Movies thread, sorry obertray.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on August 13, 2007, 09:49:53 AM
Harrie and Earl,

I noticed there was some sort of Outer Limits-ish series on Friday nights (9 PM CT) on ABC, called "Masters of Science Fiction" which seems to consist of free-standing shows written, presumably, by masters of the genre.  This Friday, Terry O'Quinn starred in an episode dealing with alien invasion, so if you were missing "Lost" it was kind of fun to watch him play the role of a skeptic.  Also had William Davis, the "Cigaret Smoking Man" of X-Files fame.  I don't have cable, so this may be something that was originally aired on the SF channel or elsewhere.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 13, 2007, 10:33:42 AM
barton,
Thanks for the heads-up.  I looked up the show, and it's a limited run (four episodes).  The Terry O'Quinn one was #2.   The remaining two look interesting enough to check out -- they sound kind of Rod Serling derivative.  How ABC decided to do this, I'll never figure out; it seems to run counter to most of what they do, but maybe they figure it's summer, why not try something new? 

Here's a link with descriptions, cast, etc.  http://abc.go.com/specials/mastersofscifi.html 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on August 13, 2007, 12:33:30 PM
Harrie, thanks for the link.  The episode two, which I watched, did have some of the...what to call it?....quality of an old TZ episode, maybe "moral awareness" might describe it.  Like Serling's stuff, it came with a sort of message about the human condition and some philosophic exploration.  In this episode, it dealt with warfare and disarmament, and what would happen if everyone could understand everyone else, i.e. there's some sort of universal translator field given off by the alien pods so that people speaking two different languages understand each other.  I don't think it had quite the brilliance of Serling at his best, but it was much better than the other summer sci-fi we get around here, also run by ABC, which is the teen wunderkind thing, Kyle XY.  Which I call "Kyle KY" because there is something so oily about its main characters.

 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on August 13, 2007, 05:02:05 PM
There I was with my tinfoil hat on, thoughts of Howard Hessman from Johnny Fever from WKRP on Cincinnati, and then John the alien and the dirtweed parade, setting us up for some kind of revelation about the a 2014, because of the weird pyramid/hopscotch game, and the way that there is no way they should be watching all of this on the computer from the coffeeshop, the way that the aliens watched the $6M man battle Sasquatch from the alien ship...every time I was on the wavelength the tinfoil hat would fail and the whole mess seemed like the first HBO special written with the aid of at least 20 monkeys strung out on crystal meth psychosis and writing it all down over a two-week period where they didn't sleep, but anyway, I was transfixed, miffed, amused, frustrated, angered, and battered with one WTF? scene or line after the other, so yeah, thank god for "Entourage."

Will there be a Season II of "John From Cincinnati" or not, or rather, is one even planned, since there doesn't seem to be much dramatic trajectory other than "shit happens," I suppose that more inexplicable shit could happen for another couple of years.  Thing is, I'm in, I'm a fan, but what about all the folks who are expecting the next "The Sopranos," which had brilliant nuance and subtext but which was compelling and straightforward on dramatic and acting merit, or even the macabre whimsy of "Six Feet Under," quirky and unsettling at times but also funny and fairly conventional as a family drama that "happens to take place at a funeral home."

But JFC is as fried as KFC, and yet, I watch, hell, I even like it a little, but all I can gather so far is that the aliens are here to save us from the towel heads, or so my tinfoil hat has gathered, wait, I'm getting another transmission...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on August 13, 2007, 05:06:41 PM

Will there be a Season II of "John From Cincinnati" or not, or rather, is one even planned...

JFC is to cable-drama as "The Chevy Chase Show" was to talk shows?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on August 13, 2007, 05:08:52 PM
There I was with my tinfoil hat on, thoughts of Howard Hessman from Johnny Fever from WKRP on Cincinnati, and then John the alien and the dirtweed parade, setting us up for some kind of revelation about the a 2014, because of the weird pyramid/hopscotch game, and the way that there is no way they should be watching all of this on the computer from the coffeeshop, the way that the aliens watched the $6M man battle Sasquatch from the alien ship...every time I was on the wavelength the tinfoil hat would fail and the whole mess seemed like the first HBO special written with the aid of at least 20 monkeys strung out on crystal meth psychosis and writing it all down over a two-week period where they didn't sleep, but anyway, I was transfixed, miffed, amused, frustrated, angered, and battered with one WTF? scene or line after the other, so yeah, thank god for "Entourage."

Will there be a Season II of "John From Cincinnati" or not, or rather, is one even planned, since there doesn't seem to be much dramatic trajectory other than "shit happens," I suppose that more inexplicable shit could happen for another couple of years.  Thing is, I'm in, I'm a fan, but what about all the folks who are expecting the next "The Sopranos," which had brilliant nuance and subtext but which was compelling and straightforward on dramatic and acting merit, or even the macabre whimsy of "Six Feet Under," quirky and unsettling at times but also funny and fairly conventional as a family drama that "happens to take place at a funeral home."

But JFC is as fried as KFC, and yet, I watch, hell, I even like it a little, but all I can gather so far is that the aliens are here to save us from the towel heads, or so my tinfoil hat has gathered, wait, I'm getting another transmission...

After two weeks off, I went back to JFC to watch the Season finale.  Hopefully the series finale too.
The first insult was when i watched the "Re-cap" they showed at the beginning. I watched most of the season, but NONE of the scenes I watched were in the season recap.  It all seemed like stuff from the last episode or two.  That means you didn't fucking need to waste your viewer's attention for all those weeks if it all boils down to the same storyline happening for the third or fourth time in the show. WORST hbo SHOW EVER!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on August 13, 2007, 05:10:28 PM
The coffeshop scene was the worst in modern television history.  How the fuck were they watching that shit go down?  A webcam is believable, one that seems to follow the actors around is not.  WORST!! EVER!!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on August 13, 2007, 06:01:36 PM
"JFC is to cable-drama as "The Chevy Chase Show" was to talk shows?"

Yeah, the cringe of the Parade Speech reminded me viscerally of Chevy's embarrassingly sincere birthday smarm toward Goldie Hawn.  The flopsweat is palpable...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on August 14, 2007, 12:19:14 PM
"John from Cincinnati" is so bad that it makes "Manimal" look like "Cop Rock," or vice-versa.  My theory on where Bruce Greenwood went after two episodes is that he said "fuck this noise," and they got him to shoot the hotel room scene to have a way to sort of tie it together.  I don't think the show was entirely written when shooting began, it's David Milch, after all, we trust him, we have a relationship.  Well, that is the best way to get fucked over.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on August 14, 2007, 07:13:27 PM
[reconfiguring design of tinfoil hat for better dirtweed reception from my father]

"John from Cincinnatti," on HBO, catch it while it still don't cost ya' nuthin'


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on August 15, 2007, 09:14:02 AM
"John from Cincinnati" is so bad that it makes "Manimal" look like "Cop Rock," or vice-versa. 

Did you read the Bret McKenzie interview in The Onion last week?............

AVC: Did you have any hesitations about the way you incorporate songs into the show?

BM: Yeah, we watched Cop Rock, and that terrified us, and then we just kind of held our breath and gave it a go.

and later...

AVC: Do people keep comparing you to Cop Rock?

BM: I do. Executives early on did. Well, we'd bring it up, because we'd heard it was a musical. And then we'd see the fear in their eyes.

http://www.avclub.com/content/interview/bret_mckenzie_of_flight_of (http://www.avclub.com/content/interview/bret_mckenzie_of_flight_of)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on August 15, 2007, 10:30:06 AM
Good interview, I liked in the last one (or the prior one) where the manager is sort of ambivalent about the cost vs. the "well, that's what rock stars do..." when they "trash" the hotel room and raid the mini-bar (sorta), and his disappointment/relief that it wasn't as bad as it should have been/could have been.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on August 15, 2007, 10:31:17 AM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070815/ap_en_ot/tv_john_from_cincinnati (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070815/ap_en_ot/tv_john_from_cincinnati)

 LOS ANGELES - "John From Cincinnati" has caught its last wave on HBO.
ADVERTISEMENT

The surfer drama that aired its season finale this week will not return for a second run, the premium cable channel said Tuesday.

The move represents a rare cancellation by HBO of an hourlong drama after its freshman season and a misfire as the channel tries to build its post-"The Sopranos" schedule.

"John From Cincinnati," which blended family drama with the metaphysical, earned mixed reviews and failed to spark audience interest.

The show, created by David Milch ("Deadwood") and "surf noir" novelist and screenwriter Kem Nunn, starred Bruce Greenwood and Rebecca De Mornay.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on August 15, 2007, 10:35:59 AM
http://www.cracked.com/index.php?name=News&sid=2304&pageid=2 (http://www.cracked.com/index.php?name=News&sid=2304&pageid=2)

Potential movie: Trey Parker and Matt Stone's Dumb and Dumber 2

It was Jim Carrey, before he got older and started making serious movies. It was Matt Stone and Trey Parker, before South Park got all preachy and libertarian. Their paths nearly intersected in a way that could have made, yes, we'll say it, Poop Joke History.

Forget about the terrifyingly bad film that did get made, Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd. Stone and Parker were hired to write a Dumb and Dumber prequel back in the late '90s, right after the first film became a hit. Had they followed through, the result could have been a film so crude that society itself may have been in danger of total, immediate collapse (people eating each other on the streets, fathers clubbing sons to death with family dogs, etc.).

We can only guess at what the plot would have been. Perhaps it would have involved a terrorist plot to unleash a chemical bomb that causes every victim within a mile to become inflamed with ravenous homosexual lust. Maybe Harry and Lloyd could have stolen that bomb from the terrorists and realize the only way to keep it from detonating is by continually farting on it (it has a voice-activated detonator and, by sheer chance, Lloyd's farts sound exactly like the phrase "delay timer" in Arabic). Then maybe at the climax of the film they accidentally detonate the bomb at mid-field during the fourth quarter of the Super Bowl.

Or, you know, not. We'll never know.

Why it didn't get made: When a hot, young talent hits it big, there's invariably a period where they're tempted to say "Yes" to every offer that comes in, for fear that people will stop asking. Stone and Parker were in that stage when they took this on, before they realized they'd be working 22-hour days meeting South Park deadlines.

Another factor: Jim Carrey decided he was too good for sequels right around the time of Ace Ventura 2, so chances are he wouldn't have come on board anyway (at which point the studio started talking prequel instead of sequel). Thus, the horror that was Dumb and Dumberer: When Harry Met Lloyd was born. hoisted onto an unsuspecting populace, and then quickly forgotten, peace and reason returning.

And while we're on the subject: It's just as well that Dumb and Dumberer bombed. If the director (Troy Miller) had been given more movies, he may not have gone on to make the superb Flight of the Conchords TV show.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on August 15, 2007, 11:39:47 AM
Good interview, I liked in the last one (or the prior one) where the manager is sort of ambivalent about the cost vs. the "well, that's what rock stars do..." when they "trash" the hotel room and raid the mini-bar (sorta), and his disappointment/relief that it wasn't as bad as it should have been/could have been.

Murray (the manager) might be my favorite character.   

The bit you mention is part of a running one, and is one I haven't seen before, that I can remember.  In several episodes, Murray admonishes Bret and Jemaine for something or other, and then two minutes later does a complete 180, while not actually withdrawing the previous statement on the issue. 

For example, on the subject of band members dating, Murray takes a hard negative stance, asserting that band members dating is bad for business, in that the female fan base will grow if the perception is that band members are "available," etc.  Then, two minutes later, Murray asks Bret about his new girlfriend Coco, "She's really nice, isn't she?  She seems nice... You should hang on to that one..."

This is all enhanced by the concept that over half of Murray's dialogue is one cliche or another, due to the fact that his job is to be NZ's cultural attache to the US, so he needs to learn the expressions and idioms, etc.  It all comes around and together with Murray's concept that, hey, I'm managing a band, and bands trash hotel rooms and wear leather suits, etc.

This post is way too long, but last week's "On Tour" episode was my 3rd favorite, behind the episode in which Bret gets the job holding signs, and the "Bowie's In Space" episode.   My favorite aspect of the "On Tour" episode, beside the fact that Murray's character was central to it, was that Bret seemed to be doing an impression of Dean Martin's singing voice in that "Mermaids" song.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on August 15, 2007, 11:51:18 AM
I didn't notice the Martin thing, but the dialogue of the manager demonstrates that he's the least competent of all but also has a hard time being "difficult" and is invariably cheerful, I like the tone that whatever petty grievances are harbored in an episode meet with some sort of reluctant cheerful solution.  Jemaine is the new white R & B Nigel Tufnel.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on August 15, 2007, 11:59:17 AM
Oh, and the ax came down today or yesterday on "John From Cincinnatti," as artistically daring as they've been willing to be, from "Mr. Show" to TFotC, I thought of the line from "The Sopranos":  "Those [are] some tough Jews..."  From some of the commentary on the Mr. Show disc, they are indeed tough negotiators (remember how long they kept Gandolfini hanging), but there is hardly an excuse to be made for not canning JFC, one of most inexplicable television phenomenons in recent pop culture memory, arguably the worst season of TV made by talented people this decade.  (I'm excepting things like Jim Belushi, naturally)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on August 15, 2007, 01:23:33 PM
Damages:

For the first time, I could barely stay awake while watching it and had to rewind it several times.

It's getting very tiresome what with the blandness of the young associate (there is a reason, I guess, for not remembering the character's name), her fiance's character (young residents are usually overworked; this guy seems to have too much time on his hands); the fiance's sister and her drugs and sexual habits.  If I had been her I would have thought logn and hard before releasing my medical history to anyone.  If she's that naive, she is not capable of runnig or owning a restaurant.

There doesn't seem to be a shred of reality and when one of the associates remarks to her that it is surprising that she didn't remember the location of the building (five years ago?), I thought the show jumped the shark.

Can you remember where you were two years ago? 

Who's writing the scripts? 

It started off so interesting.  I'm with the guy who wanted to take the first offer.  So far, there is no smoking gun. 



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 15, 2007, 01:47:07 PM
Right here. lulu,re: whatever.  I was afraid of that, and I can't even remember, if I slept right through it on and off, or did I miss something?

Is this something that is happening because of the politicization of TV so that Drama suffers because there is not enough financial backing left which has any brains?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 16, 2007, 12:08:28 PM
lulu,re:#428

I did see it, last night. I had forgot it was on the previous  night. But since the sponsors have not lived up to their idealistic announcement from the start, there is a lot of introductory commercial inserted by the Fx programming to keep themselves on the air, including come-ons for other shows, so there is this hodge-podge occurring between Glenn Close doing dialogue as a teaser for the intro,probably to synopsize the show from last week, then a commercial, and so on.

This was an inauspicious start, and I kept on at the computer until it sounded interesting enough to pay some attention.  In a short time it dragged in use of time during a hearing to get the testimony from,the blonde (you say this is the fiance's sister? I completely missed that, but they seem to have lost me in just three episodes).

The only thing good that I have to say about it before the morning is nigh,Glenn Close has a lot of interesting visual tricks as an actor to  draw your eyes to her -- in particular, the expression on her face while other dialogue is going on in interviews and hearings.  This trick is called,"scene stealing". She does it with a lot of experience and practice, manipulation of the expression playing over the face is almost a lost art in television, and for one who can do that cleverly,with an awareness of where and when and how the camera is panning in track across your direction, you never lose the centering of the scene upon yourself as if you were the most important character in it. You hold the stage. In her case, it was learned through film experience.  She must have taken to heart what is legendary about Dietrich's instructions of all her lighting and how the cameraman must apply himself to it. Marlena Dietrich was not at all hesitant about that being a bargain for the enjoyment of her favours and therefore had a somewhat unusual menage a trois with her compliant husband Rudi whom she had brought out of Germany nor did her director complain in the least as it was his bread and butter and she made him famous. Not odd, that she should star in a film like Catharine the Great.

Certainly, Close is entitled to take this prerogative but, it used to be frowned upon by directors who asked the actors during preparation of a scene,Not to Mug.  Anyone who did that and pretended to be unaware of doing it, the usual explanation, would find themselves not being cast for roles in repertoire.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on August 16, 2007, 12:29:53 PM
Re: Damages.  I'm perfectly willing to let the show play itself out, to the part where all is revealed.  I assume there will be a second season and a new problem for Glenn Close to wrestle with.

I'm like Dave Letterman, I'm fascinated beyond reason with Glenn Close's face (the rest of her ain't bad, either.)  She was on Letterman's show the other night and he made the remark as her time was up, "I wish you could leave your face."  Close was startled.  Letterman quickly explained that he meant he was so enamored with her face that . . . .

Glenn Close is nowhere near beautiful.  So, what is it?  Is it like Lyle Lovett being so, well, ugly?  And I'll tell you somone else whose enigmatic sortof smile plays on the the face most of the time.  Dick Cheney.

So it goes . . . I'm hooked on Damages the same way I'm hooked on Big Love.  I've got a soap opera heart?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 16, 2007, 12:59:06 PM
I brought this back on Aug.12th. and think maybe I should have it made up as a t-shirt? But this time, I will start it again not to dzimas but,

I don't know, donotremove, Re: Popular Music
« Reply #356 on: June 28, 2007, 12:04:22 PM » Quote Modify Remove 

-------------------------------------------------------------------------------

"I don't know dzimas, perhaps it's our generation but then again you have other  connections to enjoying Lyle Lovett's music.  He reminds me of a Frenchman in the Cajun country who caught sand fleas/chiggers and had to make his living playing New Orleans bars and who will always be disappointed in love."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 16, 2007, 01:06:27 PM
Donotremove,

To best appreciate Glenn Close, you have to watch her open a scene in one of two versions filmed under the title: Liaisons Dangereuse. I checked, it is the Stephen Frears version of Dangerous Liaisons, in which she plays the Marquise  de Merteuil opposite John Malkovich (and if you can stand Keanu Reeves)

I like both versions filmed at about the same time. But, Glenn Close is majestic.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 16, 2007, 01:09:05 PM
ps:

She was not bad in Hamlet either (gosh,that was a production by Mel Gibson!) or in a more recent version of The Lion in Winter.  She apparently likes "majestic".


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 16, 2007, 01:12:08 PM
madupont, re Glenn Close's mugging and scene-stealing, I really enjoy when an actor does that (but not too much).  Find me guilty of aiding and abetting a scene-stealer, but when responding is done in moderation, I get that the character is still involved in the scene, despite not having a line to say at that moment. 

It bothers me more when someone does that thing where, since the other character is speaking, you can see the subordinate actor mentally making a shopping list, or thinking about where to go get faced that night, or even thinking "Oh dear G-d, what's my line?!??"    Reminds me of a grade school play where the kids walk to center stage, stop, turn to the audience and say their line.  Then they turn and walk away and the kid with the next line steps up.

Just my humble opinion.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 16, 2007, 01:15:57 PM
Perhaps Ms. Close does like to play majestic, but she also has the bones for it.  Her face has that patrician, not too pretty, not hideously ugly, strong character thing going on that (again, IMHO) lends itself to parts that call for majestic. 

Having nothing to do with anything, but IIRC Ms. Close's lineage goes back to the Mayflower. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on August 16, 2007, 02:09:28 PM
Glenn Close can play evil like no other actor.  Looking at her gives me the chills and I wouldn't want to mess with her.  (I'm talking about her characters; not Ms. Close herself, of course).  She did play a warm and loving mother on a show directed by Christopher Reeves and also starring David Straitharn as a couple dealing with their gay son who is stricken with AIDS; the mother being supportive; the father having a hard time dealing with his gay son.

The trouble with Glenn on this show is that Rose Byrne as the young associate is so bland; there is no competition there acting wise or maybe the role is just made that way, so Close stands out by a mile.  Byrne's character bores me.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 16, 2007, 07:17:22 PM
I finally got to watch the third ep of Mad Men (having missed the second) and happy to see that tonight is when the fourth is going to be on (I'll probably see it some other time).

So I'm sitting there wondering who Pete reminds me of and then it hits me.... He's who Dave Foley used to be. And then there is a scene where the bos and the bosses boss go into see the bosses bosses boss to ok the firing of Pete (which he already knows about) and who does he look like? Dave Foley as far into the future as Pete is in the past. If they had Dave Foley on as a guest there'd be some sort of rip in the TS continnuum, I'm suure!

But since I haven't been making tv commentary for a while (and since I just watched some of it on the DVR looking for something to erase) I just want to say that my other favorite show of this century was Raines with Jeff Goldblum. This highly stylised cine noir gumshoe with a mental tick show was just the most endearing role for JB (of whom I'm generally not a fan but about whom I'm always willing to be sympathetic.) Maybe it was because I knew at the outset that it was going away I felt sad knowing it was going to be gone.

Excellent TV in both cases.

In MM, you have to love the subtleties like when the divorced woman holds her hand to her chest, her left hand so that we are sure to see that she has no ring and hasn't for some time. There was a great discussion about the difference in the drinking patterns bewtween the generations. The Warriors drank because "it feels better than loosening your tie, because it's what men do." And the Beat Generation drinks because they are maudlin.
 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on August 16, 2007, 07:44:48 PM
I think Ms Byrne's rep suffers at the role she has early on in this drama.  I'd expect her to pick it up plenty as scenes dictate.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on August 16, 2007, 11:52:36 PM
I saw "Sarah Silverman" say "watch my show or I will kill this dog...," and the only other pop-reference to a similar saying is porn, wherein Tony Tedeshi says at one point during I'm guessing 1997 on the Spice Channel:  "Watch this movie or I'm going to kill this cat..."

Am I missing the pop-culture link or is the phraseology too common?  If not, it's possible that Sarah Silverman is making an obscure Spice reference to pimp her new Comedy Central season, if so, congrats, and not traumatized, but I feel like, hey man, you don't remember in "Sunset Boulevard"....

...or something, but then I realize I've seen almost everything they would have seen, and then I'm thinking, we're talking about Deshmo, who for a skinny guy was able to turn the ability of non-EDS into an 8-ball, no prob, but then I'm thinking that the thing that the three of us have in common is not an obscure pop-culture reference that I don't know about, but the one that I do...fucking "Spice," we got it for free when we supposedly had the alien box that came into our house.  No, we had friends that had those boxes, I was always "too chicken."  (:))))


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on August 16, 2007, 11:56:33 PM
I hate that smiley face, by the way, I can talk about my emotions without a yellow person, I mean who isn't yellow, look at the audience, guy still has MOO GOO GUYPAN on his tie wants to tell me about yellow people, but I kid the...


Title: Re: Mad men
Post by: obertray on August 17, 2007, 10:50:29 AM
Apparently it was not ep three but four, at least.

I'm falling out of like with this show already... It is less and less about the advertising game and less and less about the times and more and more about plot twists within the lives of the characters.

I guess I don't like the layering of issues on the characters. Sometimes arcs die in real life and they don't become part of an ever more complex whole. An example being the secretary who overhears Don's beat artist chick enticing him over the phone and now it's part of the drama... Ok, I guess it can be seen as indicative of the mores of the times, but, then there is a reason I stopped being interested in The Andy Griffith Show, at some point, old morays should have been eaten by the new morays, that's life in the reef.

The way the show progresses indicates that there was a time right before this time when everything was going smooth and then for some reason everything changed. Ok, that is supposed to be at least part of the premise, that the introduction of the pill and of valium and of Kennedyism all interacted to produce the sexual revolution, women's liberation, equal rights and the entire later generation grocery list of social upheavals, and how that impacted those that had just come into their own quo with which to claim status.

I like the premise, I just am starting to dislike the execution of it.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 17, 2007, 11:00:32 AM
I saw "Sarah Silverman" say "watch my show or I will kill this dog...," and the only other pop-reference to a similar saying is porn, wherein Tony Tedeshi says at one point during I'm guessing 1997 on the Spice Channel:  "Watch this movie or I'm going to kill this cat..."

Am I missing the pop-culture link or is the phraseology too common?  If not, it's possible that Sarah Silverman is making an obscure Spice reference to pimp her new Comedy Central season, if so, congrats, and not traumatized, but I feel like, hey man, you don't remember in "Sunset Boulevard"....


The phraseology is too common. I semirecall some rock album doing the same thing back in the 60s70s. It was old and established back when Cleavon Little Pointed the gun to his own neck in Blazing Saddles. Was Sarah using her own dog as the victim of her threat?

If she's going judge by me, that dog is a gonner! As that dog of a show ought to be. And Sarah too, just what we need a Jewish Garafallo who's twice as annoying and half as funny while trying to milk the same teet of sardonica. Uck, not for me thanks. She is to stand up comedy what rap is to funk.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 17, 2007, 12:58:25 PM
(http://content.answers.com/main/content/wp/en/thumb/b/b3/250px-Natlamp73.jpg) This is from 1973.

I knew it was something, then I thought Mad Magazine, then I thought again!

Sarah Silverman is a hack!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on August 17, 2007, 01:04:50 PM
I liked her telling of the Aristocrat.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 17, 2007, 01:16:29 PM
Never heard it, is it youtubed?

Meanwhile, The Aristocrats is always funnier for the teller than it is for the listener.

It's really not that funny as a joke only as an exercise in knowing where the top is and then going over it.

Just mho.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on August 17, 2007, 01:19:11 PM
Never heard it, is it youtubed?

Meanwhile, The Aristocrats is always funnier for the teller than it is for the listener.

It's really not that funny as a joke only as an exercise in knowing where the top is and then going over it.

Just mho.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5l_rdSKXji0 (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5l_rdSKXji0)


I like her meta-telling of the joke.  Moreso for the Joe Franklin bit afterwards.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 17, 2007, 01:31:14 PM
Thank you.

I'm going to wash my eyes out with Lifeboytm now!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 17, 2007, 04:01:28 PM
Kam,

do you have any idea what age obertray is or what country he comes from? He is setting himself up as anti-semite and a few other things but he throws a stew of items for which he likes the premise but not the execution. "Garafallo" may not have been as funny as  Mira Sorvino and
Lisa Kudrow do:Romy and Michele's High School Reunion--1997; but,as jbottle knows(as do I) Sarah Silverman does porn jokes, always has, she set me back on my heels the first time that I watched the  IFC cover the Spirit Awards, but that's her generation who were sitting there as film makers and a few oldsters from my age group get included as well because they started making films when they were young and they are necessary to the business. We have all heard L.A's idea of off-color entertainment but what I really hate is the Jay Leno brand of interview which he thinks is funny with Demi Moore where the only part of the entertainment interesting was the music segment since something is out of synch about what comes up on the screen compared to the announcement info you get as to what is playing on that channel at that hour!  Drives me crazy. So why  doesn't obertray know where Sarah Silvernman is at in her routine?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on August 17, 2007, 04:34:01 PM
I saw "Sarah Silverman" say "watch my show or I will kill this dog...," and the only other pop-reference to a similar saying is porn, wherein Tony Tedeshi says at one point during I'm guessing 1997 on the Spice Channel:  "Watch this movie or I'm going to kill this cat..."

Am I missing the pop-culture link or is the phraseology too common?  If not, it's possible that Sarah Silverman is making an obscure Spice reference to pimp her new Comedy Central season, if so, congrats, and not traumatized, but I feel like, hey man, you don't remember in "Sunset Boulevard"....


The phraseology is too common. I semirecall some rock album doing the same thing back in the 60s70s. It was old and established back when Cleavon Little Pointed the gun to his own neck in Blazing Saddles. Was Sarah using her own dog as the victim of her threat?

If she's going judge by me, that dog is a gonner! As that dog of a show ought to be. And Sarah too, just what we need a Jewish Garafallo who's twice as annoying and half as funny while trying to milk the same teet of sardonica. Uck, not for me thanks. She is to stand up comedy what rap is to funk.

Garafalo's cute.....




..til she opens her yap about politics


---

Silverman's a  hack?  Compared to who?

I think she is a pretty good comic actress.  Some may think she should stick to that, but she's certainly making a name for herself.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 17, 2007, 04:55:29 PM
Madupont,

If you have questions about me, why don't you ask me? I'll tell you some of what you want to know and a greater percentage of what you need to know.

I'm closing in on 50. I live in the United States (have done so since birth).

You misunderstood my posit on ober tray (which was written to synch with a post I had made earlier that very day about a handle that I had wanted to use but forgot about when I chose the one I did. The idea was that if I called myself Uber Alles, then I would have Godwinned myself before I even got into any fights (it's my idea of a joke). When you asked me if my name meant "top shelf" then I recognized that Ober could be seen as "uber', which I hadn't thought of earlier.

To say that Sarah Silverman is a Jewish Garafalo is not anti Semitic. Or if it is to you then your Semitic sensitivity meter is set so low that there's no sense in debating it, so you're free to think what you will.

I'm throwing a stew? Maybe you are not aware of the TV show Mad Men. I semi highly recommend it, it's on AMC. At least  I did recommend it and I'm less enchanted by it than I was before.

I reserve the right to not find funny, anyone I don't find funny. I find SS's Comedy Central show to be wretch inducing. It's just not my cuppa (as the until recently young are known to say). Don't like her, don't like the other actors on the show, don't like the pacing or the premise or the idea that she's essentially ripping off Seinfeld's proof that the characters don't have to be likable for the show to be likable.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 17, 2007, 06:02:20 PM
Quite frankly, my complaint is that the whole low level intelligence USB that is United States of Bush has an anti-semitic meter set in high-gear and it hasn't stopped yet.  Let me know when they pull out of Iraq and the television becomes adult (not in the sense you mentioned but for IQ). As I said, I had a school-mate named Oberbreckling so if anything I have a low setting on my Aryan meter. But, Those were the Days, when you only  had two kinds of names on the enrollment list, German, or Irish, no other flavors, as Edith used to say to Archie Bunk-um.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 17, 2007, 06:29:16 PM
Umm ... OK?


Title: Re: High School Musical II
Post by: obertray on August 20, 2007, 05:03:54 PM
So Disney Channel has finally beaten Nick at its own game?

Good says I. Why? Because now maybe Nick will raise it's game too. Nothing like a race towards the top as opposed to the race to the bottom that the rest of the nets are in. 

I have noted over the years the talent at Disney (my favorite having been Shia Le Bouf from Even Stevens) and I have noted with somewhat less pleasure, their pushing of lessser talents too. I guess it can't be denied that Disney has always had a knack for graduating child stars to adult. See for examples Annette and Frankie. They got the best years out of Lindsay Lohan (it's unfortunate, in my mind that that girl can't get a decent chauffeur!) although she came up in a different Disney path, and it seems to show. The Brittany Spears thing didn't quite work out the way any of us would have hoped, and Timberlake, well, I don't know if they have a piece of him anymore either.

The corporatism of these products is a little sickening, first you are on a show, then you become a female lead on a show then they trot you out as a singer (maybe there is a bit of girlpower cartoon voiceover work tossed in)  and they'll see if you stick, then they'll do a feature film around you and if it goes in theaters, you're golden, if not they can pretend they just made it for Disney Channel anyway and maybe they'll retool you, if you can still stand it. Problem being that there are other girls right behind you some even shortcutting ala Hannah Montanna, so if you're Lizzy Mc Duff you might start making more headlines about the role your purity than purity of your roles.

My target market daughter was among the 17.2 million (which, when you figure the size of that target has to be a mighty big percentage   300,000,000 x 51% = 153,000,000 divided evenly over 60 years is about 2.5 million per year they say they're looking for the 4-14 age group (ok, boy and girls should be about 25,000,000) to have 17.2MM in a market of 25MM is 68%, that's huge!) She watched after DVRing it.

Nick will hopefully pick it up and start making there own stars and stop depending on Canada to provide dramas for and about drama queens (South of Nowhere, De Grassi and other teen soap operatic stupidity which nick runs for it's "teen Nick" audience.)


Title: Re: L&O: CI
Post by: obertray on August 21, 2007, 11:33:33 AM
Where is it moving? USA network?

What happened here? NBC finally decided to lighten it's L&Oad and they tossed away the most leasest or the least mostest of the three?

And why did USA go and spoiler the show on top of it all. I for one was wondering if D'onofrio was going to come back. Overall I have to say that he is my favorite dramatic actor on all of television (not that I watch all that much drama on... well.. on anything, save real life.) I feel like we're getting to watch one of the great actors of our time perfect his craft each time I watch the show. Maybe I'm overstating, but mark that up to not knowing what I'm talking about. Perhaps it's just a personal preference.

I can't say that I bought the contrivance of the season ender that shattered Bobby's world (and, no I don't mean Deal Or No Deal). And what I particularly liked about L&O:CI was that it wasn't about anybody's private life, at least not more than the glancing reference, as it is in L&O as they refer to Jack's taking the gals home for some "down time fun and games".


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 22, 2007, 12:33:14 PM
Where's Lulu?

I need your assessment of this week's Damages!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on August 23, 2007, 04:30:35 PM
Did someone call me?  I thought my ears were burning.  ;D


Spoilers for those who haven't seen it:

Damages was better than last time.  I still can't figure out Hewes.  I know she's bad but I never know where she is going (brilliantly written).

And trying to make Frobisher the poor victim doesn't fly.  He's a bastard.  He's in cahoots with the speaker for the plaintiffs who keeps saying they should take the offer from Frobisher and get rid of Hewes.

Then Patty's former assistant decides he wants to go on his own or take a position with another law firm where he can become partner and then decides to go it alone with the plaintiffs after they drop Hewes.  In the end, Hewes gets him back, after she tells him he's not partner material.

And Rose is still strutting after Hewes while trying to stick with her fiance.  I'm really curious about what did happen to her fiance.  It gets curiouser and curiouser and I'm sticking around to the end of the season.  It won't be on next week and I'm sad.

And I'll be even sadder when Philip Bosco leaves; he's guesting and he's wonderful in whatever he does.

Did you know that the producer (or one of them) is Allen Coulter of Six Feet Under "fame?"


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 23, 2007, 05:20:34 PM
Coulter then has something to do with over all production values. Six Feet Under did manage to always pick up threads from past episodes which at first seemed solo episodes but the continuity became incredibly good and I miss most of those people including the mainly "liberated" Kathy Bates who came out as a nude, time after time and again when ever any director or producer gave her an opening to just take it all off.

Everybody's thematic problem,pose or hang-up was checked into at some further development.  Probably the people whom I miss most were the wholesome homosexuals who didn't come on as racist or misogynist, or ridiculous, or egocentric, etc.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 23, 2007, 06:01:58 PM
Ps. lulu

I'm going to be truly annoyed if we find out the guy who killed her boyfriend is the same one who has attacked her in the living room for the last three weeks while the dog can't rescue her, and whom she believes that she killed.  Okay, so there were two perps; one in the living room and one in the bathroom of the great apartment found for them by "Patty".    We know it wasn't the pigeon.   Of course, it could have been; when you look back and remember all the blog commentators who couldn't decide if the pussy cat on the wall wasn't really a tom cat and therefore not Adrianna but Moltisanto.    www.nybooks.com has just done a coverage,Aug.16th.praising David Chase for being the greatest thing since grated Parmesan cheese for hooking us and convincing us that criminality exists in America.

The reviewer also indicates that Chase was getting back a little bit for, just what, I forget? Because David Chase says, in college, he majored in Rolling Stones albums.  Etc.   He also pointed out to me that I apparently missed a couple of episodes by the way he describes them which I simply don't recall and now sound frightfully interesting. I think however his take on Carmela is only half right. He feels sorry for her but then goes on to describe her growth (which is very funny looking back into their home movie theater as she catches up with WASP culture hits of the past; but then reviewer describes Italian-American women as outside of the mainstream culture in a somewhat exaggerated way) finalizing his judgment of her as that, she settles for her status as a well to do middle-class suburban gangster's wife. 

Settles would not be the way I'd described those well-to-do middle-class suburban gangsters' wives who ask me, instead of Father so and so, what they ought to do since divorce is unheard of while your old man is in the joint.

Of course, the thing about Carmela was (along with that I would never have believed the first time that I saw her performance in something like early Law and Order, on one of those Labor Day all day marathons, or maybe it was Homicide: Life on the Streets/Baltimore to be exact, that she would come up with the character that she created for The Sopranos. Just goes to show what ensemble acting will do for the development of an actor), oh, yeah, West Caldwell was nothing like that as I recall from my earlier New Jersey past(episodes 1 and 2) nor upon meeting anybody from there in between in around the 1960s when I opted for people who seemed in-between two worlds, Chicago, where Pa came from, and Las Vegas where Pa sent them to take care of whatever he sent them there to take care of. But, hey, yeah, I think it was a good thing, she didn't go back to Italy with Furio.

But this son of a b, who reveals unknowingly that he does read what we write in the nytimes.com, has the nerve to say he thought up to the last moment, and/or hoped that Carmela would blow Tony away and that would have been the surprise ending.    What a dope. Which is why, I say, she didn't settle. She just did what every well to do suburban middle-class gangster's wife, to my knowledge, does.

Now, about that Frobisher.   You can't help loving him since he is Ted Danson(whom I also thought was great in Gulliver's Travels. Or, not just Sam?) What I caught in the last episode, was his throwaway lines, spoofing the new or forever US society, in which he cons his former employee into doing a few more favours for him while offhandedly promising much, just as before, with no guarantee anything he says is real.

[further ps.: also liked how
"witness' boyfriend got his come uppance by being picked up in a bar and escorted into a dark street or alley without lighting to get beaten to a pulp.  Just proving that justice is mensa-mensa. Equivalency wise.]


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on August 26, 2007, 06:15:47 PM
Harrie and Earl,

I noticed there was some sort of Outer Limits-ish series on Friday nights (9 PM CT) on ABC, called "Masters of Science Fiction" which seems to consist of free-standing shows written, presumably, by masters of the genre.  This Friday, Terry O'Quinn starred in an episode dealing with alien invasion, so if you were missing "Lost" it was kind of fun to watch him play the role of a skeptic.  Also had William Davis, the "Cigaret Smoking Man" of X-Files fame.  I don't have cable, so this may be something that was originally aired on the SF channel or elsewhere.





Hey Bart,

I've been looking for this ever since you mentioned it two weeks ago and I finally noticed it last night on the ABC affiliate at 10:30. The episode starred John Hurt, Brian Dennehy and that guy who plays the plumber on Deperate Housewives. I enjoyed it even though I'm not totally sure what happened at the end. (Why did home base really need the mutants' blood since it didn't seem to be for the reason given?) The show had a jazzy, mellow, noirish musical score, too, which didn't seem to fit with what was happening on the screen, but was still nice to hear.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on August 27, 2007, 11:38:54 AM
I've seen two of them, the one with "Locke" and the last Friday's, which seemed relatively a misfire, though it bore the stamp of Harlan Ellison upon it, who is much admired in sci-fi circles, both as a short story writer and a screenwriter, not to mention outrageous personality at conventions and such.  This episode seemed like a kind of rehash of mutant themes culled from a fairly cobwebby sector of the genre and, as you noticed, not too skilfully put together.  (I liked the mutants more in the Phildickian film,  Total Recall...)

I'm not sure, but I think Ellison may have cameo'd as one of the mutants early in the show.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on August 27, 2007, 11:42:43 AM
In fact, I'm pretty sure it was Ellison, the more I reflect on it:  it was a short stocky Jewish guy who had that look of a non-actor delivering his one and only line.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 27, 2007, 12:11:54 PM
barton,

It was probably Harlan. My best friend, like a sister to me, until she became my husband's mistress, went out there earlier into the studio system for her make-over and promptly glommed on to Ellison.

But is that the Real John Hurt, or just John Heard, or Bill Hurt or some other rascal who hasn't half the ability to hold a camera as John Hurt?



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on August 27, 2007, 12:47:31 PM
The man in the picture has overtones of Montgomery Cliff and James Dean and one of the, the, oh hell, I can't think of their last name--that family of brothers that seem to pop up everywhere--they have pouty lips.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 27, 2007, 12:58:16 PM
If you mean the Wilsons, I don't think it's one of them.  I'm thinking David Lynch, maybe?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on August 27, 2007, 01:29:47 PM
What are you all talking about?  What picture?



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on August 27, 2007, 01:35:29 PM
No, their last name starts with a "B" I think.  Sheesh.  It's right on the edge of my mind, poor old used up thing that it is.

Your picture, Barton.  The one you have posted under your screen name.  We're tryng to decide who it is.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on August 28, 2007, 09:38:24 AM
It might be

http://imdb.com/name/nm0188882/ (http://imdb.com/name/nm0188882/)



Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on August 28, 2007, 11:27:25 AM
So I guess nobody ever heard of "right-clicking" with their mouse?  If you right-click, you get a little menu (in Windows, anyway) and at the bottom there's a choice called Properties.  Click on that, and the URL of the picture is often....informative.

Somehow, that pose does obscure what he usually looks like in pictures.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 28, 2007, 11:37:12 AM
Well, by that manner it's probably better the girl in OCB's avatar is sitting down, I mean, with measurements like 37-28-63 !!!



Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on August 28, 2007, 11:42:51 AM
A Day Or A Lifetime


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 28, 2007, 11:59:25 AM
Just to mention, miliseconds before he flames out in a blaze of over exposure, Mike Rowe of Dirty Jobs With Mike Rowe is what television should be.

How It's Made manages to mangle it's subjects with it's Canadian Mangling iron (For those who don't know, which may be no one, a mangling Iron is an ironing press with a roller that is used by commercial venues with a need to iron large pieces, in large quantities, like hotels and sheets.... A litle bit of my own boring explication, maybe I can get a job on How It's Made!) dryness. They also seem to leave out the fun part of the process all of the time too! I'm not sure how they suck the fun out of that show (which we are rivetted to anyway) Maybe they could do a segment aboot that!

Maybe we could have some fun here and try to think up a few jobs for dirty jobs, he's always begging for some, and I keep saying, maybe I'll try to think of some.

Perhaps he could work for a day cleaning the toenails of homeless people? Don't they try to clean those people when they come into some of the shelters?

Maybe he could spend a day going around with one of those "Bottle guys"? You know (maybe you don't if they don't have a deposit law in your state) the guys who push shopping carts along a route looking for deposit bottles to return to the store. These people are generally pretty dirty, so I figure it must be the job! (well he spent a day with a guy looking for owl vomit, so the bottle thing has possibilities.

Couple other scattered thoughts,

The commercial for Ex Lax or something where they are on a construction site and they pull the brown steel beam through the opening in the concrete wall, and then there is the dumptruck dumping a load... It almost worked without me even having to take the medicine! It took me a second or so to connect what I was seeing with what was being said. Now I forget what was said, except that I have the gist of it. I'm looking forward to seeing it again.

The Lobster Wars show, not as good as the King Crab show, which gets old quick too. This is a first view assessment, and not a full view at that, just a gut reaction.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 28, 2007, 12:00:16 PM
BTW Baldwin


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on August 28, 2007, 12:07:30 PM
Ober, if you're looking forward to the Ex Lax commercial...well, perhaps it's time for a new hobby?

I agree the right-click method is not always reliable.  If you get pics from google images, or similar, it usually works.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kitinkaboodle on August 28, 2007, 12:21:33 PM
So I guess nobody ever heard of "right-clicking" with their mouse?  If you right-click, you get a little menu (in Windows, anyway) and at the bottom there's a choice called Properties.  Click on that, and the URL of the picture is often....informative.

Somehow, that pose does obscure what he usually looks like in pictures.





David D.?  Well, I knew that I liked the photo, now I know why...
Where/what is it from?  Not recent, surely?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 28, 2007, 12:23:39 PM
That thought had crossed my mind -- DD, that is.  That'll teach me to go with first instincts.....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 28, 2007, 12:28:24 PM
barton,#469

I can see the resemblence without the make-up. He's almost as much fun as some of the stuff that John Turturro unleashes upon us.(I always love it when he lets his Italian get the better of him and this wild person emerges, an eccentric in clothing preference, a temperament from whom you don't what to expect next.)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on August 28, 2007, 12:37:56 PM
Ober, thanks.  Baldwin it is.  And I still say it looks more like one of those brothers than David Duc--the right click worked for me.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on August 28, 2007, 12:53:57 PM
barton,#469

I can see the resemblence without the make-up. He's almost as much fun as some of the stuff that John Turturro unleashes upon us.(I always love it when he lets his Italian get the better of him and this wild person emerges, an eccentric in clothing preference, a temperament from whom you don't what to expect next.)

Italians are wild people?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 28, 2007, 01:21:27 PM
Ober, if you're looking forward to the Ex Lax commercial...well, perhaps it's time for a new hobby?

Watching TeeVee is not so much a hobby as it is a summer fireplace.

Watching the fireplace in winter is a mesmerizing experience, watching it in summer is either extremely unsatisfactory (given the interference of it's static nature) or uncomfortable, sitting near a burning fire on a Sunday afternoon in July is probably better in a place like lower Chile. So I put the TeeVee in front of the hearth and gaze.

Reminds me though of the folks who long for a plasma screen to put above the fireplace. That really makes me wonder about people, but maybe it's just me that sees the mantle place to be a space for the ashes of the dead and the clock that we'll take when Antiques Roadshow comes to town and seasonal flowers and christmas tchothkae and the like. Not for images of colorfully clad, armored, steroid containers to smash into each other in pursuit of a idealized "Goal".

Truth be told, the only shows I intend to watch are Stewart/Colbert and Two and a Half Men (4 and a half all together I guess).


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kitinkaboodle on August 28, 2007, 01:59:23 PM
Finally did get that plasma, put it in a room with a fireplace (not over, gads, why anyone would do that makes no sense to me either, Ober!) and must say I'm looking ahead to enjoying both come football, right soon. 
Mantle(s)?  Art and candles IMHO............


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 29, 2007, 11:54:38 AM
Just want to say that I'm going to give Mad Men one last try tomorrow night.

I was happy to see to Murray brother show up in the show, the one that used to be in that summer replacement comedy where he was the rich kid and she was living in the trailer park... Imdb HIC... Joel Murray, Pamela Reed and Grand. I have always had a soft spot for Pamela Reed because of that show.

Joel has the ability to bring joy to the scene without chewing up the scenery like Bill insists on doing (I don't know that I'd live or die by that characterization, bu Bill does tend to want to make himself the center of attention). I am more than a little sure that Joel was the voice of Bob on those Quiznos commercials, but this isn't listed on IMDB.

I saw the actress who plays Peggy (Elisabeth Moss) on a L&O:CI rerun yesterday... The one with two of the kids from The Black Donnellys, the Jimmy Donnelly and Joey Ice Cream (I really liked that show, sorry it got canned). http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0809493/ The fun of The Donnellys is picking out the L&O:CI characters on it.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on August 29, 2007, 12:38:37 PM
House is back on Sep. 25th.  Looking forward to seeing him go it alone, now that all his students have quit.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kitinkaboodle on August 29, 2007, 01:26:35 PM


Barton:

Thanks for the House heads-up!  The one and only network show for me...although I'm giving Damages my time, hoping that it doesn't lag, as it seems to have given up some speed from the first two episodes.  Men in Trees had some good moments back whenever.  Anyone know if that's coming up in the fall with anything new?  Rumors were that Heche's co-star was the catalyst for her most recent divorce...?  Sounds like something that belongs in another forum... ::)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on August 29, 2007, 01:38:13 PM
House went against Criminal Intent last season, and lost, in my holmes anyway.

I'm sort of glad that I missed it, because the Cop thing seemed to take the show over for the first half of the season... It seemed that way from a distance anyway.

I did note that everyone was gone, he fired the English Boy, the girl decided that this made him damaged enough and went to him (does that say that she came to view House as less damaged than Chase?) And I forget what happened to the whathisname... I never invested too much into those characters anyway, given that they had a "rookie, to be traded" feel about them.

But I agree, I'm looking forward to This New House and I'm also missing Boston Legal...

Is BL still going to be on?  http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0402711/quotes That stuff's funny! Answer, Sept 25th again



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kitinkaboodle on August 29, 2007, 01:56:57 PM
Ah!  BL!  Outta sight outta mind, 'tis good, yes, looking forward to it, totally spaced that one off (summer is good for that)!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on August 29, 2007, 08:23:06 PM
House is back on Sep. 25th.  Looking forward to seeing him go it alone, now that all his students have quit.



Bart,

Actors Jennifer Morrison (Dr Cameron), Jesse Spencer (Dr Chase) and Omar Epps (Dr Foreman) will all return to House this coming season. The producers of the show, however, have so far been very coy about the employment status of the characters they play.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on August 30, 2007, 12:01:05 AM
We're loyal House fans at our house, but still await the episode wherein it is revealed how much Ducolax he has to take to counteract all that Vicodin, which makes one seriously constipated.  There was the episode where he catheterized himself because he couldn't pee, but the other inability is a side effect of Vicodin well known enough that not writing in something about it is a serious oversight on the part of the writers.  Hey, maybe they can reveal that at least half of the pills he's swallowing are laxatives!  Hmmm, can one write to the writers of shows?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on August 30, 2007, 10:25:29 AM
Nytemps -- the thought had crossed my mind, too.  And given the writers lack of reticence in past years about such matters as rectal bleeding, there can be  no appeal to delicacy here.

My network shows tend to be monosyllabic-- House, Lost, and Bones.  They ran the Bones last night on which Stephen Fry appeared as Booth's FBI shrink -- I had missed his first show last spring, so glad they repeated it.  Also the one where Brennan meets her sailor man.  I hope they can bring Fry back, as a regular thing.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on August 30, 2007, 11:52:25 AM
Damages fans programming alert.

All of the episodes that have been shown so far will be rebroadcast back to back starting at 3 PM Eastern (til 8 PM Eastern) on Monday, Labor Day.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 30, 2007, 12:46:42 PM
barton,#469

I can see the resemblence without the make-up. He's almost as much fun as some of the stuff that John Turturro unleashes upon us.(I always love it when he lets his Italian get the better of him and this wild person emerges, an eccentric in clothing preference, a temperament from whom you don't what to expect next.)

Italians are wild people?


If you are lucky. Otherwise no.  So, don't give me agita. Depends doesn't it which of Turturro's characters are your favourite characters?  I haven't seen any that I don't like.  But obviously this topic belongs in movies;even if I see most of his performances in them on the tv. This response of yours reminds me too much of last April when people didn't believe which guys were whom in the last death-defying episode of The Sopranos. A lot of kvetching about nothing. I lived some major portions of my life in New Jersey, which was not altogether satisfying but, here's the  punch line, I watched The Sopranos because I missed New Jersey; so maybe I should just sign this as, sincerely,
Nancy Marchand


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 30, 2007, 01:19:35 PM
madupont, you do realize you'd be writing that from the grave, then?  Just checking your vitals, etc.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 30, 2007, 03:12:37 PM
I thought that would be a nice touch, being able to come back and watch the rest of the show after at most a couple of seasons. Some people think she had that; at least her spirit inspired them to keep that in mind. A remark possibly more useful to jbottle on how you input your script. But as of this week, I'm vitally angry, I have no trouble understanding where her character was coming from but I miraculously cured myself of what ailed me by concentrating on raising the ghost of Gregory Corso who didn't have a mother and behaved like Nancy Marchand when he wasn't  being putanesque. The poor kid died at 65 pounds. Nancy god love her is probably doing wheelies off the edges of clouds because she reminds me of many an old woman standing today outside a fish market  to gossip in Calabrese with the rest of the crowd.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on August 31, 2007, 11:09:41 AM
So the WSJ has a little thing today about shows coming out this fall, and one of them sounded familiar.  It's called Reaper, and the premise is:  a 20-ish slacker's parents sell his soul to the devil, and he has to hunt down and return souls for the Devil. 

Which reminded me of Brimstone, a great (IMO) show from about ten years back  that lasted not quite one season and featured this premise:  A dead cop, sentenced to Hell, is returned to Earth by the Devil to recover 113 escaped evil spirits.   IIRC, the cop (Peter Horton) had 113 tattoos, one for each soul; as each sould is recovered and returned to Hell, a tattoo disappears.   (I guess if the show was a success, they'd have problems with Episode 114.)  Anyway, the tattoo thing reminds me of Jack's tattoos on Lost, and how sometimes you suddenly notice one you haven't seen before.  Wonder if there's a tie-in....

So I'm a little pissed, because I'd rather have been able to just watch more Brimstone than wait ten years and see it recycled.  However, according to IMDB, Kevin Smith directed an episode of Reaper; and if he can get behind something, I usually at least give it a shot.

The upshot of the WSJ article is that the American public is being offered relief from grim reality (their words) via fantasy, whimsy and comedy.  Granted, the new sci-fi-ish shows are trading on the success of Lost and Heroes, but isn't there also an economic tie-in, like there is (or was?) supposed to be between skirt hemlines and the economy? 

The other sci-fi type shows include Bionic Woman, Journeyman, Pushing Daisies.  There's also a non-sci-fi show coming out -- a "musical noir" about a guy trying to open a casino in Nevada.  I'm tempted to lay odds on how long it will (or more likely, won't) last.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on August 31, 2007, 12:52:51 PM
Is Pushing Daisies the one about the detective who touches corpses and then they wake up and tell him details about their deaths?  I saw a trailer for this in a movie theater, if so, and it looked somehow both awful and amusing at the same time.  My feeling is that the talking with corpses theme has kind of been done, in shows like NCIS, where "Ducky" talks to his autopsies, and of course in Six Feet Under.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on August 31, 2007, 01:47:32 PM
barton,

I wish that they would just can it for awhile.  They obviously can not afford productions, after having seen to it that a certain political element(I imply that they think of themselves as "certain" about their commitment) has the higher percentage of ownership and control than ever before.  They obviously think if we watch tv and pay for subscription to do so, that we are the understood idiots of "idiot box" fame.

I do not recall watching any tv in the last week, other than checking the weather channel twice.  Apparently, I'm weaning myself of it, the same way you are refining the meat level of protein you consume. Will I feel light as air,by giving this up?  At the moment, I feel terrible. Withdrawal symptoms for lack of creative, aesthetic and intelligent television availability.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on August 31, 2007, 08:49:00 PM
Is Pushing Daisies the one about the detective who touches corpses and then they wake up and tell him details about their deaths?  I saw a trailer for this in a movie theater, if so, and it looked somehow both awful and amusing at the same time.  My feeling is that the talking with corpses theme has kind of been done, in shows like NCIS, where "Ducky" talks to his autopsies, and of course in Six Feet Under.





It was also done in Tru Calling in which that was the actual premise. Come to think of it, though, Tru listened to the corpses but never spoke to them. A very underrated show.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 01, 2007, 12:56:37 PM
Haven't seen Tru.  Will check availability. 

They were talking to corpses in Shakespeare.

Maddie, I find tv pretty easy to not watch during the summer.  It's harder to avoid during winters if one lives alone, when the nights are long and it is sort of a fireplace substitute for some, a source of sound and flickering light.  I didn't own a tv for about ten years and have a sort of gap in my cultural knowledge (if ID'ing tv characters constitutes "cultural knowledge") resulting.  Later, when I had kids and they were young, we kept it off most of the time, to encourage other pursuits.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on September 01, 2007, 01:15:23 PM
I channel surf looking for documentaries, some history, and movies I've missed by not going out to theatres anymore.  I check PBS early each evening to see what's new or to catch something I want to see again.  The Sundance channel has documentaries on Mondays and "green" stuff on Tuesdays.  Other cable channels are starting to show more documentaries than they used to.  I like a few food shows, the Discovery Home channel, and HGTV.  Cspan and Cspan2 have my attention some of the time.  I watch local news and Charles Gibson for national.

My cable company provides preview so I can click ahead to see what will be on any given channel for the evening (its like a channel by channel TV Guide.)

I've been watching television since 1952 except when I was given over to "wandering."  But I'm a reader, also.  Books, newspapers, soup can labels, the backs of cereal boxes . . . .


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 01, 2007, 10:28:33 PM
barton,

I can kind of testify to donotremove's reading habits,except for the cereal boxes, being nearly double the average "readership" posting in these parts. (the soup can labels are another matter, more than likely having to do with:" I like a few food shows,...". It is apparent that he reads more non-fiction, which is also the habit of the American History forum which also occasionally reads historical fiction, such as: All The Kings Men(I understand that Sean Penn did a version of this or am I just casting again?).

Personally, I prefer literature.  Straight, no chaser. This has allowed me to have absolutely no problem stunning the Professors of doctoral seminars with  my insights (while the non-professionals condescend to castigate me when they are running a forum and resort to calling me homophobic if necessary for them to feel like they are putting one over on somebody) and I can usually source the connection for a visiting fireman who has a vocation as poet beyond reproach and who did not previously perceive the connection and is stunned in a moment of enlightenment which is different than an epiphany.  Then, I disappear.

"a sort of gap in my cultural knowledge (if ID'ing tv characters constitutes "cultural knowledge") resulting."  I know how that feels. I could have done that to the complete  1960s, except for the day that somebody shot JFK and we won't say who because that scam is ongoing. I mean how much cultural knowledge do you need to connect the dots?
This has a lot to do with raising a child properly, when they say things to you like,"Did they shoot grandma too?"

Actually, this has a lot to do with your insight,"They were talking to corpses in Shakespeare."  That was always the thing that got me about Shakespeare (perhaps, you had in mind the,"Alas,poor Yorick. I knew him well,..." ?) because, they did the funereal aspects so well in the periods of time that he wrote about. Most people just love the death scenes when it gets to be group carnage as we come to the end of Hamlet and the curtain drops. Wow!

More important to me is the intimacy of the bearing out the dead in the appropriate shroud and accompanying them to the family sepulchre, where nothing has changed the routine in not only  centuries but perhaps a millenium since the Romans left. Which is really quite odd that in Hamlet within the same performance you can see Ophelia being born out, while alas, poor Yorick whose infinite jibes...   And this is a culture noted for its pre-Christian traditions.  When Alice Munro writes a fiction, she likes to have everybody over to help prepare the funeral pyre for her deceased husband. Wow! that blew away the fiction discussion for the month, when they got to that part.

I decided to use television as recreation in the 1970s when I had to cram 5,000 years of Chinese literature into five years. Although, because my mind could absorb no more, I would sit doing Chinese embroidery for relaxation under the lamp at the end of the Weimar stuffed sofa and only look up at the tv when they got to the punch line.

Somehow, I did however in those twenty years, get to enjoy the first Mrs. Woody Allen whose life I sometimes seemed to be leading and thought I understood the Bunker family of Brooklyn better than my neighbours; and, then, there was Masterpiece Theatre.

I did have a friend who developed a sort of cultural knowledge gap but that was why  after all  that the gov't sent him home every four years so he would realize that he didn't know who the heck Henry Winkler was much less the Fonz, if he was ever going to make it to Tokyo for the State Department and get out of Seoul.  After which my brother came down from Alaska for our Dad's death and looked amazed when I said, as you so aptly put it,"during winters if one lives alone, when the nights are long and it is sort of... , a source of sound ..." because ,here it was, with July about to begin, and he had just gotten a divorce from his second wife and her kids (as my mother's neighbours so pithily put it,"You mean, you divorced Rose and the children?").

I won't even get into what other pursuits children get into when they've seen what's been on tv before they pursue it.


Title: Flight of the Conchords
Post by: Kam on September 04, 2007, 05:49:24 PM
Re: The third Conchord

This was their season finale.  It was very dissapointing.  Moreso than the Sopranos finale.  I hope they come back for another season, but if not, i'll take it. A very nice little show.

Their next to last episode may have been their best.  Even though it recycled an earlier theme with Murray the band manager's patience with the guys being tested.

Murray driving the Accord was awesome.  I don't like his new ride.


Title: Re: Flight of the Conchords
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on September 05, 2007, 07:57:54 AM
Their next to last episode may have been their best.  Even though it recycled an earlier theme with Murray the band manager's patience with the guys being tested.


Word.  I can't decide between the "on the road" episode or the "Bowie in space" episode or the "Bret gets a job" episode. 

I was not, however, disappointed in the season (series?) finale.  I thought that Todd guy was pretty funny, and if you're ever going to go over-wacky with it (e.g., Todd's dog-song is a big hit, has a gig at Giants Stadium, Murray drives a fancy car, etc.), it might as well be in the finale.   Plus, it's easy enough to reel it back in if there is a 2nd season.

More than anything, I just like that the "Todd's dog-song ends up being a big hit" thing was consistent with the whole "these guys are losers" theme of the show.  And that's not to say I dislike the characters or the guys playing them.  I just tend to like shows where the main joke is that the main character is a loser, e.g., my favorite show ever, "Get A Life". 

"FOTC" reminds me of "GAL" in that sense, especially the "third Conchord" episode.  In any event, long live "FOTC" and mark me down for a "I hope they come back" vote.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on September 05, 2007, 02:43:15 PM
The ax is still out from JFC, so we'll see how much bloodlust is left.  I'm guessing that "Flight" is posting good numbers and is as much of a Sun. night tradition second only to "Entourage," and very cheap to produce relative to most other original programming.  It will get at least three seasons because the future revenue from DVD sales is inevitable as the show is at least a "cult success" like "Mr. Show," and I think the HBO brass have recouped a lot of dough from those DVD releases at a good price point vs. what they have to sell "The Sopranos" for, for example.  So, FoTC is a no-brainer, I imagine the video portions are the toughest and most-expensive to shoot but the entire season probably costs less per episode than Lorraine Bracco per episode, or Bruce Greenwood whose disappearance from JFC was odd at first, and then, ok, I get it, he split.  If you look at the Final JFC episode you see BG in one frame and then his suspended feet in the scenes with other cast members.  He even looks CGI'ed in during the final DIRTWEED PARADE SEQUENCE.  I think you're safe for two more seasons, oil.  I tried to watch and had high hopes for the David Duchovny series "Californication," and while he's a gamer and there are funny moments, the writing is so bad at times that it's hard to endorse the entire enterprise.  I like the premise of (again the loser theme) a struggling writer somewhere in the Hollywood food chain bouncing around the chaos of the city, but the execution has often been weak.  The Showtime weed one I saw for the first time was fairly amusing, so I'm thinking about swithing to those comedy/dramas after HBO f((((ed JFC up so bad.

I forget what the new dramas on the HBO horizon are, but none seemed very promising, looking forward to the new "Curb Your Enthusiasm," where the theme is that "Larry David" is kind of a schmuck and an asshole, but events conspire to make him seem like a twisted and sick and depraved and duplicitious complete asshole, and the dramatic irony is that he's just a regular vain, self-interested, funny, uh, asshole who doesn't really like too many people and hates people generally.  It's a very funny show that fits in sorta with the "loser" theme even though LD plays a "loser" who is similar to himself, and I think himself has upwards of $50M, he got everything that Jerry got out of Seinfeld, and hell it may be $200m with residuals, but it's not really dough that gets you out of being a loser, but it helps.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on September 05, 2007, 03:40:21 PM
I'm guessing that "Flight" is posting good numbers and is as much of a Sun. night tradition second only to "Entourage," and very cheap to produce relative to most other original programming...  I think you're safe for two more seasons, oil. 

I'll buy that.

RE: Larry David and the "main character is a loser" thing, I think you make a good point.  I see a lot of "GAL" in "CYE", and in one "CYE" episode, they actually do a "titmouse" joke. 

Larry is in the kitchen with his wife, and a mouse scurries across the floor, and he freaks out, jumps on the table and yells, "Titmouse!! Titmouse!!"  His wife is like, "WTF?  Why would you yell 'titmouse'?  Why wouldn't you just yell, 'mouse' or something?"  Earlier in the episode, he got caught looking at some woman's breasts or something like that, so the joke of the show is that Larry is accused of being obsessed with breasts, etc.

Anyways, in an episode from the 2nd (and last) season of "Get A Life", Chris is exposed to a toxic waste spill, kind of like Chevy Chase in "Modern Problems", but instead of giving him telekinetic powers, it makes him into a genius.  He and his landlord (Brian Doyle-Murray) try to find a way to capitalize on Chris' newfound genius, and decide to make a go of it on the professional spelling bee circuit, and in one bee, the word he gets is "titmouse."  Of course, Chris laughs uncontrollably, because it's such a funny word, etc.

I know that's not a major connection or anything, but if I had to bet one way or the other, I'd bet that Larry is a "GAL" fan.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 05, 2007, 03:57:16 PM
http://www.hbo.com/tellme/cast/

Sunday at 9


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 05, 2007, 04:04:12 PM
http://www.hbo.com/tellme/cast/

Sunday at 9

I don't think i could be less interested.  If HBO is going to produce a female oriented series it might as well be funny. I don't think i'll watch.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 05, 2007, 04:04:47 PM
I am sure they will be crushed.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on September 05, 2007, 04:15:20 PM
That was the one I had no interest in...where's the hook, relationships are fu***ed up?  "Dysfunctional Family Drama Set in a funeral parlor..."  "Dysfunctional Family Drama set in New Jersey where dad is a mob boss..."  "Suburban mom makes ends meet by becoming a pot dealer..."  "Potential schizophrenic or alien makes odd connection with the the collapse and renewal of the multi-generational surf scene in present day meth-ridden beach community as dischordant human jazz instruments occasionally connect but mostly recite their own self absorbtion and distcontent..."

All of these are interesting premises, but "Tell Me You Love Me," as counter-programming to the NFL, maybe, but guys will not catch up on Tuesday unless they get hooked when the Texans are playing one Sun. night.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 05, 2007, 04:20:50 PM
TIVO age

I'm certainly not saying I'll like it

Female cast looks strong.  Don't know the guys.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on September 05, 2007, 05:30:42 PM
Not a big DVR/Tivo personage, at all.  I just figure if I can't stay awake for the musical guest on Conan on a Wed. night that means I'm a pu$$y, but only because I'm too cheap or technophobe to buy a DVR.

I do wan't and can't yet (until the release of GTA for PS3) justify a PS3 purchase, but the $100 off the $500 or so with the purchase of a 1K or better TV looks like the way to justify the 42" at the same time.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 05, 2007, 05:32:24 PM
Not a big DVR/Tivo personage, at all.  I just figure if I can't stay awake for the musical guest on Conan on a Wed. night that means I'm a pu$$y, but only because I'm too cheap or technophobe to buy a DVR.

I do wan't and can't yet (until the release of GTA for PS3) justify a PS3 purchase, but the $100 off the $500 or so with the purchase of a 1K or better TV looks like the way to justify the 42" at the same time.

Whats this deal you speak of?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on September 05, 2007, 05:46:47 PM
Best Buy


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 05, 2007, 06:23:32 PM
oilcanboyd,re:#504   I loved this episode of CYE but it has been so long since i saw it that  I am no longer sure if they just worked so much material into one episode or did they keep working this for more than one to keep the gag going?

It starts with Larry or the wife being upset about the help not wearing a bra.  I'm pretty sure it was Larry but they come to a consensus of opinion that it is Larry who is going to have to go purchase the bra for his gardener's wife.   With that we already have a second element worked into the plot because I seem to remember more than one episode that deals with the complications of how Larry relates to the gardener.  This element would never have arisen but that the gardener's wife gives perfectly natural  reasonable sounding unabashed reasons of her own for prefering not to wear a bra when she's working but we have the added satisfaction of watching Larry mugging about it to express his annoyance visually to his own wife without saying anything that will alienate her helper around the house.

Since Larry knows nothing about buying a bra, he makes the further mistake when over at his manager's house of ducking into the laundry room when -- I guess what I recall is that --he notices a bra, out of the corner of his eye, and curiosity gets the better of him to determine if this is about the size, sizing up the manager's wife (who reminds me of so many people from New Jersey whom I have known; so how do they get to L.A.?), that he ought to look for in a lingerie shop.

Instead, he gets caught in the act and this starts a whole other train of reflections  on the quirks of Larry's "psychopathology", as the manager's wife has a vocabulary and a delivery of it that could peel the finish off a brass monkey.  She is yelling, "pervert" and chasing him out of the house. Now, why this shtik is perfect for tv comic reaction, and why her character is perfect as an irritant foil to Larry David's intensive self-examination followed by immediate rationales at all times, is because could there be a household anywhere in this land where the guy has either a friend or a male relative that his wife does not "can't stand!" ?

I have just had a perfect example of this at my next-door-upstairs  neighbors,  just yesterday, where the husband's  brother stands at the door knocking without a response, while I can hear upstairs,from the layout of the apartment as they are set up, that  the non-responder is pussy-footing around over my head to keep a low-profile, while this guy goes running around past all my open windows to see if he can spot her and get her attention.  She obviously does not want him as a guest in her house. Neither do I, nor his host and hostess for that matter.

Now, my only question oilcanboyd. Is this the same episode where Larry has the inappropriate thoughts about the lady in  the pink wrap around dressing gown with the feathered neckline whom he imagines sexually confronts him in the bathroom while he is perusing the literature in the john --again I think this is at a friend's house but whatever. Larry is the classic quintessential nebbish from the days when Yiddish burlesque went to situation comedy on tv.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 05, 2007, 06:28:00 PM
Incidentally, kam,re:#511  You are the only other person that I've run into around here who was disappointed with the sell-out of The Sopranos cut and run, while David Chase was doing it, and as far as I can tell nobody else has discerned that possibly so was Tony en famille.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on September 05, 2007, 07:45:57 PM
Now, my only question oilcanboyd. Is this the same episode where Larry has the inappropriate thoughts about the lady in  the pink wrap around dressing gown with the feathered neckline whom he imagines sexually confronts him in the bathroom while he is perusing the literature in the john --again I think this is at a friend's house but whatever.

I can't remember.  Everything you describe sounds familiar, but I can't remember if that was all one episode. 

I just remember the "titmouse" thing and being reminded of "Get A Life".


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 05, 2007, 08:19:13 PM
Incidentally, kam,re:#511  You are the only other person that I've run into around here who was disappointed with the sell-out of The Sopranos cut and run, while David Chase was doing it, and as far as I can tell nobody else has discerned that possibly so was Tony en famille.

No. I liked the Sopranos finale.  You or I could have written a definitive ending with Tony dead or in Prison or Witness Protection.  That would've been nice and tidy but boring.  I like how things were left open.

I didn't like the FOTC finale.  There were no songs!  Except the crap one by the Crazy Dogggz.  In all the other episodes they at least did two songs.  And in this one we got one (unless we're counting the rocky-esque instrumental to the credits).


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on September 05, 2007, 08:36:02 PM
I didn't like the FOTC finale.  There were no songs!  Except the crap one by the Crazy Dogggz.  In all the other episodes they at least did two songs.  And in this one we got one (unless we're counting the rocky-esque instrumental to the credits).

The song was Bret's anger-dance, a la Kevin Bacon in "Footloose". 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on September 05, 2007, 08:56:25 PM
I find myself saying "yeah" in New Zealandesque a lot these days.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on September 05, 2007, 08:57:15 PM
"-ese," not "esque," i guesqe.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on September 05, 2007, 09:03:08 PM
Oy sow Brit feel huwr brist.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 05, 2007, 09:03:42 PM
I find myself saying "yeah" in New Zealandesque a lot these days.

Transitioning from the Borat "Yes" to the Jemaine "Yes" is not that hard. And quite fun.  Try it!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on September 05, 2007, 11:31:09 PM
Hell, maybe the concept of "John From Cincinnati" was that emanations from a dead planet were recieved by aliens, and they tried their hand at an HBO drama because one of the aliens liked to surf and could breathe through the toxins:  That would've been the only way to save Season Two, have it go so postmodern than the Aliens realise that their new pilot for what would have been HBO in an Ancient Civilizations on Earth:  California 101 course in COLLEGE, would have been a bomb the more they learn about surfing culture and the way people behave.  In a visual joke, the bust of USC's current football coach is sold for meth, which some of the aliens have discovered they like, from the Hawaiins, far enough out from the blast and still rolling, bring on the Boeings that have survived on the remaining jet fuel.  Where is the dramatic arc you say?  We got okayed for season two and I'm DAVID FUCKING MILCH!!!

I mean, I like the cojones, but a man of his age should stay away from the crank.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on September 06, 2007, 11:06:21 AM
With Milch, I'm not so sure it's the crank or that he's in a position where everyone "yes"-es him.  Even geniuses occasionally come up with ideas that should just be put out of their misery; but when you have Milch's track record, nobody's brave enough to whisper "gas this one" in his ear.  Just my opinion. 

Important TV news......Julie Newmar says her Catwoman outfit is going into the Smithsonian next year.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on September 06, 2007, 01:54:10 PM
FOTC Season 2... Mark it?

http://www.aintitcool.com/node/33704 (http://www.aintitcool.com/node/33704)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 06, 2007, 01:58:01 PM
Hell, maybe the concept of "John From Cincinnati" was that emanations from a dead planet were recieved by aliens, and they tried their hand at an HBO drama because one of the aliens liked to surf and could breathe through the toxins:  That would've been the only way to save Season Two, have it go so postmodern than the Aliens realise that their new pilot for what would have been HBO in an Ancient Civilizations on Earth:  California 101 course in COLLEGE, would have been a bomb the more they learn about surfing culture and the way people behave.  In a visual joke, the bust of USC's current football coach is sold for meth, which some of the aliens have discovered they like, from the Hawaiins, far enough out from the blast and still rolling, bring on the Boeings that have survived on the remaining jet fuel.  Where is the dramatic arc you say?  We got okayed for season two and I'm DAVID FUCKING MILCH!!!

I mean, I like the cojones, but a man of his age should stay away from the crank.

It wil be interesting to see if another network picks up JOHN.  Spike, perhaps?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on September 06, 2007, 02:07:06 PM

It wil be interesting to see if another network picks up JOHN.  Spike, perhaps?

They're only interested in CSI and UFC.  I long for the days when they would run MXC all the time, but nowadays it seems like they only run it at like 2 in the morning.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on September 06, 2007, 04:31:48 PM
The only thing that can possibly pick up "John From Cincinnati" is a hat made of tinfoil.  Trust me on this one.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on September 07, 2007, 11:58:23 AM
I hate seeing Deadwood characters in other roles. 

I sort of feel this way about "Band of Brothers"


For any WWII movie buffs this is must watch TV ...still runs occassionally on cable.  but best to purchase the full set on DVD and devote a solid weekend to it.  You will be riveted.

For the curious, if you liked "Saving Private Ryan" you will most likely love this series.  If SPR was too much for you, then you might want to pass...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on September 07, 2007, 12:05:03 PM
Watched a bit of the filming/taping of the new series  "The Journeyman" acouple of weekends ago while staying at the downtown Biltmore after a friends wedding --which was held on the heliport of the US Bank building.  Their first "wedding" held on the heliport of L.A.'s tallest building.

Anyway, Journeyman looks interesting enough for me to check out a few episodes when it debuts on NBC.  This episode was taking place in 1970s San Francisco.  When you see them at the hot dog cart...think of me, standing about 15 yards from the actors...

One thing I noticed (I guess this happens when you get old) is that costume group lumps all of the 70s in the same period.  Very different dress from early 70s to late 70s   also they had people wearing shoes from the 60s.   A minor point in the scheme of things I suppose...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 07, 2007, 12:09:27 PM
Well, I wear some shoes from the 8os....  :)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on September 07, 2007, 12:19:42 PM
Well, I wear some shoes from the 8os....  :)

It's true of course, when you have a large group of people they are likely to be wearing clothing from different eras.  Particularly homeless people and so forth in a city like San Francisco.    I did live there during the late 70s though and I don't think my memory is too degraded yet...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: godot on September 07, 2007, 01:33:39 PM
I loved FOTC.  I even made my entire family watch it one night.  Alas, they didn't seem to garner the same enthusiasm as I have for it.

I began to tire of it the last few episodes, especially the last one (I agree with Kam).  I hope they have enough sense to hire a couple of writers to bolster the plot lines.  I really like Bret and Jemaine a lot.  Also love the songs.  Most of them make me laugh out loud.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 07, 2007, 01:47:33 PM
Speaking of adding new plotlines, I'm impressed how long Entourage has lasted.

I wouldn't mind seeing a little bit of HBO series crossover ..  I think Ari Gold from Entourage (Jeremy Piven) meeting Bret and Jemaine would be good for a lark.  Maybe FoTC could show up at one of Vinnie Chases parties.. or maybe Eric could appear in FoTC trying to get the guys to dump Murray and join his list of clients


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on September 09, 2007, 05:36:24 PM
I have a new favorite train wreck show -- that is, there's no good reason to watch it, yet I can't change the channel.  It's Flipping Out on BRAVO. The main character, a real estate investor named Jeff, is incredibly self-involved.  Whether he's pitching a fit because his lunch came with onions when he ordered it without, or deciding to lay someone off while spending money taking his dogs to an animal communicant this guy is nobody I'd ever want to work for or even know, yet I'm fascinated.  For sure an upcoming episode is going to feature him hiring someone to wipe his butt or something.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on September 09, 2007, 06:44:14 PM
My husband watches that, too, harrie--is the "draw" a character one loves to hate. (as are sometimes relied on in such shows as Top Chef and Project Runway)?  Do you think maybe they should show it in MBA classes as example of how not to be a boss/manager, or is there not even that redeeming virtue?    


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 09, 2007, 10:35:51 PM
James Gandolfini's, Home from Iraq, is on right now on HBO east.

Alive Day


Title: Tell Me You Love Me
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 10, 2007, 10:27:24 AM
uh..................................errr.......................................ummmm....................

wow



Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on September 10, 2007, 10:57:40 AM
nytempsperdu,
For me, Flipping Out is all about the freak factor, plus the love to hate thing.  I mean, this guy has to own his own business, because I can't imagine who would ever hire him.  For that matter, I can't imagine that anyone would work for him, yet they do.   However -- based on my work experiences, he's not that different than some managers for whom I've worked (not for very long of course); so though I was tempted to say if you need to watch him to see what not to do, you've got issues, maybe that's not a bad idea. 


Title: Re: Tell Me You Love Me
Post by: Kam on September 10, 2007, 11:07:13 AM
uh..................................errr.......................................ummmm....................

wow



I didn't watch... you wanna translate your review for me?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 10, 2007, 11:26:01 AM
I tried Flipping Out, there's more of a "this is SOOO last Spring' vibe for me.

I keep wanting the housing market to crash and burn around this new breed of Rock Star Chef, Model Designer Hairdresser....

I like Flip This House better because it's over and if I never see it again it's ok. More like Extreme Home Makeover the Top than Roots (one time v. miniseries)

But the real reason I'm here today is to say that I gave mad Men the last chance and it worked. Episode 7 is what I'm up to (8 is in the DVR, but I haven't had the chance).

In episode 7 they spend a whole lot of time pointing out just how different the world was then. They do this in every episode to be sure, but they generally spent more time on just one issue (usually sexual harassment). In this episode they show:
1 A husband having a conversation with his wife's shrink wherein he tells the husband all about what's going on in the meetings,
2 A man smoking and drinking at his desk,
3 A woman entertaining her husband's boss at a moment's notice by having a salad while the men ate the steaks she had cooked,
4 (She didn't have time to defrost anything, afterall, no microwave),
5 The "acceptance" of the notion that the husband might just bounce the wife off the walls,
6 The  Boss going off to drive home with a glass of vodka and a head full of same.
7 The introduction of a chip&dip and the consternation over "What's dip?" (sour cream and brown onions, it was quite good, "You'll have to get me the recipe") (an aside, Onion dip is so much better than both salsa and humus! I was noting/lamenting the other day how the only corn chips now available are nacho/tortilla style flat corn chips. One tiny spot for Fritos and no other Fritos type chips. Whoever told the Mexicans that they know how to cook anyway!?)
8 Customer service as run by the angries.
9 No cure for the clap (also that the clap is the worst thing they got as opposed to AIDS, Herpes etc)
10 The grocery Store Scene! This was interesting because it was flawed. The idea was to show the lack of variety in the produce section. What happened though was that they had three bins of apples, Red Delicious, Mac types and Granny Smiths. Problem being that Granny Smiths were never even heard of in their section of the country (which BTW is right near where I grew up, as evidenced by the Poughkeepsie Journal in the Mother's Day Episode and the Taconic Parkway references) Then there were the watermelons, which were out of season by apple season and they weren't these seedless basketballs that we have today either. Nor did we have back in the day anything like a Pink Grapefruit. Not that it is a big deal, but it did catch my eye, a show so devoted to details they got these wrong.
11 The pregnant woman smoking and drinking wine (she didn't actually drink it, but that was not because she shouldn't, but because the scene didn't go that way.)
12 The gun.
13 The waving around of the gun.
14 The multimartini lunch.
15 The Nonplussed attitude towards the resultant mess.
16 The "He doesn't even wear a hat" attitude (towards JFK)
17 The anti catholicism (towards JFK)

That's at least 1 every 2 minutes in the show, that's a lot crammed into the show.

Meanwhile, the antagonist in this show is starting to become the sympathetic figure that we fully expect to run off and become a hippie who writes the Great American Novel. We know by his comment (and out of hand dismissal by his superiors) that he is on to something with this "youth' stuff. In the pre GOP strategy meeting when the elders are saying "he doesn't even wear a hat" the kid says, "You know who else doesn't wear a hat? Elvis!"

The dirty trick played by Don on his boss brings us back to what the show should be more about, the inner office politics of Ad men.

I'm glad to see the show got back on track (but I may hate it again by tomorrow.)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 10, 2007, 06:48:41 PM
As for me,  I just watched Larry David since he was recently brought up, and that is how I was there when James Gandolfini's special on Iraq veterans came on.

If you think that may have been depressing, it was for the people involved.

Curb your Enthusiasm, however, is meant to be an upbeat show about a guy who is  schlemiel, and the theme at present is being charitable and considerate toward people who have lost their homes in the latest hurricane following Katrina.  Sheryl has decided that is the thing to do, invite some strangers to come live with them.  Meanwhile there is a subplot about party-going and non-party-going but I don't want to put up the spoiler alert as that is too heavy, let's just skip it as Sheryl and Larry finally get to the airport late and discover they have invited a real black family to live with them.   

That's the new theme folks for the present, with lots of funny coincidences but it was kind of depressing to me, as I suddenly saw Larry David as about as uncharitable as you can get.

Discovering that James Gandolfini had the follow up before I switched channels was "a study in contrasts", as he is very loving and demonstrative about it.

I urge everybody to look for these interviews "Alive Day".  It's like, going to work for Mr.  Bush is the new higher education.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 11, 2007, 12:21:05 PM
Real quick in re: Mad Men

The return to broad brushstrokes... this time having to do with the surprise that a woman could actually be sexual and creative; plus "the closet".

The obviously homosexual (to today's observer, unthought-of of at the time) art director at a time before "Gay" is invited to be wined and dined and 69'd by a client, and although he is willing, his willingness to show his willie to Wallie is way lower than his willingness to walk away from working for the west of his wife (as faw as he knows).

The switching up of writers is starting to make for an inconsistent story. In the earlier version (the one where his brother finds him) he (Don Draper) lives with his family when his younger brother is born, but in this episode he is a "whore child" living with "Christians", the male of which getting branded a dishonest man by the hobo who passes through and evidently indelibly changes the boy's outlook.

The irony here being that Don is smoking pot with the "beat" crowd and that he is probably the Kerowaickiest of the bunch of them. Nice little lesson on nonliteral communication, as the hobo explained what several symbols meant to other illiterates (a circle with an x in it represented a pie which meant good cooking. A circle with three triangles down below the right side indicated a crying eye and meant tell them a sad story. A ^^^^^^^ meant a dog that bites lives here, and a design that represents a sickle with a line through it meant that you'd work but be cheated out of pay "a dishonest man lives here", the symbol left behind by the hobo.)

Not a spectacular episode....

Oh, speaking of which.... 2 1/2 Men has syndicated, I just happened to notice it on the date of the series pilot. All I can say is that they must have known they were contracted for at least 13 shows, because the pilot was about as fluid as Brittney Spears at the VMA's.

What was going through her mind do you think? "Everybody is staring at how fat I am!" (which I don't think she is, I find her more alluring with some poundage, but girls always think that anyway) or "Everybody knows I'm wearing a wig! I hope it doesn't fall off, I'd better go slowly so it doesn't slip!"? 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 11, 2007, 12:30:48 PM
How about, "F*ck ya' all, just give me mah money!"


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 11, 2007, 12:45:27 PM
Loathe as I am to involve myself in "celebrealty" I got the distinct impression from the bit and pieces of BS that I saw that she seemed to have finally realized that there are really people out there, beyond the footlights.

It looked like stage fright to me.

This is a person who got up on the stage before she knew that there was anything to be afraid of (it's coming). She grew up without fear on the stage (it's coming!) and then  a light finally went off and she understood that this life is real life and in real life, adults aren't supposed to get up in front of x milion people and shake their whammy fammy!

As the lyric goes "No one respects the flame, quite like the fool who's badly burned, .... Fear must be something learned"  (from Slit Skirts by P. Townshend)

Fame has burnt Brittney bad. Now that she's been sensitized, it'll take real actual talent for her to get back on the stage.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 11, 2007, 12:50:00 PM
Took talent to get her there in the first place


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 11, 2007, 01:31:55 PM
Took talent to get her there in the first place

Worded as to leave room for speculation about whom it was that was talented. Was it Brittany? Or was the talent "Owned" by the person that got her there?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 11, 2007, 01:34:22 PM
Don't try to look smarter than you are.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 11, 2007, 02:04:45 PM
As is so often said to me "You're smarter than you look. Pretty much would have to be though wouldnja?"

Other than that I don't know what prompted your snarkiness, Your Snarkiness.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 11, 2007, 02:07:13 PM
As is so often said to me "You're smarter than you look. Pretty much would have to be though wouldnja?"

Other than that I don't know what prompted your snarkiness, Your Snarkiness.

Maybe your insistence on kicking Spears.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 11, 2007, 02:28:25 PM
Talent is a relative thing.

When I listen to the music that my children listen to and then I listen to the music of people at the same age from an earlier time it is clear to me how low the talent bar has been dropped.

You want to compare the "talent" of Brittany to Cass Elliot? To Joni Mitchell? To Joan Baez? To Grace Slick? To Janis Joplin?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 11, 2007, 02:55:22 PM
These are not pop stars you have mentioned

How about the Archies?

Your dad would tell you Baez couldn't hold a candle to Ella.  Times change.


This is not a musical great, this Spears.  Of course not.  She's been more of an entertainer.   That's what so much music is these days.

Guys like us still prefer the music minus the fluff (seeing Little Feat the end of this month.  I don't expecta  light show or a huge jumbotron)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on September 11, 2007, 02:59:15 PM
You guys should move this conversation to Celebreality...

In fact I'll put my thoughts over there now in order to do so...




Title: OK, dad
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 11, 2007, 03:00:12 PM
Yeah, God knows we are getting in the way of alot of TV talk.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 11, 2007, 03:58:51 PM
Not to mention that we're talking about something that happened on tv and we're not talking about the gossip/hype that surrounds BS but rather her reality.

Give someone a name like Trojan, they start trying to protect the world from pricks like me!

Kid,

We could veer off into the ditch by asking each other to define the difference between Pop and Rock or folk or whatever.

If you want to compare Brit to The Archies, or the Partridge Family, then let's also include The Osmonds, The Jacksons, the Supremes, Melanie, Donovan, Madonna, Prince, Patsy Kline... any number of talented people who got to where they were by dint of raw talent and determination, be that the determination of the artist or the artist's nutjob father.

The Disney machine spat Brittany onto the scene fully formed. Yes, she had to have been more willing and have more twinkle than the other girls that Disney was also sending through their meat grinder. But that doesn't mean that her product was the result of artistic talent.

The other day I was listening to Satanic Majesties Request and having the old Beatles v. Rolling Stones debate within echoing canyons of my mind. It wasn't really the Beatles or the Stones, it was George Martin v. whoever mixed the SMR record. It's the promotion people who propel the stars of today even more than before (not taking anything away from Colonel Parker) and it was plenty plenty then to start off.

Brittany Spears will prove that she is a talent when if she can come back on stage, knowing what she now knows, and raise her game to meet and exceed the expectations.

(Just an aside about Sinead O'Connor... Why? Because I was listening to Tull the other other day wherein he's tearing the pope a new one all over Aqualung, which is a great album once you stop listening to "classic Rock Radio". I thought, how are the same people who sang along now all in a tither because she ripped up his picture....)



Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on September 11, 2007, 11:16:03 PM
MSNBC's two-hour show of 9/11 is basically loaded with baby-wipe and make your dick hard commercials along with the rest of the pharma and ordinary fear-mongering that accompanies the nightly news.  I'll never watch NBC's network nightly news shows again and consider the commercial exploitation of 9/11 in this particular manner, with all the favourite ad-time purchasers, extremely disrespectful of the victims of 9/11, and consider NBC corporate's underestimation of the American Public disgusting.  You are nothing but Fox Noise tonight, thanks a lot, assholes, and so long.

Is that really going to be the way you have YOUR story told?

Fucking pathetic, ordinary, and typical.

There is literally a scare drug every five minutes accompanying, wait, here's "Depend's," now "Tide Pure Essentials," now "Downy," now Morgage freak out, now CVS Pharmacy helping an old lady with "no family," "I guess I'm her son, now," says the pharmacist as he helps her pick out a drug plan...

"9/11" has now been used wrongly by NBC for profiteering that is not too far removed from what the Bush Administration has done.....you can't have it both ways and they don't get it and I'm washing my hands of NBC out of the lack of respect and disgust and disdain they have shown for the American people for not running the coverage uninterupted by ads, however welcome they might seem from the ignorant and ordinary patter of an understandably dumbfounded Couric, Lauer, weatherman.....

.....extraordinary disgust, this shouldn't be WWII war channel material yet, it's clearly exploitative and just in my mind so wrong.....

.....especially the clear connection between fear-mongering ads and really fearful cherry-picking of recent bad news, but this is different from nightly news because it's wearing a disguise, a lie, again...

FUCK NBC.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on September 12, 2007, 01:18:38 AM
Jbot, my sentiments, exactly, if I had watched the show, which I didn't.  I try not to watch anything on the Big Three.  The constant barrage of commercials--same ones, over and over and over--drives me to do and say things that make me socially unacceptable outside my home.

Not that I NEVER do.  There's something coming up on ABC near the end of the month called Dirty Stinking Money or some such title that, from the trailers, I'm afraid I'm going to like.  I also watched all those fat younguns walk 500 plus miles to earn $40,000.  So I guess I won't be growing wings anytime soon.

But you really nailed the gross commercialism of--what? You name it if it can be exploited.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 12, 2007, 04:43:20 PM
I remember 9/11 like it was yesterday!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: ponderosa on September 12, 2007, 04:46:14 PM
I remember 9/11 like it was yesterday!

Post this to the Comedy forum next time.

 ::)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 12, 2007, 10:13:26 PM
Last time there was a comedy forum, and I made comments about 9/11...well I don't like to remember it!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on September 13, 2007, 08:19:08 PM
Serious inquiries only, please:

http://store.hbo.com/family/index.jsp?categoryId=2783857&cp=2764176&clickid=mainnav_browse_txt


Title: Re: Television
Post by: pugetopolis on September 14, 2007, 03:46:57 AM
Jbottle's Mouth



"...baby-wipe and make your dick hard commercials...

disgusting...thanks a lot, assholes...and so long...

fucking pathetic...ordinary...and typical...

disgust and disdain...dumbfounded...

extraordinary disgust...exploitative...

fear-mongering bad news...a lie, again...

FUCK NBC..."



Well, that pretty much says it all doesn't it?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 14, 2007, 11:34:27 AM
I don't know, what does it say?  A string of words that suggest rhetorical excess, taken from their context, doesn't say much of anything.

Relax.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 14, 2007, 12:24:56 PM
Speaking of Mad Men...

Ep 9 (seen within a day of when it actually ran, so I'm getting better.)

Sort of a snorer this week although there are several things in it this week that, again, sort of contradict the rest of the story. For example they supposedly live in Ossning. While this does tend to make the bit about taking the car instead of the train more believable, there's no reason that ossning would have the Poughkeepsie Journal delivered on sunday mornings. At worst they'd have the NYC papers delivered.

It's no big deal, period. But this is the sort detail abnormality that used to drive others nuts when I brought them up about Sopranos (because they would assert flawlesness about that show). It's only fair, that i note them for this show too.

There is a certain Forrest Gumpedness going on here in that now they seem to be involved in all the things that eventually become hot in the future. The example this week is Betty's past as a model. She spent time in Italy and was cozy (she claims muse status) with a designer who liked to be called Johnny. Betty's neighbor can't believe that he didn't even want to do some petting with Betty and yet he made her all these dresses. They're getting a little boring with the "We didn't even know there was such a thing as homosexuals" routine. The art director of McCann Erickson (was there Erickson back then? ) was also quite swishy, and Betty had no idea. Hard to believe as it is, it has worn out its welcome on the show.

Meahwhile, the central character, as in the pivot point character as in Peggy the secretary, is becoming more and more toxic each time we see her.

Don reintroduced us to the notion that he was going to be a candidate for avante garde of the Drop out, tune out, drop acid crowd we know is on the very near horizon. He took a contract bump that had no tie-up clause (I would spoiler this, but there is no way that anyone watching this show would think that Don Draper is going to leave Sterling Cooper anyway. It's this certainty that made the show a snorer.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: liquidsilver on September 15, 2007, 02:42:43 PM
I watched "It's always Sunny in Philadelphia" on FX for the first time the other night - that show is freakin hysterical


Title: Re: Damages
Post by: lulu on September 16, 2007, 06:06:26 PM
Is it me or is this show getting more convoluted as it goes along?  You need a scorecard to try to figure  out who's doing what to whom (they are all villains, as far as I'm concerned).  And do I really  care about Ellen?  She's such a wimp and so bland, real white bread.  Either it's the role or the actress or both.  I personally do not care much for Rose Byrne.  But I'm going to see it through to the end of the story arc.  Thank goodness it will end at the season's finale before starting next season off with a new story arc.  But it's hard for me to get a handle on this show.

Even my sister, who is sharp as a tack about everything, mentioned it was getting confusing.  So I don't feel so bad.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 17, 2007, 02:42:52 AM
Lulu,

I watched it earlier this evening in a repeat of what I saw previously , just to be sure I didn't miss something; but it is now all over the place.

There are no really big points being made.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on September 17, 2007, 01:21:47 PM
Lulu, Maddy, I agree.  The storyline is almost--dare I say it?--getting comical.  But, like you, I'm seeing it through to the end, of this season anyway.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on September 17, 2007, 05:56:49 PM
Monk & Psyche finished their respective mini seasons over the weekend and now the long wait for "the second half" begins...

Thank goodness for the DVD collection so I can rewatch last year's episodes for the second time.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 17, 2007, 05:58:34 PM
Prison Break starts tonight.  Season 3.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 17, 2007, 06:05:54 PM
Can you recap 1 and 2 for us?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 17, 2007, 06:28:04 PM
Can you recap 1 and 2 for us?

You're probably asking facetiously but i'll summarize anyway:  (now go look up facetiously and then comment on my reading comprehension MOKE!)

Season 1: In US Prison - Brother 1 framed for murder of vice-president's brother, Brother 2 gets thrown in jail to plan their joint escape. They make some friends (some by choice, some because of necessity) who help in the escape preparation, then execute escape over prison wall.

Season 2: In US, seven cons on the run, several are captured and or killed.  Some loose ends from season 1 tied up, apparent happy ending turns sour in season finale.  Brother 2 ends up in a Panamanian prison where some of the ex cons from season 2 would up as well.

Season 3: Brother 1 must break Brother 2 out of prison.  (basically Season 1 again, but with worse bad guys)




Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 17, 2007, 06:34:56 PM
Can you recap 1 and 2 for us?
(now go look up facetiously and then comment on my reading comprehension MOKE!)




Go spank yourself, peckerhead


Title: South Park
Post by: Detective_Winslow on September 17, 2007, 06:40:03 PM
The funniest, most inventive show on TV will be airing new episodes until at least 2011.  :)


http://www.buddytv.com/articles/south-park/south-park-to-run-for-another-10005.aspx



With animated tv series, South Park is as good as it'll ever get.



(http://imagecache2.allposters.com/images/pic/HPM/SM1082~Cripple-Fight-Posters.jpg)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 17, 2007, 06:40:40 PM
Kidkarter: The definition of an Internet Bully who runs home with his tail twixt his legs when challenged.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Detective_Winslow on September 17, 2007, 06:50:54 PM
Can you recap 1 and 2 for us?
(now go look up facetiously and then comment on my reading comprehension MOKE!)




Go spank yourself, peckerhead


I don't think Kamiar handles meat


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 18, 2007, 11:05:07 AM
I like the new badder-ass prison break that presents itself to Michael in season three of Prison Break.  In a sense, one layer of complexity is removed in his escape plan, as the Sona prison is essentially a stockade into which all the baddies are thrown and there are no guards inside.  Basically, there is a no-man's land to cross, a wall to vault, and then you're home-free.  Contrasted with the aesthetic streamlining of the escape plot, is the messy anarchy within the walls and Michael's immediate branding as a pretty-boy superstar who must be either cut down to size or just murdered and added to the body pile. 

I think the writing for this show is brilliant and the characters memorable -- horrible as T-Bag is, I'm glad he's back to pollute the waters with his uniquely clever and reptilian machinations.  I will miss the lunatic, who died in Season Two, who was planning to build a boat and sail it to Holland, and made for some comic relief at various points in the season.

 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 18, 2007, 01:04:12 PM
Last night they had (what I would assume was) last season's cliffhanger for 2 1/2 Men (even shows I really like don't get all of my attention, so it was new to me).

It was funny enough that the object of Evelyn's desire was Robert whathisname who still looks quite good for most ages. And then it was funny enough that he won the boys over with hookers (just funny enough).

It was a treat though to see Mike Connors come out of her bedroom. Good old Mannix, I can't remember when I last saw him. BTW he looks good for someone who has been dead about a week, underwater. Could have been his makeup though, after all, he did soon die.

Has anyone heard though, if Robert (Ah crap, ok Imdb, you, know, I came up with Mike Connors, and the other day I dug out ... dang... I had it just until I was going to say it... I blame the availability of Imdb, it's like it has allowed me to clear out all that mental space so that I could put up new cobwebs there too! It's not like there are new memories filling in the spaces left by the ones I don't need anymore.

And that brings me to another question, Why haven't we demanded that the TV companies integrate Imdb with real time tv? How hard can it be to have a button on the remote that you can point at an actor, push the button and the Imdb page shows up on a split screen? Same with a dvd! Come on people, this stuff is just sprocket science!) WAGNER! (I didn't even have to go to Imdb, and Mariette Hartley was the other one! ) is going to continue on in this role? He'd be a welcome twist to the story in a Ryan Childs sort of way.

I do miss Rose, I feel so sorry for that actress who took such bad advice to go for that cross country car race show that we knew would have four flats by Bayone! Damn that Tom Wolfe! Why'd he have to make that rule? It's like the literary equivalent of Murphy's Law.

I had read a few Prisoner reviews at Netflix that were less than glowing (I'm still not finished with the series two more disks I think) but  I disagree (even though I can see their point, so far I haven't introduced or reintroduced the series to anyone who went away with the slightest inclination of seeing another one episode. Further, if you don't look at it in context to when it was made, you're sure to be under whelmed by it, even though there are many stunningly great cinematic moments throughout the series that indicate that the production was miles ahead of it's highest caliber of possible presentation.) I watched the Cowboy episode this morning.

From the very start (as the Prisoner rode his horse along the trail) it was apparent that this was a tongue in cheek effort which is what makes the series so enjoyable to me. They never take themselves too seriously; managing to fill a dramatic presentation with satire of its own genre. There was always a question in this viewers mind, "was this a fullout parody or is this just a village distortion?" I was left wondering until the end and when all was revealed it was refreshingly involving in its surreality (this is in sharp contrast to the "Forget Me Not..." episode where the ending was uncharacteristically explained by No.6 to No.2 thus actually foiling the professor's ingenius con*).

If you haven't seen this series, I heartily recommend it (but then nobody that I have recommended it to so far would second that enthusiasm).

* A classic sf story of putting one man's mind into another man's head. #6's mind put into the body of another so that he would find the scientist who developed the procedure of transferal. Not unlike Total Recall, #6 left himself clues against this eventuality, but with TR, Hauser knew he was going to become Quaid. The Young Frankenstein brain transfer pulled off a pretty cool (albeit obvious) twist in that all three of the people that you wanted to survive did, even though two of the three died. The professor took the enemy agent's body and left the agent's mind in his own, old frail body which then died. the old professor now had a brand new young body with which to continue his works. Neat how the ethical dilema of stealing a body was averted... This is a very very good show.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 19, 2007, 05:27:10 PM
Further to the Cowboy episode of The Prisoner was the character played like a Star Trek extra (meaning of course that he dies by the end).

He was visualy striking not only for himself but for his resemblence to (http://www.moviecritic.com.au/userimages/user624_1175040228a.jpg)
is remarkable... I can't find an image of the guy, but he's tall lankie wears his pants up to his armpits and suspenders above that over an orange red shirt and a stovepipe hat. his eyelashes give him a girlish countenance not unlike the eyelash of the druges.

I cannot assume that his appearance is coincidental.


Title: Re:The Prisoner
Post by: obertray on September 20, 2007, 09:54:12 AM
Last show coming up.

The bedtime story episode I could see turning off a vast majority of persons watching it. It is obviously one of those "we're stretching here" episodes. And yet I enjoy it because that's the sort of guy I am, the kind of guy who will like what he likes regardless of how half empty that glass is!

The penultimate episode reintroduced good old Bailey of the Rumpole Leo Mc Kern as the last #2. I understand that this was at first designed to be a season ending cliffhanger, but then it became the set up for the "Fall out" episode which (because I've been snooping) has been spoilered for me, but generally by people who don't like the show, so I'm not particularly concerned by their appraisal.

I'm anxious to see the end (my family is anxious for me to see the end, so that they can get a movie from Netflix next.)

I fully expect myself to get a computer that i wil bend and twist into a DVR, DVDburner, net appliance so that I can abuse the Netflix online movies (after which time I'm sure someone will offer such an appliance for a low price with a two year sign up to their online movie service, the bastiges)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 20, 2007, 11:06:14 AM
Ober, glad you are continuing to explore the wonders of The Prisoner.  I remember the storytime episode (that's the one with the mysterious woman in white, the cyanide candles, the whole Bond spoofiness, right?) fondly.  A tale for children of all ages, indeed.

Oh....gas coming in the keyhole again, must run.

Be seeing you!



Title: Kid Nation
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 20, 2007, 11:09:18 AM
Not too bad

A Jeff Probst soundalike, similar skills contests to Survivor, but always better to rip off your own network.

Critics silenced a bit when the first kid goes home on his own volition, revealing that each week every kid gets that option.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 20, 2007, 11:41:22 AM
Ober, glad you are continuing to explore the wonders of The Prisoner.  I remember the storytime episode (that's the one with the mysterious woman in white, the cyanide candles, the whole Bond spoofiness, right?) fondly.  A tale for children of all ages, indeed.

Oh....gas coming in the keyhole again, must run.

Be seeing you!



Yes Bond spoofiness, especially the goofy disguise. But the cyanide candles were much more "Wild Wild West" than 007. Oh and the shoe shine agent with the telephone in his shoe brush, I should see when Get Smart started the shoe thing, this is definitely a cousin to that (and a second cousin to Underdog!).

When scoffs at something his boss said on the phonograph record and the boss says "What was that!" Oh nothing... 

It's fun to watch people having fun, and after all the hard struggling that no. 6 did in the earlier episodes, it's nice to see that it is a sense of humor and an appreciation of whimsy that wins the day for him. the reed that bends v. the oak that breaks so to speak. I supose that will be the over arching theme when we get to the end, the rigidity of the analytical computer falls prey to no. 6's flexible mind.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: luee on September 21, 2007, 05:20:09 AM
Survivor China anyone, some interesting characters abound. Somehow reality shows have jaded my interest for canned dramas and comedy.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 21, 2007, 10:38:56 AM
Some of us instinctively feel we are getting close to solving the riddle of what the heck Glenn Close and Ted Danson are doing with their Damaged plot.  It should end anytime soon and then we will know what it was about.  Perhaps Ted could invite Glenn to a party sometime over at Larry David's house post-fire-damage repair or maybe even a new house? One never knows.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 21, 2007, 11:39:27 AM
Survivor China anyone, some interesting characters abound. Somehow reality shows have jaded my interest for canned dramas and comedy.

Luee

I recorded it - will watch later today.

Certainly interested in discussing THIS (and Kid Nation) over the next weeks, rather than what's been brought up by the masses.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 21, 2007, 11:46:07 AM
The masses?

Man do you ever have a low tolerance for crowds!

Where do you live; In Ted Kazinski's neck of the woods?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 21, 2007, 12:54:38 PM
Anyone planning on watching the new Ken Burns 7-part documentary on PBS about World War II?

Starts this Sunday night.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on September 21, 2007, 02:11:58 PM
I do, MrUtley.  The series is a 14 parter that is being shown for seven nights, starting this Sunday on PBS.  There's a review of Ken Burn's The War in today's NYT.  While praising him and his cinematic work--including this effort--the reviewer takes Burns to task for presenting WWII from just the U.S. participation point of view, when, infact, the whole world was involved.  Good point, but I'm sure I'm going to appreciate this documentary however Burns has chosen to present it.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 21, 2007, 03:36:52 PM
I do, MrUtley.  The series is a 14 parter that is being shown for seven nights, starting this Sunday on PBS.  There's a review of Ken Burn's The War in today's NYT.  While praising him and his cinematic work--including this effort--the reviewer takes Burns to task for presenting WWII from just the U.S. participation point of view, when, infact, the whole world was involved.  Good point, but I'm sure I'm going to appreciate this documentary however Burns has chosen to present it.

That's a duimbass reviewer for you.

There's nothing wrong with a narrower than global perspective, as long as your not passing it off as a comprehensive view, I don't see the validity of such a vapid point.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 25, 2007, 10:39:23 AM
1. The Prisoner Finale... Not at all what I had been lead to believe, so far as I understood both what I had been lead and what it was. #6 is not #1, the computer was not specifically significant. and the show was less psychodelic than many of the earlier episodes. Overall, it was a joyous ending. It was like Christmas though, it was only over because the end came. There was nothing in this episode that prevents this from being just another setup by the "them" whomever them are, and he'll wind up in Portmerion tomorrow morning.

If I were to pick nits about this program, I'd be all over the idea that a good spy would be able to figure out where he was by watching the suns angle and it's relative sunrise times etc.
I'd point out that the jet flyover in the Many Happy Returns ep where they show the village off the coast of Iberia couldn't work, given that the vilage was 30 miles out of London.

But I won't. It was a fun show that, as Barton contends, in the wellspring from which many of today's psychodramas flow.

2. Bill Clinton on Jon Stewart... Boy looks thin! Another Democrat doing even better as a former president than he did as a president. It's good to see.

3. The Big Bang Theory... I couldn't place the one guy (the short one), I knew I knew him, and that he was usualy cringing in fear... I cheated... I won't spoil it for others playing the game at home. It turned out pretty funny. I don't know that they'll be able to continue very long, but then I'm not trying to make money on the show, so I'm not willing to do the work that it will take to maintain it.  I'm sorry Stephen Colbert, Mondays at 8:30 go to this show, so far.

4. 2 and a half Men... Very good season starter. A lot of good laughs, nobody seems to be phoning it in, everybody seems to want to be there.

5. Rules of Engagement... Solid.  Funny. The frat boyedness of Puddy is more than a little over the top, but otherwise its still a good "one more for the road" of Monday night.

Tonight is House and Boston Legal. I would like to watch Reaper but it's against House, I'm not betting against the House.

Speaking of whom. It looks like L&O:CI will be against ER. How ironic will that be if CI beats ER?

 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 25, 2007, 10:58:06 AM
Ah, the Prisoner finale.  Dem bones, dem bones, dem dry bones!  What is to become of the midget butler (the only other regularly billed actor in the series, besides McGoo)?  Odd, indeed, to discover the village is on the coast of Kent, when the surrounding hills have always looked so very Welsh.  Is the Prisoner an allegorical hero, who is imprisoned only by himself?  Was the Village a drunken paranoid dream, following a resignation bender?  A virtual reality created by foreign spies, mining our man for information?  Too early in the morning here...

2.5 Men -- I don't do sitcoms, generally, but have watched this on occasion and found myself laughing against my better judgement.  It's refreshing to see a tv show where a child, instead of being smarter and better than his elders, can be somewhat dim-witted and oafish.  Cryer and Sheen seem to be putting a new spin on an old duality, perhaps best presented in The Odd Couple.  The housekeeper is priceless. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on September 25, 2007, 11:10:34 AM
There's nothing wrong with a narrower than global perspective, as long as your not passing it off as a comprehensive view, I don't see the validity of such a vapid point.

Burn missed the boat on Jazz, giving a very narrow view of the subject material, so it doesn't surprise me that there is criticism to his take on The War.  The same has been true for all Burn's documentaries.  He presents a great number of compelling pictures, but he oftens misses the big picture, even in his highly acclaimed Civil War, where he chose to write out Reconstruction, even that which had begun in 1864.  Eric Foner, for one, was very upset as he had been consulted on the series.  Foner later pushed for and got PBS to do a two-part special on Reconstruction.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on September 25, 2007, 11:13:54 AM
Barton, I just love it when our two images of Duchovny appear top and bottom.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 25, 2007, 01:15:15 PM
There's nothing wrong with a narrower than global perspective, as long as your not passing it off as a comprehensive view, I don't see the validity of such a vapid point.

Burn missed the boat on Jazz, giving a very narrow view of the subject material, so it doesn't surprise me that there is criticism to his take on The War.  The same has been true for all Burn's documentaries.  He presents a great number of compelling pictures, but he oftens misses the big picture, even in his highly acclaimed Civil War, where he chose to write out Reconstruction, even that which had begun in 1864.  Eric Foner, for one, was very upset as he had been consulted on the series.  Foner later pushed for and got PBS to do a two-part special on Reconstruction.




Well, if you study the Reconstruction Era, you will understand the Republican Party.

As for "The War", so far, I am enjoying it, and teh folksy way of weaving domestic experience with individual combat experience and policy. NOt an easy task, and provocative.

I don't look at documentaries as comprehensive summaries of events, but rather thought provoking forays that create a desire in you to learn more.

Maybe that's why I give Burns the room to be creative and not all-encompassing in his work.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 25, 2007, 02:06:00 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCUBxgdKZ_Y&mode=related&search= (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RCUBxgdKZ_Y&mode=related&search=)

I pasted this over in Comedy too but... These have to be among the funniest Tv commercials of all time! Big fan as I am of the "Vee Dub representin Deutschland in da houze!" ads, these I can't believe someone actually did. I'm also shocked that I saw these ads on the tube considering that they are for a dealership a full continent away from my home.

These are the Trunk Monkey spots. A set of ads where there is a monkey in the trunk of your Suburban Dealership auto. This money tries to bribe a cop, foils a car theif, chases down some eggers, chaperones a date and a few other monkeyshines. It will brighten up your day (especially if its going good already!) 

I'm a little embarassed by the fact that I didn't recognize these as an ad package which was purchased by any number of auto dealers across the nation. I guess that goes to show the good job that was done by the seller in meshing the local client's name into the package. To contrast, there is a law firm in maine that uses Robert Vaugn in it's ads and it is so clumsily done (the localization) that it makes it look like a spoof of the concept (sort of like The Man From U.N.C.L.E. did to spy shows).


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on September 25, 2007, 02:12:41 PM

Well, if you study the Reconstruction Era, you will understand the Republican Party.


It is this kind of narrow views which I'm talking about.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: caclark on September 25, 2007, 03:33:16 PM
I’ve always found Ken Burns’ history to be sound in its reporting. The flak he took from Eric Foner over The Civil War was not because of what he put into the series but because of what he left out. I find that criticism small and petty.

Admittedly, Eric Foner is one of our most renowned Civil War historians while Burns is a filmmaker. But the series was Burn’s project, not Foner’s. Burns was the creative force that envisioned it and then made it happen, the one whose prerogative it rightly was to decide what the focus would be. Had he bowed to Foner, it would have been Eric Foner’s Civil War instead of Ken Burns’ Civil War.

Every history is limited in its scope. The one whose property it is decides at what point to stop and wrap it up in editing his material. Perhaps Foner should have produced his own film documentary on the Civil War instead of sniping at Burns who trusted his own instincts in keeping creative control over his own work.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on September 25, 2007, 11:42:35 PM
Documentaries are a little different than dramas, Burn doesn't seem to know the distinction.  He treats history as drama.  Of course, it makes it more compelling, but he chooses to cut what doesn't fit within his dramatic sense of events, and as a result there are a lot of gaping holes in his narrative.  He sought out Foner and others to consult him on Civil War, and then chose to ignore their advice.  In this sense, Burn is little different than a television producer.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on September 25, 2007, 11:58:37 PM
I didn't know til now about the Burns/Foner "issue"--could there have been just a wee bit o' sour grapes involved?

Burns and Novick were interviewed on a local PBS station by Josh Kornbluth (a comic monologuist/tv interviewer in SF) and I was surprised at the passion Burns exhibited about his subject and his "from the bottom up" approach.  He noted that WWII vets are dying at the rate of 1,000 a day, saying one can't know that and not act.  He also said if one didn't fight in that war or wait for someone fighting in it to come home, they would not be in the movie.  Perhaps he was most emotional in his antipathy to calling it a "good war"--obviously considering such a thing impossible, emphasizing instead that it was a "necessary war."  

Co-fiilmaker Novick seemed less emotional about the subject but she described more fully their method of choosing their subjects and the labor of going through archives, calling the 'net great but limited--one needs to dig through card catalogs and boxes of papers, etc.  

The only thing I don't know is if the station I'm watching edited out the swear words
as I read many stations did--for the kiddies, d'ya suppose, those who are likely daily bombarded with worse?  I'm sure not aware of such language, but it hasn't been on my mind as I watch.  

I did hear a pilot talking about number of missions to get a medal--naturally Catch-22  sprang to mind.  I suppose I should be ashamed, but that's the only WWII lit. I've read and I never developed a liking for war movies.  Though a large contingent of my relatives were from Bedford VA, which supplied a number of young men disproportionate to its population, I still have never seen Saving Private Ryan that was based on those.  Indeed, I only recently learned about a monument to them there.  

On the subject, a WWII movie I've never heard talked about is The Americanization of Emily--anyone here seen it and care to comment?  


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on September 26, 2007, 12:44:26 AM
Interesting that criticism turns into "sour grapes."  I suppose it is hard to argue with the success of Burn's documentaries, but I think there is always room for criticism.  He oftens knows very little about his subject matter heading into these documentaries.  He treats them as learning experiences, relying on historians to provide him with the necessary information.  Naturally, he is attracted to the more charismatic historians like Shelby Foote, who became the central authority figure in Civil War.  In Jazz, for whatever reason he chose to go with Wynton Marsalis as one of his main sources of information, and since Marsalis doesn't like fusion and avant-garde jazz there was little or no mention of it in the series.  The series pretty much cut jazz off at 1961 with the last 40+ years treated as an afterward.  There was a lot of criticism of his Baseball series.  Now, he does The War. Burn sticks to pretty much the same formula from one of these massive documentaries to the next, so I imagine the same criticisms apply.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 26, 2007, 10:23:18 AM
Dzimas, your Duchovny image needs a shave.


Title: Ay Caramba!
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 26, 2007, 10:42:38 AM
CANE.




Simply........................





sizzling.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: caclark on September 26, 2007, 10:45:20 AM
"....could there have been just a wee bit o' sour grapes involved?"

I’ve wondered about that myself. I don’t wish to accuse Foner who is a historian for whom I have great respect. But I will say that it can be hard for a professional historian not to resent nonprofessionals who popularize history and in return receive far wider acclaim than they and have the greater impact in shaping public perceptions. I say nonprofessional in the sense that Ken Burns is not a professional historian. But he is a professional filmmaker whose choice of subject matter shows a passion for history. From what I’ve seen of his work, he handles it responsibly and evenly. So when he occasionally steps on the toes of someone like Foner, keep in mind that every interpretation of history is subjective and subject to challenge.



Title: Re: House & Boston Legal
Post by: obertray on September 26, 2007, 10:47:03 AM
The House of Legal Ill Repute...

Well, Boston won this time Yankee fans!

Boston Legal's 90 minute season opener stepped on House's "footprint" and so I don't know what happened in the second half of House as a result, I have only a passing knowledge of what happened in the first half, because I knew I wouldn't see the end.

John Larroquette as the new Rene Auberjonois... Very special guest star Mark Valley... Wha? HUH!?! I guess I should have saved that final episode from last year to catch up after all (or before all as the perception may be). Bad news for John though, sleeping with Schmitt has a deleterious effect on one's life span on this show. If I were him I'd make sure that I was ALWAYS the second or third person to get on the elevator! I'm very happy to see JL here and if I remember correctly, many of The Practice's fans were hoping that he would reappear (although I am not sure if he was a guy who showed up as a criminal in the other show, if so then this would be a different character.) Poole was a criminal in the Law & Order series, killing multiple wives and lovers over the years. Its always fun to see him back once in a while (he'd be good late season to pull Denny's bacon from the fire in a "two against one, named partner" showdown... just after all our other hopes are dashed).

I guess the annoying Italian girlfriend of Clarence is gone. I'm not sure that America was ready for an "Inter weight class" romance of such diametrically opposed personality types.

It's nice to see that Hermione got over that whole Hogwarts thing and brought her talents and charms to bear on another misfit genius. And then she showed her stuff by taming a bear... Brilliant Hermione!

With all the people who are no longer with the firm, its surprising that she has to share an office with (I can't think of his name...Hands) almost as surprising as JL handing his first case off to the newest new girl in the whole fricken office. But then "we all have our quirks, some of us just hide them better than others".

As to Shirley's case... Sometimes this show gets too depressing by half! It is nice to see though the good fight for sanity by the trial lawyers bar (if that's the right term) even if/as we contrast that against Hermione defending "the obvious killer" and Alan's admission that he doesn't care if the guy is guilty or not, he only cares about the application of law. (so i guess, it really is contrasted, seeing as its Alan on both issues).

Overall, enough new blood to make it fun and enough of the old blood to keep it that way.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 26, 2007, 10:51:01 AM
Can you describe "Cane" Mr. Carter?  I might have watched the premiere last night, but I had sort of maxed out on tv, watching the premieres of both "Bones" and "House."  Tuesday seems to be strong on monosyllable titles.

House remains the funniest not-billed-as-a-comedy show on television, and the final twist on the medical mystery was a good one -- you feel like you should have seen it coming, but somehow you didn't.  (and by "you" I mean, primarily, "me")  The whole kidnapping the guitar subplot was wickedly funny, with little spoofs from Dr. Wilson on the standard cliches of the kidnapping thriller.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 26, 2007, 10:57:28 AM
http://alpha.cbs.com/primetime/cane/


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 26, 2007, 11:04:12 AM
What I meant was could you elaborate on your one-word review of the show....I've seen the trailer.  If this is a discussion thread, then it's a place to set out your opinions in sufficient detail that it generates a chat, motivates watching, etc.




Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 26, 2007, 11:15:06 AM
Watch it or don't.  The show's off to fantastic start.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 26, 2007, 11:21:18 AM
]
Documentaries are a little different than dramas, Burn doesn't seem to know the distinction.  He treats history as drama.  Of course, it makes it more compelling, but he chooses to cut what doesn't fit within his dramatic sense of events, and as a result there are a lot of gaping holes in his narrative.  He sought out Foner and others to consult him on Civil War, and then chose to ignore their advice.  In this sense, Burn is little different than a television producer.


It's the editing that is a bastard when you are trying to cover that many fields of military operation at once, albeit the personal family histories depicted.

Which is what I meant,yesterday, where ever I posted it, let's see if he plays it straight...

It's the matter of speaking in World History, the other day of what Herodotus tells us and then deciphering a Sol Zaentz production which is of course gorgeous, but what about the thoughts that come to mind at certain points in the dialogue. I can still see Binoche standing there in one of the smaller gothic arch windows exterior paneling for  light source in the ruins, where she is warned about bombs that could be set off as yet undetonated.

Thus my thoughts run wild over Monte Cassino (because I am used to Benedictine monastic life?) and how Burns is sure to be informative with the throw away line, as we watch the Heinie go over the rubble, that the Germans made a pact,or was that a deal?, with the Church not to damage the most famous Monastery in history (outside the Greek that is). I am watching this rerun in my head and immediately have another take and a throw away line, considering, why not Cardinal whatshisface over here in the US requiring a similar deal from Rooseveldt? Well, we know the answer to that one. By setting up their positions in the range of the approach to Rome, they knew that they would attract American fire; and the Americans under fire advanced.

A whole other line personal to me is the concept of yama so da me shi, where a sansei serviceman comes to say goodbye to his parents and can not deliver an alcoholic beverage for this farewell party. Touche! Having watched Japanese weave down the streets, I understand the ceremonial tradition of having a drink formally, so I appreciate from personal contact his equally throw away lines about the nature of this war in rejoinder to the guard who has to follow the rules --about going off to war to defend this country while his parents are behind barbed-wire with armed men posted at the four corners of the enclosure under orders to fire upon possible escapees. "Shit", delete that. I've been watching a whole generation of my peers die off of diseases brought about by being born in or having to play and try to stay warm while undernourished in those camps because our government perceived the incarcerated as racially similarly defined to the nearby local Indian reservations' inhabitants.  

I am now waiting for the Burns follow-up on whom exactly made out like bandits selling the belongings and the SF homes and farm real-estate on the plateau; and exactly who were the defenders of the Americans of Japanese descent who tried to get their homes and property back for them, and tried to stop the disbursement of their more personal property when they lost their Constitutional rights like we all have now, and I am glad to say that I was the obedient follower of a teacher who stood up to do that. You know Americans when they want to be are f......rip-off artistes and opportunists or should I say opportunits?

It's the mirror-face image is so daunting about that war. You find your government imposing the same, "sanctions" as they call them now, so let's just refer to them as procedural necessity from some rule-book in the sky, in regard to the internment of civilians of foreign(in fact, "Eastern") ancestry that reflect back to us the police round up in occupied territory or let's take the Reich itself and the Nuremberg Laws and "detention camps" from Berlin to Paris; and then anybody should wonder too much why as kids we were adults before we learned of these West Coast detainees in the Southwest of our childhood memories. Like Germans, nobody talked about it. "We didn't know..." until after the war(?)

Roger Cohen did an interesting piece in the IHT yesterday for inclusion in nytimes.com. that I ran into by accident by the end of the replay of episode whatever of The War. Making merry at "Soldaten hutte" outside Auschwitz, that I didn't think much of it at first until I really looked at the familiar German love of the camera to document everything and started reading the comments of the blog.  So I consider the request you received, as ironic at crossed purposes somehow but that's just a passing thought.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 26, 2007, 11:30:28 AM
Watch it or don't.  The show's off to fantastic start.

What a louse.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 26, 2007, 11:34:57 AM

What I meant was could you elaborate on your one-word review of the show....I've seen the trailer.  If this is a discussion thread, then it's a place to set out your opinions in sufficient detail that it generates a chat, motivates watching, etc.


barton, got to love you, but man there has never been a book discussed here much less a tv production or film--second thought, qualify that "here" because I really mean what came here from the nytimes.com from two different camps, outside of actual History forum that discussed any aesthetic or historic  or political depth which ever your choice of medium or discipline from any qualified position to do so with one or two or three or maybe four or five exceptions of those who are lovers of the arts and humanities, that means amateurs but they think about what they are saying about what they love.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 26, 2007, 12:21:35 PM
Gee, I feel so special now.

Thanks Madupont.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 26, 2007, 12:24:15 PM

What I meant was could you elaborate on your one-word review of the show....I've seen the trailer.  If this is a discussion thread, then it's a place to set out your opinions in sufficient detail that it generates a chat, motivates watching, etc.


barton, got to love you, but man there has never been a book discussed here much less a tv production or film--second thought, qualify that "here" because I really mean what came here from the nytimes.com from two different camps, outside of actual History forum that discussed any aesthetic or historic  or political depth which ever your choice of medium or discipline from any qualified position to do so with one or two or three or maybe four or five exceptions of those who are lovers of the arts and humanities, that means amateurs but they think about what they are saying about what they love.

Please write in sentences.  You are impossible to read.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 26, 2007, 12:25:48 PM
You still try?  :)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 26, 2007, 12:42:22 PM
At least she knows how to be civil, Mr. Carter.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 26, 2007, 04:14:55 PM
Not necessarily, barton.

I could have said, to obertray with love, "you will probably feel extra special tomorrow";or,to the Kid, "have you read any Kerouac lately?";likewise, to Kam,"How are you doing on that Proust thing?".


I readily identify with Coleman Silk being pursued by a jealous woman who does not know that Philip Roth is writing about her in short pithy sentences like Zuckerman Unbound.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 26, 2007, 05:40:36 PM
Tell you the truth I did think you saying that there have been no discussions here worth mentioning was fairly rude by itself. Any further incivility on your part would have been redundant.

But, Barton is the gentleman, I'm the smart aleck.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 26, 2007, 06:52:23 PM
I guess I don't mind Madupont sounding off, because she offers some kind of thought process behind it -- whether I can follow it or not is another matter.  But I like me a challenge.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 26, 2007, 07:11:45 PM
It was rude.  But thats fine.  Thats just internet angst. Which is what this post is too.

I'd just like to not have to drop acid before reading one of maduponts posts in order to "get it".

It hurts my head.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 26, 2007, 08:08:51 PM
Tell you the truth I did think you saying that there have been no discussions here worth mentioning was fairly rude by itself. Any further incivility on your part would have been redundant.



Don't be too hard on the old dame, gotta be tough when everybody she ever knew who could carry on an interesting and aesthetically correct conversation with her is dead....bored to death, no doubt.


Title: Re: The new season
Post by: obertray on September 27, 2007, 08:22:27 AM


Last night I had them record Back To You for me.

I found out that this was not the series premier, that was last week...

I must say that if it weren't that this show was recorded I'd have switched the channel within the first minutes. Then Fred Willard showed up, then the guy... I think he's the janitor on The Suite Life but I'll imdb him in a minute. showed up. A second banana and a banana peel slipper... this might be worth... (Nope, not the same guy, but he’s  generally a loser type character)

You know, what I really got tired of on Fraiser? That's right... Fraiser. And Fraiser's continued devolution from an affable buffoon to insufferable straightman who steps on all the jokes may not be complete, but it's far enough down the road for me not to want to watch him AT ALL!

I've been watching old Marx Brothers movies lately (as if there's any other type of Marx Brothers movie) and I had also read that Margaret DuMont never quite got the joke that she was the btt of. And yet Ms Dumont had the grace to let the jokes fly around her.It made for a semiperfect straightwoman.

Mr. Grammer is famous for comparing his show to the Jack Benny Show. Jack Benny was a straight man who got the last laugh by milking the pause and letting the audience know that he got the joke.

Kelsey... You're no Jack Benny! You stomp on the comedy because you can't let the joke be on you. You're not funny enough to be the funnyman, and now you're too arrogant to be the straightman.

Wednesday night at 8:00 still belongs to Jon Stewart.

Fox is in the hen house, laying eggs!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 27, 2007, 10:46:55 AM
Tell you the truth I did think you saying that there have been no discussions here worth mentioning was fairly rude by itself. Any further incivility on your part would have been redundant.



Don't be too hard on the old dame, gotta be tough when everybody she ever knew who could carry on an interesting and aesthetically correct conversation with her is dead....bored to death, no doubt.

Well it beats being scorned to death by self-appointed supercilious sycophants of sophistry.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 11:12:12 AM
"...supercilious sycophants of sophistry."

Try saying that fast three times.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on September 27, 2007, 11:51:10 AM
What?  Has this become a stopover for pusillanimous nattering nabobs?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 27, 2007, 12:32:26 PM
I think that nabob obertray the gnostic should consult the sycophant from fiction about Gnosticism since there is not only sexist discrimination and racist discrimination but the the addition of  discriminatory Age-ism. Gnosticate on that for awhile.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 12:35:32 PM
Ageism?  nah.  You don't have to be old to bore people to death...spend an afternoon with MTV for example.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 27, 2007, 12:38:08 PM

It was rude.  But thats fine.  Thats just internet angst. Which is what this post is too.

I'd just like to not have to drop acid before reading one of maduponts posts in order to "get it".

It hurts my head.



Now, you are getting it. It was supposed to do that. Or, do you have some objection to trying to read Proust?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 27, 2007, 12:43:14 PM

Ageism?  nah.  You don't have to be old to bore people to death...spend an afternoon with MTV for example.


Do you normally watch MTV ? Let's face it, you are in here making a boring comment of your own because I just told you where you might find information that you think you already know about Shostakovich and Eisenstein and your reply was to read the book forward from  Ten Days that Shook the World and post it in Non-fiction.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 12:46:22 PM
of course I watch MTV...I teach music to teenagers.  It is helpful to know where they're coming from.

And yes I have read the forward of the book (which I don't believe mentions the artistic denounciations), as well as the book, and I have watched the film based on the book.  Most people do read the books they are discussing rather than just googling and then doing the cut/paste/cha cha. 



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 27, 2007, 12:47:32 PM
I guess that must be nearly as difficult as being menopausal.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 01:05:24 PM
Ya...and when I approach menopause, I'll be sure to ask your advice on dealing with the difficulties....although, I have to say, I think you might have gotten a bum steer on Hormone replacement.


Title: Dirty Sexy Money
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 27, 2007, 01:06:32 PM
Decent debut

Worth another watch. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on September 27, 2007, 01:18:18 PM

Ya...and when I approach menopause, I'll be sure to ask your advice on dealing with the difficulties....although, I have to say, I think you might have gotten a bum steer on Hormone replacement.


I didn't have any problem with menopause. What you are missing in tacky remarks about whether or not I did what and when is that you too are going to be Older than  you are and it will be your turn to find out that the way you've been  treated, in a forum that I'd rather not mention, will continue to be a disappointment but worse. Women at your age become invisible anyway. It's an interesting experience. And since I already grew past that, sorry but I won't be around to give you any advice.  You were unable to make use of what you had received which was to find out why you relate so badly to other women by insistantly resorting to childhood tactics.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 01:31:18 PM
well...I do have problems relating to women who are stupid, fuzzy headed, egocentric and boring.....

And I would agree that women at my age become invisible....but usually those are the women who have gotten through life relying on their looks and their connections rather than on anything of substance they have achieved on their own.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 27, 2007, 02:28:01 PM
Just like TeeVee, as soon as it gets interesting...Commercials about "womens' problems!"


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 02:52:48 PM
can't live with em, can't live without em.......  ;)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 02:59:28 PM
But have you noticed the commercials for "men's products" during televised sporting events that seems to have arisen over the last few years?  Do men even watch commercials? 

Other interesting commercials, products for erectile disfunction aired during reality dating shows.....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 03:01:11 PM
You can picture the guy sitting there, watching Blind Date, thinking to himself, "Wow....my eyes tell me she's hot, but I'm just not feeling it....Bam...a commercial for viagra or the like.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 27, 2007, 03:11:59 PM
You can picture the guy sitting there, watching Blind Date, thinking to himself, "Wow....my eyes tell me she's hot, but I'm just not feeling it....Bam...a commercial for viagra or the like.

Anyone here ever been to the Museum of Television and Radio?? If you go, you can reach into their archives and find a show called "Twenty-five years of Great commercials" or something like that.

I've seen it. what amazes you the most is how commercials from thirty or forty years ago stick in your head. Especially jingles, like You can trust your car to the man that wears the star.
The great big Texaco star!"
  or taglines like "I can't believe I ate the WHOLE thing" or "Where's the Beef?"


Of course you can call up lots of your old favorite shows, too.

Very cool place...on 52nd Street in NYC.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 27, 2007, 03:33:54 PM
We watch the 2&1/2 Men at 7:00 on 11 and there is always an ad for the Lady Schick (or something) and I commented to ifeyway "Do they really think that this is a show that women watch in great numbers?"

Lhoffman,

I thought that you were going to go towards the visual of the guy who takes Viagra before watching Blind Date.

Glad you didn't, I wouldn't want that visual in my mind.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 27, 2007, 03:40:25 PM
MrUtley,

I propose a trip!

And then we can go to see Jon Stewart,....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 04:10:05 PM
That would be a trip!!!   "Plop Plop fizz fizz, oh what a relief it is."

TV show theme songs used to be quite a bit more memorable, too.  Gilligan's Island....you get the whole idea behind the show from the introductory jingle.  Brady Bunch....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on September 27, 2007, 04:17:04 PM
Beverly Hillbillies...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 04:22:54 PM
YES!!!! "Come and listen to a story bout a man named Jeb....."

And wasn't that banjo great!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 04:34:07 PM
There are some good contemporary openings, though.  The Sopranos theme comes to mind, and Monk's It's a Jungle Out There.  Always liked the sort of hip feeling to Frazier's "tossed salad", even though I don't like the show. 

Oddly enough, I remember most music I've heard since the time I was about three years old, but I can't bring to mind the House theme....even though I like the show.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 27, 2007, 05:25:06 PM
There is a man who lives a life of danger
To every one he meets, he stays a stranger
With every move he makes
Another dare he takes
Odds are he won't live to see tomorrow!

Secret.... Agent man! Secret Agent man
They've a given you a number, and a taken away your name!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 27, 2007, 10:10:13 PM
"Making your way in the world today takes everything you've got..."

Cheers!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 27, 2007, 10:41:33 PM
Boy da way Glenn Miller played...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 27, 2007, 10:59:02 PM
Is it just me, or does hearing those songs make you feel good?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on September 28, 2007, 10:03:48 AM
Reaper:

Because of the interesting reviews, I watched (or attempted to watch) this show.  The only person worth watching is Ray Wise as the Devil.  This show is boring as hell and so are the actors.  It sounded like a fun show (in a wierd way like Dead Like Me except they were to escort people to wherever they are going to) and not like Reaper where he is to retrieved escapees from Hell which is too crowded.

BORING!

And Damages now threw in a new red herring in the form of a stalker after Ellen's fiance. Did she or did she not kill the fiance?  This show is so disorganized and yet I can't stop watching.  Bizarre.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 28, 2007, 10:32:29 AM
To my surprise Reaper was on again last night, So I got a chance to catch this retrospective of the Kevin Smith filmography.

The show is about a guy who turns 21 and finds out that the Devil had made a deal with his parents for the soul of their first born child, when he turned 21. The devil comes to collect and he employs the youth to be his bounty hunter for souls that escaped from Hell.

Gee, this sounds more than a little bit like the dilema plotline of Dogma.  The kid works in a dead end job with other losers... More than a little bit like Clerks and there is a pretty girl who shouldn't work there but who does and who is the unrequited love interest of the protag.

The Devil, it turns out, has a fairly well oiled machine running up here and there is a thriving business in soul deals. (One soul bought was the doctor who told the parents that they couldn't have children, which they didn't want to because they had sold the soul. Surprise!).

So here we are, in 2007 with a TV show where the devil is being portrayed as just a stiff businessman with a corporate mentality. (This is a conversation that could be had in most of the files here, from TV to Religion and Politics to Science and Religion to Sports, he even mentions that he has a favorite hockey team as he is punishing a zamboni operator for breaking his promise to the Devil, thus indicating to our boy that he does not tolerate failure!)

There is a scene early on where the devil is making the argument to the boy that this is not a bad thing that has happened to him by saying "I've seen this story, I know how it ends, God wins."

For some lame reason, guy tells two guy friends what happened (and even takes them along on the bounty hunt) but won't tell girl. Lame secret identity, Clarke Kent Lois Lane dynamic then being set up, it's very annoying, especially given that the guy friends aren't smart enough to keep a secret from the girl, who is also a friend.

Interesting that Silent Bob is Jay in this go round. He's fat, he's scruffy, he never shuts up.

If they keep this show on Thursday night, I'll watch it some more. It's not great acting, it's not great writing, it's better than needed Special Effects. It's amusing, I'll give it a 2 &1/2 out of 5.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 28, 2007, 11:47:38 AM
Obert, the theme to Secret Agent was one of the few things I learned to play on guitar, as a youth.  Great tv theme and one that is repeatedly refreshed in the public mind by it's usually-ironic use in film comedies.  Someone in Canada was telling me recently that the series was released as "Danger Man" in Canada. 

Great CSI last night -- the only CSI that I watch, the original is still by far the best.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 28, 2007, 01:06:16 PM
Anyone remember what a person "would rather fight than switch" for?



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 28, 2007, 01:07:09 PM
Benson and Hedges?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 28, 2007, 01:18:43 PM
I think Tareyton (Tarlton?)  But what was "a silly millimeter longer?"


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 28, 2007, 01:20:21 PM
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bNN0L2UoPvQ


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 28, 2007, 01:22:21 PM
LOL....even better!!!!!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NAExoSozc2c&mode=related&search=


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 28, 2007, 01:29:38 PM
Benson and Hedges?

Nope, that was "a silly millimeter longer" than Tareyton cigarettes which to some "taste[d] good like a cigarette should" (can you name that one?).



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 28, 2007, 01:30:27 PM
Winston


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 28, 2007, 01:32:26 PM
What are the lots that you get to like in a Marlboro?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 28, 2007, 01:43:40 PM
 LOTs: filter, flavor, pack or box?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 28, 2007, 01:44:43 PM
Winston
correct!

How about "My wife. I think I'll __________ "? And the product?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on September 28, 2007, 01:46:49 PM
...keep her.  Geritol.  One of the actors in that series was Wayne Maunder.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 28, 2007, 01:49:31 PM
Cool, Tigger.

Do you remember what got you so clean your own mother wouldn't know you?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on September 28, 2007, 01:50:53 PM
No, I was a dirty child.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 28, 2007, 02:20:28 PM
rehab?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 28, 2007, 02:26:23 PM
Mr. Bubbles, Mr Utley.

And you are correct sir, in Re: Marlboros

These days people go to rehab to see their own mothers!

What theme song is this?

Dun dada dun dada dun dada dun dada DUN DUN
Dun dadadundadadundadadun dun dadadun  dun dun


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 28, 2007, 03:34:39 PM
Dragnet?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on September 28, 2007, 03:37:08 PM
Got a Television question for everyone:

I'm intereted in buying an HDTV for the first time.  I can't go with Plasma so i'm looking at the higher-end LCD models. 1080p 52 inchers like the Sony Bravia.  But I hear good things about Samsung and others as well.  Does anyone have a review or recommendation they can share of their HDTV experience? 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 28, 2007, 03:46:38 PM
Mr. Bubbles, Mr Utley.

And you are correct sir, in Re: Marlboros

These days people go to rehab to see their own mothers!

What theme song is this?

Dun dada dun dada dun dada dun dada DUN DUN
Dun dadadundadadundadadun dun dadadun  dun dun

Bonanza!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 28, 2007, 03:48:13 PM
Got a Television question for everyone:

I'm intereted in buying an HDTV for the first time.  I can't go with Plasma so i'm looking at the higher-end LCD models. 1080p 52 inchers like the Sony Bravia.  But I hear good things about Samsung and others as well.  Does anyone have a review or recommendation they can share of their HDTV experience? 

i have a Sony Bravia and I love it.  Picture quality is excellent.

And I forgot, Mr. Bubbles was correct.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on September 28, 2007, 04:06:01 PM
Mr. Bubbles, Mr Utley.

And you are correct sir, in Re: Marlboros

These days people go to rehab to see their own mothers!

What theme song is this?

Dun dada dun dada dun dada dun dada DUN DUN
Dun dadadundadadundadadun dun dadadun  dun dun

Bonanza!

Impressive!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 28, 2007, 04:43:07 PM
Mr. Bubbles, Mr Utley.

And you are correct sir, in Re: Marlboros

These days people go to rehab to see their own mothers!

What theme song is this?

Dun dada dun dada dun dada dun dada DUN DUN
Dun dadadundadadundadadun dun dadadun  dun dun

Bonanza!

Impressive!

And correct too!

How about this one?

Dadada da DAAA da
dadada dot daaaaaa
dadadadot da DAAA
dadada DAAAAA


Title: Re: Television
Post by: ponderosa on September 28, 2007, 05:14:24 PM

How about this one?

Dadada da DAAA da
dadada dot daaaaaa
dadadadot da DAAA
dadada DAAAAA

?

My favorite...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wAh5SJrIEwY

Best line I remember...

While Levitt is transferring a nutcase out of the precinct the nutcase says to Barney's wife...

"You're beautiful."

Levitt then tells her...

"Don't listen to him. He's crazy."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on September 28, 2007, 06:53:09 PM

What theme song is this?

Dun dada dun dada dun dada dun dada DUN DUN
Dun dadadundadadundadadun dun dadadun  dun dun


We gotta right to pick a little fight...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on September 28, 2007, 06:54:38 PM

How about this one?

Dadada da DAAA da
dadada dot daaaaaa
dadadadot da DAAA
dadada DAAAAA

this one is  a little harder ... maybe Perry Mason?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on September 28, 2007, 06:59:08 PM
I think Tareyton (Tarlton?)  But what was "a silly millimeter longer?"

Not just Benson & Hedges , for they had more than one offering  --  Benson & Hedges 101s

I like the game   


Do you all remember The Teaberry Shuffle?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on September 28, 2007, 07:00:57 PM

How about this one?

Dadada da DAAA da
dadada dot daaaaaa
dadadadot da DAAA
dadada DAAAAA

this one is  a little harder ... maybe Perry Mason?


ooops, I think I got it, but I think you might have misplaced a note or two...

At a faster speed, it obviously becomes   Hawaii 5-0


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 28, 2007, 09:22:03 PM
Mr. Bubbles, Mr Utley.

And you are correct sir, in Re: Marlboros

These days people go to rehab to see their own mothers!

What theme song is this?

Dun dada dun dada dun dada dun dada DUN DUN
Dun dadadundadadundadadun dun dadadun  dun dun

Bonanza!

Impressive!

And correct too!

How about this one?

Dadada da DAAA da
dadada dot daaaaaa
dadadadot da DAAA
dadada DAAAAA


Very close to Bullwinkle's theme song, I believe.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on September 28, 2007, 09:26:32 PM
Yeah, I think it is Hawaii 5-0.

How about:

DA DA dadadadadada
da-da  dadadadadada
Dadadadadada da-da da da


Title: Re: Television
Post by: oilcanboyd23 on September 28, 2007, 10:25:31 PM
I read somewhere that REM got like $3MM from Fox back in 1991 for the right to use "Stand" over the opening credits of "Get A Life".  That was a win-win.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on September 29, 2007, 03:56:13 AM
Kam, all I know is a note in the NYT said don't buy one of those big jobs till after Christmas.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Detective_Winslow on September 29, 2007, 04:12:30 AM
Does anyone remember the Andy Dick Show?  I remember thinking it was hilarious.  Why the fuck hasn't MTV released that on DVD?






Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on September 29, 2007, 02:25:45 PM
Got a Television question for everyone:

I'm intereted in buying an HDTV for the first time.  I can't go with Plasma so i'm looking at the higher-end LCD models. 1080p 52 inchers like the Sony Bravia.  But I hear good things about Samsung and others as well.  Does anyone have a review or recommendation they can share of their HDTV experience? 

Panasonic was just rated the best by CR.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on September 29, 2007, 06:10:50 PM
Hawaii 5-0 is correct.

Very good!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on September 30, 2007, 02:43:52 PM
"Moonlight" stinks.

In case anyone was wondering.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on September 30, 2007, 11:16:28 PM
Oil, REM got $100M from Sony about the time they bought Paramount.

I don't know how much of it they really saw, but that was the story at the time.

It would also explain how they suck.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 01, 2007, 11:06:55 PM

How about:

DA DA dadadadadada
da-da  dadadadadada
Dadadadadada da-da da da

I'm not getting it.   Are you sure there aren't any duhs or bas or dumps in there?  :)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 01, 2007, 11:08:56 PM
how about


Da da da dum ...  tap tap
da da da dum ...  tap tap

da da da dum     da da da dum    da da da dum ....tap tap



Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on October 02, 2007, 07:40:37 AM
That's creepy and it's kooky.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on October 02, 2007, 10:20:43 AM
Yeah, I think it is Hawaii 5-0.

How about:

DA DA dadadadadada
da-da  dadadadadada
Dadadadadada da-da da da

BAT MAN dadadadadada
bat man etc
etc BAT MAN

Well, I didn't see the bolding until I copied and pasted.

I don't know how I missed that bold blank space!

OK

Dee deet
dee dot da dee deet
Dee deet
dee dot da dee deet deet

Bomp ba domp bump


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on October 02, 2007, 11:01:24 AM
Wish I knew how to use the recording mechanism on my dual DVD/VHS player.  Tonight I'll have to choose between the newest Damages and a 5 part mini series on HBO that, from the review in today's NYT, seems like a winner.  Drat.  The HBO offering--Five Days--will be on Tuesday's at 8 PM Eastern and Pacific, 7 PM Central.  If the first installment doesn't last 2 hours, I should still be able to catch Damages.

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/10/02/arts/television/02stan.html

I won't worry about missing Ken Burn's The War.  I keep going to sleep while watching it.  After the first 3 episodes it all seems to blend into sameness, except for the news and comments from the four towns that are featured.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 02, 2007, 11:20:26 AM
Damages reruns later on Tuesday and usually again on Wednesday


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on October 02, 2007, 11:39:59 AM
Kid, you're right.  I checked the schedule on FX and should be able to work both of the shows in.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 02, 2007, 11:56:25 AM
Anyone watching Journeyman?

Good stuff.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on October 02, 2007, 11:59:18 AM
Watch a cop drama last night called K-Ville, which wasn't particularly good but was sort of compelling simply because it is set in post-Katrina New Orleans and the plots deal with locations and situations most directly affected by the hurricane.  It also has some acting talent in the form of John Carroll Lynch -- you might remember him as Margie's husband in "Fargo" or as Leigh in "Zodiac."  I can't see getting hooked on this every week, but maybe something to look in on from time to time.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on October 02, 2007, 01:29:54 PM
Saw Chris Rock on Everybody Hates Chris last night.

I don't know why with this show, but I just don't add it into the regular rotation. It has a good chance now, given that it is up against mostly nothing (only Jon Stewart reruns). I think it's a case both of being on a channel I don't watch and at times that I don't watch them. The cast is good, the characters likeable the premise ok (except that you know how it turns out, so its hard to feel sorry for the boy, he's going to be a multimillionaire! And the show is not very humorous type funny.

The Big Bang theory has indeed shot it's wad. Even I knew what they were talking about when they were talking geekese. I thought last week that the problem might be keeping up with the brainiac speak, but at least they're getting paid for it. Apparently, not enough. Again, the characters are likeable enough, the premise is thin but enjoyable, there are jokes in here and the physical comedy is ok. I just don't see this one going anyplace.

2&1/2. Watched it.

Rules of didn't engage me enough, I'll finish watching it some other day.

Britany Spears...

I'm not taking this to celebreality because I'm more about what the TeeVee ISN'T saying about this deal. How about somebody in the media says "You know, maybe the crowd of 100 photographers, etc around the girl where ever she goes is THE problem. Not part of the problem THE problem." I yell at my kids when they make too much noise around the house when I'm trying to think. I can only begin to imagine how much booze and drugs I'd take if I had that constant buzzing and harassment  everytime I opened my front door.

I'm no Dianophile, but the press of the media swarm cannot be a good thing for people. They're going to kill this one and then just move on to the next one!

Today show advertising... It's not just me. The other morning they had an ad for the new Bob Dylan retrospective cds. Then there was the ad for the new Joni Mitchell cd (don't know if it's new or old) then in the same break there was the Eric Clapton cd ad. On Friday they had had Bruce Springsteen "on the plaza". Today they interviewed Mick Jagger on the release of his solo greatest hits. Then they had Annie Lennox singing a song (which I think she booted, but I don't know, maybe she meant for it to sound like that, I respect A.L.'s genius with a song). Point being... Do I see a pettern developing here? I don't dislike any of the artists herein mentioned, it just strikes me as odd.  Worthy of note.
 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 02, 2007, 07:59:07 PM
That's creepy and it's kooky.

you're on fire!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 02, 2007, 08:01:20 PM
Anyone watching Journeyman?

Good stuff.

Yes.

I had a post about this a few weeks back.   I watched part of the taping in downtown LA (dressed up to look like S.F.)

I was standing about 10 yards from the hot dog cart...



Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 02, 2007, 08:04:08 PM
They're going to kill this one and then just move on to the next one!


Quite literally.  I think that is exactly was has a number of people worrying at the moment.  You half expect to read her obituary any day now...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 02, 2007, 08:28:09 PM




Britany Spears...

They're going to kill this one and then just move on to the next one!


 

Scary -

I know you don't mean this literally, but I was thinking just that today - how the press would feel if this girl offed herself.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 02, 2007, 08:29:16 PM
Anyone watching Journeyman?

Good stuff.

Yes.

I had a post about this a few weeks back.   I watched part of the taping in downtown LA (dressed up to look like S.F.)

I was standing about 10 yards from the hot dog cart...



OK - I'll rewatch it and critique your standing around


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on October 03, 2007, 11:46:53 AM
Cavemen: People from rock houses shouldn't live in glass tubes! If I had a wilderbeast thigh bone around I'd have gone all 2001 on my TeeVee by have way through this absolutely unbearable drek! Where's Godzilla when you need him? Speaking of which, they would have shown a bit of tongue in cheekieness if they had Bang A Gong as the theme song, or had the character say, instead of saying "Now we're going to have to listen to James Blunt all weekend", "Now we're going to have to hear him blaring T Rex all weekend again!"

The show takes it's premise WAAAAYYY too seriously.

This show bombed itself back to the stone age!

House: Gaslight! Maybe it's a further reference to it's Holmesian spin. I guess it's ok from a non fanatic pov for them to trhow a couple of extra curve balls for the season ticket holders, I can understand it, even if I don't dig it. (For those who didn't watch it; House was sure that he had seen Chase and the girl around the hospital, but Wilson convinced him that the two were in Aridzona. House then thought that he might just be seeing things.

I'm not sure that Gaslight is a word others use. Around my house we use it in the above sort of scenario. It refers to the old movie Gaslight  where the husband is trying to convince his wife that she's crazy.) As to the crop of students and the old man, this I really like. I wish they were carrying this plot line out beyond the next few weeks. Meanwhile I do notice that the three students are still in the opening credits. I certainly hope they don't become his staff again. I'd much rather see the hospital opt to expand the department and have dueling diagnosticians.

Boston Legal: It's just not the same without Alan getting up and making his speech du semain. Overall a forgettable episode.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on October 03, 2007, 12:55:01 PM
Agree "House" can use fresh faces among his residents.  The winnowing process was pretty funny stuff.  The three from last season are all young actors and probably looking not to get stuck in their roles, so turnover seems natural.   And the change serves overall storyline plausibility -- it is a teaching hospital, after all.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 03, 2007, 01:02:39 PM
Cavemen: People from rock houses shouldn't live in glass tubes! If I had a wilderbeast thigh bone around I'd have gone all 2001 on my TeeVee by have way through this absolutely unbearable drek! Where's Godzilla when you need him? Speaking of which, they would have shown a bit of tongue in cheekieness if they had Bang A Gong as the theme song, or had the character say, instead of saying "Now we're going to have to listen to James Blunt all weekend", "Now we're going to have to hear him blaring T Rex all weekend again!"

The show takes it's premise WAAAAYYY too seriously.

This show bombed itself back to the stone age!

House: Gaslight! Maybe it's a further reference to it's Holmesian spin. I guess it's ok from a non fanatic pov for them to trhow a couple of extra curve balls for the season ticket holders, I can understand it, even if I don't dig it. (For those who didn't watch it; House was sure that he had seen Chase and the girl around the hospital, but Wilson convinced him that the two were in Aridzona. House then thought that he might just be seeing things.

I'm not sure that Gaslight is a word others use. Around my house we use it in the above sort of scenario. It refers to the old movie Gaslight  where the husband is trying to convince his wife that she's crazy.) As to the crop of students and the old man, this I really like. I wish they were carrying this plot line out beyond the next few weeks. Meanwhile I do notice that the three students are still in the opening credits. I certainly hope they don't become his staff again. I'd much rather see the hospital opt to expand the department and have dueling diagnosticians.

Boston Legal: It's just not the same without Alan getting up and making his speech du semain. Overall a forgettable episode.

Epps is back

He let it slip at the Emmys


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on October 03, 2007, 05:16:43 PM
Epps was the most interesting of the three, with the most interesting chemistry with Dr. House -- glad he's returning....I can def see him as a kind of rival to House, maybe nabbing a neurologist post and then clashing with House over neuro diagnoses.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on October 03, 2007, 08:52:47 PM
Barton,

Don't know if you're still keeping up with Prison Break. The answer to the question I wondered over on Third Eye is that the actress who plays Scofield's love, Dr Sara, just had a baby about a month ago. She's still under contract to the show, but will have a limited role this season due to maternity leave. That's why in Monday night's ep, for example, she was heard, but not seen directly.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 04, 2007, 09:23:38 AM
donotremove, re:#692

The War is running early Wednesday nights through October (think that I counted seven episodes in the original running?).

I guess, as a consequence of this series,I gave up on Damages without missing it?   Unfortunately, it is not included (FX that is) as reruns available on demand.  I might have had just one more leeway of patience left to see how it all turns out, if the more dramatic series hadn't occurred on PBS (where you can find most of the material written or photographed at PBS.org)

I did find that I sympathized with the American girl from Sacramento,Calif., Sasha Weinzheimer, in the prison-camp,San Tomas, in the Philippines for the duration of the war, quite unexpectedly with the last episode when she recounts coming home to the US and along with her parents being asked about her "horrible experience being in a prison camp and what was it like?", only to discover almost immediately as she attempted to bravely tell them -- that they weren't really the least interested as they instead kvetched about their comparative miseries in the US during the war.  That's when she realized it was  hopeless.

They simply could not estimate as Americans the difference between rationing with food stamps and actual  malnourishment which ends in being starved to death; a child realizing in a very realistic way that both adults and children were in the camp hospital overnight and would die  from hunger to the point of starvation. Being children who are always as children curious about everything, they would impromptu say things like, "Seven,last night."; her mother still hadn't filled out after the return to the States, weighing a mere 78 pounds because she had breast fed the baby of the family, her son, for three years, so that they would not lose him.

Photographs, taken near the end or at the end of their detainment when the Yanks arrived and liberated the Philippines, revealed that most men were becoming emaciated at a rate and to a degree getting very close to approximating liberated survivors of labor camps in Europe.  I think that I had forgotten about it over the interim, about Westerners caught by the Japanese invasion of the Philippines, what they looked like and the veterans returning from the Pacific, until I saw these pictures.  In many ways, the war was not carefully prepared for or readily organized from an American point of view as we would believe and had been led to believe.  Makes you even more leery about present day events both here and abroad.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on October 04, 2007, 10:40:10 AM
Earl, they did a good job making me think Sara was "in" the episode, but now that you mention it, we do only see her from behind looking out the window, or hear her voice.  Well, a baby explains it.  (sentence ambiguity unforseen and regretted)

Can you explain several of the actors wearing long-sleeved shirts or coats and/or hoodies in Panama?  Isn't it like 90 or above most of the time down there?  The actors are constantly spritzed with beads of water to emphasize the heat. 



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on October 04, 2007, 11:53:44 AM
Maddy, I have managed to keep up with Damages by missing the last 30 minutes of The War on Tuesdays.  On my cable, Damages runs again on several different days but I can never remember which days or when.  I have not been as impressed with The War as I was with Burns The Civil War, which was unabashedly stunning film making.  Perhaps it is because, over the years, I have seen lots of WWII "war" series (on PBS), plus Victory At Sea.

Wasn't A Town Called Alice a film that highlighted the travail of the Europeans imprisoned by the Japanese in Malaysia and elswhere?  I have that movie on VHS somewhere here in the house.  First time I saw that Brown fellow and I was impressed by his handling of his role.  He's Australian, of course, but not with a capital A--being an Aussie is only part of who he is.

I sympathize with anyone asked to recall adverse experience to an American audience of a certain age and class, no matter how exotic the locale.  A quick survey will suffice, thank you. Let me come in there, sideways, Gene.  You want to hear about adversity . . . ?

If you can catch a rerun of the first episode of Five Days on HBO, do it.  There will be five episodes, Tuesdays at 8 Eastern/Pacific, 7 Central.  It's about a mother and her two children that disappeared--poof--on their way to visit grandfather (played by Edward Woodward, whom I thought was dead).  BBC.  Good stuff.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 04, 2007, 12:01:53 PM
donotremove,
" I have not been as impressed with The War as I was with Burns The Civil War, which was unabashedly stunning film making."

Yes, but could you dance to it?  It started getting to me about the third episode and I could no longer resist. That was the music that we all knew how to dance to in those years. Right after dzimas had remarked that Wynton wasn't going far enough with the scoring, I saw the big band creation they did and had footage on for Ken Burns to use --and there was a man who was seated at the piano and commenced to play stride boogey just like my father used to play for relaxation, with a little barrelhouse on the side.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on October 04, 2007, 12:12:10 PM
Admittedly, I'm shallow -- but Ken Burns ruined The Civil War for me, and it's a subject I'm pretty interested in to begin with.  Burns' The Civil War just droned on (IMO), beating point after point to a bloody, grisly death.  That doc actually killed my interest in the topic for a couple years, to the point where anything Burns does, I tend to avoid.  And yes, I realize I'm in the minority on this one.

By contrast, I'm really enjoying The War (so to speak).  I think the difference for me is, it's real people speaking of their experiences versus a good reading over period music.  The stories are at times so wild, yet told in such a matter-of-fact way that I just hang on every word.  My parents have/had their own stories from that time, but dad was 4-F so they're all stateside stories, though I had uncles who fought.  Even though I'm taking The War in bits and pieces, not watching every night -- still afraid of  overkill -- it's a highly rewarding program.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 04, 2007, 05:01:38 PM
donotremove,re:#710

I found it! and, immediately watched it, although it has been awhile since I had my ears quite that attuned to  Britishisms of tonality. I recognized Janet McTeer as the officer with the blonde hank of hair falling over her face which signaled me that she was trying to do it authentically as Helen Mirren had done for her series on tv. And here's what I put together in case you have forgotten what else she does so well. In the first example she was  the big lady dressed appropriately somewhat post-war in what had been Forties fashions who discovers someone is secretly entering the back-door to the barn which she can see while she is washing up, so that Miss Marple can discover that some young lady is posing for the artist who has a painting studio out there.

1.Marple: The Murder at the Vicarage (2004) (TV) .... Anne Protheroe
2.Songcatcher (2000) .... Professor Lily Penleric, PhD
3.Carrington (1995) .... Vanessa Bell
4.Wuthering Heights (1992) .... Ellen Dean
... aka Emily Brontë's Wuthering Heights (USA: complete title)
5.The Black Velvet Gown (1991) (TV) .... Riah Millican
... aka Catherine Cookson's The Black Velvet Gown (UK: complete title)
6.Portrait of a Marriage (1990) (TV) .... Vita Sackville-West
7.Miss Julie (1987) (TV) .... Miss Julie
8.Half Moon Street (1986) .... Van Arkady's Secretary

She has done much more than this but these are what I have seen of her work starting with,The Black Velvet Gown, on PBS, possibly Masterpiece Theatre.
The last thing that I saw her in was,The Intended, with Olympia Dukakis, which was quite weird, nerve-wracking and probably could out-horrify beyond The Poisonwood Bible but I don't think that I would have recalled the name at the time that reading was  "being conducted" . In any case, the cast of characters for the PB would not know what to make of people like those in,The Intended, for which Mcteer did some of the writing for the adaptation from a Danish writer.

One thing that I absolutely did not see her in was this:102 Boulevard Haussmann (1990) (TV) .... Celeste
because I can't see how I would even imagine Alan Bates as Marcel Proust!

I went down Edward Woodward's list because I've seen him play everything from Sherlock Holmes to Cardinal Wolsey but he's the guy you always call,"You know, what's-his-name".

I shall look for A Town Called Alice, to determine if it is what I have seen  My sisters lived on a street called Alyce; which kept me confused for a bit but they have now moved on to separate head-quarters.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 04, 2007, 05:06:20 PM
ok sorry if I missed it...


Full details on The War :  What network  and you say Wednesdays or Tuesdays?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on October 04, 2007, 06:23:50 PM
The War is running on PBS channels, so check your local listings (though the linked page says Wednesdays at 9, so there you go).  Here's a link, usually you can input your ZIP code and get info -- http://www.pbs.org/thewar/ 


Title: Law and Order in the USA
Post by: obertray on October 05, 2007, 12:15:02 PM
The new and improved version of L&O:CI premiered on USA last night... Now let me please understand what is going on with USA first of all. Apparently they are going to have a night that is devoted to currently running NBC shows, the run Fox reruns (House) and they have their own shows (CI and Monk being two that jump to mind as full production valued shows, Psyche being anotherish. Ish in this case being based on the star power of the players Dule from Holes and West Wing and Corbin Bernson being the big names.) Television has changed, and I guess I have to say that it is for the better.

So they changed the theme music and successfully made it 1970's futuristic, Hated it.

Bobby is fetal in the opening, ignoring a call from 1 Police Plaza (although why they were calling a guy with two more weeks of disability leave after the death of his mother, and a guy that is considered a lunatic in the first second and third case is a mystery) But he takes the cell phone call from Eames and rejoins the world with only that slightest nod to the cliff he fell off over the summer. All he needed was a shave, what a man!

Ok, so he is reverting to Private Gomer Pyle size (I understood that he put on 50 pounds for that role, but only for the role) in my mind that makes him more relatable to in that..well let's just say that I'd have a hard making it through the USMC obstacle course my first time through these days. This is really a non issue to me but it bears noting, just so that it is not interpreted as ignoring.

The show was good. You'd never know there was a difference.

I'm sorry to see that Noth's partner has changed again, and I don't know that the other one got written out of the part. I thought that when she started that there was going to be an issue around her sexuality, but/and it is a tribute to the show that it never became one and that it was such a nonissue. She was good at her job, that's all that mattered, and because of it she was a likable character. I sorry to not see her go. Noth is swinging for the Jack McCoy record for assistants, then he's looking for the impossible, The Murphy Brown cup!

Mad Men...

Only saw half as it was the twilighter after L&O, but I really didn't feel the need to stay with it. Drapper is a less and less likable guy with each new episode. Now that I think of it, I am curious about the brother, was he successful in his suicide? What was in the package he mailed? Why'd he leave the money stacked behind( not that he coulda taken it with him, but that he coulda shipped it back to Don)? I don't really care why he killed himself... watch that be the important part. I can see where this might be the point of the show (there's a good reason that white males shouldn't be allowed to run the world by themselves) but I guess it's just the idea that I don't like antiheroes. Don't come into my living room and demand that I like you despite you're being a despicible person.

Advertising, I find fascinating. The brains behind advertising I find exciting. Their penii I find much less interesting.
 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on October 06, 2007, 10:13:14 AM
I too watched the new L&O:Criminal Intent.  I really don't want to hear about their private lives.  And if Goren is such a lunatic, how comes he solves a lot of the cases.  I think they threw in too many red herrings and it got more involved than he should have.

And where did Goren learn so much.?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 06, 2007, 03:50:34 PM
donotremove,re:#710

This is a bit complicated but bear with me for my heart is pure and it is all for a good cause. Which is what is said about the hero of this story known as: The Town like Alice.  Or, things we probably would not have known otherwise. 

In order to determine if I had seen this, I looked it up and there were at least three different offerings(although it seems to me that the idea was so recurrently popular that a number of variations were made suitable to each era).  The original, however, is a novel by Nevil Shute whose name you surely recognize as did I; but that was the one of three versions where I was lucky to find that out right from the start. It was written in 1950, made into a film in 1956 which was followed by the film of: On the Beach, in 1959, from the book published in 1957.

Shute had begun to write way back in the 1920s but was actually an aeronautical engineer. "By the outbreak of World War II, Shute was already a rising novelist. Even as war seemed imminent he was working on military projects with his former Vickers boss Sir Dennistoun Burney. He joined the Royal Naval Volunteer Reserve as a sub-lieutenant and soon ended up in what would become the Directorate of Miscellaneous Weapons Development. There he was a department head, working on secret weapons such as Panjandrum, a job that appealed to the engineer in him. His celebrity as a writer caused the Ministry of Information to send him to the Normandy landings on 6 June 1944 and later to Burma as a correspondent.

In 1948, after World War II, he flew his own plane to Australia. On his return home, concerned about the general decline in his home country, he decided that he and his family would emigrate and so, in 1950, he settled with his wife and two daughters, on farmland at Langwarrin, south-east of Melbourne.[1]Australia features in many of his later novels, including the well-known A Town Like Alice (1950). He had a brief career as a racing driver in Australia between 1956 and 1958, driving a white XK140 Jaguar. Some of this experience found its way into his book On the Beach." [wikipedia]

Nevil Shute Norway(his birth name) died in 1960.  The miniseries of--
A Town like Alice,appeared on tv in 1980.  By 2001,the documentary appeared; A Profile of a Town like Alice.

As you can see, the format of how the story is presented changed to suit each era, so I guess it depends which version you have?

But here are the ideas that went into the work, straight from his life.

"The framing story of A Town Like Alice (U.S. title: The Legacy) concerns business development as a moral imperative. Jean Paget, who has inherited money, explains to her solicitor that she wants to return to Malaya, where she was a prisoner of war under the Japanese, and dig a well for the villagers who helped save her life. By the end of the book, for equally highminded (and economically hardheaded) reasons, she is operating a small shoe factory in an Australian outback town, then an ice cream parlor where the factory staff can spend their wages, then a cinema and other ventures. and the development Jean has begun is putting the previously dingy Willstown on track to become "a town like Alice Springs". "[wikipedia]

"Shute's novels frequently present private enterprise (along with self-reliance and individual responsibility) as a source of moral good. In this respect, he advocates a theme found in some examples of American 1950s literature, such as that of Ayn Rand or Cameron Hawley.

The roots of this belief can be clearly traced back to his involvement as a young engineer in the drama of the two competing airships R100 (private) and R101 (state). To him, the catastrophic failure of the R101 deeply symbolised the unsoundness of socialist teaching and planning. [citation needed]

A Town Like Alice is a characteristic example. Jean Paget, who has been working as a secretary in a pleasant but uninspiring job, has received a substantial legacy from her uncle. She ponders what she should do, now that she no longer needs to work. The following exchange, as described by her solicitor, Noel Strachan, flashes by almost as an aside, but is key to Jean's character and the story:

I knew of several charitable appeals who would have found a first-class shorthand-typist, unpaid, a perfect godsend and I told her so. She was inclined to be critical about those; "Surely, if a thing is really worth while, it'll pay," she said. She evidently had quite a strong business instinct latent in her. "It wouldn't need to have an unpaid secretary."
"Charitable organizations like to keep the overheads down," I remarked.
"I shouldn't have thought organizations that haven't got enough margin to pay a secretary can possibly do very much good," she said. "If I'm going to work at anything, I want it to be something really worthwhile."
[wikipedia]

"His prescience about how British Socialism, after WWII, would tend to destroy what he conceived as the British way of life, and his own views on this, were espoused in works such as In the Wet and The Far Country."...Shute lived a comfortable middle class English life, during a period, from the turn of the nineteenth century to past the middle of the twentieth, where class was a predominant factor in life. His heroes often tended to be middle class: solicitors, doctors, accountants, bank managers. Invariably, like himself, they had enjoyed the privilege of university, not then the purview of the lower classes."[wikipedia]


I count at least 24-25 works of what were referred to as "popular literature" or popular fiction but heavy on the technical details of science and engineering;the nuts and bolts of things. Speaking of "nuts", he has also a  supernatural element  about one (nut) who develops a new religion centered about himself, which Shute considered to be his best writing : Round the Bend.

I should not leave out what the estimation of his, On the Beach, was in that two year period from when it was read by the public until they had seen the movie.  "...set in a world slowly dying from the effects of an atomic war. Its popularity is owed in part to its adaptation as a film, which Shute despised because of the liberties taken with his characters."

On the Beach
"Shute's most famous novel, On the Beach, was published in 1957 and is one of his least characteristic: dark in tone and devoid of his usual optimism. It is set in Australia after a nuclear war has devastated the northern hemisphere, with air circulation patterns slowly bringing the fallout to the southern hemisphere. Ostensibly about nuclear war, it is really an examination of how people choose to live and prepare for death when they have knowledge of imminent death.

Shute's optimism is still present in a veiled form. The tone of the book is melancholic but not at all angry. He does not envision a violent breakdown in society, his characters do not whine, rail or riot but try their best to cope with the inevitable and to "muddle through" -- though their "stiff upper lip" demeanour (very typical of Shute) may be seen as implausible and can be difficult for readers to accept. Published in 1957, the book played a role in influencing U.S. public opinion towards support of the atmospheric test ban treaty.

In 2007, Gideon Haigh wrote an article in The Monthly arguing that On the Beach is Australia's most important novel. He writes that "it was the first book of its kind and still among the most shocking. Most novels of apocalypse posit at least a group of survivors and the semblance of hope. On The Beach allows nothing of the kind."[2] He explains that within months it had been serialised in more than 40 newspapers, some of which had never serialised novels before. The rights to adapt it to the screen were acquired by Stanley Kramer. It was filmed on location in Melbourne, starring Gregory Peck and Ava Gardner, and released in 1959. It became the first American film shown in the Soviet Union."










Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 07, 2007, 11:36:50 AM
donotremove,

I tracked down that essay mentioned in the last paragraph.
re: Gideon Haigh

http://normblog.typepad.com/normblog/2007/07/writers-choic-2.html


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on October 07, 2007, 12:47:48 PM
Thank you, Maddy.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 07, 2007, 04:28:24 PM
RAH

YAY


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on October 08, 2007, 12:03:37 PM
I too watched the new L&O:Criminal Intent.  I really don't want to hear about their private lives.  And if Goren is such a lunatic, how comes he solves a lot of the cases.  I think they threw in too many red herrings and it got more involved than he should have.

And where did Goren learn so much.?

Where did Goren learn so much? We'', he DID play Professor Moriarty in a very credible Sherlock movie just before he joind the L&O family http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0337593/ (http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0337593/).

But seriously folk... I always was under the impression that police work  (and his mother) were all that occupied his mind and time and that this added to his training as a profiler equaled an encylopedic knowledege of everything.

On second viewing of the L&O:CI ep a second change became apparent. Product placement!

When the swat team comes motoring down the street and the breaks squeel them to a stop, the camera shot is of the Chevy symbol in hub of the hub cap. It ended up facing right side up.

Then there was the Twister twist. The new skateboard configuration with two inline wheels on a double platform doohickey (they sell them in Sharper Image IIRC) Not only did it figure into the case but a little kid actually gave us a demonstration of how it works. It blended into the story just fine, but I would be remiss if I didn't mention that it is happening (crusader against product placement that I have been).

A video store in the area is shutting down and so I vultured in to pick its bones... I got only two of the six discs of L&O the first season. I'm sorry to report that this show was terrible! The acting was stiff, the writing had an extra H (writhing) and the sets were downright depressing. We were all asleep at 8:30 when we sat down to watch it. It could use some commercials to break up the monochromatic, monotonal monotony!   

We also got the Sherlock TV pic mentioned.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 08, 2007, 12:24:47 PM
lulu,

After catching up a bit on Criminal Intent last night in between other things, I'm definitely signed on for the Thursday episodes as there is no escaping the inuendo presented to us in the new CI promo. In other words, it was like saying: "Carrie is gone for good, now that I'm here!" (with a little aura reflecting Noth was once Mr. Big before he joined Criminal Intent.)  Can't help it, I like watching his work, it is very nuanced despite his photogenic presence.

I have other reasons for watching this show as well but if I mention it, the hate patrol will add another name to that list of  people I know which is their reason to carp about me.  Is it a jealousy thing do you think? pardon the Jersey vernacular.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 08, 2007, 12:25:21 PM
Donotremove, 

You are welcome.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 10, 2007, 12:13:43 PM
lulu,

I did give Damages another try last night, after catching the second episode of a recommendation from Donotremove  which is known as Five Days.  I'm missing a lot of dialog from the latter, my knack for British ways of expression is dwindling; but, sometimes the former is nearly as strange when there isn't any dialog and just Patty contemplating the geese flying over the lake.  Even Kiki the cat understood what that was; perked her ears right up.

Last night, it became obvious that Ellen (or the script writer) has read your estimation of Ellen Parsons in this forum.  She even announced verbatim what you have previously said, denied she was that dumb and implied it was all a ploy.  Between that and one suicide (how many more to go?), I've come to a decision this is for viewing only, turn off the sound and make up the dialogue as you go along as some people do when they watch television as a group.

Now that we have had all the revelations about Ray what more have they got to fool us with?  That Patty's son always knew Ellen was a "hottie" and snuck in (although we seriously suspect "another woman") an apartment that he was probably familiar with so he could off the competition?  Seriously, I thought Ray would be dead by now anyway from a terminal illness; but they will probably throw that in as the motive next week.  This show is just too sophisticated for me.  It plays like a soap opera, often sounds like one, so I say (as does Kiki), "if it honks like a goose", takes a formation like a goose, it probably is.






Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on October 11, 2007, 03:27:33 AM
We get shows a year behind in Lithuania.  I guess the television stations can't afford the current seasons.  Desperate Housewives has become the house favorite, even though I find it too derivative for my tastes. I'm often noting where the scenes are derived from, much to my wife's chagrin.  Bringing Kyle McClachlan into the show, seemed a pretty obvious tip of the hat to Twin Peaks, especially in the way the writers presented Orson in such a menacing light at the beginning of the third year, only to turn out to be such a pussycat.  Although the show seems to owe more to Picket Fences, which I see has come out on DVD.  Interesting that private dectectives and homicide detectives are black.  First Richard Roundtree and now Ernie Hudson. The whole thing between Susan and Mike and Ian was so ridiculous.  Made me think of Lady Chatterly having to choose between a paraplegic husband and the game warden.  If it wasn't for Tom and Lynette and family, this show would have no center, but even here the writers toyed with taking the centerboard out when they introduced the dashing Rick into Lynette's life, and made Tom look about as ugly as possible in his bedridden state.  Amazing how the men are so weak in the show, like in Sisters from years past.  Carlos seems to hold his own against the Dames of Wisteria Lane, but the others are such drips. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on October 11, 2007, 11:19:17 AM
I found DH to get pretty tedious after a while.  Had some funny moments, but nothing compelling enough to keep me watching.  Plus, IIRC, it ran in the same time slot as Cold Case, one of the best cop dramas on U.S. television.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on October 11, 2007, 03:42:22 PM
No such competition here, so we ended up watching DH.  I agree with you, it gets very tedious, but it is fun to watch at the same time.  I don't imagine it has too many years left, as they seem to have squeezed about as much as they can out of these "girls."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on October 12, 2007, 12:16:30 AM
Anyone watching "Pushing Daisies?"  We are enjoying the fast pace and banter even as we predict that the coyness will soon overwhelm both.  Hope Chenoweth gets more musical numbers and for more screen time for Digby.  Is the look of the show similar to other Sonnenfeld works (I may have seen some but now don't recall)?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on October 12, 2007, 09:55:32 AM
I've seen Pushing Daisies, but likely won't stick with it for long.  It reminds me a lot in look, feel and (sort of) premise of Wonderfalls, which one of the series' creators (not Sonnenfeld) also created.  (Now parse that!)  I also love Kristen Chenoweth (and the lead guy, who was in Wonderfalls, too) - -but the whole plot point about not touching the girlfriend and dog wore on me by the end of the first episode. That part aside, I do enjoy the writing and even the artificially heightened look of the show, even if every once in a while the hubby or I point out something that was borrowed from Wonderfalls.

Sonnenfeld's done RV (just threw that one in for yucks), Out of Sight and Limony Snicket -- maybe that has a similar look to PD?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on October 12, 2007, 03:42:40 PM
Thanks, harrie.  I haven't seen Wonderfalls or the other items cited.  My kid loved the Lemony Snicket books, none of us saw the movie because we figured it couldn't be better than Handler's performances in bookstores complete with singing of the Count Olaf  song.

I almost wish I knew more science so as to understand how the colors in Daisies are produced and envisioned.  "Heightened" indeed!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on October 13, 2007, 12:34:02 PM
The process is called "saturation" and it's much easier to do now that things are digital.  You can see unremitting color saturation in the Robin Wms stinkorama, What Dreams May Come.

See also, Tim Burton.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on October 13, 2007, 12:36:39 PM
Interesting experience, "What Dreams May Come."  Beautiful to watch, but the movie....


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on October 13, 2007, 04:29:36 PM
Why thanks, barton.  Now at least I have a term I can look up.

I take it all survived The War on PBS, or maybe "survived" just comes to mind in connection with the final ep with the death camp scenes.  Of the tales told/heard in previous episodes before I dozed (no reflection on anything other than the time of night and my work schedule), I keep recalling that of Mr. Medicine Crow, of Montana, I believe, though I forget his connection to the locales of the series (perhaps there was none but his story was too good to leave out).  His army stint enabled him to complete all of the requirements for achieving warrior status--whether he killed any enemies, I don't remember, but I do recall being a warrior only required touching the enemy. 

Anyone else here enjoy the travel channels, PBS shows like "Globe Trekker" etc.?  Now even the Food Network has travel shows, though shots of people eating unappealing foods in exotic locales isn't my idea of entertainment.  With increasing age (and decreasing dollar), this is likely to be our mode of travel for some time to come.

Another board I used to visit had several threads for people visiting (or even relocating to) various areas.  Wonder if there would be support for something like that for those "Escaping from Elba." (I haven't looked at any of the threads in the International section yet.)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on October 13, 2007, 05:08:52 PM
Nytemps, I check the Travel channel for anything resembling "going there, checking out the sights, talking to the folks, and eating the food" type shows.  So far, the only one that combines all that is Anthony Bordain (the former chef, now writer-traveler) and that weird fellow that eats stinky stuff--which I do not watch.  Globe Trekker is also on PBS.  But you never know where you'll run across a travel type thing.  TLC (The Learning Channel) sometimes has one.  And, of course, Rachel Ray is likely to turn up anywhere.  She may be at your front door now.  :) 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 13, 2007, 05:48:20 PM
...
Why thanks, barton.  Now at least I have a term I can look up.

I take it all survived The War on PBS, or maybe "survived" just comes to mind in connection with the final ep with the death camp scenes.  Of the tales told/heard in previous episodes before I dozed (no reflection on anything other than the time of night and my work schedule), I keep recalling that of Mr. Medicine Crow, of Montana, I believe, though I forget his connection to the locales of the series (perhaps there was none but his story was too good to leave out).  His army stint enabled him to complete all of the requirements for achieving warrior status--whether he killed any enemies, I don't remember, but I do recall being a warrior only required touching the enemy.  ...

...

It actually required killing an enemy. Medicine Crow may have been Oglala Sioux as Lakota Sioux and Dakota Sioux tribal territories (now reservation areas) stretch anywhere from Minnesota, through both South and North Dakota and into Montana. We'd have to check PBS.org to be sure, as they have all the materials on the program series. But, since they were already dealing with a place in Minnesota as one of the four specific regional towns that they were covering to use for examples, there is a pretty good chance he was from Minnesota; as the other areas were Mobile, Alabama, and Sacramento,California and then a northeastern coastal area which I think was in New England where they concentrated on a particular Italian family which was a heart-rending story from start to finish.  It seemed to be so normal between start and finish but it is the record of a young man's devotion to his mother as he keeps everything secretly to himself by pretending it is A-Ok, just in a normal day.

But back to Medicine Crow, whatever his US locale, the locale in which he completed stealing his enemies horses, was in Germany on a Sunday when he figured wrong and thought Germans are Roman-Catholics so they will all be in Church but they turned out to be Protestant and at home when he turned the horses loose to drive them off which is typical Sioux protocol for battle technique. The other qualification you may have found distasteful, is the traditional war practice they used in WW2 as well, but so did American Caucasions in the Pacific for instance, and that is "counting coup" which involves taking a portion of the enemy's physiognomy to attach to your war belt.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 13, 2007, 06:01:29 PM
Nytemps, I check the Travel channel for anything resembling "going there, checking out the sights, talking to the folks, and eating the food" type shows.  So far, the only one that combines all that is Anthony Bordain (the former chef, now writer-traveler) and that weird fellow that eats stinky stuff--which I do not watch.  Globe Trekker is also on PBS.  But you never know where you'll run across a travel type thing.  TLC (The Learning Channel) sometimes has one.  And, of course, Rachel Ray is likely to turn up anywhere.  She may be at your front door now.  :) 

I'll get the oil.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on October 13, 2007, 07:06:11 PM

Perhaps what is being thought of is scalping (which I seem to recall was introduced or adapted by Native Americans from French fur trappers), but "counting coup" as I taught it when I taught US History did not involve the taking of body parts.  I know wikipedia isn't the last word, but their version is in line with that:

Quote
Counting coup
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Counting coup was a battle practice of Native Americans of the Great Plains. A nonviolent demonstration of bravery, it consisted of touching an enemy warrior, with the hand or with a coup stick, then running away unharmed. Risk of injury or death was involved, should the other warrior respond violently. The phrase "counting coup" can also refer to the recounting of stories about battle exploits.

The term is of French origin from the verb couper, which means literally to cut, hit or strike. The expression can be seen as referring to "counting strikes".

Coups were recorded by notches in the coup stick, or by feathers in the headdress of a warrior who was rewarded with feathers for an act of bravery.




Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on October 13, 2007, 07:10:16 PM
Quote
I'll get the oil.

Ha, you and my hubs both!  She consumes her meals with gusto and sex appeal the likes of which I don't recall seeing since that scene in Tom Jones.

Donot:  Is Ian Wright your favorite Globe Trekker as he is ours?  I sure hope he doesn't decide to hang up the hiking boots anytime soon.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on October 13, 2007, 09:52:01 PM
Butting in here where I have no business.....An ancestor of mine was scalped (by Yankees). She is said to have lost a good chunk of flesh off her head, but she did live. 

I wasn't there, this was one of those stories passed down.  But as far as I know, it wasn't embellished as it rolled along, or by the time it got to my generation she'd have recovered instantly, beaten the Yanks, and we'd still be under British rule.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: pugetopolis on October 13, 2007, 10:52:43 PM

Butting in here where I have no business.....


Oh, that's okay    ;D ;D ;D


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on October 13, 2007, 11:51:53 PM
harrie: You most certainly do have business here, or wherever you choose.  I'm intrigued by the ancestor scalped by the Brits, sounds like quite a tale--where and when was that, and however did she survive?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on October 14, 2007, 12:29:47 AM
Thanks for the vote of confidence, nytempsperdu.  The scalping was before the Revolution, or possibly during the early part of it. I have a little family history thing, but it's not handy.  I had ancestors who were both Tories and Yankees, but my direct ancestor was a Tory.  He and his family fled the colonies to accept a land grant from George III in Canada; or, depending on your point of view, they were chased out of the colonies (but there was a land grant). 

In the fleeing, a sister got scalped in upstate New York, but was determined to go on, and did.  She continued to live and function once they arrived in Canada, it's not like they arrived and she dropped dead or anything.  To go crazy with the family lore, she was carrying her melodeon on her back, and supposedly the blood stained it forever... etc.  My mom has the instrument, and it's all just a very dark cherrywood, no blood stain that I can see.

I should go find that family history, though, because I think there's a lot of assumption on my part that it was Yankees who did the deed, since they were hostile parties to the Tories.  Given that it happened in upstate NY (which I think I recall correctly), it may have been a different hostile party.  Or just a grumpy fur trapper, for that matter.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on October 14, 2007, 01:14:50 PM
Someone elsewhere pointed out not to take a show that features an experimental car which runs on dandelions too seriously.  That said, I do wonder how the Pie Maker in PD deals with eating meat.  If anything dead is touched back into life, then...

the mental pictures are both grisly and funny.

Is he vegetarian?  If someone keeps watching this, let me know.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on October 14, 2007, 01:47:52 PM
Nytemps, yes Ian is my Globe Trekkerfavorite.  He's so normal. Not a herioc bone in his body.   :)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 14, 2007, 04:15:57 PM


Perhaps what is being thought of is scalping (which I seem to recall was introduced or adapted by Native Americans from French fur trappers), but "counting coup" as I taught it when I taught US History did not involve the taking of body parts.  I know wikipedia isn't the last word, but their version is in line with that:

Quote
Counting coup
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Counting coup was a battle practice of Native Americans of the Great Plains. A nonviolent demonstration of bravery, it consisted of touching an enemy warrior, with the hand or with a coup stick, then running away unharmed. Risk of injury or death was involved, should the other warrior respond violently. The phrase "counting coup" can also refer to the recounting of stories about battle exploits.

The term is of French origin from the verb couper, which means literally to cut*, hit or strike. The expression can be seen as referring to "counting strikes".

Coups were recorded by notches in the coup stick, or by feathers in the headdress of a warrior who was rewarded with feathers for an act of bravery.






*"The term is of French origin from the verb couper, which means literally to cut,... "

Sorry, as a teacher you are out-ranked by my cousin's husband who wrote a treatise on warfare among the Sioux, which I think was published by the Univ.of Nebraska. I read it in the early 1990s and don't even remember his name. I  am no longer in correspondence with her.  She and I spent some of the early years of my life together when her parents were at St.Carlos reservation working with the Chiricahua Apache in Arizona. When she became a teenager, we delivered her back to the reservation, and I spent a little time there  living among "Native Americans" (my grandmother called them "savages")as I was somewhere between age three and age five, sort of after three but not as late as five when I began kindergarten.

I didn't see her again until I was thirteen or fourteen, on another trip west, not necessarily hitting all the high points on the road like -- I had told donotremove about suddenly remembering Deadwood,after the tv series was entirely finished. 
( I just came in here to report seeing Robin Weigert again last night, not as Calamity Jane, but in an appearance of Law and Order,Criminal Intent, and episode known as "Recall", and gosh she is a tiny thing but I remembered her face; not sufficiently however to have even recognized her in a blonde wig when she played one of the street-walkers in, The Good German, until I saw the shot of her with George Clooney. www.imdb has become a regular "face-book" for actors, they don't have to carry those around with them as they appeared in different roles nor have their agents send head-shots.)

My parents and I just took the train out to San Francisco, by which time my cousin Lois was all grown up but still living at home, in one of those houses that looks like it is on the slant of the hill with a garage and a front door into the house; living-room,dining room and kitchen with back yard steps down to the outside from the first floor, up to the second where you have two or three bedrooms --and a split bathroom, half on each side of the hall!, just up the street from Golden Gate Park.  I have no idea when she was married. Her parents moved north to Marin sometime before I left for New York. So I didn't hear from her again until After my father died and Before my mother did, when Lois told me to read "the book"

Meanwhile I had lived in a region adjacent to the Sioux, my brother still lives in Minnesota,but you may want to take a look at this book:http://www.amazon.com/gp/reader/0143036211/ref=sib_fs_top/002-9958069-1421637?ie=UTF8&p=S00Z&checkSum=QFAtih9Dv3vEdgvn8tIhCKpXW1bGBVPCc5V3ZJPctdw%3D#reader-link

and in particular look inside the book at the back flap (on-line at Amazon) because George M.Marshall III , in photo, claims that Crazy Horse was a Lakota like himself. Others say Crazy Horse was Oglala Sioux.

My godmother didn't care one way or the other but wrote out checks for charity to Rosebud reservation.

I first caught Marshall on CSPAN2 and I couldn't put my finger on exactly who it was of whom he reminded me but it probably goes all the way back to childhood where I learned the fundaments. If I track the other textbook for the university, will let you know.

But back to Medicine Crow, about whom this all began on PBS Ken Burns,The War, whom I am sure would be offended that you doubted his manhood in never having killed an enemy during WW2 when he became a warrior by fulfilling all three of requirements as he reported back when he arrived home on the reservation. Somewhere in this mess of forums I commented in American History when reading about something following the posts with weezo between April into May, that the disfigurement of the body that occurred when the FBI men took charge of a woman's  at Pine Ridge for autopsy lab, the remains of which was returned to her family was inexcusable because the removal of the hands was more than mere scalping which would embarrass the ghost from coming back. Someone in that administration trying to prove a case against Leonard Peltier was well versed in Sioux spiritual-traditions which would shock her family when they received what was left of her remains.






Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 14, 2007, 05:14:32 PM
harrie,re:#743

I love that description:"I have a little family history thing,..."; I've got one of those which I call the Blue Book because it literally is between blue covers, (which I have to check regularly to remember whose kid that is, as they are dispersed all over the place)and sent by my sister after a family reunion of all the remaining live ones, for which one of our cousins compiled to the best of her ability.

I can understand your quiet description of the embroidering that takes place because when my mother had asked me to send what I had, they could not make heads or tales of it because it was from Early Generations of the Dupont Family -- and it flew in the face of my first-cousins religious indoctrination to say the least.  I figured, if they couldn't take that then they weren't ready for the rest of it.

Upstate New York, specifically Genesee, was where Victor Marie Dupont decided(upon retirement from the French National Guard) that he would become a romantic tradesman at an Indian trading post, while his brother Eleuthere tended to powder making.  This again came up in American History, before these forums, while yet at the nytimes.com with some of the readings suggested from a handful of books on the Native American experience, such as: Looking East Across the Atlantic. or, something by Merrill.

When one day, attempting to complete my reading for discussion, I came upon some beautiful drawings, took one look, identifying what it was about in the text, and quickly closed the book covers shut.  They were drawn by Victor Marie's wife , as girls had been taught to do at the end of the 18th.century and  dressed in her cute little Empire bonnet and full regalia, after saying goodbye to the family who still lived at Beau Sejour,in New Jersey from which Pere et fil(singular) ferried across to the financial district, the young marrieds traveled north to Genesee which the young bride did not like very much after drawing carefully shaded,cross-hatched studies of Indian maidens all of whom looked very sad. I am used to this, it is a high rate of depression, because it is a hard life, or it was then, and most often still is now.

Because of that factor, Victor Marie was soon back with Eleuthere on land bought at the suggestion of Lafayette, somebody purchased a  small flock of Merino sheep and Victor Marie got busy with their breeding to increase the flock. The textile institute still stands there on the other side of the Brandywine  from the compound of houses; and I ended up reading a lot of papers on experiments in producing "body armor" for Iraq because we were still in the nytimes.com forums, specifically National Security and these guys from Canada would go on and on about specifications because they were entrepreneurs who claimed to have been the first contractor on repairing pipe-line in June of 2003 back when they were posting in the Western Europe forum while posting under variations of pseudonyms as Elwood Green, Greenwood, or sometimes just Woody accompanied by a trio of friends who opened a bar in the middle of the discussion forum. Those were our first spinners for the Bush administration, best at fabricated stories, seemingly unaware why I could not agree with them.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: pugetopolis on October 14, 2007, 05:18:09 PM
(http://www.sexymalecelebs.co.uk/Galeries/data/media/309/R10.jpg)

I like Desperate Housewives.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on October 15, 2007, 12:23:29 AM
Quote
In the fleeing, a sister got scalped in upstate New York, but was determined to go on, and did.  She continued to live and function once they arrived in Canada, it's not like they arrived and she dropped dead or anything.  To go crazy with the family lore, she was carrying her melodeon on her back, and supposedly the blood stained it forever... etc.  My mom has the instrument, and it's all just a very dark cherrywood, no blood stain that I can see.

That is quite a compelling tale, harrie.  (Why does The Red Violin come to mind?  Oh yeah...)  Thanks.  Family lore is much pursued in VA, or was when I lived there and still is by some in the family now scattered.  And you just never know which of the young'uns is going to develop an interest.  In our case, my aunt's favorite grandson, who teaches middle school in Boise, far from any family meanderings, yet he cherishes her letters and reminiscences and will someday inherit not only her decades of accumulated genealogical work but the sword of the Chastains (unbeknownst to her two sons, his dad and uncle, who cherish very little, according to her). 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on October 15, 2007, 12:28:30 AM
Yes what a story!  I was thinking along the lines of "Accordian Crimes"....one of my favorite books.  It must be wonderful to have that sort of romantic history in your family.   (Although, I suppose at the time....)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: pugetopolis on October 15, 2007, 01:04:58 AM
(http://www.sexymalecelebs.co.uk/Galeries/data/media/309/normal_EO4d.jpg)

I like Desperate Housewives...

...especially Ryan Carnes....



Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on October 15, 2007, 12:21:08 PM
I agree with earlier post about the men mostly being kind of weak on DH.  I'm not saying it's a chick show or anything, but I do sense that suburban women would be a stronger demog for this than me.  The only woman I really dig on the show is Felicity Huffman.  I did watch several eps where she's being paranoid about her new neighbor, thinking he's a pedophile, and thought it was a dark funny commentary on middle-class paranoia.

Eva Longoria is vastly overrated.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 15, 2007, 03:22:42 PM
Apologies, nytempsperdu!



Why thanks, barton.  Now at least I have a term I can look up.

I take it all survived The War on PBS, or maybe "survived" just comes to mind in connection with the final ep with the death camp scenes.  Of the tales told/heard in previous episodes before I dozed (no reflection on anything other than the time of night and my work schedule), I keep recalling that of Mr. Medicine Crow, of Montana, I believe, though I forget his connection to the locales of the series (perhaps there was none but his story was too good to leave out).  His army stint enabled him to complete all of the requirements for achieving warrior status--whether he killed any enemies, I don't remember, but I do recall being a warrior only required touching the enemy. 

Anyone else here enjoy the travel channels, PBS shows like "Globe Trekker" etc.?  Now even the Food Network has travel shows, though shots of people eating unappealing foods in exotic locales isn't my idea of entertainment.  With increasing age (and decreasing dollar), this is likely to be our mode of travel for some time to come.

Another board I used to visit had several threads for people visiting (or even relocating to) various areas.  Wonder if there would be support for something like that for those "Escaping from Elba." (I haven't looked at any of the threads in the International section yet.)


I found the web-site at PBS,   Medicine Crow was exactly that: a Crow. The Sioux were his traditional enemy.

http://www.pbs.org/thewar/detail_5177.htm

The outcomes of his interactions with the enemy at the time had some humorous aspects, at least from his present older point of view.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 15, 2007, 03:40:05 PM
I agree with earlier post about the men mostly being kind of weak on DH.  I'm not saying it's a chick show or anything, but I do sense that suburban women would be a stronger demog for this than me.  The only woman I really dig on the show is Felicity Huffman.  I did watch several eps where she's being paranoid about her new neighbor, thinking he's a pedophile, and thought it was a dark funny commentary on middle-class paranoia.

Eva Longoria is vastly overrated.



LOL

Overrated how exactly?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on October 16, 2007, 07:00:29 AM
I agree with earlier post about the men mostly being kind of weak on DH.  I'm not saying it's a chick show or anything, but I do sense that suburban women would be a stronger demog for this than me.  The only woman I really dig on the show is Felicity Huffman.  I did watch several eps where she's being paranoid about her new neighbor, thinking he's a pedophile, and thought it was a dark funny commentary on middle-class paranoia.

Eva Longoria is vastly overrated.



Huffman is the best thing the show has going for it.  Longoria plays Gaby well, but her character is the classic "rich bitch" and is not overly appealling, especially in season 3, but dear Eva always looks good in lingerie.  The show plays more to demographics than it does to any sense of place, as I couldn't imagine bringing together 5 more disparate figures than these "desperate housewives."  Nevertheless, I find the show fun to watch.  Kind of a Sisters meets Thirtysomething meets Picket Fences sort of thing.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 16, 2007, 12:26:50 PM
SPEAKING OF: Thirty Something, that's why I originally dropped into movies this morning to ask very sotto voce who had been discussing Blood Diamond in there. (and promptly forgot)

I've been watching it piece-meal when I have a moment;and, it comes by(not a Desperate Housewives viewer but, you probably get that,by now). My first impression was to be turned off by the fact of Leo. He is not named that for nothing. Yet,he is growing up and filling out nicely and I have to remind myself that anybody who could carry the role of Rimbeau
in Total Eclipse...

(I figured he was so-so in The Aviator)  but, I am not here to praise
Leonardo Di , nor to bury him, since he was surpassed by Damon in the The Departed.

I simply recalled that many people in this forum were not enthralled by Thirty Something although I was amazed with the writing that went into it and really tired of Peter Horton. That kind of "cool" hipster is still happening on this week's latest tv. Have you caught,"Tell me,You Love me"?

Therefore, I think that Blood Diamond was not bad for Zwick and Herskowits (which just goes to show that I did not love them enough to get the spelling of their names correctly).

Without discounting DiCaprio, it has an interesting premise, excellent photography of African highlands and jungle, lots of action, some sensible romanticism about the Colonial Past or why people are what they are, but that does not overlook the sometimes ingenue performances of Jennifer Connelly and Leo in tandem; yet, perhaps that is what you get when you throw a couple together on a heated dance floor, innocuous pick-up lines from once or twice in a bar and irrevocable banter when you can't entirely make out what you actually heard over the loud music but will become memorable when things inevitably go wrong which they have to .

Leo going in and out of two or three different East to Southeast African dialectical intonations of how to speak English when you are raised speaking two or three languages will require me to listen to this on the other tv. but I have a feeling his delivery was so spontaneous that I may not be able to tell what he says when he shifts because he seems to have a pretty good ear without getting tongue-tied for mimicry and imitation of idiom unless that was all he remembered from the dialect coach.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 16, 2007, 01:13:16 PM

Eva Longoria is vastly overrated.


Guessing you are over 30 Barton?


Title: Cavemen
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 16, 2007, 01:23:29 PM
So I guess now we know why more commercials aren't turned into television shows.  I suppose this could have been riotously funny, but the writing is pretty bad.

What's next?

Stay tuned for "Whaaaaat'sss  Uuuuuppp"  The hilarious hijinks of two beer drinking friends...

Immediately following  The Talking Gecko with the British Accent  absurdly funny, cuddly reptile does observational stand up comedy...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on October 16, 2007, 02:23:34 PM
Good guess, Trojan.  But it's not the attractiveness issue (though she isn't really my type) so much as my sense that if she weren't shapely and perky, people would notice that she wasn't all that great an actress.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 16, 2007, 08:13:32 PM
Haven't heard ONE call her a good actress.  That's why I got the chuckle from the "overrated" line.

DAMN - forgot to TIVO Caveman.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 18, 2007, 11:10:52 AM
Haven't heard ONE call her a good actress.  That's why I got the chuckle from the "overrated" line.

DAMN - forgot to TIVO Caveman.

I was about to say something similar regarding Eva. I think the appeal is purely physical.

If you like Caveman, you should try to record it permanently, because it doesn't have much more time would be my guess.

I still have episodes of Max Headroom and Sledge Hammer taped and pull them out once in awhile--not too mention Briscoe County Jr.

 Wait, didn't we have this conversation a few months back?



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 18, 2007, 09:43:09 PM
Cavemen thus far is certainly no DINOSAURS


Title: Re: Television
Post by: luee on October 18, 2007, 10:01:54 PM
No need to tivo you can catch many of the complete episodes from the networks or
http://www.channelsurfing.net/

Catching up on some of the best and worst. Cavemen was better than the commercials, still needs work. I like journeyman but Quantum leap was better. One reality competion I cannot get into is dancing with the stars. Nation of kids is alright.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 19, 2007, 11:40:07 AM
Cavemen thus far is certainly no DINOSAURS

...not the mama!

loved that damn show...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 19, 2007, 11:46:50 AM
jury is still out on Journeyman, but I am enjoying it so far.  It seems to me that they are using the Lost concept to some degree...

they are developing a story between all the characters while only giving occassional clues to the central mystery.

If nothing else it's funny listening to the main character trying to hold his "american" accent...

Speaking of Lost...what the hell?  It's already late October...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on October 19, 2007, 12:57:53 PM

Speaking of Lost...what the hell?  It's already late October...

Lost is coming in February.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on October 19, 2007, 12:58:55 PM
jury is still out on Journeyman, but I am enjoying it so far. 
If nothing else it's funny listening to the main character trying to hold his "american" accent...

He was better in ROME.  Accents aside.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: luee on October 20, 2007, 01:48:45 AM
Checking out the adventures, no canned comedy please. Journeyman was good but not quite a Quatum Leap, a big fav. Chuck yes a goodtime romantic comedy; adventure, action, smart lines, borrowed from the 70s Get Smart, UNCLE, Charlies Angels etc., etc.
Bionic woman, ugh much too serious and bloody for such a bizzaro premise. Took the old series and went way over the top.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: luee on October 20, 2007, 01:54:30 AM
To answer the opening question I was one of the few that was disappointed in the Sopranos from the start, so the ending did not disappoint me more.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on October 21, 2007, 12:03:19 AM
I have found it!  HBO On Demand has 19 episodes of "The Wire" until 10/28 so I will return from Baltimore about then (only found this last night and since I'm a responsible  chore-doer am only up to #7). 

I figure I'm allowed, never got into Sopranos or other such, though some years back another Baltimore show, "Homicide: Life on the Street," did have my undivided attention on the nights it was on.  A veteran of that show is in "The Wire" along with many fine performers.  Any other fans here?   


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on October 21, 2007, 12:05:44 AM
I'm a big fan of The Wire.  I think its the best show on HBO.  I caught Episode 1 again.  Funny how they did it.  They took themselves too seriously.  With the close-ups and the security camera in the elevator.  They were trying too hard.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 21, 2007, 08:11:54 PM
Heads up! I just found out that I missed the first of tonight's showings of a remake of --The Wicker Man--as it was finishing up.  I noticed something odd although I was familiar with what was going on; the girls/women looked different from what I'd previously seen, the old British version quite awfully frightening to say the least. Then I found out why, that it was a remake, permitted by Studio Canal that I'd  never known about.  I have no idea how it varies but suspect it does as more modernized.

It will be on again tonight in various places on HBOHD. Check your HBO schedule to see if it is showing in your area. Definitely part of the film build-up for Halloween.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 21, 2007, 10:45:58 PM
I have found it!  HBO On Demand has 19 episodes of "The Wire" until 10/28 so I will return from Baltimore about then (only found this last night and since I'm a responsible  chore-doer am only up to #7). 

I figure I'm allowed, never got into Sopranos or other such, though some years back another Baltimore show, "Homicide: Life on the Street," did have my undivided attention on the nights it was on.  A veteran of that show is in "The Wire" along with many fine performers.  Any other fans here?   

Homicide is all over STEALTH Network.  Don't know if you get that.

A great way to catch up with TV sets/seasons is the local library.  Our system here in North Jersey is fantatstic (share between about 40 towns, where you can get a title sent to your home library).  WEEDS 1 and 2 are my next looksee, but I can't stop rewatching West Wing.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on October 21, 2007, 11:35:58 PM
I have found it!  HBO On Demand has 19 episodes of "The Wire" until 10/28 so I will return from Baltimore about then (only found this last night and since I'm a responsible  chore-doer am only up to #7). 

I figure I'm allowed, never got into Sopranos or other such, though some years back another Baltimore show, "Homicide: Life on the Street," did have my undivided attention on the nights it was on.  A veteran of that show is in "The Wire" along with many fine performers.  Any other fans here?   

up to episode 6 myself.  its great seeing the first season and seeing Prez being a total fuckup asshole when in later season his character is such a nice guy.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on October 22, 2007, 01:05:54 PM
Maddy, I wasn't familiar with any earlier version of The Wicker Man.  Saw what you say is the new version the other night.  I knew nothing good was going to come of things when the float plane turned up sunk in the bay.  I can still hear our hero (can't think of that guy's name to save me) screaming.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on October 22, 2007, 01:15:37 PM
My sympathies to a "Lost" fan who was unaware of the super-long hiatus that was imposed on the series.  Yes, it's not coming back until February, for various complex reasons that might fall under the category of "screwing with us." 




Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 22, 2007, 01:21:51 PM

Maddy, I wasn't familiar with any earlier version of The Wicker Man.  Saw what you say is the new version the other night.  I knew nothing good was going to come of things when the float plane turned up sunk in the bay.  I can still hear our hero (can't think of that guy's name to save me) screaming.


Nicholas Cage/

Donotremove, I just gave this version an absolutely bad review over in the other Movies or, one or another of them, as it is getting confusing. I think it stunk versus the "British cult Classic" and I gave my reasons why. It would be just a little like having Rachel Ray as the new Miss Marple.  It would get lots of attention from viewers, I'm sure; but it would not be the same as  to what Miss Marple brings to analyzing and solving the crime after serving everybody canapes and sherry.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on October 22, 2007, 02:45:42 PM
Speaking of Ms. Ray, I caught part of her show the other day, and she doesn't look good -- she was puffy and tired-looking.  I don't mean this cattily; I actually like her in small doses.   (Nor will I make the too much DD coffee joke.)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on October 22, 2007, 02:47:03 PM
Rachel Ray as Mrs Marple. What a hoot.  Thanks for the laugh, Maddy.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on October 23, 2007, 12:41:39 AM
Quote
its great seeing the first season and seeing Prez being a total fuckup asshole when in later season his character is such a nice guy.

And aren't we thankful for nickname for one whose name is unspellable, though not unpronounceable!  You can see why his penchant for noodling out solutions to puzzling parts of the investigation might very well lead to his later occupation, but I still can't figure out other parts--like the shooting up of the cop car told about early on and attacking the kid that he half-blinded (guilt attack over this also  contributing to later career change?)

I'm getting way more of McNulty's angst than I want and less than I want of such scenes as the opening of one ep where the kid gets the younger kids off to school, each (except one) with a bag of chips for nutrition.  Some of these kind of details convince me that portions are drawn from real experience, just as some of the cop "war stories" are interlaced with the fundamental, practically tribal, conflict. 

Back another time, kid's running me off the PC.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on October 24, 2007, 05:51:41 AM
I see Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman is now available on DVD,

(http://ec1.images-amazon.com/images/P/B000MEYKA0.01._SS500_SCLZZZZZZZ_V46730913_.jpg)

http://www.amazon.com/Mary-Hartman-1/dp/B000MEYKA0/ref=cm_cr-mr-title/105-5791205-4542015

Louise Lasser always reminded me a bit of Jane Curtain, or vice-versa.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 24, 2007, 10:41:58 AM
But,wow,dzimas, she reminded Woody Allen of Mia Farrow or vice-versa.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: lulu on October 24, 2007, 04:40:02 PM
Barton:

I love that cat; he looks really tired.  Didn't you give him/her any food?  [g]

Damages

Did anyone watch the conclusion?  My head spins with this show.  People are good then bad then good then .....  Despite the insanity of it and the head spinning from watching the show, I will be back next season for more masochistic entertainment.  For some reason, it's addictive even after I shake my head after watching an episode and I couldn't even begin to explain any episode.  A fascinating train wreck


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on October 25, 2007, 05:48:10 AM
Lulu, I was rummaging around in the online LATimes yesterday, to get a closer look at what's going on with the fires, and ran across a review of the final episode of Damages.  Whoever it was--sorry, I didn't pay attention to the author--really 'splained to me what's what with that show.  Hot damn, now all is revealed.  And, with all that knowledge under my hat, I'm quite sure, now, that Frobisher will survive.  He MAY survive to have the last laugh at Patty.  Now that we know the bitch will kill to get her way, I'll believe anything.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 25, 2007, 04:01:25 PM
Donotremove,

Wow, where do I find that review?[I did subsequently find it while Melba was down], at LATimes. When I started notifying you of the music at the end of Five Days episode, I entirely forgot that I was supposed to be watching my last chance to see Damages last night at eleven! Had missed the Tuesday timing; anyway, I was probably too sleepy to stay awake and make much sense of Damages.

I am up to the point where we have the aftermath of Ray's suicide and the police okaying Patty can go home as she has no responsibility --but from there on I have no memory. You know, fate sometime keeps me really confounded when I find Danson following himself with Curb Your Enthusiasm and I've just spent an hour where he poured himself a drink and read Ray's will left on the desk under a framed desk-photo in that office with the "moderne" window straight out of Gotham.

I've got it that Frobisher is directly responsible for the murder of Ellen's boyfriend but where am I?

Anyway, I enough-ago discovered that I can watch all the repeats of Curb Your Enthusiasm that I want but not Damages because it is FX.

I am of course enthused to learn that Lulu is as "head-spun" as I; because I was beginning to think that I was the only one trying to figure this out and getting taken in every week. I'm wondering if our locals will commit to buying a next season?

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/showtracker/2007/10/damages.html#more

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/showtracker/2007/10/damages-now-you.html#more


http://www.latimes.com/entertainment/news/tv/la-et-sopranos-davidchase24oct24,1,4803966.story?coll=la-entnews-tv&ctrack=3&cset=true

I told you so, Soprano fans where ever you were, either nytimes.com blog of the year or here-ins. Mr.Utley from Nutley(?) in particular.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on October 25, 2007, 04:52:57 PM
Don't post a link no one can get to and say I told you so.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 25, 2007, 06:40:15 PM
Which link can't you get to and why?

"I told you so" has to do with what David Chase decided at this late date to tell the public about the ending of The Sopranos.   He's very disappointed in what was "his public". Possibly because when he flew off to Europe he saw things that he might have been overly busy to notice until he stopped to look around and he decided his former audience sounded like ingrates.

Personally I didn't indulge in the extremities of reaction that people put into blogs about what happened. I didn't go in for symbology, reading into; it was bad enough that it just ended because I started to watch it when on the way to LA(and) demanding that HBO be functional when I returned just in time to view the opening.  I missed New Jersey and its Italian community much too much to not see every bit of this show for nostalgia's sake.   I was not particularly disappointed as time wore on.  It had to dwindle away and finally stop. Chase was negatively impressed that viewers thought that the family which they had watched for that many years, especially Gandolfini, should be "punished".

Maybe audiences are kind of trite after all.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 25, 2007, 07:16:14 PM
speaking of good TV, and for those of you not on the College Football board...

There is a great game on tonight-- #2 Boston COllege v #8 Virgina Tech.

I'm going to leave work early to go watch it.


also posted there...


With the recirculate button depressed the smoke isn't too bad for the ride home,  but I can't quite hold my breath all the way between leaving the building and getting to my car.

We have hepa filters running 24/7 in the house...

The sky has been so thick with smoke the last couple of days--this has to be what nuclear winter is like...

Pretty much all schools are closed, so the kids sort of get to see what a snow day feels like-- except they can't go out and play outside because the air is too bad...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on October 25, 2007, 07:17:13 PM
that and the "snow flakes" are ash...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 25, 2007, 09:55:45 PM

that and the "snow flakes" are ash...


Steven Spielberg, tall smoke-stack in background, people in village street of Auschwitz death camp below notice the drift falling on the air and think it is snow. Schindler's List.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on October 25, 2007, 10:00:32 PM
http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-howtohelp25oct25,0,1314278.story?coll=la-home-center

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/index.php?storyID=9277

 California Burning, today's slides; keep in mind that means today, when referring to Bush promises funds(and take a look at the new trimmed down Arnie).

Also, I need some help with this one:

http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-federal25oct25,0,6878965.story?coll=la-home-center

Disaster status means more federal fire aid

By Tami Abdollah and J.P. Renaud, Los Angeles Times Staff Writers
2:17 PM PDT, October 24, 2007
Here is the 6th.paragraph down:


"But the presidential declaration allows people to seek additional help. People within the seven counties could receive as much as $28,200 to deal with emergency lodging issues, a spokeswoman for FEMA said by telephone from Washington."

Now were these the counties that Bush was trying to gerrymander quietly undercover in the first place?

The blog discussion, underneath, would be indicative of a difference of opinion here.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on October 29, 2007, 01:26:48 AM
DAMN!  I only got thru episode 10 and missed the last three episodes of the WIRE before HBO took it out of rotation.  Now they're showing episodes 14-25.  Fuck HBO ondemand.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on October 29, 2007, 06:23:22 PM
I suggest blockbuster.com

Join the cheapest mail order version.  They have Season 1 - you likely need disc 4 and 5, maybe just 5


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on October 29, 2007, 11:33:41 PM
thanks for the tip. tip o'my cap.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on October 29, 2007, 11:40:51 PM
Thanks from me, too.  I did get up to ep 16, but am glad to have the tip for future ref.

My enjoyment of the series continues to come from the little tales, sometimes even asides to the main plot(s), that you can just tell are peculiar enough to have been someone's real experience.  Sort of the "you couldn't make this stuff up" school.

Occasionally, I can't help wishing the females, except the wonderful Greggs and the less-seen but promising woman DA, weren't quite so much just there because of their involvement with the males, but I'm only in 2nd season. There may be riches to come.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 02, 2007, 12:43:55 PM
The fight for better media continues to make news across the country. Tonight, check out Bill Moyers Journal at 9 p.m. on PBS


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 05, 2007, 01:21:52 PM

Anyone remember Love, American Style ?

Little vignettes centered loosely around sex/love in America...

I was pretty young, but I remember really liking the show. It was lighthearted and fun.  It also seemed like a good vehicle for B and below talent to stay in the public's mind.

As long as I'm on that one, how about Rowan and Martin's Laugh In  ?

I guess Dancing with the Stars. et al  have replaced the variety shows of yesteryear...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on November 05, 2007, 01:34:21 PM
Prison Break is back on tonight right? The World Series etc has interrupted the season. I can't even tell if its any good this year.  I'm getting bored of it.  But i'll give it more time.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 05, 2007, 01:38:32 PM
Prison Break is back on tonight right? The World Series etc has interrupted the season. I can't even tell if its any good this year.  I'm getting bored of it.  But i'll give it more time.

What are they going to do with that show?  Didn't the star wind up actually going to prison recently?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on November 05, 2007, 01:41:07 PM
Prison Break is back on tonight right? The World Series etc has interrupted the season. I can't even tell if its any good this year.  I'm getting bored of it.  But i'll give it more time.

What are they going to do with that show?  Didn't the star wind up actually going to prison recently?

You're thinking of the Tweeter character.  He was killed off in season 2.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on November 06, 2007, 01:06:12 AM
Kam, how far did you get in catching up on The Wire ?  I'm well into Season Two, and note that the TV critic here is recommending catching up with it during the writer's strike.   


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on November 06, 2007, 02:18:14 AM
Three episodes to go in Season1.

I've seen the rest of the seasons but never all of the first.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: notrab on November 07, 2007, 10:04:02 AM
Prison Break

--- Trojan -- a minor character who was killed off last year went to actual prison.  The lead actors remain at large.

Looks like the writers strike is happening and starting to have some effect.  Disparate Housewives is closing the set.  "Lost" may also, though that series doesn't resume until next February.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 07, 2007, 11:56:05 AM
I remember the last writer's strike...can't remember the issues.

Is there a low scale wage that the argument is about?  It's hard to believe they don't make darn good money...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 07, 2007, 02:58:40 PM
Trojanhorse,

It is about the extra refinements to technology that have been added since...

Things like being able to upload programming or films at home or on the go, or on your cell-phone!???

Contracts for actors for instance always include their cut of future earnings when reproducing media comes into play. Screenwriters inevitably get the short end of the stick and have been fighting this battle to have the same rights to reproduction of their written material in performances on new reproductive media since I'm not sure when. I first became aware of it in the late 1980s, possibly anywhere from 1989 through the time when the O.J. Simpson hearings and trial began in June of 1993.  I was living in the same greater household of a young person who had been involved in one of those flabberghastingly dumb series that become popular overnight because there are so many viewers in the same age group; we all had our separate apartments of course -- in a 17th.century Colonial Inn.  Since we saw each other everyday on that daily basis of neighbours under one roof, who interact overly much, I quickly became aware of the true significance of the writer's strike, since young tv series actor was attempting to build her Movie Career.

When the writers strike, the Screen Actors Guild supports the strike. This means, nobody works until the haggling to gain that raise on the copywrighted material is resolved.

If you think television is dastardly dull now, it is going to become shockingly significant, until this chapter is over.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 07, 2007, 03:10:31 PM
I think Journeyman is about all I've been watching lately which would be affected.


I have been waiting for the return of Monk, Psyche and Lost, however...


Title: Good Morning Americas
Post by: Kam on November 07, 2007, 04:03:05 PM
http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/player/popup/?rn=3906861&cl=4902258&ch=4226714&src=news (http://cosmos.bcst.yahoo.com/up/player/popup/?rn=3906861&cl=4902258&ch=4226714&src=news)
 
just wait through the ad


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on November 07, 2007, 04:09:12 PM
I think Journeyman is about all I've been watching lately which would be affected.


I have been waiting for the return of Monk, Psyche and Lost, however...

There's always POKER  :)

Actually I get the idea that shows won't be affected just yet - other than those taped daily, like Leno, Letterman, Conan, The Daily Show. etc.......

The CMAs are tonight

And Mike and the Dog just gave me Ace in the Hole (TCM - 8 PM) as a possibility.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: notrab on November 07, 2007, 07:24:06 PM
Shows like Desparate Housewives are affected now, per various news sources.  Actors, including Felicity Huffman and spouse William Macy, took up signs and joined the picket line today in support of their writers.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on November 07, 2007, 08:06:01 PM
I didnt say they were working

But they have shows already in the can


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 07, 2007, 09:13:37 PM
So long as College Football does not require writers, I will be quite comfortable for the next two months...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 08, 2007, 08:33:34 AM
http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/index.php?storyID=9435

Truth behind the Grin

TV hosts are nothing without writers, says colin bostock-smith, who should know.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 08, 2007, 10:57:19 AM
http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/index.php?storyID=9435

Truth behind the Grin

TV hosts are nothing without writers, says colin bostock-smith, who should know.


except that alot of them got their start as writers...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Urethra_Franklin on November 08, 2007, 02:33:56 PM
Anyone remember the Andy Dick show on MTV?

Though the man truly is a dick, the show had the funniest damn sketch comedy I've ever seen.


I've searched everywhere and haven't been able to find it on DVD.  The show ran for 3 season and was nominated for an Emmy.

MTV released his "Apprentice" show on DVD, which surely had substantially lower ratings.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 08, 2007, 07:36:37 PM
Anyone remember the Andy Dick show on MTV?



Have not seen it on video.    I think we may have discussed him a few months back here.    He's a funny guy...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 10, 2007, 07:29:20 PM
Did all the TV posters go on strike also?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 10, 2007, 07:32:54 PM
The other morning I was having vague memories of an old show which I think was called Branded

My recollection is that it could hav been Chuck Conners (same actor as Rifleman - though I may be confused)

I remember him having his stripes and his buttons torn off at the beginning of each show --dishonerably discharged for desertion during a battle (although falsely accused).

ANybody else remember this show?  I still see Rifleman on TV occassionaly , but I don;t believe I have ever again seen Branded -- if that is even what it is called...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on November 10, 2007, 07:39:10 PM
Yes...there was a show called Branded...one of those where the theme song tells us the entire premise of the show.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DKmJPnAGUJk


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on November 10, 2007, 07:42:22 PM
The opening of The Rifleman seemed cheesy even back then.....Notice the shot where Chuck sort of looks out of the side of his face and grins at the camera.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IX2oZ6Kv_qo


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 10, 2007, 07:44:57 PM
The theme song is probably why I can still recall the show...  I just wasn't sure that was the correct title of the series

I was in elementary school when this show was on and the take off song was


Stranded...
stuck on a toilet bowl
What do you do when your Stranded
...and you don't have a roll...

It went on from there, but gets even more graphic and I'm sure none of you want to regress to elementary school...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on November 10, 2007, 07:45:37 PM
On the other hand....how hip is this?

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=phvZf6EHac4


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on November 10, 2007, 07:46:42 PM
Stranded....too funny.  No one quite explores the graphic possibilities of re-ordered lyrics quite the way children do.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 10, 2007, 07:51:25 PM
Yeah they wanted Roger Moore to play James Bond but couldn't get him out of his contract...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on November 10, 2007, 08:36:53 PM
The other morning I was having vague memories of an old show which I think was called Branded

My recollection is that it could hav been Chuck Conners (same actor as Rifleman - though I may be confused)

I remember him having his stripes and his buttons torn off at the beginning of each show --dishonerably discharged for desertion during a battle (although falsely accused).

ANybody else remember this show?  I still see Rifleman on TV occassionaly , but I don;t believe I have ever again seen Branded -- if that is even what it is called...

Yes, I recall that show, and we sang the same revised lyrics as you cited.  All I really remember is at the opening, Connors stands there stone-faced while his stripes are ripped off and his sabre is broken over his CO's bent knee.  Then Connors is sent walking out of the fort, with those big gates slowly closing behind him.

Plus John Goodman did that whole riff on Digby who created/wrote Branded in The Big Lebowski.  But I haven't seen that show around, even on the Westerns channel, which seems to have every other Western rerun.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on November 10, 2007, 08:58:22 PM
And this is the part where I remind myself to carefully read all posts before posting in order to not cover territory already covered....sorry about that.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on November 11, 2007, 02:49:51 PM
I was kind of looking forward to "Real Time" last Friday, but he makes like six shows before going on vacation and running re-runs, maybe it was eight, but I don't get it...if you're going to run your mouth like he does, you ought to at least make a season of it...I don't get it...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: luee on November 13, 2007, 08:09:15 PM
Yes another list, top 50 TV icons. My surprise omission was Bob Hope;

Johnny Carson Tops 'TV's Greatest Icons' List
Nov. 13, 2007, 1:30 PM EST
The Associated Press

It doesn't take a psychic in a bejeweled turban to figure out that Johnny Carson landed the top spot.

But deeper down the ranking of "The 50 Greatest TV Icons," you may find a name that surprises you (or even makes you scratch your head). Which is part of the fun.

The list, released to the Associated Press, was compiled by cable's TV Land network and Entertainment Weekly magazine.

It's the source of a two-hour TV Land special airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST (and is also featured in the issue of Entertainment Weekly appearing on newsstands the same day). The special counts down from Larry Hagman (No. 50) to Carson, with mini-profiles of each "icon" in turn.

But what's a "TV icon" anyway?

Someone who "jumps off the screen into your home," says Henry Winkler, who is ranked 32nd, while Regis Philbin (No. 27) says, "If you hang around long enough, they call you an icon."

Along with human TV stars, the list contains a pooch (Lassie), a Muppet frog (Kermit), a cartoon dad (Homer Simpson) and a full-blown comedy troupe (the original Not Ready for Primetime Players from "Saturday Night Live").

There's one "Friend" (Jennifer Aniston) and two current late-night hosts (David Letterman and Jon Stewart made the cut, but Carson's successor, Jay Leno, did not). TV comedy trailblazer Milton Berle is on the list, though not his contemporary, Sid Caesar.

The list of "The 50 Greatest TV Icons," compiled by TV Land network and Entertainment Weekly magazine:
50. Larry Hagman
49. Calista Flockhart
48. Jimmy Smits
47. Simon Cowell
46. Lassie
45. Sarah Michelle Gellar
44. Susan Lucci
43. Flip Wilson
42. James Gandolfini
41. Jon Stewart
40. Sally Field
39. Jennifer Aniston
38. Bea Arthur
37. George Clooney
36. Diahann Carroll
35. Michael J. Fox
34. Bob Barker
33. Ellen DeGeneres
32. Henry Winkler
31. Sarah Jessica Parker
30. Alan Alda
29. John Ritter
28. Howard Cosell
27. Regis Philbin
26. Farrah Fawcett
25. Heather Locklear
24. Michael Landon
23. Barbara Walters
22. Milton Berle
21. Kermit
20. Carroll O'Connor
19. Andy Griffith
18. William Shatner
17. Bob Newhart
16. David Letterman
15. "Not Ready for Primetime Players"
14. Ed Sullivan
13. Jackie Gleason
12. Dick Van Dyke
11. Roseanne
10. Dick Clark
9. Homer Simpson
8. Jerry Seinfeld
7. Mary Tyler Moore
6. Carol Burnett
5. Walter Cronkite
4. Bill Cosby
3. Oprah Winfrey
2. Lucille Ball
1. Johnny Carson


Title: Re: Television
Post by: TrojanHorse on November 13, 2007, 10:49:46 PM
Yes another list, top 50 TV icons. My surprise omission was Bob Hope;



fun to read...

Hope certainly had the TV "specials" but not a series as such right...   more of a movie guy...

I'm more surprised that "Mr Television" only ranked 22, but given how far we are removed from that era, I guess it is not too surprising.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 14, 2007, 07:11:33 AM
trojanhorse* (what's with the asterisk?)

I always felt that Sid Caesar far surpassed Milton Berle in talent.  He was quite a bit more accomplished;whereas Berle was merely zany. I think the era changed just about then from memorable oldies but goodies to a more Rat Pack update amid the talent scouts and the little matter of technology.  I knew of perfectly capable character actors,female, quickly to jump out of their pre-professional amateur status and leap into vocational training to become tv camera persons for the main news affiliates in small midwestern towns.  I wonder what they think looking back on their decision from today's perspective. Where are they now? that sort of thing.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: desdemona222b on November 14, 2007, 10:25:49 AM
Did anyone see the season finale of Curb Your Enthusiasm last night?  OMG, it was GREAT.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on November 14, 2007, 10:29:23 AM
This was easily the best seaosn since #1.

I started out with not much appreciation for the direction they were going with the BLACKS - and it turned out just grand, didn't it.

Love Leon, Auntie Rae - and Vivica did a real nice job.  Even the kids were well cast.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 14, 2007, 10:32:57 AM
Leon is the best thing that ever happened to Larry David.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on November 14, 2007, 10:40:03 AM
Yes another list, top 50 TV icons. My surprise omission was Bob Hope;

Johnny Carson Tops 'TV's Greatest Icons' List
Nov. 13, 2007, 1:30 PM EST
The Associated Press

It doesn't take a psychic in a bejeweled turban to figure out that Johnny Carson landed the top spot.

But deeper down the ranking of "The 50 Greatest TV Icons," you may find a name that surprises you (or even makes you scratch your head). Which is part of the fun.

The list, released to the Associated Press, was compiled by cable's TV Land network and Entertainment Weekly magazine.

It's the source of a two-hour TV Land special airing Friday at 8 p.m. EST (and is also featured in the issue of Entertainment Weekly appearing on newsstands the same day). The special counts down from Larry Hagman (No. 50) to Carson, with mini-profiles of each "icon" in turn.

But what's a "TV icon" anyway?

Someone who "jumps off the screen into your home," says Henry Winkler, who is ranked 32nd, while Regis Philbin (No. 27) says, "If you hang around long enough, they call you an icon."

Along with human TV stars, the list contains a pooch (Lassie), a Muppet frog (Kermit), a cartoon dad (Homer Simpson) and a full-blown comedy troupe (the original Not Ready for Primetime Players from "Saturday Night Live").

There's one "Friend" (Jennifer Aniston) and two current late-night hosts (David Letterman and Jon Stewart made the cut, but Carson's successor, Jay Leno, did not). TV comedy trailblazer Milton Berle is on the list, though not his contemporary, Sid Caesar.

The list of "The 50 Greatest TV Icons," compiled by TV Land network and Entertainment Weekly magazine:
50. Larry Hagman
49. Calista Flockhart
48. Jimmy Smits
47. Simon Cowell
46. Lassie
45. Sarah Michelle Gellar
44. Susan Lucci
43. Flip Wilson
42. James Gandolfini
41. Jon Stewart
40. Sally Field
39. Jennifer Aniston
38. Bea Arthur
37. George Clooney
36. Diahann Carroll
35. Michael J. Fox
34. Bob Barker
33. Ellen DeGeneres
32. Henry Winkler
31. Sarah Jessica Parker
30. Alan Alda
29. John Ritter
28. Howard Cosell
27. Regis Philbin
26. Farrah Fawcett
25. Heather Locklear
24. Michael Landon
23. Barbara Walters
22. Milton Berle
21. Kermit
20. Carroll O'Connor
19. Andy Griffith
18. William Shatner
17. Bob Newhart
16. David Letterman
15. "Not Ready for Primetime Players"
14. Ed Sullivan
13. Jackie Gleason
12. Dick Van Dyke
11. Roseanne
10. Dick Clark
9. Homer Simpson
8. Jerry Seinfeld
7. Mary Tyler Moore
6. Carol Burnett
5. Walter Cronkite
4. Bill Cosby
3. Oprah Winfrey
2. Lucille Ball
1. Johnny Carson


Thanks for the list

We could have some fun noting some we feel were left out

DANSON over Flip Wilson


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on November 14, 2007, 02:55:07 PM
i had a chat with larry david at the fred claus premier a week ago saturday.  we had been chatting about my own daughter's having become orthodox many years ago, a topic in which he was quite interested.  i told him that thought the scene where the ultra-orthodox woman jumped out of the ski lift at sundown rather than be seated next to him was not a fair jab at orthodoxy, because observant jews place so high a value on life, and that the obligation to save life trumps almost all religious prohibitions.  he smiled and said "true story."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: desdemona222b on November 14, 2007, 03:10:15 PM
Someone mentioned the casting on "Curb Your Enthusiasm" being so great this season.  That's exactly what I kept raving about last night - we love "Leon", too.  Really, someone should find out who this actor is - he is just too funny.  Bringing on the Blacks is a stroke of genius, IMO. 

Another ingeniously cast character was Larry's therapist, Dr. Bright.  My God, he talks just like William F. Buckley.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 14, 2007, 05:36:35 PM
kitcarter8,re:#833

Did you know that I just found out that Homer Simpson (mentioned in your posted article) is some kind of a quasi-villain in a novel by Nathanael West.  I think the quotes in fiction forum were in regard to his novel,Miss Lonely Hearts (but it could have been: The Day of the Locust).

But a little further enquiry revealed that Homer Simpson comes up quite a lot in great literature. Enquiring minds want to know.

Do you think it is possible that the creator of The Simpsons wanted to be a Hollywood writer like Nathanael West?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 15, 2007, 10:03:06 AM
Desdemona

"Really, someone should find out who this actor is - he is just too funny.  Bringing on the Blacks is a stroke of genius, IMO."

That's J.B. Smoove.  Believe it or not he has been a writer (and won an award for it) as well as an actor on: Saturday Night Live.  He has a film in post-production,Frankenhood.

I think the writing shows.  No one could improvise as fast as he does without  having put it to some writing experience. We get to see the speed at which his mind works as he works opposite Larry David.

I started catching up last night with my backlog of episodes unseen in last few weeks, by watching Curb Your Enthusiasm, for three back to back. I am as far as Larry and Sheryl coming down from the Ferris wheel after her therapist having phoned her about the real deal because the therapist has a new patient: Dr. Bright


Title: Re: Television
Post by: desdemona222b on November 15, 2007, 10:13:19 AM
I started catching up last night with my backlog of episodes unseen in last few weeks, by watching Curb Your Enthusiasm, for three back to back. I am as far as Larry and Sheryl coming down from the Ferris wheel after her therapist having phoned her about the real deal because the therapist has a new patient: Dr. Bright

Maddie -

Corey and I did the same last night and decided we had seen most all of them.  Which episode number is that with the ferris wheel?  Don't think I remember that one. (Asssume you're watching this stuff On Demand like we are.)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 15, 2007, 12:07:06 PM
Des,

#59 which could have been titled,"The Duelling Therapists"  because Larry and Sheryl continue to communicate throughout this separation but only according to the words of their personal therapist's advice.

That touch of Larry selling his good points, that misrepresent him in the best light to Sheryl's therapist, was a stroke of genius. Observing her sliding into this groundless infatuation of transference-touche  for the patient's husband was priceless; since, of course in his self-centeredness, he would never perceive it as seductiveness. (This is where Jeff Garlin's acting ability comes in handy, his readiness to register the rapid take on any psychology.)

The repeated encounters, by coincidence, of "friends" who decided they "were with Sheryl", took me right back to a period of time many decades ago, many, which everybody has had to experience at least once to be "previously married".   Watching it on tv, as an outsider, permits you to realize how extremely funny it is; that no human beings ever grow up. Psychiatrist Melanie Klein could have written it but I don't think she is any longer around.

Of course, the very beginning premise of the ever willing to be helpful female seated at the next table in the hospital dining room as Larry and Jeff grab lunch, ought to be revisited but probably won't be. From the point where you get her "clinical"perspective on sexual relations, her every scene reminds you in detail of how doctors approach life, and that in fact their living arrangements are never exactly  charmingly domestic but are business-like and their business is "health"(at least in the earlier years of their practice).  This interaction of Larry and the Lady Doctor was very well written and I was in hysterics as each scene with her developed into further submission on his part and unconscious dominance on her's.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: desdemona222b on November 15, 2007, 12:45:21 PM
Well steel yourself for Episode 60, because it is roll on the floor funny.  I love Dr. Bright.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on November 15, 2007, 01:38:02 PM
Don't have cable and have no time to watch more tv on an "appointment" basis, but I do rent some of the best on DVD when they come out.  I assume there are some CYE eps out on DVD by now, so I'll have a look.  Have heard good things about it, and Larry David was the major writing talent behind Seinfeld, which bodes well.

Speaking of the funniest stuff on tv, "House" this week poked fun at documentary making -- at one point, Hugh Laurie, after seeing how far off the truth a hospital documentary is going, quips, "I've got to stop trusting Michael Moore!"





Title: Re: Television
Post by: desdemona222b on November 15, 2007, 01:45:48 PM
It took me awhile to 'get' to Curb Your Enthusiasm.  I never even watched it until starting maybe a year ago, and then very sporadically.  I think I turned it off several times, too.  Got a bit of a chuckle out of it here and there, but never enough to get into it.  Didn't know about the Seinfeld aspect, let alone the fact that it is impromptu.  When the re-runs of Extras started this season, I was watching them because I love Gervais, and one night my son finally became a convert when a particularly funny episode was on.  It was followed up by this season's epsiode of Curb that introduced the Blacks, and we just laughed our backsides off.  My son was so excited he started watching Curb reruns and on demand, so now we're "regulars".

Cheryl Hines is the perfect straight man, lady, whatever, btw.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 15, 2007, 11:52:29 PM
Barton,
Strange thing is that Larry David, although the writer of Seinfeld, is not the least bit  "Seinfeldian" in his persona and desdemona is correct about Sheryl being, what used to be among comic-duos, the somewhat awed wife that he can be so outrageously smug. When the duo were both guys, one of the pair would have to be a tiny bit dumb to say the least, for putting up with the wise-acre of the team.  Playing it as Husband and Wife is actually something that I haven't seen in years, although it has probably been out there and I just overlooked it with a lack of enthusiasm for any more slices of contemporary American life.

I mean you could compare to Edith Bunker being a well-meaning sweetie of a ditz married to a guy who knows it all or so he thinks. Sheryl is not that; last night I heard her defined by three men on the show,for being a good cook, accompanying her husband where ever he wanted her to go, and being just a well rounded good looking broad which these guys do not intend pejoratively. It is the highest compliment in their strata of society which is Southern California involved in "representation of talent" or "writer"(for talent),etc.

These definitions of what makes a good wife are strictly by California standards. Edith and Archie lived in Brooklyn. Larry and Sheryl live in a creative center of the entertainment industry.  They are the younger successful people who have been around awhile. (Although I must say that every once in a while the sets for the interiors annoys me immensely because they look like the people in charge of this aspect just tacked the front door of their house to some cardboard thin walls. If anything the production-values are not even illusional but meant to cost- cut the budget whereas they do fine by using their locale's  environment for exteriors so that a lot of the business that takes place was written into the script to be set at the local dry-cleaner, some real club either of a prominent restrateur or just a popular hang-out.)

But here I have to back up a minute, because Larry is obviously older than Sheryl; so, when I said they are "young", that has to be qualified. She is young (as compared to him) but he is "successful", so that is expected in their milieu; it is just that he will never grow up. If you were ever a boy genius, why would you ever want to grow up?

As desdemona noted, "the perfect straight man,lady,whatever..."-- is a throwback to the old pre-television, radio comics of the era when the 1930s slipped into the recovery of the 1940s. You turned on the radio while you did the dishes and you listened to "marrieds" like Fibber McGee and Molly.  When you went to the movies, you were privileged to see how the other half-lived by watching Nick and Nora Charles solve a mystery which was billed as The Thin Man.

In California, this is a complete joke. When my son, who lives in this milieu and atmosphere compares some latest "Larryism" with me or vice-versa, the humor is in the fact that everybody's friends are exactly like this, these are the values that prevail in Southern California, quirky, off the wall, petty attitudes, trivial annoyances blown up to life-size kvetching.

On the other hand, where I live, it would be impossible to see television programming at all, if it wasn't brought to us by cable because that is the profit motive.

However, I have to warn you, that when I returned to the East Coast 25 years ago, I had to warn my mother, "You know what? Those television serial situation comedies you watch in the Midwest and suppose are made-up attitudes of whacky non-existent people played by "stars" of acting whom we know are "stars" because they win awards for what they do, well they aren't acting. This is the way people really behave in the greater Metropolitan area. Like Seinfeld."



Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on November 16, 2007, 10:58:28 AM
"Not that there's anything wrong with that!"



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 16, 2007, 02:33:46 PM
Barton,

You see that cat over there Draping Pelham123 ? I found today that I had the chance to write my thoughts on my own female counterpart to that cat who looks like he spends all his time watching movies on tv.

But I don't know where to post it. Perhaps Pets? That is if I don't find some long dissertation in there about Proust; or,  some cartoonist repro artist pretending his posts are poetry. (or,even snide remarks from the resident alien from outer space who has been writing his movie club reviews out of the Criterion Club liner notes, blogs and forums, instead of being a regular guy and writing from scratch).

I've had two days of Pet-mania, among other things.

My cat also views tv from the couch but I am dumbfounded what she gets off on because it displays an advanced empathy quotient. No Teletubies, Barney,or Big Red Dog, for her.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 17, 2007, 02:46:36 PM

"Not that there's anything wrong with that!"




Re: Larry David, bicoastal Curbs your enthusiasm for Seinfeld or vice-versa?

Today, I ran across a good one that I can only paraphrase. A poster who got caught in a really bad line-up of comments about Katie Couric dissing Dan Rather had this to say. "I used to like that morning show until I realized it reminded me of an episode of each morning with Katie as Elaine, Al Roker as George, and  Lauer as Jerry."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 17, 2007, 11:42:29 PM

Well steel yourself for Episode 60, because it is roll on the floor funny.  I love Dr. Bright.


I just watched #60. That finale  took awhile before it crept up on you. Tell me, Do  you think possibly Larry had a brilliant idea when Imus got in trouble about some injudicious choice words?

L.D. on the other hand will take a chance on anything, if he thinks you will get how funny it is to be bizarre.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on November 18, 2007, 02:17:43 PM
Madupont:

"My cat also views tv from the couch but I am dumbfounded what she gets off on because it displays an advanced empathy quotient. No Teletubies, Barney,or Big Red Dog, for her."

I don't imagine a cat would care all that much for Clifford the Big Red Dog.  The other two I suspect have soundtracks dominated by shrill voices, which can drive a cat away.  We used to have a cat that would just go nuts over nature shows on PBS that focused on birds -- he would perch in front of the set and, for a while, would paw at the screen.  After a while, as he came to understand that the wall of glass was forever blocking off the birds, he would just stare and make tremulous sounds, his lips trembling.  There were some (to us) amusing experiments, in which he would try going around, or over the top of, the tv set and getting in through the back.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 18, 2007, 03:05:54 PM
Barton,

I had to put a stop to that immediately - that going around to the back to investigate how to get at the birds.  Fortunately, there are really enough birds around here because of plantings that interest them, so she can observe them on a larger scale: 56inch by 70inch is the smaller, mostly robins but a squirrel visits  on this channel to make her jealous with his speed.  How about 72 by 72 just for Gold Finches, canaries,and red cardinals, and sparrows. Used to get rabbits but I think they were killed off by request of some tenant with seniority or maybe it just went forward automatically by the kind of people who have to kill everything living?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 18, 2007, 03:09:26 PM
Ps,

As I compared with donotremove about the film,The Story of the Weeping Camel,  Kiki the cat could not leave the room while that was on but was transfixed listening to the  unhappy and complaining camels. One very hungry.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: luee on November 20, 2007, 05:54:08 AM
Anyone interested in some classic commercials from the sixties?

http://www.archive.org/details/Televisi1960


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on November 20, 2007, 01:13:51 PM

Tonight's "House" looks intriguing...involves a magician as a patient.   Last night has become a tv void, now that Prison Break is on hiatus.   Read a witty and funny sci-fi writer from the SF Bay Area, Rudy Rucker.  Very readable, excellent as a written substitute for tv.

As with most boomers, sixties tv commercials are burned deeply into the longterm storage part of my brain.  I'm reluctant to reactivate the relevant neurons.  (hey, alliteration!)

 



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on November 20, 2007, 01:15:26 PM

Tonight's "House" looks intriguing...involves a magician as a patient.   Last night has become a tv void, now that Prison Break is on hiatus.   Read a witty and funny sci-fi writer from the SF Bay Area, Rudy Rucker.  Very readable, excellent as a written substitute for tv.

As with most boomers, sixties tv commercials are burned deeply into the longterm storage part of my brain.  I'm reluctant to reactivate the relevant neurons.  (hey, alliteration!)

 



Monday is High Stakes Poker followed by Journeyman.  Come on!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: desdemona222b on November 20, 2007, 01:21:46 PM

Well steel yourself for Episode 60, because it is roll on the floor funny.  I love Dr. Bright.


I just watched #60. That finale  took awhile before it crept up on you. Tell me, Do  you think possibly Larry had a brilliant idea when Imus got in trouble about some injudicious choice words?

L.D. on the other hand will take a chance on anything, if he thinks you will get how funny it is to be bizarre.

What I picked up on was the gerbil rumor - a minor news item several months back was Sylvester Stallone's confession that he started the gerbil rumor that went around about Richard Gere in the 90s.  Apparently the two of them hate each other's guts and Sly did that to Gere as a revenge thing.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 20, 2007, 02:38:33 PM
des,

Two more despicable guys, as human beings, have ever existed on the big screen (or, the small).


Title: Re: Television
Post by: luee on November 20, 2007, 07:23:18 PM
Humor; 
24: The Unaired 1994 Pilot

http://www.collegehumor.com/video:1788161


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 26, 2007, 07:56:50 PM
 
Truman Capote's life--specifically his trip to research and write the classic 'In Cold Blood'--is the focus of this adventurous biopic.
 
   
 
 
 
Start Date 11-26-07
 
End Date 12-23-07
 
Category HBO Movies
 
Sub-Category Drama
 
Cast Toby Jones
Sandra Bullock
Daniel Craig
Peter Bogdanovich
Jeff Daniels
Hope Davis
Gwyneth Paltrow
Isabella Rossellini
Juliet Stevenson
Sigourney Weaver
 
Director Douglas McGrath
 
Year 2006
 
Rating R
 
 ADULT CONTENT
ADULT LANGUAGE
VIOLENCE
 
 
Runtime 117 Minutes
 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on November 27, 2007, 12:23:17 AM
So what's the title of the Capote biopic on HBO?  It looks interesting.

(I still can't believe In Cold Blood was on a reading list for high schoolers -- at least one 9th grader who did a book report on it was fairly traumatized.)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on November 27, 2007, 01:05:07 AM
And, please, what are the two "Other" shows on the ballot in the header?  (The "Pushing Daisies" vote was mine.  Am still watching, in spite (or because?) I can't imagine a show more diametrically opposed to The Wire catching up on which was a mini-project during T'giving time off.  The Wire has featured a surprising lineup of directors--Agnieska Holland's vision of hell (Ep. 33, I think) was akin to Bosch TV.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 27, 2007, 03:40:42 AM

So what's the title of the Capote biopic on HBO?  It looks interesting.

(I still can't believe In Cold Blood was on a reading list for high schoolers -- at least one 9th grader who did a book report on it was fairly traumatized.)


I can't either, I was fairly traumatized by the screen version; if not that film than the one you asked about, I thought the name was up there when I copied out since I just got the information tonight.

Rather than a biopic, it is the "alternative version" of what Philip Seymour Hoffman gave us.

This interpretation is by Toby Jones, who was also seen in The Painted Veil, which helped ever so much in my understanding that he was an actor's actor and not just the ..... whimsical little guy flitting around with Sandra Bullock in tow or sometimes in tow to her because Harper Lee didn't play those ranking routines with her childhood buddy.

In fact, he was so blissfully light-feathered in the first part of the film as he planned his successful return to literature that I was hardly ready for his fatal fall into the seduction to which he had subjected himself.

As you can see, the cast is truly weird, to all show up together; if you feel any confusion after viewing this odd little movie, in which Paltrow does a smash Lounge singer routine for openers (and then disappears forever), and Sandra Bullock suddenly does a performance that would have won her an Oscar under any other circumstances, just let me know because I kept my cheat sheets of the research I did on which one of the ladies who lunch, and dance for each other is actually Babe Paley. I seem to remember that's Sigourney Weaver.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on November 27, 2007, 08:52:29 PM
In case anyone else wonders, the title is Infamous.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on November 27, 2007, 11:51:48 PM
That kind of contrasts it to the other film "Famous",subtitled:InColdBlood

Just threw that in for the heck of it as a bit of humor although I'm about at the point where I wouldn't mind now seeing it again to compare. I did rather prefer Chris Cooper as the resident law man in Kansas; rather than Jeff Daniels who is such a prig  and a sop.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on November 28, 2007, 02:02:50 PM
I second the vote on Pushing Daisies.  Initially thought it was just too silly to live, but somehow its lunatic inventiveness (Scratch N Sniff bomb plots, Alternative Vehicles that run on dandelions, and the many bizarre ramifications of the Pie Maker's special gift for resuscitating the dead...) and off-kilter wit (the detective loves to knit and subscribes to a humor magazine for knitters called Knit Wit...) reaches some kind of critical mass, perhaps augmented for this male viewer by levels of cuteness (Kristin Chenoweth, Anna Friel) that make Kelly Ripa look a bit worn around the edges, not to mention the hope of someday again seeing Chenoweth bouncing up and down in a mermaid costume that ventures into new and exciting frontiers of cleavage.

Boobs, puns, and grotesque animated corpses -- what more could one ask for??





Title: Re: Television
Post by: thanatopsy on November 28, 2007, 06:21:20 PM
I'm not much of a TV fan but have always enjoyed the old Dr Who series. Its initial producer Verity Lambert recently passed away :'(:


http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/2007/nov/23/television1?gusrc=rss&feed=media


``Verity Lambert, the first producer of Doctor Who and one of the most respected figures in television drama, has died aged 71.

Lambert was also the BBC's only female producer in 1963 when she worked on the time-travel drama that grew to become one of the UK's most popular TV shows. She died last night following a long illness, but was "working right up until the end", according to the BBC.``


Few people could match her creativity and artistic vision.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on November 29, 2007, 12:00:47 AM
So we flipped around the channels tonight and developed a sophisticated -- okay, not really -- drinking game.  Sci-Fi has a show called Ghost Hunters -- I know.  But these guys who mostly debunk haunted places in their spare time also work in real life for Rotor Rooter; and the RR company is mentioned or the guys are shown in their RR clothes so often, you'd think RR was underwriting the show. As far as I know, they're not.  But -- every time Rotor Rooter is mentioned, take a chug.  By the end of most shows, you'll be well on your way.


Barton, she's mine.  I saw her first.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on November 29, 2007, 10:49:50 AM
 ???


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on November 29, 2007, 10:57:19 AM
???

Kristin Chenoweth -- it's just a girl-crush joke.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on November 29, 2007, 08:04:47 PM
I'm a little slow -- seasonal affective disorder got its hooks in me.   Had a Bill Murray man-crush for several years, but then George Clooney came along.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on November 29, 2007, 08:40:59 PM
I second the vote on Pushing Daisies...

...Boobs, puns, and grotesque animated corpses -- what more could one ask for??


I hope Harrie will back me up on this: That last comment tells me you need to be renting Buffy the Vampire Slayer seasons on DVD immediately.

By the way, I very nearly voted for Pushing Daisies in the above poll. My vote, however, ended up being the lone vote cast for Cane. It was close, though. Very close.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on November 29, 2007, 10:35:28 PM
Earl, I will back you up on this. Buffy has the boobs, puns and animated corpses -- perhaps the Faith episodes would be a good jumping-off point, given the list of prerequisites. 

My one gripe with Buffy, and it's a weak one, is the overuse of Valley Girl language in the first (partial) season.  On the other hand, those are some of the best episodes, content-wise -- Nightmares (or Lucky 19); Out of Mind, Out of Sight (Invisible Girl); and Teacher's Pet (the substitute Biology teacher) are some of my favorites.  But with Whedon's writing, most episodes have at least one must-catch moment or line; he's a freakin' brilliant writer, IMHO.

Count me in as an FOB (Fan of Buffy).


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on December 04, 2007, 01:59:18 PM
Sci-Fi is running a mini-series, Tin Man (not to be confused with Tin Men or Pushing Tin ) -- it's an alternate take on The Wizard of Oz.  We're watching it. More precisely, the hubby is watching it, I'm puttering and doing stuff because I don't really care for it.  Tin Man is very dark, very dour, very depressing, IMO. 

For example, in The Wizard of Oz, torture was implied and we were mostly scared just by the looks of the winged monkeys as they looked menacing while approaching Dorothy or chasing Toto.  In Tin Man, electrodes are attached to characters' brains, and (I believe) they're killed when they don't give up the info.  It's like Oz has become Gitmo or something.

Looked at the right way, I guess it can be kind of campy, so maybe I should just change my outlook.  Anybody else watch this, and am I terribly wrong and just missing the boat?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: weezo on December 04, 2007, 02:23:48 PM
I put "Tin Man" on last night, then did my newsletter and edited some web pages and never got into it. When hubby came home, he had a talker on, so the tv was turned off. I didn't realize it was a mini-series. You are right, that it is dark, scary, and depressing. Even on the commercials, the yellow brick road goes through a scary forest.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on December 05, 2007, 05:24:56 PM
Quote
And now for something completely different...I mean, really.

I watched the final season 3 episode of The Wire but could not figure out who Omar referred to when saying to Stringer Bell "Your boy gave you up." Later we saw a beat-up looking young man being led out, with Bro. Mouzon handing someone a weapon & giving instructions to the effect of seeing that it (presumably the young man's execution) would be done properly.   For story purposes, it probably matters not, but can someone on top of this fill me in?

I remember this scene from when i watched it a year ago.

Avon Barksdale gave up Stringer Bell to Omar.  Told him where to find him.  Remember Avon says to no one in particular in one of the last scenes ... "it's just business"

I don't recall the beat-up young man.  I remember Brother Mouzon told his lackey to take care of the weapon properly as in dispose of it. 

Again, my recollections are not recent.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on December 05, 2007, 09:10:37 PM
nytp,
I've heard nothing but raves for The Wire, but it's on HBO; which around here means you have to sell some real estate or raise up some kind of ransom to subscribe to it.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on December 05, 2007, 10:53:49 PM
nytp,
I've heard nothing but raves for The Wire, but it's on HBO; which around here means you have to sell some real estate or raise up some kind of ransom to subscribe to it.

Or on DVD, still $50 a season.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on December 05, 2007, 11:00:14 PM
Thanks for the heads up, but I don't have $50 to spare right now (and I've avoided Netflix because I don't have the time to watch enough flicks to justify a monthly fee).  The Wire is on my list for when the time becomes right.  Do the evil mega-stores (Blockbuster/Hollywood Video)  still rent DVDS?  Maybe that's worth a look. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on December 05, 2007, 11:24:39 PM
Harrie, "The Wire" is better than "The Sopranos" if you've already seen "The Sopranos," you should rent it by seasons or buy it, but see it with your boy most def.  It's intense, dense, and incredible.  It sings the song of Baltimore in nearly real time or ten years removed, I don't know how they did what they did at all, to have the sort of limitation of this takes place in Baltimore and it has to be cop, crook, dealer, gang and street real??  Nobody would do that, now, to make a different story in a different place that's an "amalgam" of "people that I know," that's not what this is, it's a gunshot wound into the American conscience, or should be, and a call to family and the sustaining things that we have as a society, and how we've failed in particular places, particularly Baltimore.

It will change the way you look at serial drama, I envy you and sig for the journey, but it's really amazing.  It makes "Dexter" look like "Family Ties."


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on December 06, 2007, 02:35:13 AM
jbottle,

You don't get out of the car when going through there. Not even to go to the restroom of a garage. You just get through there as quick as possible. It is like  Philip K. Dick designed the place. Ironically, I take a certain satisfaction in that, hope against hope you don't think me crass but it is because of a relative of mine (by marriage to my father's brother) who was really keen on the place because she came from Little Rock. She tried very hard relating to the racial changes by the end of the 1950s but she died at Glen Burney about 32 years later which is the antipodes of the scenes you are seeing and describing. I had enough of it with Homicide: Life on the Street(but, it wasn't an exaggeration, apparently). Yet, don't mistake that I do not know what you are referring to, as the honesty of the take. Don't forget Washington,D.C. is right down the street. I've had enough honesty for one lifetime.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on December 10, 2007, 12:08:41 AM
Nobody home...? I came in to remind anyone who wants to see Infamous
that it is on around 12:25am on the East Coast; again, tomorrow, that is--rather, less that twelve hours after the above, with a back to back repeat/repeat on HBO2. 

By now, I'd forgotten it was scheduled this month, Gwyneth Paltrow fans,Daniel Craig fans, Sandra Bullock fans(this is her surprise performance,as Harper Lee),and Isabella Rosselini fans, and Sigourney Weaver fans, you too can become a Toby Jones fan as well. He's Truman Capote.

Peter Bogdanovich as Bennett Cerf, and Jeff Daniels as Alvin Dewey are expendable.  Likewise, roles of Bill Paley and Gore Vidal can never be done justice, after you've seen Frank Langella's version of Paley, and Gore Vidal's version of Gore Vidal, Gore Vidal, and more Gore Vidal.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on December 10, 2007, 11:48:27 PM
All right. So I saw it again and vastly more appreciate it. It sneaks up on you.  If Barton is out there somewhere, did you know that Mark Ruffalo was asked to play the part of Perry Smith (before Daniel Craig accepted the part) but Ruffalo turned it down a mere two months after Mark Walberg had. What gives with this "role"; anxiety of picking up bad aura?

Now, I have to paraphrase for you, one of the best throw-away lines ever conceived by Diana Vreeland (fashion editor who was known for her bon mots or not so bon critiques).
"Jack found out about his wife's affair and ended the marriage immediately that same night; but, for a man who from then on had no trust in women,to throw himself entirely from that moment into the arms of men? I ask you.Why would anyone that upset with the indiscretions of women expect to find sexual fidelity in the less  likely sex, by trusting men." Diana Vreeland

Joan McCracken (December 31, 1917 – November 1, 1961) was an American dancer, actress, and comedian who became famous for her role as Silvie ("The Girl Who Falls Down") in the original 1943 production of Oklahoma!. By age 11, she was studying dance with Catherine Littlefield. She dropped out of high school to join Littlefield's ballet company. She was a student of George Balanchine in the first year of the School of American Ballet (SAB).

McCracken toured Europe and danced at Radio City Music Hall before creating the role of Sylvie. She was married to Jack Dunphy and then to dancer and choreographer Bob Fosse from 1951 to 1959.

She died from complications of diabetes in 1961 on Fire Island, New York, aged 43. She is said, by her biographer, to have been the inspiration for the protagonist Holly Golightly in Truman Capote's novel, Breakfast at Tiffany's, although this can be disputed.


Jack Dunphy (1915–1992) was a novelist and playwright born in a working class neighborhood of Philadelphia, perhaps best known today for his long-term relationship with Truman Capote.

Dunphy danced as one of the cowboys in the original Broadway production of Oklahoma! He was married to musical comedy performer Joan McCracken, who played Elvie in that production and who went on to marry Bob Fosse.

According to the press kit distributed by Sony Pictures for the film Capote (2005), when he met Truman Capote in 1948, Dunphy had written a well-received novel, John Fury, and was just getting over a painful divorce from McCracken. In 1950 the two writers settled in Taormina, Sicily, in a house where the author D.H. Lawrence had once lived. According to the press kit, "Ten years older than Capote, Dunphy was in many ways Capote’s opposite, as solitary as Truman was exuberantly social. Though they drifted more and more apart in the later years, the couple stayed together until the end."

Enough said.    I would not for the world want to trivialize the matter of fact "repportage" of the Wikipedia and not do it justice.









Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on December 11, 2007, 01:58:16 PM
Didn't know Ruffalo was offered the part in ICB -- but I get the "aura" thing with actors -- you don't want to really nail a horrific role and then feel like it's sticking to you -- like being punished for being too good at your craft.

Looks the writers strike is settling in.  "Pushing Daisies" is one of the latest to run out of script -- tomorrow night's is the last ep.  Rest in peace.  Or maybe the Pie Maker can touch the show and, you know...





Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on December 12, 2007, 01:54:16 AM
Barton, it was for Infamous, the other Capote, with Toby Jones rather that Philip Seymour Hoffman. Nevertheless, the role was Perry Smith; and, my first impression was that Daniel Craig was very bad in it. On second viewing, not at all; just the  nature of Perry Smith's character as Truman wrote him.

Anyway it is on your tv if you get HBO this month, or did you say  not in Kansas/Nebraska area?  For someone living in that territory, the scenes of the Clutter murders are hard to take, I would imagine. Upon watching this film again, it was Oh,Lord! remembering living in circumstances like that where that sort of thing could easily happen. It is in fact how I had the first fall-out from our current resident at Melba's hit-list because I dared to contradict his smarty pants holding forth with reproduced Avedon shots of the killers and discussing the Novel ICB. He came up with one more poetic line, which I didn't know was his habit (at the time) something about, (glibly)people in small towns like that pass like ships in the night,unquote. I called him on it.

To my knowledge, the small rural town is one where you can barely break away from the daily encounter at the same time,same place,same person. You learn to love it. Tragedies when they happen are memorable forever because you saw that person every day. Anyway, that kind of thinking put me on the hit list immediately. He made a plan. I should have known.

But I get what you are saying about Ruffalo. Exactement. (He had however done that dicey role for Jane Campion just three years earlier,In the Cut, opposite Meg Ryan with jennifer jason Leigh as her sister....
This alone would get  him the offer of the part because you are never really sure if he might not turn out to be the killer and I can say that after reading the book. It was a must read book, back in the early 1990's?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on December 17, 2007, 09:27:44 PM
Infamous is by the way playing until Dec.23 on HBO (and then?

--one never knows, perhaps it will be free tv, as much as one can expect of that from television.


Title: FIOS
Post by: kidcarter8 on December 17, 2007, 10:22:32 PM
Put the order in yesterday

Will report back on it after the install next month


Title: Re:Fios
Post by: obertray on December 21, 2007, 09:07:13 AM
Put the order in last Sunday, 4 phone calls later, I remember why I consider Verizon such a drag when it comes to customer service. (Supposedly they have a software glitch that prevents them for including TV in my package. I just reupped with the satellite company with the HD package and a massive storage DVR, 350 hours standard or 50 hours HD but, well wasting money is sort of my special talent, so... plus, with the free tv, it'll just about pay for the net increase to my current Verizon bill so... except that I need another tv like I need to be told I'm an asshole by another person.)

OTOH I also signed up for cable telephone (turnabout being the fairest play here) for the office. There I get TV Internet (fat band) and 5 telephone lines for the same price I'm now paying for Internet (chubby band). Yes that does fry my onions, that they're obviously way overcharging me currently for internet, but it make the decision to go a no brainer (although; they're supposed to be lighting up the area around my office building with Fios in January, but the service dept at VZ can't seem to get to me in re the cost of multi phone lines on the Fios package so... I'll take my chances and if I'm wrong someone will call me an asshole.)

Right now I have Vonage. Can't say that I recommend it, but their online control of the system is lightyears ahead of the cable product. I'll be keeping some of my Vonage lines just so thatI can keep that online functionality.

BL has yet to show a rerun. I'm not sure why (scabs, non union or a deep library of scripts) They have also yet to show a stinker (this week they took on the greens and beat them, and Alan beat the subprime bank practices with what will be the end result, banks will have to renegotiate these mortgages so that they don't face extinction.)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on December 21, 2007, 12:17:50 PM
I open up the paper this morning and I am greeted with this article discussing what was bad on tv this past year.

I find it funny that anyone can make a living writing about television in the first place, but the idea of looking over a vast cultural wasteland such as the tv entertainment business and then writing about the worst of the waste is just pure silliness.

Garbage written about garbage and "Quick! how fast can I recycle this!"


But for those of you who like this sort of thing, have at it:

http://www.nj.com/columns/ledger/sepinwall/index.ssf?/base/entertainment-0/1198215430239380.xml&coll=1


Title: Ali G - Dead
Post by: Kam on December 21, 2007, 04:46:27 PM
http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071221/ap_en_ce/people_sacha_baron_cohen;_ylt=Ar4hBOS6oYbojnw23mkr1jGmG78C (http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20071221/ap_en_ce/people_sacha_baron_cohen;_ylt=Ar4hBOS6oYbojnw23mkr1jGmG78C)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on December 23, 2007, 02:54:16 AM
I don't know how I will live without Ali G.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on December 23, 2007, 02:41:18 PM
Dzimas, the Verizon problem had become a bit more than a bit much when the chose to involve themselves in politics and our private business as to what we communicate and with whom. Since they had first helping by their position of being there when you use their product, they decided they could be of help in letting the Decider know what we had to say about what we thought.

Since we usually say what we want to say anyway, having been raised with that right before the Decider decided he was the deciding factor in everybody's business, we are not necessarily sure we should be paying for the service that Verizon is doing for him.

I have a working assets pitch around here somewhere that came in the  e-mail recently, and if I didn't forward it beyond the gates of recall, will bring it up for your attention. Although you might locate their web-site more quickly  as you usually seem to have done.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on December 28, 2007, 09:35:26 AM
Lulu,

I don't know which is worse, that they have a new dumb show to figuratively cross the picket-lines  with something probably of no better caliber than what we watched at the beginning of the season with Glenn Close and Ted Danson(all production values and too much Mystery?)...

"The continuing Hollywood writers' strike looks like giving the young British actress Billie Piper an unexpected career break in the US. Executives at the cable channel Showtime had been planning to adapt Piper's provocative ITV2 series Secret Diary of a Call Girl for the States, just as shows like The Office have been re-cast and 'translated' in recent years. But with the strike still not settled, Showtime is taking the plunge and buying the series itself.

Showtime president Robert Greenblatt said he was "captivated" by Piper's performance. Will American audiences be equally captivated by Piper's portrayal of Hannah, the legal secretary who moonlights as high-class prostitute Belle? With the former Doctor Who actress seen in several semi-nude scenes and lesbian romps, the answer is probably yes - as long as they can understand Secret Diary of a Call Girl's distinctly British accent.

Meanwhile, Showtime rival HBO has its own prostitution project in the pipeline, from Darren Star, the creator of Beverly Hills 90210 and Sex and the City. It is currently dubbed Diary of a Manhattan Call Girl."

...Or, letting Darren Star loose on  us again  while failing to mention that he brought us that "really quality show"(said with, tongue in cheek; which is not easy to do):Melrose Place  ?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on December 28, 2007, 10:35:03 PM
I am enjoying Donald Sutherland's performance on Dirty Sexy Money.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on December 31, 2007, 01:15:47 PM
Anyone who liked "Futurama" might check out some direct-to-video movie releases in the coming year -- the first one is "Futurama, the Movie:  Bender's Big Score" -- the synopsis looks hilarious, and there's some major ensemble voice talent behind it.  It's in my queue, so I'll report back when it arrives.

Happy Completely Trivial Arbitrary Calendar Event!



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Donotremove on December 31, 2007, 03:44:02 PM
I've worn out the batteries on my remote channel surfing to get away from politics and car commercials. I may join up with netflix myself.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on December 31, 2007, 08:51:03 PM
Donotremove,

I have no problem finding weird stuff, all of which I could watch but some choices have to be made.  HERE,have patience while I TELL you a tale in two posts, probably....

I know this is somewhat asking a lot but do you remember this quite famous elderly woman detective?
 
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0441885/plotsummary   and then we have this much younger woman:
 
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0441885/                      and, if you will just be so kind, to run down the cast list--
 
you will notice that she is Janet McTeer, playing Anne Protheroe; and it is kind of hard to miss her because she is 6 foot, 1 inch tall which allows her to carry off those 1940's fashions quite well( post-War, of course).
She was blond in this episode. But, if you add to it by making her a red headed,6 ft.1 inch, Taurean, she
becomes the exceptionally famous actress,Gertrude Lawrence, a mere three years later for the film,Daphne.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0963169/
 
How shall I explain how I got into this? Last night, when having had enough stuff and nonsense, and noticing nothing on television, I perused the push button intense movies and thought I ought to watch two of my favorite actors torture each other,again, Isabelle Adjani and Gerard Depardieu, in Camille Claudel.
 
Since,Depardieu is Auguste Rodin, he gets to torture his mistress, his model and assistant who began to be her own sculptor in her own right.  On the other hand, Isabelle,playing Camille, brought her boyfriend along as cinematographer and director:Bruno Nuytten
 
Camille's real brother was the poet about whom W.H.Auden wrote:
"Time that with this strange excuse/Pardoned Kipling and his views,/And will pardon Paul Claudel,/Pardons him for writing well."
 
Yes, although he knew young Arthur Rimbaud and the Symbolists, he was not That Paul [that was Verlaine].
 
 
Yet, wait a minute. I could also see, Mindwalk, you know right away what that word synthesis brings to mind if you lived through the Seventies.
 
Filmed by Berndt Capra who has a brother named Fritjof Capra(they are Austrians), he decides to make a film about two impossible brothers(or, are they just friends?) who represent two different mentalities. Sam Waterston is of course the Lawyer (wasn't that novel?)ergo Politician and John Heard is the Poet.  They meet Luv Ullmann (for those of you who have viewed Ingmar Bergman films) and have an intense dialog about the nature of men and women because She is the Scientist. Perhaps this is a trialog(?) but, as different as the two men are in their tolerance of each other, Luv really flaps her gums about the development of the process of Scientific thinking and the philosophy it has fostered or was that the development of the process of Scientific Philosophy and the Science that it fabricated.   What is the thing that makes it possible to even begin to tolerate the intensity of the battle of the sexes. Smart guy that Berndt, he shoots it at Mont.St. Michel
 
By now, I have found Daphne, in which Janet McTeer plays Gertrude Lawrence. Daphne is, of course, du Maurier and Janet, who makes an overwhelming over 6ft. star of Stage and Screen, was  Daphne's father's mistress.  got that?  Well of course, he was Gerald du Maurier, Actor-Manager. So that accounts for it. What more is there to say?
 
Oh, I suppose that I could throw in the suggestion -- if you want to know what an Actor-Manager was in those days, take a look at Jeremy Irons in: Being Julia (where Julia is Annette Benning).
 
By the way, in regard to that 6 foot Amazon Comedienne, make that "Daphne's father's 'last' mistress. She  performed in Noel Coward's light comedies and sang the songs of that risque Cole Porter whom as you grow up in the Fifties you will eventually grasp the fundamental truth of their talent but Daphne du Maurier of course insists that her father became ultimately homophobic as a result of impressario-ing the careers of actors and talent that had to be managed somehow.
 
But get this, that is why she developed a male personality, she insists.

(to be continued...)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on December 31, 2007, 09:00:46 PM
Now, I ask you, who have been around, reading the copy that spews out of Meander While We May, these many years, do you remember or recall anything of this being said by either isabel_k or Stodolka, any other ladies who were there chime in if you will on Lady Daphne du Maurier, because we had a very good chat-group going completely off the wall one afternoon, or morning, or whatever about these novels that she wrote,Daphne, and how they became movies, and then we went right on to the Brontes who had been her influence other than the repression of her boyish nature by Dad.
 
Not once did anybody mention in Meander that when Daphne du Maurier went to talk with Doubleday publishing house, that she instantly became infatuated with Ellen Doubleday, who for our purposes is exotically, enticingly played as a femme-fatale with near Southern flirtatiousness, only  she isn't Southern just very sophisticated and reminds me of my Little Rock,Baltimore,Flint,General Motors auntie. She is however a ravishing brunette as played by Elizabeth McGovern who will knock your socks off. You won't believe she could possibly be doing this role in 2007.  I think that occurs when you have a statuesque red head like Janet McTeer ready to make an entrance from the wings on the other side of the stage.
 
Between the two of them, Daphne comes across as pale by comparison,but talented, because she walks like a boy in her husband's pants since trousers are what you wear when you sit all day writing mystery novels, sometimes of the arcane, like a Wilkie Collins but,personally, kicking your cuffs is not a comfortable way to get through life. Yet, dear Daphne is considered to be one of the few rare women who was able to write as a man.  Not with a man's nom de plume but as a man speaks and writes when she is writing from that point of view. She writes whole novels like that. Easier said than done.
 
isabel_k, as you know, collects the great feminist writers of Britain (and the British-Canadians like Atwood);despite her other hobbies, isabel was the foremost authority on British writers we had in the entire house of forums.  But, it was just an aside with her, reading for pleasure, they were the women who wrote in her native land.
 
And for  you Kate Winslet fans out there, let it be known that her Finding Neverland pose, dying for Johnny Depp, as the mother of  J.M.Barrie's boys, the Llewelyn Davies tribe whom he wrote into Peter Pan, or the Boy Who Never Grew Up, they were of course Daphne Du Maurier's cousins. Which may have been how she got that idea that she was still a boy.
 
It is not at all unlikely that being her father's child, and being in the environment of his profession that she would have noticed that some of the most famous actresses in his day were Peter Pan. She may have been a little too young to have realized that about Maud Adams, or Zena Dare, but surely by the time of Eva Le Gallienne? And she lived some thirty years beyond Mary Martin flying into the wings from one side of the stage to the other. Here is the all-time great of her Grandad's era(he started Punch magazine with "cartoons";
http://www.dgillan.screaming.net/stage/th-frames.html?http&&&www.dgillan.screaming.net/stage/boucicault/boucicault-n.html

(the first Peter Pan)

 
Ah,well, enough said.  But, why couldn't you  have told me, Pugetopolis, about Logo channel?  Having seen the creme de la creme, I probably won't watch it much if at all.  Then I wouldn't have had to write this for the du Maurier fans out there of Dame Daphne du Maurier( did you  get that? She was"knighted" by the Queen ) and I could have instead looked up the famous last words because probably poet W. Stafford was in CPS Camp with Kenneth Rexroth, whereas i think that when Gary Snyder was up there in the Northwest, that was a bit later toward the end of WW2 whereas he went to Daitokuji  Monastery during Vietnam; or maybe with William Everson, at Walport    http://www.santacruzpl.org/history/people/everson.shtml  (who became Brother Antoninus).
 
Or, maybe the Objectivist poets. Or, the Feb.15,2003  war objectors who protested in 800 cities around the world.
 
Peace.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 02, 2008, 04:49:40 PM
HISTORY CHANNEL has been airing a series(?) called 'The Universe'.  Last night I stayed up late to watch their episode on The Moon.  Fascinating stuff.  The moon used to be much closer to us and moves away from us at the rate of about 1-2 inches per year.  That means, in an average lifespan the moon will drift further away from the earth by about the length of the average wingspan, give or take a few inches.  Eventually, it will get so far away that the earth's gravitational hold on the moon will be lost and the moon will go speeding off into space.  Without the moon, our tides would be very different.  Without tides, scientists claim that life as we know it would never have formed.  Billions of years ago, the moon, being closer, produced 1,000-10,000 foot tides, churning up the earth and sending earth subtrate into shallow pools where primordial life could form.  Without the moon, the days would be 6 hours long and our biological clocks would be all screwy. This is not too much of a concern as the Sun is supposed to go kaplooey way before that happens.  So we'll need a new home anyway.  Maybe we could put people on the moon in a state of suspended animation.... wait til the moon leaves orbit and cruise the universe waiting for a landing spot with a nice bright sun nearby.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kidcarter8 on January 04, 2008, 10:55:16 AM
Huckaby would disagree.  :)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 04, 2008, 11:10:59 AM
I sat up way too late in the wee hours opening my e-mail from Sundance which has begun their entire full January countdown to the Sundance festival at Park City,Utah.  I've ticked off numerous films playing on their channel, as long as I remember to turn on my tv set and notice their Reminders. They are sponsored by the Stella Artois people that I linked into -- I think it was -- this forum,just for the laughs occasioned by their advertising.  So, I'll be catching up with all the movies that I didn't watch while watching their movies that I did watch.

Plus, the new Iconoclasts. I want to see the Norman Lear episode, also Sean Penn in the wilderness without having to necessarilly see his film lest it gross me out, and maybe I'll even stand stand for Madeleine. Albright giving Ashley Judd the tour of Washington.


Title: The Wire - Season 5
Post by: Kam on January 07, 2008, 03:10:42 PM
Watch out fans, there are spoilers in here: http://blogs.kansascity.com/tvbarn/2008/01/the-wire-season.html (http://blogs.kansascity.com/tvbarn/2008/01/the-wire-season.html)

I've watched the first 2 episodes of the season so far.  I pay for HBO onDemand, so I have already seen the first episode three times.  And last night, I stayed up until 2am to watch Episode 2, as soon as onDemand had it.  For any fans, nytempsperdu et al... you won't be let down by the first episode.  For those of us who've seen the first four seasons, you will love where they go in Episode 2.  For the uninitiated, you will be too confused by the newness of what you're seeing to understand how neatly woven the fabric has become.  That first 20 minutes of Episode 1 is flawless in its execution and so rewarding in its scope.  All the pieces matter.

HBO is also advertising having three 'The Wire' prequels on HBO onDemand.  Thats BS.  The closest they get is a scene where Bunk first meets Jimmy.  Its all of 3 minutes long.  The other prequels are just as shallow.  Very dissapointing.


Title: Re: FIOS
Post by: obertray on January 09, 2008, 12:25:04 PM
Kidcarter8,

I don't know how's yours going, but I still have no Fiosity and still no kind of servicing from Verizon.

Innerstingly, Vermont nixed the deal to sell Verizon's lines to Fairpoint Communications because they don't want a dimunition of service from a smaller company. ARE THEY FOR REAL? Worse than Verizon? And what do they think? That VZ is going to start treating Vter like human beings that live in clustered communities? Not gonna happen VT! VZ is going to sink their dough into Fios in the more heavily populated suburban markets (Meaning, I'm not sure when/if NYC is going to get upgraded either).


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 09, 2008, 04:57:50 PM
(http://www.hbo.com/thewire/img/castcrew/character_season04/thomascarcetti2.jpg)

Tommy: Hey, Norman, you know what I had for dinner last night? Tuna sub. I ate it in the car.

Norman: When I finish my memoirs, that shit'll be in there, no doubt.

(http://www.hbo.com/thewire/img/castcrew/actor_season04/regecathey.jpg)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on January 09, 2008, 09:26:16 PM
Ahhh, kam, thank you for acknowledging the new season of The Wire.  As with the other institutions delineated, I've enjoyed the old-timers' "war stories" this season at the newspaper, and the prospect of more to come.  I'm a little confused about how the lead newsroom guy (whatever the position is of the guy played by an actor who was in Homicide) connects to the others in the story line, if indeed a connection was established, other than via the overall theme of Season 5 Ep 1: cutbacks at the PD, the paper and the drug-dealing co-op. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 10, 2008, 12:31:56 AM
Larry David Curbed by Obama Loss

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/people,554,larry-david-shows-his-enthusiasm-for-barack-obama,11999



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 10, 2008, 01:13:39 AM
Ahhh, kam, thank you for acknowledging the new season of The Wire.  As with the other institutions delineated, I've enjoyed the old-timers' "war stories" this season at the newspaper, and the prospect of more to come.  I'm a little confused about how the lead newsroom guy (whatever the position is of the guy played by an actor who was in Homicide) connects to the others in the story line, if indeed a connection was established, other than via the overall theme of Season 5 Ep 1: cutbacks at the PD, the paper and the drug-dealing co-op. 

(http://www.hbo.com/thewire/img/castcrew/actor_season05/clarkjohnson.jpg)

City Desk Editor Gus Haynes played by Clark Johnson.  Fact:  Clark Johnson actually directed the first two Episodes of the Wire from Season 1.

Norman has a connection to the Sun.  He worked there for years before joining the Carcetti campaign.


Title: The Wire
Post by: Kam on January 10, 2008, 04:44:33 PM
Interview with David Simon - creator of HBO's THE WIRE

http://www.believermag.com/issues/200708/?read=interview_simon (http://www.believermag.com/issues/200708/?read=interview_simon)

“MY STANDARD FOR VERISIMILITUDE IS SIMPLE AND I CAME TO IT WHEN I STARTED TO WRITE PROSE NARRATIVE: FUCK THE AVERAGE READER.”


Title: Re: Television
Post by: kitinkaboodle on January 10, 2008, 05:34:36 PM
Gabriel Byrne anyone?  HBO's upcoming format (on 1/28) may be of some interest...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on January 11, 2008, 10:59:24 PM
Greetings, kam.   Another connection to the newspaper was a brief scene of Bubbles peddling papers in traffic--can't recall which ep it was in.  Speaking of Bubbles, I can't remember ever wanting so much for a (fictional) addict to succeed in getting clean.  What was said about the element of shame had me saying "Amen!" at the screen and I still weep at the scene when his old sponsor finds him. 

Thanks so much for the wonderful Simon interview.  Quite different from him speaking to Terry Gross on NPR.  Re this from that:

Quote
But instead of the old gods, The Wire is a Greek tragedy in which the postmodern institutions are the Olympian forces. It’s the police department, or the drug economy, or the political structures, or the school administration, or the macroeconomic forces that are throwing the lightning bolts and hitting people in the ass for no decent reason.

If I could beg another season focused on another institution as "Olympian force" it would be public health, as in a hospital--NOT Hopkins--but a "general" hospital treating the GSWs from the street battles as well as the myriad diseases afflicting those who might be called "collateral damage" in the "drug wars."

   


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 13, 2008, 03:27:05 PM
Did anyone see, The Legacy, on night before last, as part of the Sundance Festival 31 days pre-ParkCity?  It's a strange tale in French and Georgian(with the music of the latter) which shows you how the other half lives according to old traditions in the midst of poverty, and the culture clash between the French travelers ideas compared to the abominable local  customs but this angst is somewhat relieved by meeting someone in their own age group for awhile.

Oddly enough the film on cable went through local translation problems when listed in  the local newspaper. I had already been sent a reminder from Sundance channel but was nevertheless upset when I checked the time in the paper and discovered a film description that was anything but what I had been told by Sundance on-line.  I hated to think the same thing would happen to me as did the other night when I set a reminder for something that looked interesting, only to have it last 15 minutes and I cannot find any indication of that on-line at Sundance which describes a usual movie-length. I wonder now if somehow a slip up provided a nice prevue for the public without a future film to follow?

Anyway, The Legacy came on, right on schedule. And when it was over, being altogether too sad a feeling with which to leave you, I began to look forward to someday seeing that other film that the local newspaper mistakenly thought it was, a real rouser of the weird and occult and scary stuff, also known as The Legacy, with Katharine Ross and Sam O'Neill, anybody seen that one?

Here's the lagniappe, when they didn't provide anything more than 15 minutes of prevue-like light fluff the previous night,entertaining short about short kids in school for the first early years and with a male teacher who seems to enjoy teaching very little children although none of their natural science projects work out because the subjects never fail to die. He and the kids just don't have the knack of nurturing butterflies,snakes, visiting puppies, etc.  but I got to see and listen to an almost ancient Yves St.Laurent talk about his career, after his mother talked about when they first knew he had a flair for dressing women. Well, he was a little older than the kids who could not raise butterflies...

Yves did seem to enjoy dressing women in the things that he magically drew. He described it as, he would sketch a woman, her face, and as he began to go along the neck, everything she wore came into view as her personality dictated. I can believe it. From there on he had enough satisfaction dressing the appropriate model in what had arrived creatively on his sketch, so that he didn't cross dress. He was an Algerian pied noir, so I kept thinking of Jean Rochefort as The Hairdressers Husband who used to  dance to North African records in the shop to make his wife laugh.

They went through most of his changing presentations from the time that he took over at Dior upon Dior's death, and I remembered them one by one, The New Look, which was elegance and full skirted, corseted,fitted jacket, worn with a small hat,most often veiled. The the Geometric look when the average American decided whether or not to actually buy and wear a pair of white boots or not because one or the other decision made all the difference in the world  as to "how you were seen". I don't believe St.Laurent had anything to do with that boot; but people wore them with geometric designed wardrobes.(and short-hair by Vidal Sassoon) Then, the memorable era of the Russian look after an inspiring trip to Russia where women asked how should we dress? They had nothing to work with, how could they buy anything. Yves changed that and told them what they had. It of course appeared immediately in The New York Times, after he got back from Russia with his drawings of what came to mind. Very exotic looks that very few of us would be able to afford either.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 14, 2008, 12:45:12 PM
It must have snowed heavily because no comment on movie awards from Golden Globes.

As to television, I can tell you as a matter of fact I am not sorry that Longford did for series (although, I had no idea it was. I was under the delusion it was a one-shot perfection of drama on how we get taken by the malignant psychopaths among us.); nor am I sorry that Glenn Close won for her role in "Damages" which is somewhat about the same thing but not as well written for presenting the scenario. I guess in one case it is the State against the poor sod who got mucked about and acts out viciously to prove her worth to some creature of the opposite sex who has encouraged her to do something royally deviant that no one would believe a woman would do.   Damages merely offers us what we already knew before 2008, that the wealthy of the corporate structure will cheat the poor employee out of his rights. How is that for a mucking? while we are left guessing whether Glennie and her assorted accomplices are any better sort of people (nobody said they were human beings).

But don't you suppose if someone would write the appropriate vehicle for both Glenn Close and Jim Broadbent it could have been what the movie buffs refers to as boffo even on the small screen; when you consider that Julie Christi did win best actor of the female sex(and she did that right up to form!) for:Away from Here. Which I think is a first time out for the director giving visual form to the content of Alice Munroe's novel.

Oh, I forgot. There are no more small screens in America; just non-corporate types of little people whose salary can not afford the luxury of trying to find anything to watch on tv. Glenn Close was playing a character who tried to do right, by the first  category but, as to the production,it doesn't stand comparison to her roles as Sarah,Plain and Tall, either the Skylark episode or Winter's End. Both of which she produced.

It indicates she is a better producer than those who produced this mess for which she won best actress anyway.

"Jim Broadbent, I would like to introduce you to Glenn Close".

He's already met  Kate Winslet, a close second coming up; and Nicole Kidman who is not.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on January 15, 2008, 11:50:06 AM
Prison Break is back, one of the few interesting things left to watch for those of us who don't buy cable.   "Susan" is developing as a formidable villainness and arch-psychopath -- the season starts with her getting a taste of her medicine but the happy glow dissipates quickly as she escapes captivity. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on January 15, 2008, 10:00:50 PM
Sometimes with Prison Break I'm kind of amused at the idea that this guy named Lincoln Burrows...

...who was accused of killing the Vice President's brother once upon a time (remember that?), was minutes away from being executed for said crime, then escaped from prison, then was exonerated by a series of events too lengthly to number even in this run-on sentence, and whose face must be known all over the world due to the saturation news coverage such a situation would demand...

...could so freely walk around in Panama City, which is depicted as a cosmopolitan place with gleaming skyscrapers and posh hotels. Does no civilian ever spot him and say, "Hey, you look just like that guy. Nah, can't be."

Anyway, yeah, I agree that Queen B-word is becoming more fun to root against than Guard Brad in Season One and Agent Mahone in Season Two. (Although keep an eye on Whistler.)  Maybe if there is a Season Four she'll end up in jail with Scofield along with her two predecessors in villainy.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on January 15, 2008, 10:08:07 PM
Oh, yeah, and I was just starting to like that Panamanian Colonel who was in charge. Well, as much as I could like a guy who uses waterboarding, that is. "This guy's actually getting places," I thought. "In the other two seasons it would have taken at least three episodes to get through this much plot." Then, alas, she iced him and basically rebooted all the 2008 plot development so far.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Dzimas on January 16, 2008, 04:34:25 AM
On a nostalgic note, I was very happy to see the original Mod Squad is finally being released on DVD,

(http://thorg.chattablogs.com/images/modsquad.jpg)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on January 16, 2008, 12:23:32 PM
Earl, mindbending thought there, Susan ending up in a big cage with variously morally bent men lacking in female companionship. 

I've wondered about the anonymity of Burrows, and also the baldness -- as a free man, you'd think the first step was to let the prison 'do start growing out.  Then there's Michael, who spent last season in a sweltering hellhole always clad in a long-sleeve shirt, and often with a hoodie over it.  Training for the hot box?  Retains water and is too embarassed to request cranberry juice?  Who knows.

What surprises me a little is the seeming naivete of Whistler's girlfriend -- she must be deeply into him and determinedly oblivious to all the fishiness.  And, yeah, he could supersede Queen B who were meant to understand was once a good girl turned psycho by some kind of horrific captivity situation.









Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 17, 2008, 02:50:33 PM
http://www.sundancechannel.com/films/500257916

STRANGE CULTURE   (this one will freek you out)

Appeared at the 2007 Sundance Film Festival
What does it take to fall under suspicion as a terrorist in contemporary America? Experimental filmmaker and artist Lynn Hershman Leeson (CONCEIVING ADA) tells the disturbing Kafkaesque story of Steve Kurtz, a conceptual artist/college professor who was suspected of bioterrorism after FBI agents found harmless microbes in his house. Breaking from documentary convention, Hershman Leeson uses comic strips and actors (Tilda Swinton, Thomas Jay Ryan and Peter Coyote) to tell the tale. "A scary testament to the power of fear" -- Seattle Times.

(The above mentioned actors have contributed their work to this for a just cause, to give resonance to the significance lest you misunderstand the opening portions of this film for a comedy)

Friday January 18 at 12:35AM
Friday January 18 at 10:35AM
Sunday January 20 at 3:35PM

http://www.strangeculture.net/


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 21, 2008, 04:40:02 PM
'MLK: A Dream Deferred' premieres at 8 PM on Jan. 21, and will repeat at 11 PM.

http://www.blackvoices.com/blogs/2008/01/16/isaiah-washington-dream-special-is-a-good-move/

If anyone knows which channel(?), post it please because Mr.Johnson who owns BET is showing the other version: Boycott

in my local area, which was a really fine film starring Jeffrey Wright and Terrence Howard and another actor playing Bayard Rustin whom I thought was stunning(more stunning in holding camera than Bay R. in real life).

This is going to take some research, I can see, to discover who has the Isaiah Washington narrative version?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 21, 2008, 04:48:51 PM
Repeat


Grab some popcorn and a beverage - one of your favorite films is about to screen on Sundance Channel!

Film: A Guide to Recognizing Your Saints
Screening Time: TUESDAY JAN 22 11:10PM


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on January 21, 2008, 05:59:36 PM
'MLK: A Dream Deferred' premieres at 8 PM on Jan. 21, and will repeat at 11 PM.

http://www.blackvoices.com/blogs/2008/01/16/isaiah-washington-dream-special-is-a-good-move/

If anyone knows which channel(?), post it please because Mr.Johnson who owns BET is showing the other version: Boycott


madupont, as far as I can tell, MLK: ADD is on TV One, a network not listed on my cable system.  I checked all my syndicated channels just in case, and none of them have it scheduled. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 21, 2008, 11:28:43 PM
Thanks,harrie.  I found it at the last minute, but it was playing opposite
Boycott.

So I dutifully watched Isaiah Washington introduce,Dream Deferred, which is similarly to a civics lessons for necessary review.

Then I had time to switch back to Boycott, which is more of a work of art at a higher level of civics, in which Jeffrey Wright never quite gets as drawled out as Martin Luther King, no matter how low he pitches his voice; and this is one of those films where everybody has to look like everyone did back then so Jeffrey Wright manages to convince you and you realize wow, with the charisma that he is projecting, what if Martin Luther King had looked like Jeffrey Wright?

I am always irreverent when it comes to reverends but it is an equal opportunity irreverence. Lucky me, I got there just in time for The Scene and there were more of them, scenes strung together than I had remembered in which Bayard Rustin does his bit.  I had no idea who the actor was when I first saw Boycott, on tv approximately seven years ago but, coming here allowed me to discover where Bayard Rustin was raised as a Quaker in southern Pennsylvania along the Underground Railway route.

In Boycott,Rustin is played by a mysterious captivating figure from whom you cannot take your eyes away. He speakes like he is placing each word in front of you into your field of vision  like a shimmering sphere of a bead that he is stringing into a line of thought and when they break like soap bubbles popping in the air, not in sequence but all at one time, they have entered your mind permanently. He moves gracefully or elegantly, puts his cigarettes out like an early Hollywood diva; and, finally when I discovered who this person really is, was not surprised (although I was supposed to be surprised)that he had studied dance in Washington,D.C.  That figured. It isn't even weird although it is at the same time, because Erik Todd Dellums is the son of the former mayor of Oakland,California who then went on to become Congressman Ron Dellums of California.

Erik one would think would make it in movies.  He made Spike Lee movies like:Do the Right Thing.  And lots of -- Homicide: Life on the Street. Apparently was on, The Wire. And does other oddities. Considering that I was a fan of the first two categories, I did not recognize him in the least; which may have everything to do with the precise detail he put in conveying Bayard Rustin on camera.  He would have seen him in California but would have been much too young possibly to understand who that was because he is now only forty-four years old. 

Of course, the result was he became so fired up with all this activism, that his one rash moment, no big deal, was writing a small article for the San Francisco Chronicle downing the film Cold Mountain for not really being about   the Civil War, and not hiring enough black actors to look meaningfully authentic even though it was supposed to be somewhere between Virginia and Kentucky.  What can you do when you are up against one more Jude Law or Nicole Kidman movie much less one with both of them together and that perky little blond person who was just such an upper for having skills all the way through the plot?   

Yet, in terms of the prior trivia game, he out-epicenes even Rupert Everett; and frankly makes Jude Law look like some kind of a midget bereft of finesse and smooth graceful movements who probably should have been with Renee Zellweger instead of Nicole Kidman if there was any justice. Renee at least has that "zing" which Jude always overworks in his own repartee, whereas Kidman too often appears vacant, or vacuous.   

Now, if only oilcanboyd23 or jbottle happen to have seen him on The Wire, I might find him in an episode listing for Erik Dellums, but obviously The Wire enjoys having a cast of dozens of faces and types to flavor Baltimore. I really thought I must be dealing with a completely unknown actor that they hired on from God knows where you find a person like this? Although reviewers have said, Dellums was the only person who was able to come up to the intensity level of Andre Breugher, when doing episodes of Homicide: Life on the Street.                         


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on January 22, 2008, 09:35:59 AM
madupont, is this what you're looking for? 

http://www.imdb.com/name/nm0217529/
(#6 on the list of credits)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 22, 2008, 09:57:53 AM
Yes,and thank you for reminding me but how does one get a copy of a series episode which is as long ago as 1998?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 22, 2008, 10:12:25 AM
I guess, I found that out, it will just take awhile to scroll through the HBO site and line up what they have according to what is on the Dellums' credits.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on January 22, 2008, 10:58:40 AM
madupont, are you looking for The Wire or Homicide:LOTS?  TV.com takes some wrangling, but they're pretty helpful in both cases. 

Here's a listing of The Wire episodes
http://tinyurl.com/374pjp


Here's a listing of Homicide episodes
http://tinyurl.com/3exrx7


Plus.....
On Wednesday, January 10, 2007 at 9 p.m. ET/PT, THE WIRE will begin airing on BET with its series premiere. The basic cable, multi-season run of THE WIRE on BET will consist of all 50 produced episodes, with each episode airing in a 90-minute block. The first three episodes will be shown in a three-day marathon beginning Wednesday, January 10 through Friday, January 12 from 9- 10:30 p.m. ET/PT each night. Beginning January 18, THE WIRE can be seen every Thursday night at 9 p.m ET /PT with an encore run on Saturday nights at 9 p.m. ET/PT. The Peabody Award-winning series tells the story of a single drugs-and- murder police investigation from the point of view of both the police and their targets.

I don't know if this simplifies your quest or complicates it, but there it is.  I'm psyched, but pissed I missed the startup mini-marathon.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on January 22, 2008, 11:23:58 AM
Prison Break seems to be upping the ante in terms of blood and general violence, this season.  Credibility is starting to stretch in an Indiana Jones fashion, where men take severe beatings and receive blows that would surely cause concussions and other trauma that would require days of bed rest, yet manage to shake off with a few dabs of a moist rag and a shrug of the shoulders. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 22, 2008, 11:56:00 AM
Prison Break seems to be upping the ante in terms of blood and general violence, this season.  Credibility is starting to stretch in an Indiana Jones fashion, where men take severe beatings and receive blows that would surely cause concussions and other trauma that would require days of bed rest, yet manage to shake off with a few dabs of a moist rag and a shrug of the shoulders. 

Sucre's poor little Mari Cruz, always being used! 
Bellick drops a chicken's foot, even gained respect to boot.
Scofield finds a killer's touch, why does he mourn for Sammy much?
LeChero regains his leadership rung, I can't recall if Colvin ever fired a gun.
And do we see a chance at love, Lincoln plants a little bud.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on January 22, 2008, 01:40:59 PM
Wow!  charming little PB poem, Kam!  Yeah, I noticed that Linc had raised a little eiffel tower there for Whistler's gf....many possible subplots have been set up, indeed so many that the last couple episodes have been a bit dizzying.  And Whistler is turning into such a mysterious figure that it's almost as if he stumbled in from the "Lost" set -- does he have a "family" somewhere, including a wife?  in Phoenix?  is his name Miller?  Just what sort of secrets lie in that little birding book?  (you may remember, btw, that a website last year, at which messages were left, was called europeangoldfinch.com...a cute little coincidence...)



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 22, 2008, 05:07:21 PM


Now, if only oilcanboyd23 or jbottle happen to have seen him on The Wire, I might find him in an episode listing for Erik Dellums, but obviously The Wire enjoys having a cast of dozens of faces and types to flavor Baltimore. I really thought I must be dealing with a completely unknown actor that they hired on from God knows where you find a person like this? Although reviewers have said, Dellums was the only person who was able to come up to the intensity level of Andre Breugher, when doing episodes of Homicide: Life on the Street.                         

Dellums went from Drug kingpin in Homicide to Baltimore City Medical Examiner in The Wire.  (http://water-bender.com/images/actors/koh.jpg)

You can hear a 2 minute clip of Erik as drug dealer being interviewed by two homicide detectives, 23 minutes into this Clark Johnson  NPR interview (http://www.npr.org/templates/player/mediaPlayer.html?action=1&t=4&islist=true&id=13&d=01-21-2008)

The actor who plays OMAR has an NPR interview (http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=18299087) of his own.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 22, 2008, 05:09:46 PM
Wow!  charming little PB poem, Kam!  Yeah, I noticed that Linc had raised a little eiffel tower there for Whistler's gf....many possible subplots have been set up, indeed so many that the last couple episodes have been a bit dizzying.  And Whistler is turning into such a mysterious figure that it's almost as if he stumbled in from the "Lost" set -- does he have a "family" somewhere, including a wife?  in Phoenix?  is his name Miller?  Just what sort of secrets lie in that little birding book?  (you may remember, btw, that a website last year, at which messages were left, was called europeangoldfinch.com...a cute little coincidence...)



"wait, what am I? A toothless crack ho?"


(http://www.buddytv.com/articles/prison-break/images/jodi-lyn-okeefe.jpg)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on January 24, 2008, 12:11:25 AM
harrie: Welcome aboard watching The Wire!  Dunno if the channel has commercials, if so, sorry if those lessen the impact--actually it may provide something of a breather in intense parts.   

Though she didn't get into The Wire (just as well, it might be too heavy for 14) my daughter is now a full-fledged fan of Flight of the Conchords and mom's only slightly less so, both of us are enjoying the catch-up--now on ep. 6 of 12.  Is that it for this series, or are more planned, if anyone knows?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 24, 2008, 12:03:39 PM
harrie: Welcome aboard watching The Wire!  Dunno if the channel has commercials, if so, sorry if those lessen the impact--actually it may provide something of a breather in intense parts.   

Though she didn't get into The Wire (just as well, it might be too heavy for 14) my daughter is now a full-fledged fan of Flight of the Conchords and mom's only slightly less so, both of us are enjoying the catch-up--now on ep. 6 of 12.  Is that it for this series, or are more planned, if anyone knows?

Did you notice that the guy who plays Klebinow in the newsroom of The Wire is the same actor who does Mel's (Kristen Schaal) husband Doug.  David Costabile:

(http://www.theatermania.com/news/images/9205a.jpg)

 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 24, 2008, 12:13:52 PM


Though she didn't get into The Wire (just as well, it might be too heavy for 14) my daughter is now a full-fledged fan of Flight of the Conchords  Is that it for this series, or are more planned, if anyone knows?

Yis. It is.

http://www.televisionaryblog.com/2007/08/hbo-renews-flight-of-conchords-for.html (http://www.televisionaryblog.com/2007/08/hbo-renews-flight-of-conchords-for.html)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on January 24, 2008, 09:45:04 PM
Terrific news, kam, will start looking forward to future flights (and will look for the common actor--that didn't sound right, but you know what I mean). 

So, what did you think of the Bowie episode?  It's one of the few my hubs saw, too, and he laughed more than I did.  I think he got more references to albums--yes, folks, there are still people who call them that and have to struggle, often switching to "record" then detouring by "tape" before arriving at "CD"--costumes, songs & lyrics.  Kid & I liked the songs in the discrimination vs. Kiwis ep more.  Kid's only dilemma is that she'd like to tell a good friend about the show but the friend's mom is--oh NOES--Australian.

My only dilemma: alarm at the "awww" sounds from the kid when one of the pair (yes, mostly Bret) gets dissed or dumped or just looks like he has "hurty feelings."  Please tell me this is not an omen.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 24, 2008, 11:33:21 PM
Bowie was one of the better episodes. i love the song Jemaine sings to Bret about liking him in a heterosexual way, but I didn't like the Bowie episode as much as I liked the Kiwi episode (Bret and Jemaine learning the meaning of flipping the bird) or the Mugging episode (Rhymenocerous vs. Hiphop-opotomus).  I also like Episode 1 of course, "The Humans are Dead".   "Most Beautiful Girl in the Room".


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 24, 2008, 11:38:53 PM
Now, if i could figure out what you all are talking about.????

Yes, that is Dellums, and I kind of figured out by the episodes of The Wire that he was the medical examiner (but, with that hair? Which by the way was not the style when Bayard Rustin was the preferred role. I imagine it is rather hard being a Congressman's son at the same time as rustling up acting gigs).


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on January 25, 2008, 02:31:21 PM
Quote
"Most Beautiful Girl in the Room".

Ah yes, "You're so beautiful, you could be a waitress...or a model, part-time"--brilliant!



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 25, 2008, 02:39:59 PM
Quote
"Most Beautiful Girl in the Room".

Ah yes, "You're so beautiful, you could be a waitress...or a model, part-time"--brilliant!



You're so beautiful, you could be an air hostess in the 60s
You're so beautiful, you could be a Tree
You're so beautiful
Definitely one of those girls i've been speaking to in the chat rooms
mmmmm... wildsexyangel22
You're so beatuful
Beautiful...
You could be a part-time model
But you'd probably have to keep your day job


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on January 25, 2008, 03:33:42 PM
Thanks for correct version.  Kid's b'day coming up--DVD of show or CD of songs...or can she just put their songs on her iPod from iTunes, maybe? My ignorance of how such things work is shame-making.

Another question I couldn't answer was from hubs--did/does the writer's strike affect the new FotC season?

Off in search of a website...


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 25, 2008, 04:22:09 PM
Thanks for correct version.  Kid's b'day coming up--DVD of show or CD of songs...or can she just put their songs on her iPod from iTunes, maybe? My ignorance of how such things work is shame-making.

Another question I couldn't answer was from hubs--did/does the writer's strike affect the new FotC season?

Off in search of a website...

I don't recommend the CD ... i mean... its only $5 or something like that on iTunes but only comes with about 5 songs.

The DVD on the other hand is a sweet deal: all 12 episodes for only $19.95


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on January 25, 2008, 04:30:02 PM
Excellent, repeated thanks, kam!

 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 25, 2008, 07:20:09 PM
(http://www.bustedtees.com/bt/images/BT-carcettiformayor-gallery-4895.jpg)(http://www.bustedtees.com/bt/images/BT-carcettiformayor-featured-4905.jpg)(http://www.bustedtees.com/bt/images/BT-carcettiformayor-featured-4901.jpg)


http://www.bustedtees.com/shirt/carcettiformayor/male (http://www.bustedtees.com/shirt/carcettiformayor/male)

$15 T-shirts make a good gift too


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on January 25, 2008, 10:59:16 PM
True, but not that particular one. Fictional mayor has nothing on SF's real one. Gavin Newsom's going strong at beg. of term 2, even after drug/booze/sex mini-scandals, & this a.m.'s newspaper says he diverted funds voters approved for public transit to his staff.  Oh yeah, at a recent ceremony, he managed to swear in two people to the same position.  Ya gotta love city livin'.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on January 28, 2008, 02:31:59 PM
Gabriel Byrne starts series tonight HBO, "In Treatment"


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on January 28, 2008, 10:10:09 PM
Last ep of FotC had kid in raptures--Demetri Martin is her darlin' at the moment.  Mom's a Demetri fan, too, but was disgruntled (or less gruntled) at the ending, can't really say why.

Lord of the Rings spoof was perhaps inevitable but was hilarious, nonetheless.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on January 29, 2008, 12:15:41 PM
Have no cable, but have heard Martin on NPR and will seek out DVD.  Probably no relation to Steve Martin, eh?

Watched the repeated pilot of the Terminator spinoff last night --nothing worth comment there -- lots of f/x, things exploding, hot women...less than the sum of its parts.

"Lost" returns in two days -- given the basic arc of the show, I hope they wrap it up in the fourth season.  In any case, we need to know who was the guy in the coffin.  And if Hurley managed to drop a few ponds.




 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on January 30, 2008, 01:55:10 AM
There are 48 more episodes of Lost to go.  Its not being wrapped up this season.  We were supposed to get 12-16 installments but that was the plan before the strike.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on January 30, 2008, 12:13:24 PM
Too bad.  I like the show, but would like it to conclude if only so they can stop jerking us around with this skip-the-fall-season bullshit.  A dramatic hook in May to bring you back in September is cool, but making people wait eight months smells kind of manipulative in the worst way.  Also, looking back, I think they overdid the red herrings, the weirdnesses that they dangle in front of you and then just let slide.  A core mystery is great, but 47 core mysteries is just tedious. 





Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on January 31, 2008, 11:59:24 AM
The Courant's TV critic liked the new Lost stuff, what he's seen or been fed - not sure about the scenario there.  But he said that by making a concrete end date, the writers have a place from which to work back, and the critic seems to think the details will be interesting and dovetail together somewhat niftily.  He did say that in tonight's or the next ep, the (perhaps non-)rescuers appear, so it sounds like fun may start right off the bat.  I hope he (Roger Catlin, the critic) isn't lying.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on January 31, 2008, 12:15:46 PM
I watched the subscripted (annoyingly) replay of the season ender last night, which was kind of useful in bringing back some of the details that had slid from my mind over 8 months.  The "not Penny's boat" issue is pretty compelling, as is who's in the coffin.  The boat issue will be addressed right off, but I suspect the coffin ID will be dangled in front of us for quite a while.

Also, the "I have to get back to him" from Kate at the LAX empty lot rendezvous with Jack in the flashforward -- would "him" be Sawyer?



Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on January 31, 2008, 01:58:45 PM
...or the ubiquitous Nathan Fillion?  (the apparently clueless policeman she married in the past)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on January 31, 2008, 08:05:28 PM
I didn't mind at all the subscripts in last night's rerun of the S3 finale, but then, I also used to enjoy VH1's Pop-Up Video back in the 90's.

Here's an interesting interview with Michael Emerson, the actor who plays Ben:

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/ent/tv/5500209.html

This bit is tantalizing:

Quote
Q: Tell us a secret about the new season.

A: Consider this: You thought you'd met dangerous characters before, but this season your sympathy system will be dramatically rearranged, and you'll meet characters more terrifying than you'd ever imagined.


Funny that at the time of his first appearance he knew no more about his character than we did. As far as he knew, he was playing a guy named Henry Gale who came to the island in a hot air balloon. I believe, though, that has changed since then and now he is one of only three actors, along with Matthew Fox and Terry O'Quinn, who have been told by the show's producers how the show will play out to the very end.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on January 31, 2008, 08:16:49 PM
Oooh, thanks for the link, Earl. I totally missed last night's pop-up show, will have to see if it's by any chance online.  I'm a fellow Pop-Up Video fan, by the way.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 01, 2008, 01:00:52 PM
I don't like subtitles of any kind, unless necessary.  I'm a right-hemisphere guy.  Or just bad at mental multitasking.


The flashforward seems to be an effective device for the series -- the Oceanic Six thing gives such a tantalizing sense of what is to come on the Island, and shows different characters dealing with possible guilt over some kind of desertion of the other survivors -- Kate seems to be blocking it off, but Hurley and Jack are deeply affected.  Charlie obeys the rule of "you're never really dead on Lost" and will no doubt keep popping up in ObiWanesque apparitions.

And I suspect Jacob will be a strong invisible maguffin in the coming year, embodying the island's supernatural mysteries as the smoke monster once did.  Hurley joins the club of those who have seen the rocking chair rock itself.

The sense of shifting sympathies that Emerson mentions was also brought to the fore by the mere fact of him as the choice of narrator for the Review Show that preceded the premiere.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on February 01, 2008, 09:09:20 PM
I'd forgotten until last night how Lost can sometimes make me chase shadows. I look for some meaning, something solid to grasp, only to find air slipping through my fingers.

Hugo told Imaginary Charlie that he saw him in the convenience store "standing by the Ho-Ho's." Then later he and Jack play a game of HORSE on a basketball court. Jack quits with Hugo ahead. How far had he gotten in the game? HO, that's how far. Ho-Ho's and HO. Coincidence? (Well, probably it was, but I couldn't help noticing it because my senses are heightened to about "Mick St John on Moonlight" levels whenever I see a new episode of Lost so that I can process these random tidbits.)

Like, for example, I couldn't help wondering if Hugo's reference to "Oceanic Six" had some connection to his six Lotto numbers. Probably no connection at all, but there you go.

I don't mean to make this sound like a complaint. I'm having fun with it.

Any thoughts out there on why Hugo lied to the police detective and said he didn't know Ana Lucia? When the detective first appeared, I thought for a second that the actor looked familiar and wondered what other shows he'd been in that I would have seen. Then he mentioned he used to be Ana Lucia's partner and I had a D'oh moment. "Of course! He's been in Lost, duh, that's where I've seen him."

Also, I could understand very easily Hugo reaching the conclusion (based on Charlie's "Not Penny's Boat" message) that the people on the boat were not to be trusted. But that didn't necessarily mean he had to side with Locke, did it? I fully expected him to look at Locke and say, "I may not be staying with Jack but I'm not going with you, either, dude. You're nuts."

People on the show seem to be calling him "Hugo" rather than "Hurley" more often lately

By the way, I read sometime during the eight-month hiatus that some of the remaining episodes will be flash-forwards, some will be flash backs, and some will be vague enough that we might not be able to tell if they're pre- or post-Island.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 01, 2008, 11:46:40 PM
More Lost watchers here, with teener daughter showing more interest than last season. She's still wishing Vincent would come back and come in for more screen time, that Charlie weren't dead, and that Kate would just, like, disappear.  I'm as weary of Jack as she is of Kate, and we both snicker at the Sawyer Scowl, and are both happy to see Hurley get more story, hoping it's not just getting him out of the way early. 

Who would I like to see more?  Rose and Bernard, especially some back story (did I miss that?) and to hear lots more of her wonderful voice.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 02, 2008, 12:26:53 PM
Hurley has moved from comic relief man to a more central character -- a good thing,  I agree.  Earl's comments...

"I don't mean to make this sound like a complaint. I'm having fun with it." sums it up for me, too.  LOL the whole "ho-hos" coincidence.  They do like to mess with our heads, don't they?

Vincent will return, I'm sure.  I'm sure dogs are joyfully in touch with the island's healing powers...speaking of which, at the end of last season there's a flashback where Ben, age 10, meets one of the original Others in the jungle and you may have noticed he appeared to be an older version (gray wig) of Richard Alpert.  30 years later, Alpert seems younger and was the one who accompanied Juliet from the mainland.  Same guy?  Rejuvenated by island mojo?  A son?

As to Hurley's not mentioning Anna Lucia, he's in an interrogation room with a cop...is he really going to say, "Oh, yeah, her -- she shot and killed one of the passengers and then later was murdered herself -- let me tell you all about that!"  Does the phrase "can of worms" come to mind?

Another thing that made my Lost antennae quiver -- Ben's use of the phrase, "every LIVING person on the island will be killed" [by the freighter people].  Normally, I would just view the adjective "living" as a way of speaking dramatically or whatever, but this is the island we're talking about, where it's uncertain how dead the dead people really are and you have people like Jacob whose metaphysical condition is pretty uncertain.  Is there a hidden meaning to Ben's turn of phrase?

What fun.









Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on February 02, 2008, 07:58:25 PM


LOL the whole "ho-hos" coincidence.  They do like to mess with our heads, don't they?



Seems I dismissed that one too soon. I cannonballed into a Lost blog today and discovered that the letters "HO" also appeared written on a board somewhere in the episode. I hadn't spotted that. Here's the theory, which I'll copy&paste from the site:

Quote
perhaps, maybe, "HO" could refer to the element Holmium:


A trivalent metallic rare earth element, holmium has the highest magnetic moment (10.6µB) of any naturally-occurring element and possesses other unusual magnetic properties. When combined with yttrium, it forms highly magnetic compounds.

Holmium is a relatively soft and malleable element that is fairly corrosion-resistant and stable in dry air at standard temperature and pressure. In moist air and at higher temperatures, however, it quickly oxidizes, forming a yellowish oxide. In pure form, holmium possesses a metallic, bright silvery luster. Holmium oxide has some fairly dramatic color changes depending on the lighting conditions. In daylight, it is a tannish yellow color. Under trichromatic light, it is a fiery orange red, almost indistinguishable from the way erbium oxide looks under this same lighting. This has to do with the sharp emission bands of the phosphors, and the absorption bands of both oxides.
Because of its magnetic properties, holmium has been used to create the strongest artificially-generated magnetic fields when placed within high-strength magnets as a magnetic pole piece (also called a magnetic flux concentrator). Since it can absorb nuclear fission-bred neutrons, the element is also used in nuclear control rods.


Here's the blog if anyone wants to read more:

http://blogs.chron.com/tubular/archives/lost/

There is a long (and mostly entertaining) recap and analysis of the episode. It's filled with links and mentions more than a few theories. One of the most interesting involves the man who visited Hugo in the hospital and didn't have a business card to offer him. Apparently, the guy's name, Abbadon, is a reference to something in the Revelations chapter of the Bible and all sorts of other weirdness.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 02, 2008, 10:17:01 PM
With the Ana Lucia denial, I think the can of worms explanation is likely a good one.  But I spent some time trying to recall whether Hurley had met her or somehow not met her.  He could have said, "Yes, but she was injured in the crash and lingered long enough for us to learn her name, but she didn't survive her injuries." 

Thinking about where the conversation could go from there, I'd say not opening that can of worms might have been the right choice. But -- what if opening that can of worms (and other cans of worms) is the key to the Oceanic Six getting their lives back on track? Meaning are they -- or at least Hurley and Jack, so far -- miserable because they've buried the past (whatever that entails, island-wise) rather than deal with it?

Earl, did you notice in your blog reading (or anyone's recollection) whether Jack had ever told the guy on the other end of Naomi's phone his name?  I didn't recall his ever saying "This is Jack;" yet, the parachutist lands and says "Are you Jack?"  Or am I just inventing a conspiracy?  Wouldn't be the first time.

I thought it was interesting that Ben wanted to go with Locke -- I mean, I might not want to go, bound, with the guy who I'd just shot in the gut a couple days earlier. But staying with Jack, who'd pounded the crap out of Ben, wouldn't be much more pleasant; so I'm thinking/wondering if Ben actually knows something, and isn't (for once) just trying to manipulate events by saying he knows something nobody else does.

With the cabin scenes, I was confused -- basically by Hurley's turning from the cabin and then seeing the same cabin in the opposite direction, then being able to will it away, so to speak.  Sure, maybe it was a figment of his imagination -- but what if he has Walt-like gifts and just doesn't realize it and/or know what to do with it?  (Hence Charlie's "I'm dead, but I'm here" line and being able to slap him.  Or maybe that whole scene, including the other patient, was a Hurley hallucination.)  That would certainly drive me to the land of bathrobes and meds.   

Sawyer didn't drop one snarky nickname throughout the show, did he? 

I was hoping ABC would rerun the episode tonight -- it's not like they have tons of new stuff hanging around -- but I guess that was too much to ask for early in a new ratings period.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 03, 2008, 01:06:59 AM
You don't need them to re-run the show. Just go to abc.com and watch it at your leisure.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 03, 2008, 09:10:39 AM
Thanks, Kam. But there's scuttlebutt about Jacob looking like Jack's father, and I saw John Terry's name in the credits so I'd believe it, but I just want to see if I can get a better look.  And that better look isn't going to happen on my computer monitor.  If I have a slow day at work, maybe I'll watch it there, though. I know various sites have screen caps and stuff, but that feels like cheating.

So....any ideas whose eye that was?  Jacob's? Locke's?  Hurley's, in some trippy, time-bending, alternate dimension way?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 03, 2008, 01:41:40 PM
The HO stuff is almost unbearably clever, which makes me think red herring, BHWDIK?  Remember the blogosphere theory a year or two back that the Island was keeping the earth's magnetic poles from reversing?  Kind of like that.  The only thing that I can grasp onto with any degree of certainty is that there is a magnetic anomaly and the well-documented fact that strong magnetic fields can affect the brain in odd ways.

On the Jacob matter, I got lost somewhere in your questions, Harrie -- when does Hurly SEE Jacob?  I thought Jacob was an invisible dude (I'm talking like Hurly now) that tilted rocking chairs and broke windows when upset. 

I do think rejuvenation is going to reappear as one of the mystery themes, given Richard Alpert's transformation over three decades, and perhaps that will somehow dovetail with magnets and ho-hos and such.  Indeed, it seems possible that Jacob is some kind of Later Stage of being an Other.   And maybe the smoke-critter is another intermediate stage.  For all I know, smoke-critter is what dogs turn into, and someday Vincent will be a smoke-critter. 

Patchy is clearly indestructible, so will survive the underwater grenade for sure -- he's been speared, his brain boiled in a giant microwave, and generally knocked about, and keeps coming back for more.  I expect him to make trouble, maybe on the freighter at some point.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 03, 2008, 02:16:49 PM
The Tubular blog is pretty funny stuff.  Apparently,  I was distracted for part of the cabin/Hurly scene and so missed that Dr. Christian Shephard, aka Jack's dad, was in there taking a break from being dead or whatever.  It seems to me, as it does to the blogger cited here, that Jack's dad is not Jacob, but that possibly Jacob's cabin is some sort of hot spot for the local dead people.  This got me to start composing a list in my head of all the people who could be hanging out in Jacob's cabin -- U.S. Marshal whosits, Gary Troup (the author who was sucked into a jet engine in the first five minutes of the series), Shannon, Boone, Ethan, Handsome Pointed Stick Guy (sorry, I'm terrible with names) (he was the other mole who pretended to be a passenger), Libby, Anna Lucia, Mr. Eko, Mr. High School Science Guy (remember the dynamite?), Mr. Friendly/Tom, Locke's fake kidney-thievin' dad, the underwater dykes, and last but not least, Charlie (plus maybe a dozen miscellaneous others and Others).  If they're all jammed in there with a dead polar bear soul, I'll bet "Help Me!" is about the most understated and least profane quote we're going to get from them.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 03, 2008, 03:27:31 PM
Earl re:#954
                                                      Avaddon,the place of Destruction
In Revelation 9:11, it is personified as Abaddon, "Angel of the Abyss",[1] rendered in Greek as Apollyon; and he is described as king of the locusts which rose at the sounding of the fifth trumpet. In like manner, in Rev. vi. 8, Hades is personified following after death to conquer the fourth part of the earth.

ABADDON, ("Destruction"): In the Old Testament a poetic name for the kingdom of the dead, Hades, or Sheol (Job xxvi. 6; Prov. xv. 11, where Abaddon is parallel to Sheol). The rabbis used the name for the nethermost part of hell. In Rev. ix. 11 the "angel of the bottomless pit" is called Abaddon, which is there explained as the Greek Apollyon ("destroyer"); and he is described as king of the locusts which rose at the sounding of the fifth trumpet. In like manner, in Rev. vi. 8, Hades is personified following after death to conquer the fourth part of the earth. In rabbinical writings Abaddon and Death are also personified (cf. Job xxviii. 22).

http://gw.gamewikis.org/wiki/Abaddon



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on February 03, 2008, 08:19:39 PM
 

Who would I like to see more?  Rose and Bernard, especially some back story (did I miss that?) and to hear lots more of her wonderful voice.

There was one episode (last season, I think) which explored the back story of how Bernard and Rose met and fell in love. We learned then that Rose suffered from some illness which was never specified, but it was strongly suggested that her condition was terminal. She and Bernard traveled the world looking for some miracle cure, but no luck. Then they crashed on the island and Rose's condition was better. It was also revealed that Rose recalled seeing John Locke in his wheelchair in the airport before boarding the flight and she knows that he couldn't walk before and that he can now. She made a comment to him that went something like, "We both have reasons for not wanting to leave this island, don't we?"


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on February 03, 2008, 08:23:12 PM

As to Hurley's not mentioning Anna Lucia, he's in an interrogation room with a cop...is he really going to say, "Oh, yeah, her -- she shot and killed one of the passengers and then later was murdered herself -- let me tell you all about that!"  Does the phrase "can of worms" come to mind?

Another thing that made my Lost antennae quiver -- Ben's use of the phrase, "every LIVING person on the island will be killed" [by the freighter people].  Normally, I would just view the adjective "living" as a way of speaking dramatically or whatever, but this is the island we're talking about, where it's uncertain how dead the dead people really are and you have people like Jacob whose metaphysical condition is pretty uncertain.  Is there a hidden meaning to Ben's turn of phrase?

What fun.


Excellent points, both.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on February 03, 2008, 08:27:48 PM

Earl, did you notice in your blog reading (or anyone's recollection) whether Jack had ever told the guy on the other end of Naomi's phone his name?  I didn't recall his ever saying "This is Jack;" yet, the parachutist lands and says "Are you Jack?"  Or am I just inventing a conspiracy?  Wouldn't be the first time.


I kind of remember that in the S3 finale when Jack first made contact with the freighter that the guy on the other end said, "Who is this?" and Jack identified himself. But I could be wrong.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 03, 2008, 11:11:42 PM
Has anyone watched Gabriel Byrne as yet, new series: In Treatment?

I saw one segment tonight; they are done in half-hour episodes of psychotherapy.  He does this quite well. I have not yet made up my mind about this experiment. But, it is interesting; and intense. HBO




Ps. Breach is on tonight, Chris Cooper as the historic sell-out  to the Soviets; in about 20 minutes, HBO.  As I remember this, lot of pressure and suspense: will the spy sent to spy on the spy get out of the desk-drawers in his boss'office before the boss-spy finishes coming down the hall and opens the door?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 04, 2008, 02:03:56 AM
Quote
There was one episode (last season, I think) which explored the back story of how Bernard and Rose met and fell in love. We learned then that Rose suffered from some illness which was never specified, but it was strongly suggested that her condition was terminal. She and Bernard traveled the world looking for some miracle cure, but no luck. Then they crashed on the island and Rose's condition was better. It was also revealed that Rose recalled seeing John Locke in his wheelchair in the airport before boarding the flight and she knows that he couldn't walk before and that he can now. She made a comment to him that went something like, "We both have reasons for not wanting to leave this island, don't we?"


Of course, thanks much, Earl.

Starting out, that "Tubular" blog is amusing, but it quickly becomes a matter of wondering who and why then abandoning it feeling sorta sad. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 04, 2008, 10:41:02 AM
I had to LOL at analysis like this...

"Kate informs Jack that she too has found a blood trail, and perhaps Naomi is trying to trick them by doubling back and leaving multiple trails. Jack thinks it's adorable when girls try to "think" and "make plans" so he gives Kate a big hug and sends her off to the beach where she can re-apply her makeup and comb her hair so that she's pretty when the rescuers arrive."





Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 04, 2008, 12:44:08 PM
Barton

It sounds like your tv series people ought to go see the star of this other tv series:

http://www.hbo.com/apps/hodschedule/hodcategory.do?CATG_ID=PMRS8020   


In Treatment

I'm recommending it to everybody now that I know how to find the danged thing. It's begun the second week but last week's five performances are available On Demand but it is somewhat tricky to know exactly where you are going since it is listed under HBO series.

I tried to guess off the top of my head, kind of like the forum Movie Trivia, what Gabriel Byrne was about in this new whatever and figured they probably meant -- drug rehab?  Nope.  this is the real deal: Psychotherapy, played by  tv actors but, for the public.

Go ahead. Think of a problem. They've got it.

I accidentally meandered into the one, already(?), yes, where the young woman named Laura  develops "transference" in the first week!




Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on February 04, 2008, 01:18:23 PM
Has anyone watched Gabriel Byrne as yet, new series: In Treatment?

I saw one segment tonight; they are done in half-hour episodes of psychotherapy.  He does this quite well. I have not yet made up my mind about this experiment. But, it is interesting; and intense. HBO




Ps. Breach is on tonight, Chris Cooper as the historic sell-out  to the Soviets; in about 20 minutes, HBO.  As I remember this, lot of pressure and suspense: will the spy sent to spy on the spy get out of the desk-drawers in his boss'office before the boss-spy finishes coming down the hall and opens the door?


It's a GREAT show. Terrific acting and very stimulating.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 04, 2008, 01:44:19 PM
Gabriel Byrne in a tv series about psychotherapy almost makes me want to subscribe to cable!

BTW, see Byrne in the kangaroo noir, "Jindabyne."  He is excellent, as always.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: kitinkaboodle on February 04, 2008, 01:51:42 PM
Barton~~
He's so very good in this role -- although I'm biased -- really enjoy his work -- wish he did more.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 04, 2008, 02:24:08 PM
I'm biased, too (my tagline, below, is a quote from Byrne in Miller's Crossing). 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on February 04, 2008, 03:51:01 PM
Super Bowl ads,

Can I just say that this year had the worst overall crop of Super Bowl ads?

Ironic in that this year had one of the best games of it's history. Enough "if onlys" to keep even the mostly disinterested, interested.

The ads I did like included the preshow ad with the deaf visitors to the deaf host's house1 The pepsi Max ad, made all the better with Chris Katan telling people to "Stop it"2 huh.... I'll give the Witch Doctor one one thumb up (and not protocolgically speaking), and I thought that the Unibrow was pretty funny (but then, I don't watch Ugly Betty)

Speaking of pretty Tom Petty. How lame was that!? No redeeming social value at all in that. Gimme the Stones (who are older than their namesake and yet still can put out the goods) or Gimme Prince, but Tom Petty is background music.

Oh, and HD, There really is a difference. Really. Do we NEED it? No, but it really does look better.

In case you didn't see them

1 The two guys in their truck don't know which house their friend lives in. They are signing each other, there is no sound in the ad. They decide to deduce which house is the one they are looking for, the driver lays on the horn until the neighbors turn on their lights, the house without the lights is his. Clever.

2 The characters in the ad are nodding their heads, about asleep. Then they drink the product and they are super awake, bobbing their heads to the sounds of "What's love? Baby,don't hurt me" as did messrs Katan and Farrell in the SNL skit.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 04, 2008, 04:15:26 PM
Tom Petty looks like the Burger King guy without the crown.

(http://i.a.cnn.net/si/2008/football/nfl/specials/playoffs/2007/02/02/super.bowl.halftime.ap/p1.tom.petty.jpg)(http://images.buycostumes.com/mgen/merchandiser/27401.jpg?is=350,350,0xffffff)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: law120b on February 04, 2008, 05:45:07 PM
except that the burger king knows how to sing before a large audience without lip-synching.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Urethra_Franklin on February 04, 2008, 05:50:12 PM
I must say that I enjoyed Janet's titty pop moreso than Petty's shitty rock


When will the Superbowl put on a decent halftime show?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 06, 2008, 12:39:04 PM
I cannot address your Petty concerns right now.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 08, 2008, 11:33:21 AM
One thing about "Lost" -- never lacking for mass quantities of new and ambiguous information to absorb.  Just what was that gizmo that Miles (Asian ghostbuster) flipped on in the dead gangsta's room -- looked like a handvac choking on a cogwheel?   

Enjoyed Hurly's booboo where he starts to mention seeing Jacob's cabin and then covers, when Locke starts probing, with "oh, the, uh, passenger cabin...on the plane...."  Lost's most lovable character and worst liar (clearly due to lack of practice).

And there's the polar bear bones somewhere in Africa with the Dharma project strap buried along with, the chopper team's manhunt for Ben, the always bizarre Jeremy Davies (who I've never seen play anything like a normal human), the whole fake-815 crash site off Indonesia (just how big is that shadowy cabal??), and what makes Daniel (Davies) go boohoo in the first-news-of-815 flashback? 

And finally Ben's bombshell, "I have a man on the ship," after amazing mnemonic feats in which he spews out entire CVs of the chopper team while most likely suffering from head injuries and dehydration.

And what about that bullet that went through Locke -- last season, it sure looked like a gutshot to me, not a through-and-through you could just dismiss with I don't have a kidney there so no problemo.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 08, 2008, 12:06:40 PM
Re broadcasting Eli Stone immediately after "Lost" -- is the assumption that passive viewers will willingly emerge from one rabbit hole and jump down another (lawyer who has divine hallucinations, er, visions)?   Seems like they've tried this before and it hasn't worked too well.  I suspect a fair percentage of Losties cool the set after the show, some to rush into chatrooms and blogs and such, some to just sit there with head spinning for a while.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 08, 2008, 12:40:58 PM
One thing about "Lost" -- never lacking for mass quantities of new and ambiguous information to absorb.  Just what was that gizmo that Miles (Asian ghostbuster) flipped on in the dead gangsta's room -- looked like a handvac choking on a cogwheel?   

I think it was something to fool the lady.  She thinks he uses that instrument to find the ghosts or whatever, when in reality he is using it to drown the sound out that he knows he will be making.

Quote
Enjoyed Hurly's booboo where he starts to mention seeing Jacob's cabin and then covers, when Locke starts probing, with "oh, the, uh, passenger cabin...on the plane...."  Lost's most lovable character and worst liar (clearly due to lack of practice).

Both Ben and John were quite interested in hurley's slip.

Quote
And finally Ben's bombshell, "I have a man on the ship," after amazing mnemonic feats in which he spews out entire CVs of the chopper team while most likely suffering from head injuries and dehydration.

On other forums people think its either Michael or Mikael.

Quote
And what about that bullet that went through Locke -- last season, it sure looked like a gutshot to me, not a through-and-through you could just dismiss with I don't have a kidney there so no problemo.

That was quite convenient of the writers.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 08, 2008, 01:40:04 PM
Kam, I thought the device was a prop, too -- my question was as to what it actually was, i.e. is it something one could buy at Home Depot, some kind of power tool I don't recognize?  Or perhaps something he cobbled together....

Michael is an interesting theory for the mole on the boat -- I think I saw the actor's name (Perrineau) in the opening credits, so maybe he is in the picture somewhere this season. 



Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 08, 2008, 04:18:04 PM
You mean it's not an early model of these?
 (http://images.art.com/images/-/Ghostbusters--C10104123.jpeg)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 08, 2008, 04:50:19 PM
Harrie,there you are!  Times change. I've been looking for you ever since the Tuesday surprise; who'd a thunk it that Connecticut turned off Republican input that rapidly and so suddenly?

I'm days behind on Dr. Gabriel Byrne's psychotherapy sessions besides requisite reading skills that have to be exercised.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 08, 2008, 05:26:27 PM
Hey, madupont.  Domestic turmoil-y  stuff's been taking up my time.  I caught about half of a G. Byrne shrink episode, the one with the gymnast - it was excellent.  Basically two people talking, but I found it to be riveting.  Then again, it was Gabriel Byrne, so of course I did. 

I'm confused with the Republican comment about my fair state -- do you mean Super Tuesday stuff?  Connecticut's always been pretty Democratic Party-leaning, I think, discounting the Gold Coast robber baron crowd.  We're a closed primary state, and most of the state residents who are registered to vote are not affiliated -- though hordes of people did declare by the day before -- so I don't know how representative our primary results actually are.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 08, 2008, 05:58:56 PM
Me neither.  It was kind of like Lieberman.  I was totally surprised by the results.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 09, 2008, 11:15:02 AM
The real question is:

Will Michael row the boat ashore?



Title: Re: Television
Post by: martinbeck3 on February 09, 2008, 01:15:52 PM
Just hardly recovering from a Sopranos addiction I´ve come to realize that what I found so great about this series is that they guys are just like the politicians in Argentina.Did any of you noticed that about your country or is it totally different in the U.S.?


Title: Re: Television Gets LOST
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 09, 2008, 03:28:04 PM
I agree he's most lovable Lostie, am wondering if anyone's keeping track of which characters call him Hugo and which call him Hurley and what, if anything, does it MEAN.  (Sorry, last week I read a bit more than I should of that Houston Chron "Tubular" blog someone posted a link to.)

Yeah, I saw Perrineau's name in the credits and wondered how in the pluperfect subjunctive they were going to work Michael back in (actually wondered if there's an agent with enough of what it takes to get characters killed off or disappeared in one season written back in subsequently). 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on February 09, 2008, 03:46:49 PM
Just hardly recovering from a Sopranos addiction I´ve come to realize that what I found so great about this series is that they guys are just like the politicians in Argentina.Did any of you noticed that about your country or is it totally different in the U.S.?


Totally different?

Hmmmm...Not necessarily, but I think the Series is more about human fraility than anything else. The characters are so well drawn, but always, always, always you're kept aware of their flaws. And the flaws do matter. I suppose you could say that is true about politicians everywhere.


Title: Re: Television Gets LOST
Post by: Earl on February 09, 2008, 04:16:14 PM
  (Sorry, last week I read a bit more than I should of that Houston Chron "Tubular" blog someone posted a link to.)



That was me. Sorry about that. It's long and detailed and I end up spending way more time on that blog than is probably healthy.

The sheer amount of analysis she puts into it is impressive. I watch each episode and think I'm doing a fair-to-middling job of catching details and stuff that flits by in the corners of the screen. Then I go on Tubular and I feel like a guy who has just won his local club tennis tournament and thinks that qualifies him to do well on the professional cicuit: Swamped, overwhelmed, how-the-hell-do-they-do-that-so-quickly.

One of the many details she posted that interested me was the full name of the red-headed woman who dropped in by helicopter: Charlotte Staples Lewis, or C.S. Lewis. In fact, there is a whole section on there about the fact that many of the names on the show have some kind of meaning.

I haven't gotten into that www.find815.com site yet, but I may try it later. It's probably a sideshow, but could be fun nevertheless.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 09, 2008, 05:50:30 PM
LOL the tubular addiction -- been there, man.  Charlotte Staples Lewis --- cleanly missed that one and I, too, thought my Lost antenna was high-gain.  The name game has been heavy on philosophers so far -- Hume, Locke, Rousseau, and Lewis (if you count theologians as philosophers) (which I do) (but some don't) (aren't parentheses the greatest thing since sliced bread?). 

As to Nytemps pluperfect and subjunctive wonderings, I just figure it's a lot easier to bring living people back into the script than dead ones, so I'd think Michael is a shoo-in.  Unless a typhoon or giant magnet, composed largely of Ytterbium and Holmium, snuffed him while he was speeding homeward on the Minnow, and he's doomed to listening to Jacob's anecdotes about poisoned Spam while crammed in the cabin with dead polar bears and such.

Mikhail is a strong contender for the boat mole, of course, unless he went to Davy Jones's locker room after that grenade exploded a few feet from his head.  But a man with microwavable brains is probably not sensitive to grenades.



 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 10, 2008, 11:11:11 AM
Just hardly recovering from a Sopranos addiction I´ve come to realize that what I found so great about this series is that they guys are just like the politicians in Argentina.Did any of you noticed that about your country or is it totally different in the U.S.?



Martin, old friend, I guess that I must admit from the top that MrUtley and I do not or did not entirely agree as to what the Sopranos was about.  That's how we met, I linked to a New Jersey newspaper one day in total exasperation, well not total because I met a lot of nice wise guys at the nytimes.com blog on the subject but there were hundreds of dolts who have never lived Italian. I've told him before, I watched The Sopranos because I missed Jersey; after all I'd spent more than a quarter of my life there.

It's not that I adore New Jersey but if you want to meet a nice Italian girl that's where you go; it's a little more difficult to meet a nice Italian guy and besides it gets complicated because many New Jersey Italians were actually born in New York, on Mulberry street in the Village's Little Italy or maybe even Hackensack which is in N.J.  I also met old guys from Sicily who just got off the boat after they began working as a stoker when they were a young man and made the trip back and forth,back and forth, and then they stayed, moved into a nice location and bought property which they rented out and made more income, etc.

In New York, I had an Italian girl for a room-mate who came from Brooklyn, her parents from Puglia, not so nice. (How do you say crazy in Italian? I know, but do you?) Over the years, I've had friends and associates from Calabria,Sorrento,Florence, come to mind off the top of my head,who settled in the Midwest, or on the West Coast, as well as New York or Jersey, who were real painters like De Niro, real poets like Gregory Corso or Ferlinghetti, real craftsmen,like the Orlandini family,and real conscientious objectors  during the war before this one.

So, although the flaws do matter, particularly in politicians (and we have one or two in one branch of a our government at present who are particularly obnoxious,we have many more non-Italians in our government who are even more obnoxious.

But I guess why you notice the resemblence in Argentina probably has something to do with that the mafiosi depicted in The Sopranos are a political structure. Or, as a friend of mine (who spends a great deal of her life in Italy as well as New York and New Jersey) told me, "they" are a "sub rosa" government who function under the visible government of a country, who support it when they grease the works and expect their percentage in return when it is due. That's when they momentarily visibly rise to the surface. Some of the most famous "politicians" in history were Italians, sometimes in other countries, sometimes not.           


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 10, 2008, 01:31:40 PM
Translation of the above:

The Sopranos is about living Italian in New Jersey.
Many NJ italians have roots in NY.
Some Italians are crazy.
Italians have tried to increase their standing in society.
That depiction is captured perfectly in the Sopranos.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 10, 2008, 02:07:27 PM
 :D :D :D


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 10, 2008, 03:38:51 PM
Translation of the above:

The Sopranos is about living Italian in New Jersey.
Many NJ italians have roots in NY.
Some Italians are crazy.
Italians have tried to increase their standing in society.
That depiction is captured perfectly in the Sopranos.



Now, in your erudite wisdom Kam, would you please describe to all of the assembled for the tv forum what it is about politicians in ARGENTINA to which martinbeck3 noticed there was a resemblence with The Sopranos. I MEAN, once we've got that down we'll know what to do with our left over Republican administration when all the fuss passes as they leave office and we can proceed with the real challenge.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 10, 2008, 05:43:09 PM
I have no clue regarding the politicians in Argentina and their relation to characters on the Sopranos but i'll take him it his word.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on February 10, 2008, 07:20:56 PM
Just hardly recovering from a Sopranos addiction I´ve come to realize that what I found so great about this series is that they guys are just like the politicians in Argentina.Did any of you noticed that about your country or is it totally different in the U.S.?



Martin, old friend, I guess that I must admit from the top that MrUtley and I do not or did not entirely agree as to what the Sopranos was about.  That's how we met, I linked to a New Jersey newspaper one day in total exasperation, well not total because I met a lot of nice wise guys at the nytimes.com blog on the subject but there were hundreds of dolts who have never lived Italian. I've told him before, I watched The Sopranos because I missed Jersey; after all I'd spent more than a quarter of my life there.

It's not that I adore New Jersey but if you want to meet a nice Italian girl that's where you go; it's a little more difficult to meet a nice Italian guy and besides it gets complicated because many New Jersey Italians were actually born in New York, on Mulberry street in the Village's Little Italy or maybe even Hackensack which is in N.J.  I also met old guys from Sicily who just got off the boat after they began working as a stoker when they were a young man and made the trip back and forth,back and forth, and then they stayed, moved into a nice location and bought property which they rented out and made more income, etc.

In New York, I had an Italian girl for a room-mate who came from Brooklyn, her parents from Puglia, not so nice. (How do you say crazy in Italian? I know, but do you?) Over the years, I've had friends and associates from Calabria,Sorrento,Florence, come to mind off the top of my head,who settled in the Midwest, or on the West Coast, as well as New York or Jersey, who were real painters like De Niro, real poets like Gregory Corso or Ferlinghetti, real craftsmen,like the Orlandini family,and real conscientious objectors  during the war before this one.

So, although the flaws do matter, particularly in politicians (and we have one or two in one branch of a our government at present who are particularly obnoxious,we have many more non-Italians in our government who are even more obnoxious.

But I guess why you notice the resemblence in Argentina probably has something to do with that the mafiosi depicted in The Sopranos are a political structure. Or, as a friend of mine (who spends a great deal of her life in Italy as well as New York and New Jersey) told me, "they" are a "sub rosa" government who function under the visible government of a country, who support it when they grease the works and expect their percentage in return when it is due. That's when they momentarily visibly rise to the surface. Some of the most famous "politicians" in history were Italians, sometimes in other countries, sometimes not.           


In Soprano-speak, I just wanna say: Ya tink you can fuckin' work any more fuckin' stereotypes and fuckin' narrow-mindedness into that fuckin' post, ya fuckin' fuck? I mean, what the fuck!!

That is all.

"In Treatment" is getting better. His wife did a number on him, eh? And she ain't done. Dude has some hang-ups about women---lots of anger there. Looking forward to Laura's visit on Monday.

 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 10, 2008, 08:20:33 PM
Listen, about the Normans...

So you think I don't know what I'm talking about? you talking to me?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 10, 2008, 08:36:50 PM
Harrie, I watched about half as well. Then I woke up, and discovered what I'd done with the other half; slept through it. Not because it was boring; I tried to take time to watch it when I was too tired.  I just heard the punch line from the doctor, about the gymnast, as it ended for the week. So I want to catch up in the next four days, while also reading and any other demands have to be met.

If  you think that I was surprised by Connecticutt, by mistaken interpretation that since Lieberman is a silly putz -- there must be more like him, this pales in comparison to what the Bush's must think of what happened in Massachusetts.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 10, 2008, 10:48:41 PM
Changed my mind, going to watch the Heath Ledger film, The Knight's Tale, at 11:30 on TBS, after what everybody else had to say about it.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 10, 2008, 11:13:36 PM
If  you think that I was surprised by Connecticutt, by mistaken interpretation that since Lieberman is a silly putz -- there must be more like him, this pales in comparison to what the Bush's must think of what happened in Massachusetts.

A lot of Connecticut people (I have never been able to bring myself to say Nutmeggers) wrote Joe L. off a long time ago, when he ran for VP -- when he basically abandoned his Senate seat to campaign, a bunch of pretty loyal constituents figured out very quickly exactly where they stood.  Now Joe has moved from New Haven to Stamford -- "to be closer to the kids" -- but as far as many are concerned, he might as well have moved to NY, since Fairfield County is unofficially annexed to NY.  JL is like a total non-entity to many people of my acquaintance; yeah, he's our Senator, but maybe we can change that the next time around.

Not to be oblivious, but what happened in MA? I've had the feeling that people who actually have reason to know Romney vote against him -- so did he lose?  Or do you mean that McCain came up pretty closely behind him?

And see if you notice Alan Tudyk in A Knight's Tale.   Or don't; but enjoy it anyway.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 11, 2008, 02:05:36 PM
Always found it interesting that the Arkansas side of my ex-family is solidly and strongly Clinton-hating.  So I'm familiar with that home state hate phenomenon.

BTW, hoorah for the writer's strike officially ending today.  The question I'm sure on everyone's mind is if the strikers have been writing material on their laptops on home to keep their chops up and all -- i.e. will there be material that can be swiftly brought out for shooting scripts and maybe, please god or pantheistic lifeforce or whomever, Abrams can get some more "Lost" eps shot by this spring so our season won't be quite so stunted?



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 11, 2008, 02:59:48 PM
Harrie,

Is Tudyk's carrot top natural or what?  Frankly, the only thing that took some adjusting to -- was getting used to the idea that Paul Bettany was in the cast after having perceiving him as a homicidal maniac vicious British gangster some  years ago. Which was a shock in itself because he so much resembled musician,Gerry Mulligan.

But once realizing that is a  broad against character idea to have him play Jeff Chaucer in his countrified just traveling through twang, he really adds to A Knight's Tale, especially with the intros we became so used to on late night tv("He....re..'s Johnny!").   I can really see what Barton meant, I think it was Barton, about being pleasantly surprised at how well high-school athletic competition events home cheering section immediately kicks in as soon as the tournament is ready to begin. The detail involved in this by allowing the entire minor cast improvise at will for the camera to pick up in passing was like an in-joke about the dramatizations used on the History Channel.

Just between you and me, I consider that the actual background sets seen in distant camera  behind the tournament were spot on.  When they said, "Rouen" -- Rouen is what you got!

An unpleasant piece of casting was Ms. Sosossone(sic), I've probably got a vowel wrong, in clothing and hair styles she brought with her from Hawaii.   I was trying to imagine this discussion taking place in wardrobe? "Oh, never mind with that, I brought my own clothes. So much better fitting."  She was just a little bit too much like an Angelina Jolie body-double for Girl Interrupted. (tattoo and all, as I found on imdb).

In so far as being a clever romp through Mediaeval World for several fun guys, Will Thatcher's little troop of varlets  dispatched themselves quite a lot better than the young hero first discovered in Name of the Rose who has been over-acting since day one.

I suspect over time, I will get to see all the Ledger genre one by one.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on February 11, 2008, 03:08:22 PM

i.e. will there be material that can be swiftly brought out for shooting scripts and maybe, please god or pantheistic lifeforce or whomever, Abrams can get some more "Lost" eps shot by this spring so our season won't be quite so stunted?



I've heard different estimates re Lost. On a radio show I heard about a week ago, the announcer claimed that a friend of his was one of the striking writers (but not on the Lost staff). He said that his friend said that a show like Lost is extraordinarily difficult and time-consuming to make just because of the sheer logistics of filming so many scenes in Hawaii and in the jungle. He said that even if the strike were resolved immediately that the next new episode (after the eight already in the proverbial can) wouldn't be ready for airing until about mid-Summer and no way would ABC run a new ep at that time.

Then this morning the local ABC affiliate here reported during their entertainment segment that ABC hopes to crank out 5 more episodes (after the eight) before calling this season quits.

We'll see. The first explanation sounds as if it makes more sense, but I'll hope for the second one.

There are other series, though, like The Office, for example, that work on a quick turnaround. They reportedly can go from first cast read-through to air-time in about three weeks. They like to stay topical. It varies from show to show.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 11, 2008, 06:09:31 PM
Earl, re:#989

You probably know all this already but, just in case, you can check these out for all the connections to C.S. Lewis

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/C.S.Lewis

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0108101/   Shadowlands



Title: Re: Television
Post by: pugetopolis on February 12, 2008, 12:24:07 AM

In Soprano-speak, I just wanna say: Ya tink you can fuckin' work any more fuckin' stereotypes and fuckin' narrow-mindedness into that fuckin' post, ya fuckin' fuck? I mean, what the fuck!!
 

Thank you, MrUtley, I couldn't have said it better myself.

There's a good reason blah blah blah



Thanks, MrUtley. I enjoyed your response to Madame Madupont's
message so much that I posted it over in the Movie Trivia Forum.
In response to a message she dumped on me. Cheers. 


 ;D ;D ;D




Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 12, 2008, 11:42:29 AM
Earl, the first of your two prognostications does sound more reasonable.

If only "Lost" were a sitcom, perhaps titled "Jacob's Island," "Jack Loves Kate," or "Everyone Loves Hurley."   Or, if one wanted to work that big magnet theme for its comic potential, "Paradise Sucks."

Prison Break seemed to move along this week, which was good, as the "season" ends next week.  Credulity took a hard stretching last night, from the gunfire tape recording to the "crawling out under the trucks and hoping nobody every looks down" escape.   Next season looks like it might be rescuing Sucre, unless miracles develop next week.



 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 12, 2008, 01:31:44 PM
 Next season looks like it might be rescuing Sucre, unless miracles develop next week.


In the last 10 minutes last night they may have set up the whole next season.  It went from relatively happy ending to shitstorm pretty quick. I don't expect the Whistler/Sucre storylines to be wrapped up next week.  Mahone is on the loose as well although I don't know why they need that character anymore.

Maybe next season Sucre and McGrady and Bellick, Luchero, and Teabag can try again.  Teabag has Whistler's bird book with the coordinates.  That little maggot just won't die.


Title: da Wire
Post by: Kam on February 12, 2008, 03:11:48 PM
OMAR LIVES!  He survived jumping from the 5th floor balcony with a broken leg.  No bulletholes most importantly.  And he comes back with a vengeance.  "I'm calling Marlo a straight bitch" he says to Fat Face Rick.  Rarely have i heard a curse word uttered with so much fury.  We know how much it means to say something like that, as in an earlier episode, Junebug, his muscle, and his girl all got shot to death because people in the streets were gossiping that junebug called Marlo a ****sucker.  So calling Marlo a straight up bitch and calling him out into the streets like that is REAL.  "This aint about the money, this is about hurting his people, messing with his world" he tells Marlo's muscle.

I like that he is not killing everyone.  Just enough to make his point.  Letting others live to tell the tale.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 12, 2008, 06:32:43 PM
It does seem like the ultimate showdown of the final season will be between Omar and Marlo (whose names remind me of the whole Harpo/Oprah thing with The Color Purple not to pull a Lost fan kind of trip...)

The recent "war story" of the type I love to spot in the series was when Bunk pulled the files (which seemed on the thin side, but never mind) on the 22 row house murders, started reworking the cases and went to the forensics lab following up on trace evid. from 14 of them, only to find that cutbacks in personnel meant the hiring of a temp to file, which temp knew not the meaning of "et al." so mixed all the evidence from the cases together, leaving no way of knowing which evidence pertained to which site/murder it was taken from.  I absolutely believe in the truth of that scene, and wish all viewers of CSI and such like would see it.  (OTOH, if would-be criminals watch such shows as CSI and believe in the superhuman powers of forensics folk, and if such belief has any deterrent effect at all, maybe seing bureaucratic SNAFUs wouldn't be in the public interest.)

I also believe that "secret" grand jury proceedings were in the possession of Prop Joe. 
(In that regard, could someone could tell me the specifics of why Prop Joe was killed?)
 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on February 12, 2008, 06:41:04 PM

Prison Break seemed to move along this week, which was good, as the "season" ends next week.  Credulity took a hard stretching last night, from the gunfire tape recording to the "crawling out under the trucks and hoping nobody ever looks down" escape.   Next season looks like it might be rescuing Sucre, unless miracles develop next week.


I also liked that T-Bag could reach underneath a jeep and retrieve a book in full view of guards who have guns pointed at him, then stick that book in his back pocket, then be interrogated without being at least frisked by soldiers who have no ethical quandries regarding torture.

Re your last sentence: Haven't you been watching the show? Miracles happen every fifteen minutes or so.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 12, 2008, 07:48:14 PM


I also believe that "secret" grand jury proceedings were in the possession of Prop Joe. 
(In that regard, could someone could tell me the specifics of why Prop Joe was killed?)
 

Yes they were in his hands and he used them to warn co-op members when they were about to get raided/busted whatever.  He was killed for totally separate reasons.  He was the head of the co-op because he had the connect to Vondas and The Greek for "the good shit".  Once Marlo convinced The Greek that he would keep coming back (with suitcases full of clean money) unless they dealt with him direct, Prop Joe's fate was written.  The moment The Greek agreed to Marlo's 'insurance' deal, that insurance kicked in as Marlo no longer required Joe.  Joe tried to be a fatherly figure to Marlo, taking him under his wing.  But as Marlo said, "I wasn't meant to play the son".  Now that Marlo has removed Joe, the connect and the co-op are both him.  Now he runs everything, and as he said at the last co-op meet: 'price of the brick going up. thirty more'.  Marlo doesn't play the game like Avon did.  Avon played for cash, cars, women.  Marlo plays just to be the king.  Just to wear the crown.  Thus, he has no love for anything but the game.  And in that game he is a cold ruthless leader, the new breed who doesn't follow any of the old codes. His idea of winning the game is running Baltimore.  Now he is going to leech off of Levy for his guidance.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 12, 2008, 08:42:20 PM
Thanks so much for the recall assistance, and Marlo does seem to be without loyalties, unlike Prop Joe and the OG's, Barksdale & Bell, who the viewer can see coming up together in the projects--the final scene between the two still resonates with me.  We have seen other sides to many other characters, but not Marlo, and not "Snoop"--who seems like one that a writer would love to write a back story for. 

Another fave moment from recent ep: Freamon viewing pic of Marlo & others, figuring out that they are looking at cell phone pix instead of reading text messages, since they are "products of Baltimore public schools."  Ouch!

Speaking of said schools, wonder if we'll get to see Prez et al. again before it all ends.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 13, 2008, 11:20:19 AM
Earl,

LOL, yes, I needed a term that upped the ante beyond mere "miracle."   The show, by its nature, will need to finish up in the next year or risk jumping the shark.  An indefinite plotline about career escapers seems hard to support.  (I still think the model for such shows remains The Prisoner, which went from capture to escape in 17 episodes...)



Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 13, 2008, 12:27:21 PM
Wot! not a single freakin' one of ya watched Bernard and Doris, in the B.Balaban version while it is still being offered to you?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 14, 2008, 12:00:24 PM
I'm not sure what you are talking about....dog show?





Title: Re: Television
Post by: kitinkaboodle on February 14, 2008, 12:34:38 PM
Ms. Maddie:

Yes, I for one caught the special -- it was worth a look-see for sure.  In particular, Fienes was fine, as usual.

D. Duke's contributions to Newport  (just over the "bridge" for me) are immeasurable -- nearly one hundred (now lovely) "historical" homes were restored due to her monied interest(s).  She really did much to change Newport from the sleazy bar/primarily Navy town it was to the quintessential resort that it is today.   Of course, along with that comes the whole tourist scene -- and the traffic -- but during the winter months it's great...

Again, for anyone who may have missed Bernard and Doris seeing the aging Sarandon and quirky Fienes together is well worth the two hours.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 14, 2008, 01:42:26 PM
kitinkaboodle,

Well, people forget that it was a Navy town because it was the quintessential East Coast port for French vessels coming into what is now the New York area(Niew Amsterdam being a new Dutch town become old when the British arrived) which allowed the two colonial powers, France and Britain, to get it on for a little something called The Seven Years War(this is by the way my favourite Daniel Day-Lewis, in case anybody can't tell, for Last of the Mohicans).   

I would guess the old homes, Doris organized, belonged to former traders bringing goods into the area. We have a lot of those in New Jersey as well from that period, mostly from Scotsmen rather than French merchants; and many of those  are going to wreck and ruin even in the Princeton area which was a Scots settlement quite early in the 17th.century.  People at the Jersey Shore say the same thing about the tourists. Believe it or not, I've never been to Newport for the Jazz Festival; missed my opportunities when I had the endurance to weather the scene.

I think the tourist season largely results from the former Yachting summers of the New York Fifth avenue set, see Daniel Day-Lewis again in Martin Scorcese, Age of Innocence for the beginning of what would become the Yachting era, in fact, wasn't that a Newport scene with Winona Ryder?  (Now, the Ritz-Carlton is selling "vacation homes" in the worlds best beach fronts while they are.)

Since I watch everything Raf Fiennes does in the movies, why not television, I even caught the Harry Potter role which seemed to give him a kick as Lord Mordrun or whatever but not me in particular. Perhaps I was too tired waiting up to see it.  He has a wild sense of humor, so I can see why he would not turn down the offer to be Bernard Lafferty; and he did it awfully well. You might say, "Beyond Anthony Hopkins"!

He does have a thing for dressing gowns, though; like he did in Red Dragon while frightening Philip Seymour Hoffman to death.

Sarandon rather surprised me, because recently her performances are sometimes obviously hyper-thyroid, but this one was right on "the money". I had a friend much like her portrayal of Duke, with a family you might say was very into the Law,her two brothers at the Justice Department, so I understood the little quirks of enthusiasms that Doris took up as shown in this film, all of them quite accurately displayed. I can even understand her enthusiasm for Bernard, the shy, self-negating or self-obliterating person as Fiennes plays him, because it was well known that Doris Duke was a shy, awkward girl who resented publicity about her private life, especially because of the Depression when you become keenly aware for the first time(she was in her teens to young adulthood then) of the envy that turns into hatred of your existence--which is why most heiresses were labeled "Poor little rich girls" (but that may have been about Gloria Vanderbilt originally?).

Balaban probably decided Sarandon would bring a lot of "Energy" to the portrayal.  Doris in reality ,the more adult  she became, had one of those faces you never forget, a little like the Glenn Close look that Donotremove once remarked about (in the recent series): positively witchy.

In fact that is something they reworked in the production by the face-lift episode slated into her motivations for keeping Bernard early on. When in fact, she fell because of medication and pain-killing booze (as shown) after her face lift, at which time she was already in her eighties, and broke her hip, which meant that she was dead within the year.

Something similar happened to my great aunt who neglected to tell my sisters or my mother that some shrewd doctor had talked her into cataract surgery when she was 97 years old. She wanted desperately to keep on reading. She never recovered consciousness while yet on the operating table.


I have one of two nieces(who are sisters)going to school up there in Rhode Island at Brown,must be close to graduating, but I have no idea in what or as what, because my sister always forgets to answer when I ask her.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 15, 2008, 10:19:53 AM
Sayid:  The day I trust BEN is the day I sell my soul

Flash-Forwards indicate a soul was swapped at some point

Once a torturer, now an assassin.  Cool!

Who else will Sayid kill to protect the Lost survivors?

How long has he been working for Ben?  Is Kate also?  Is Ben the "he" Kate was referencing last year when she said "he's going wo wonder where i am" to Jack?

This show only produces more questions.  The answers it gives are few and far from providing closure.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 15, 2008, 11:11:49 AM
The girl who looked like Trishelle from Real World Elsa (whom Sayid eventually offed) had the same bracelet that Naomi had.  The writers even went to the point of Sayid closing the womens eyes, then removing the bracelet - almost ceremonial, and definitely meant for viewers to notice. So it's probably a red herring. But it got me and the hubby debating whether the Trishelle Elsa vignette was a flash forward or back.   

Any significance to the RG inscription on Naomi's bracelet? They didn't show one on Trishelle's (I don't think, anyway), so can't tell if they're the same precise bracelet or just the same style, etc.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 15, 2008, 11:34:30 AM
Yeah, I caught the soul-swapping there, Sayid.  Seems like a flashforward, since euro-smoothie golfer is told by Sayid he's an Oceanic Sixer before Sayid shoots him.  Too many questions for speculation to get far...what's Ben doing with a kennel full of pooches in Germany?  Why does Ben have 47 fake passports back in Otherville?  Who are the last two Oc. Sixers?  (or does Ben con the world into thinking he was on the flight?  Then we've got five.)  Where does this flashforward fall with respect to the Jack/coffin FF?

LOL Hurley's "great, they sent us another Sawyer" quip!  LOL Miles's trade value relative to C.S. Lewis.  Red-herring-flavored LOL to folk named Faraday and Minkowski, the physicists who broke ground on magnetism and spacetime distortions.

Respectful head-scratch for Daniel's rocket experiment -- not long after Jack asking about the Red Sox and reminding us it's 100 days since they crashed -- so maybe time travels at a different rate on the island.

Time to fire up my dustbuster and blog on to Theresa in Houston.

     


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 15, 2008, 11:53:47 AM
Unless there's a group called the Oceanic Six who are six plants put on the flight by, say, Ben?  The cava was flowing pretty freely last night, so factor that into the previous thought.  Dogs are used a lot in laboratory research - I was kind of looking for a polar bear cub stuck in there somewhere.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 15, 2008, 02:15:58 PM
The blog chat was interesting -- there was a "Grace" in the chatroom -- anyone we know, Harrie?  I posted a couple comments on Ben, under "Barton" but only one of them appeared, under the moniker, G-4449837938473 or some such, so I'm not sure quite how the process works.  In any case, Theresa is a seasoned and gracious Lost blogger, and I look forward to her formal blog entry, though I rarely have time to read them in their entirety.   

Who is RC or RG, on the bracelets?  Look for a Rudy Giuliani cameo in the future?

Harrie -- I just love the "six plants put on the flight" theory -- absolutely wacky and yet oddly seductive.  Unfortunately, I think Sayid said something that implied they were in the news, so...



   


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 15, 2008, 02:31:32 PM
I'm not that familiar with chatrooms, I guess.  Went back and looked at the transcript and there I was, with several comments toward the end.  A time delay, not unlike that founds on certain islands...

Also, a "Grace" asked....

"Do you think that dead Naomi is actually being "played" by the live actress, or is it a wax figure? I have my reasons for asking..."

And I would love to know those reasons. 






Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 15, 2008, 03:11:21 PM
That's not me, so sorry I don't know what the reasons are.  You sure that temporary moniker wasn't something like G-4815162342?




Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 15, 2008, 04:19:55 PM
What's this about "six plants put on an airplane"?  At first when I glimpsed the posts, I thought harrie was referring to some horticultural delivery system. But, then, another thought crossed my mind, if that's what was meant?

If it was, we were asked by our gov't to believe that yes they were.

(I not only saw it on tape with my own eyes but heard it translated for me; which right away screws the reliability,  when you think how the department was always complaining about not having adequate translators. That is when you begin to consider the dialogue was manufactured for easy consumption. The dubbing wipes out the 100% sure-you-heard factor and you shrug, "What's the use?"  This eavesdropping went a long way to convince people our administration has been doing the right thing.  It is not that it didnt or doesnt even now have eavesdropping equipment adequate to the task but dubbing translation over the conversation messes up any possibility that an outside native speaker watching this performance can ever accurately claim to have heard something else being said when you feel you have to drop into the mens private tent at a wedding in a Middle Eastern country when one of the conversants is celebrating a wedding in his family.

Yes, the airplane plants are mentioned and even apparently joked about as naive, simple recruits.  After six years, all it has taught me is to question why anybody takes a plane to travel in this country.

But, carry on! You were probably talking television style horticulture.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 15, 2008, 05:06:10 PM
What's this about "six plants put on an airplane"?  At first when I glimpsed the posts, I thought harrie was referring to some horticultural delivery system. But, then, another thought crossed my mind, if that's what was meant?

If it was, we were asked by our gov't to believe that yes they were.

(I not only saw it on tape with my own eyes but heard it translated for me; which right away screws the reliability,  when you think how the department was always complaining about not having adequate translators. That is when you begin to consider the dialogue was manufactured for easy consumption. The dubbing wipes out the 100% sure-you-heard factor and you shrug, "What's the use?"  This eavesdropping went a long way to convince people our administration has been doing the right thing.  It is not that it didnt or doesnt even now have eavesdropping equipment adequate to the task but dubbing translation over the conversation messes up any possibility that an outside native speaker watching this performance can ever accurately claim to have heard something else being said when you feel you have to drop into the mens private tent at a wedding in a Middle Eastern country when one of the conversants is celebrating a wedding in his family.

Yes, the airplane plants are mentioned and even apparently joked about as naive, simple recruits.  After six years, all it has taught me is to question why anybody takes a plane to travel in this country.

But, carry on! You were probably talking television style horticulture.


LOST


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 15, 2008, 05:42:02 PM
Ditto


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 16, 2008, 12:22:39 AM
I tuned in to the Breaking Bad mini-"marathon" to see how authentic it was about Albuquerque, my home for late 70s to mid-80s, could ID pretty much all the very ABQ locations (unsure about the h.s. but they just don't show much of it except the chem class.).  I quite enjoyed the chem lessons, the performance of the lead actor, and some other aspects of the show, but overall it's too much Coen Bros. worship for me.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 16, 2008, 12:06:00 PM
Kam -- Dupont: Better Living Through Digression


Harrie, that number is so familiar to me that I almost filled it in the blank on my IRS 1040 form for the SSN.  481-51-6234 (2)

I remain intrigued by the notion of using wax replicas for actors whose characters have died.  I'm sure the SAG union is excited by the prospect.




Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 16, 2008, 02:43:46 PM
Barton, yes, it would be so much cheaper. They could make a killing.

I tried to explain that to another member of this venue about the WGAe
(for your information, does television)
and the WGAw
(more info, does movies and some tv)

Writers Guild of America  could be considered as something like SAG
Screen Actors Guild; but, it contains many more writers, with the concept of being unionized.

For instance if I'm approached by a complete unknown, not a Rolling Stone, asking me to do a workshop for poets at some Arts affair for the City that benefits from tourism which is why they hold these large scale fairs sort of like Kam mentioned about tourists on a beautiful coastline or beach as at Newport,Rhode Island, and I dicker for my pay and he has never heard of such a thing, I tell him to go teach (it) himself because he thinks he's an entrpreneur and he hasn't offered me a cut of what I have no way to prove is his share of the take.

Thus when you are unionized as an artist like Screen Actors Guild, a writer in tv or films is not only unionized for support but paid for their work and has their copyright.  I've had this argument in here before that you are published, when you are published and not paying your own way to a vanity press computer generated  sort of a blog spot for someone who says he is a poet. You dig.

In this case the spin was like whether a valid journalist such as Joan Didion who wrote screen plays with her husband Gregory Dunne(brother of the notorious  Dominick who also writes and was a producer "in the business; and uncle of Griffin who has recently been making what? or has released it?) before she was widowed, and also sells hard-back copy of her coverage of events nonfictional and fictional however you see it just as Gregory did the novel of the movie that the two Roberts did, Di Nero and Duval.....

Well would Joan support a writers strike being the better kind of person she is?

I said yes, definitely. My opponent had not thought so.  I mean, Think Again! You are either in or you're out.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: pugetopolis on February 16, 2008, 03:23:15 PM
The National Writers Union

I've had this argument in here before that you are published, when you are published and not paying your own way to a vanity press computer generated  sort of a blog spot for someone who says he is a poet. You dig.

No, I don’t dig…

I’m a member of the National Writers Union AFL-CIO Local # 1981 and all I can say is there you go again…

Opining about things you don’t know anything about…

And dishing me for being a published poet and calling Gay Sunshine Press a vanity press.

Are you a union member?

Have you ever published anything?

Other than blog chit-chat?

Tell me more about me and my profession.

You seem to know everything?




Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 16, 2008, 03:51:48 PM
Thanks for the information.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: pugetopolis on February 16, 2008, 04:13:32 PM
Thanks for the information.

You're welcome, Madupont.

I didn't think you were a unionist...

And I doubt if you've ever published anything either...

Tell the truth now, Maddy...

Did you really ever know Kenneth Rexroth?

Hmmmmm?


 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D








Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 16, 2008, 05:32:55 PM
 I was selling pound cakes in Patagonia, back when my family had split up into missionary units with various intellectual agendas in the southern hemisphere, which reminds me that the lack of precipitation in the Atacama led to a flaking on the face not unlike that which some of our clan experienced during the years we baked hobby bread, down on Pontoon Avenue, you know that part of Boise, I believe, and the ovens would generate a massive electromagnetic pulse of dryness that made us all reminiscent of that nodule they removed from Kathy Bates foot, which of course was so prominently working for dramatic effect in "Misery", all of which dovetailed during our Patagonian sojourn with a happenstance encounter with Rexroth, who actually had given philatelic advice to my uncle in Saskatoon the previous year and was not entirely eager to talk to me about the "missed time" he had experienced in New Mexico, but nevertheless we did speak for a while and he sampled the pound cake samples with a certain misdirected insouciance that implied so much about the influence of the Druids, not to mention Andre Gide and PeeWee Herman, on his post-war oeuvre.

I fall into this style of free association occasionally, especially when Rexroth is thus mentioned, perhaps as a catalyst, or perhaps it is the influence of some other poster here whose style has somehow left some kind of residue in my process of...





Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 16, 2008, 07:14:13 PM
Wonderful, barton, if a tad too grammatical and comprehensible. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: pugetopolis on February 16, 2008, 08:50:49 PM
My dear barton and nytempsperdooo

Speaking of residue...

Here's something rather humorous...

It's something MrUtlely wrote about Mad and Company over here in Television Land.

It's got just the right satirical edge.

I admire MrUtley's writing very much... I hope you do too.




In Soprano-speak, I just wanna say: Ya tink you can fuckin' work any more fuckin' stereotypes and fuckin' narrow-mindedness into that fuckin' post, ya fuckin' fuck? I mean, what the fuck!!
 



Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on February 16, 2008, 09:58:42 PM
Pugey-poo, yoo-hoo!

Did I say you could quote me?

Did I give you my permission?

Ask me politely, or your out of commission!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: pugetopolis on February 16, 2008, 10:36:44 PM
(http://www.safran-arts.com/art/picture-Tennessee-Williams.jpg)


HEY! Cabana Boy! Stop poaching my work or I'll send a
large burly guy---er--no, uh- a woman!-- to smack you back to reality!



Quick...send that burly guy over here...

The sooner the better...

If you send a woman, she'll just have to get in line...

Behind Mad, Frumpy and Nytempsperdoo...

They all want to spank my naughty fanny...

But my fanny belongs to Big Daddy...

http://forums.escapefromelba.com/index.php/topic,247.msg70678.html#msg70678




Please, pretty please?

I really love the way you write.

How did you know I had a cabana?

And a dock... and a Bayliner?



 ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 17, 2008, 01:28:17 AM
your out of commission?

you're better than that!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: pugetopolis on February 17, 2008, 03:15:31 AM
your out of commission?

you're better than that!


Thank you, Kam.

I liked your message about Madame X.

http://forums.escapefromelba.com/index.php/topic,31.msg70429.html#msg70429

Cheers...


 ;D ;D ;D







Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 17, 2008, 03:34:01 AM
I'm just trying to help out where i can.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 17, 2008, 04:58:09 AM
Kam, I've been meaning to ask you; are you still Roadytoad?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 17, 2008, 05:46:17 AM
National Writers Union AFL-CIO Local # 1981

I do know a little something about that union.  At first, I thought you had written that #1981 was your membership number; but actually they unionized in 1981 with UAW, if you know anything about Walter Reuther.
He died in a mysterious hit, following a previous attempt that took the same form, it was standard CIA style.

I knew who he was because my uncle Frank was CEO of Chevrolet division,at General Motors but I probably wasn't paying much attention to what was going on at the time of Reuther's death.

Then my friend came back from India and came out to the house and catching up informatively, she happened to mention that Reuther's nephew had shown up at Hanuman Temple ,Varanasi. 

There are many people involved from Baba Ram Das, Timothy Leary,on the MIT end, Allen Ginsberg because they are all interconnected as disciples of Neem Karoli Baba.

And then you ask me stupid questions about Kenneth Rexroth.  Why don't you ask carol polk, she has some very strong opinions about the reading at the Six Gallery for Allen, and the Jazz at the Blackhawk readings by Rexroth, like it was all some hippy-dippy phase.

So I'd been meaning to ask you when the heck you showed up in SF that you don't know boo? From dates mentioned previously by you, maybe you did get there after Rexroth gave up the Pine Street apt. and went to Santa Barbara to teach.  Doesn't matter to me.

But I do know that Gay Sunshine went through changes and Llewelyn Press disassociated from them.  It may be because of for instance something you posted at one time, don't know if it was here or at nytimes but it was from Llewelyn with  Ginsberg being mentioned quite a bit in it as you posted it.  However, your version differs from the original, which I think is the crux of the contention between Llewelyn and Gay Sunshine (for all I know it is still sitting in the Poetry Forum, unless you got rid of it one of those late nights) because I really don't think you posted the unexpurgated version of what  Llewelyn  intended.

It's really a matter of where it can be printed and where it can't be.  Some of the unions are putting up  a real effort for freedom of speech on the internet, etc but not all web-masters know that; and since it is their ownership in a sense, even if they are just making use of a service, they get to decide how far they are identified with the unexpurgated material.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: pugetopolis on February 17, 2008, 07:49:59 AM
(http://www.leylandpublications.com/nav/gslogo.gif)

http://www.leylandpublications.com/

Thank for your interest in Gay Sunshine Press.

I trust you’ll enjoy the above link.

Cheers.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Lhoffman on February 17, 2008, 12:06:40 PM
Quote
I knew who he was because my uncle Frank was CEO of.....


GM execs, Maharaj-ji, drunken poets, where would history be without your numerous friends, relatives, acquainances? 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 17, 2008, 01:31:07 PM
Madupont, you've already swooped in and out-Duponted my parody on the previous page.  I bow before the master, or mistress, if you're into the whole gender-specific thing.

BTW, it's all in fun, just kidding, and no aspersions are intended on your globe-trotting  free-associational thought processes.

 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 17, 2008, 03:44:51 PM
barton, I merely answered with what is pertinent about the union mentioned as the relevant poster's membership.  The founder of that union was a man with a political outlook much like the scientist being discussed in American history and, is a well known American unionist,  in his own right.  For that, attempts were made on his life but in the Nixon administration they finally got him exactly by the method of the prior attempt. Nixon made such a fine sounding  speech of memoriam, one would be unlikely to suspect foul play against the deceased who had always  done something for the working man.

(if he had not, I doubt very much that my uncle would have risen from the line work begun either in the Depression or previous to it, and ended up in charge of the division. I don't think that I ever saw him after about the mid-1950s. He died seven years after Walter Reuther. When you know whom  it was  that the division  had been named after,and how the
entire company had been founded, it seems obvious that coincidence had also given him a leg up or a special advantage.)

What is interesting to me is that one of the surviving heirs of the assassinated union leader immediately went to India as a convert to a non-self-serving outlook but at the same time was attracted to a friend of mine who was not particularly interested in him. That's life. Her guru was the same man  whom Timothy Leary but particularly Hugh Alpert checked into after their sensory deprivation experiments(the float in a water tank without sensory input). Having come up with LSD, it was Alpert (rather than Leary) who changed his name to Baba Ramdas, or just plain Ramdas upon meeting young Reuther's guru, Neem Karoli Baba who snatched the acid from Alpert's hand,asking "What have you got there?", and immediately downing the entirety from the container, to Alpert's astonishment.

Their were no apparent effects whatsoever. This so blew Alpert's mind, as incontravertable evidence that there was something more at work here than the chemistry, that he dappled with the ashram's discipline for a time but I have no idea whether he continued to retain that anymore than Ginsberg  who was actually dismissed from the ashram by Neem Karoli Baba who made certain recommendations to Ginsberg which he would not "follow" and therefor was out of the sangha.

In other words, this ancient temple in Benares, which has recently in the last few years been bombed by Muslims, as it offers sanctuary to Hindu travelers passing through, has nothing whatever to do with Maharaji Mahesh Yoga or Transcendental Meditation.

Nor do I globe-trot.  I like traveling but it is a major inconvenience isn't it?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 17, 2008, 05:09:37 PM
Kam, I've been meaning to ask you; are you still Roadytoad?

No.  I'm not anyone else.  Kam is my actual name.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 17, 2008, 08:30:10 PM
Good.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 18, 2008, 07:59:54 AM
Is anyone aware that Feb.25th.,next Monday, in the performance by Sean Combs (shown here  in a different role as fashion mogul with Ty Beckford, http://www.blackvoices.com/news/pictures-of-the-week )
for a remake of his Broadway performance, Raisin in the Sun.

Hint, there is a commercial advertisement for the tv production on abc
to the right of the photo, if you can take your eyes off Beckford. He's kind of stunning coming down the runway at you in fashion designed by Sean John. On the street, you might step aside in astonishment, right off the curb.





Title: The Wire - Episode 7
Post by: Kam on February 18, 2008, 03:25:18 PM
NO....not Savino!!!

Just kidding hehe... no love lost for hired muscle.  There's some question in blog-land as to whether or not killing Savino was going against Omar's own code.  I say no. "You know what?" BLAM!!! Brains on the wall.  Omar doesn't seem to care much about the promise he made Bunk last year about killing people.  Poor Bunk... can't even get his LabWork back because of McNulty's fake serial killer.

Richard Belzer's John Munch character from Homicide(s) and Law&Order(s) fame makes an appearance in the cop bar.  He has a funny line he says to the bartender but thats it.  Seemed like a cameo's cameo. 

I like how there are soooo many characters in The Wire (what other show has a cast this big?) that you can kill off guys like Butchie, Prop Joe, Hungry Man, Savino etc... and the universe just continues.  Its very true to life.  Big fish or small.  Everyone dies eventually.  Many with little fanfare.  Many die in the streets or because of them.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on February 19, 2008, 11:46:18 AM
"They think they done with ol' Clay Davis...want to put ol' Clay on a shelf...sheeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeeit..."

Love that guy.


Title: Six degrees of St. Elsewhere
Post by: Kam on February 19, 2008, 12:58:22 PM
I never watched the show, St. Elsewhere.  I think I was just too young at the time although i do remember it coming on and not being interested.  I never knew that the entire show was supposed to be a dream of an autistic named Tommy Westphall?  Anyhow, with that said, some people have been studying the St. Elsewhere "multiverse" and they have ome up with 100s of shows linked to St. Elsewhere.  And if St Elsewhere is a dream, then these other shows must then also be fragments of this same dream world.  For example:

St Elsewhere's Dr Turner was investigated for murder by Homicide's Pembleton and Bayliss.
St Elsewhere's Westphall, Craig and Auschlander visited Cheers' bar
Cheers' Norm, Cliff, and Drs. Crane visited Wings' airport.
Cheers spun-off The Tortellis with Carla.
And going back to Cheers it also spun-off Fraiser.
John Larroquette Show's John Hemingway called into Fraiser's show.
Fraiser's Niles and Daphne read Caroline in the City's comic strip.
Caroline in the City's Caroline wished The Single Guy's Jonathan good luck.
Caroline in the City's Annie was hit on by Friends' Chandler.
Friends' Ross visited The Single Guy's Janeane.
Hope and Gloria's title characters visited Friends' Central Perk.
Friends?Joey spun off onto his own show Joey.
Friends? Phoebe and Mad About You's Ursula are sisters.
Mad About You's Paul leased his old apartment to Seinfeld's Kramer.

And i haven't even touched on Mash, Star Trek, The Wire, I Love Lucy, and a ton of other shows connected.

http://home.vicnet.net.au/~kwgow/crossovers.html (http://home.vicnet.net.au/~kwgow/crossovers.html)

(http://home.vicnet.net.au/~kwgow/crossovers(full).jpg)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 19, 2008, 04:02:38 PM
In a close but not quite note  - Drs. Craig, Ehrlich, and Axelrod and orderly/PA Luther Hawkins (William Daniels, Ed Begley, Jr., Stephen Furst and Eric Lanueville) from St. Elsewhere also appeared on a Scrubs episode, but as four other doctors, not their St. Elsewhere characters. St. Elsewhere was a great show.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 19, 2008, 06:40:29 PM
I heard somewhere the Richard Belzer has played his detective character on something like ten different tv series, at one time or another.  I remember he appeared on The X-Files, in that role.  I don't watch enough tube to tell you where all he's been.

I'll rent a St. Else sometime, check it out.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: MrUtley3 on February 19, 2008, 06:43:18 PM
St. Elsewhere was a great show until they ended with that stupid "it was all a dream" crap.
 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 19, 2008, 09:44:25 PM
Except for the quoted line, something about Clay Davis almost reminds me of SF's former mayor Downtown Willie Brown, who was a major state politico before being mayor, and now is called upon to comment on all things SF/CA politics.  He was another in the "he's a sumbitch, but he's our sumbitch" mold.

 



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 19, 2008, 10:34:25 PM
I don't know if it was mentioned here, but the real life Clay Davis is Larry Young. 

(http://www.msa.md.gov/msa/mdmanual/05sen/former/images/msa12159.gif)

Young, a Baltimore Democrat who in 24 years in the General Assembly has become a leader in health care matters, stands accused by the legislature's Joint Committee on Legislative Ethics of accepting gifts improperly, failing to disclose a contract with a state agency, mixing his legislative and private office budgets and using the prestige of his office for personal gain. -Washington Post, Jan/1998

http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/local/longterm/library/mdstateleg/issues/ethics3.htm (http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/local/longterm/library/mdstateleg/issues/ethics3.htm)


Larry Young was the Radio Host in Episode (6? i think) who interviews Clay on his show.
(http://www.washingtonpost.com/wp-srv/local/images/young1.jpg)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on February 19, 2008, 11:52:32 PM
Interesting...just love the performance, and the acting decision to carry out the word "shit" so long, too long, great acting choice.

Thanks for the info.  "The Wire" continues to be the best drama ever aired.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 20, 2008, 12:44:14 PM
I'll admit to a little cable envy, here.  (you need a wire to pull in The Wire)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 20, 2008, 01:52:05 PM
This is for Harrie but you all are welcome to enjoy this one.

http://www.sundancechannel.com/films/500312968    Check out the Video

Jesus is Magic/ Sarah  Silverman/Saturday,Feb.23/10pm  also,
Friday February 29 at 10:30PM
and
Monday March 3 at 1:45AM

Known for her abrasive and startlingly transgressive humor, stand-up comedian Sarah Silverman stars in her first concert film, in which she sings, dances and lets loose on some of her favorite politically incorrect topics: rape, race, 9/11, the Holocaust and sex. Justly called "the female Lenny Bruce," Silverman is never afraid to venture into the darkest places of the human soul, where she finds jokes that often induce both laughter and nervous shivers, while obliquely skewering hypocrisy and insincerity. Directed by Liam Lynch.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on February 20, 2008, 02:19:23 PM
Barton:  Start with Season 1 on DVD, they are now in Season 6 and it's always been great.


Title: Apple TV 2.0 vs. Blu-Ray, DVD & HD Cable: The Comparison
Post by: Kam on February 21, 2008, 05:14:52 PM
http://www.ilounge.com/index.php/articles/comments/apple-tv-20-vs-blu-ray-dvd-hd-cable-the-comparison/ (http://www.ilounge.com/index.php/articles/comments/apple-tv-20-vs-blu-ray-dvd-hd-cable-the-comparison/)

These formats aren't that different, although blue-ray clearly shows the little details.


Title: LOST info - Sometimes, a Bracelet is just a Bracelet
Post by: Kam on February 21, 2008, 05:43:52 PM
Who are the Oceanic 6? Want answers? Let's just ask executive producer Damon Lindelof.'

Is Ben a member of the Oceanic 6?

Damon: ''Nothing precludes him from being a member of the Oceanic 6 — other than he wasn't on the plane,'' says Lindelof. ''But he does have a room full of documents and passports. He could have just, you know, done some research and doctored some records and adopted the identity of someone on the plane — someone with no family or friends who would know otherwise. So who's to say he isn't?''

So...when will we know for certain?

Damon: ''By the end of the seventh episode, the audience will now know who the Oceanic 6 are.''



http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,20179125,00.html?xid=email-alert-lost-20080221-item1 (http://www.ew.com/ew/article/0,,20179125,00.html?xid=email-alert-lost-20080221-item1)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 22, 2008, 10:18:03 AM
Well, we added little Aaron this week.   With all that implies, and explains re Kate's need to "get back to him" in last season's finale.

Jin's map reading on Albuquerque, NM piqued my interest -- his finger was to the east of the city.  When I consulted a map, it looked like his finger was covering a town about 20 miles E. called MORIARTY, NM.  As some may have noticed, Ben's passport alias was "Dean MORIARTY" in last week's episode.  (the "enhanced" rerun mentioned this) And PROF. MORIARTY, Holmes's (Holmium, most magnetic of the Lanthanide elements, don't forget!) nemesis is tied into the detective's apparent death and then seemingly miraculous resurrection in later stories.  If I've managed to work all this out, I'm sure the hardcore Losties are all abuzz over it.

Also, Philip K. Dick fans were treated to a delicious dish of red herring last night -- did you catch it?

 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 22, 2008, 12:42:07 PM
Well, my choice for reading into details this week was...Xanadu.  Hurley's choice of movie, while awesome for its badness alone, was kind of ironic or at least  a tasty red herring.  As in, is the Lost island someone's (presumably the Dharmas, since it's their tape) idea of Paradise/Eden/Shangri-La?  Yet some of the Losties can't get off it fast enough.

Helicopter not reaching the freighter yet:  Time warp/pilot didn't stay precisely on the correct bearing?  Or person on other end of the phone was lying?  Especially since she could make an educated guess that she's on speaker?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 22, 2008, 12:44:48 PM
I didn't like this episode of Lost. Can you say Borrriiinnnngggg?  If Kate weren't so good-looking i'd want her off the screen.  Shes so annoying on-screen except when holding a gun. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 22, 2008, 12:52:10 PM
Harrie -- If the helicopter hasn't arrived at the freighter, and it's a day later, then it clearly doesn't have enough fuel to still be up in the air....so Regina is lying...or they've hit one of those time warp thingys bigtime....or they've gone down and somehow Sayid, at least, is going to survive so he can hook up with Ben later.

Kam -- The Kate thing was perhaps a bit dull, but it did at least take care of the "I've got to get back to him" mystery -- or whatever she says to Jack in last season's finale -- presumably Aaron is the "him."  As for boring, my nom for Princess of Dullsville is, and has been for a while, CLAIRE.  If she falls out of the chopper crying "Kate, take my babeeeeeeeeeeeeeee!" it's OK with me.

I loved the Xanada reference by the way...if you read the Coleridge poem, BTW, it seems to have an eerie connectedness to "Lost" --

In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree :
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man

Down to a sunless sea.

So twice five miles of fertile ground
With walls and towers were girdled round :
And there were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree ;
And here were forests ancient as the hills,
Enfolding sunny spots of greenery.
But oh ! that deep romantic chasm which slanted
Down the green hill athwart a cedarn cover !
A savage place ! as holy and enchanted
As e'er beneath a waning moon was haunted
By woman wailing for her demon-lover !
And from this chasm, with ceaseless turmoil seething,
As if this earth in fast thick pants were breathing,
A mighty fountain momently was forced :
Amid whose swift half-intermitted burst
Huge fragments vaulted like rebounding hail,
Or chaffy grain beneath the thresher's flail :
And 'mid these dancing rocks at once and ever
It flung up momently the sacred river.
Five miles meandering with a mazy motion
Through wood and dale the sacred river ran,
Then reached the caverns measureless to man,
And sank in tumult to a lifeless ocean :
And 'mid this tumult Kubla heard from far
Ancestral voices prophesying war !


The shadow of the dome of pleasure
Floated midway on the waves ;
Where was heard the mingled measure
From the fountain and the caves.

It was a miracle of rare device,
A sunny pleasure-dome with caves of ice !
A damsel with a dulcimer
In a vision once I saw :
It was an Abyssinian maid,
And on her dulcimer she played,
Singing of Mount Abora.
Could I revive within me
Her symphony and song,
To such a deep delight 'twould win me,

That with music loud and long,
I would build that dome in air,
That sunny dome ! those caves of ice !
And all who heard should see them there,
And all should cry, Beware ! Beware !
His flashing eyes, his floating hair !
Weave a circle round him thrice,
And close your eyes with holy dread,
For he on honey-dew hath fed,
And drunk the milk of Paradise.

---------------------------

 



Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 22, 2008, 12:53:23 PM
And I can't believe that bracelet last week was just a bracelet.  Bummer.

I get why the Oceanic Six would have a cover story, but I wonder if the story was always that Kate was the hero, or Jack tweaked it for her trial?  This is kind of a duh conclusion, but if Kate was made out to be the hero from the story's inception, Ben or whoever is behind it really thought about covering asses -- ie, we know Kate's going to face trial so we have to make her look really good.  Or was it that Jack loves-doesn't love-loves Kate so much he'd lie that much for her?

The writers had the hubby going, though - he had called that Kate's baby would be Aaron pretty early on. But then Jack's not wanting to see it made him think the baby was Sawyer's for about a minute, until we got the answer at the end.  So is Jack so averse to seeing Aaron because of guilt?  I can't imagine Claire would have given up Aaron, especially in light of the psychic's warning, which she seemed to take seriously.  So do we presume Claire died either through accident or nefarious doings?  Or was Aaron kidnapped for some reason? Just going all over the place.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 22, 2008, 12:56:28 PM
Quote
Harrie -- If the helicopter hasn't arrived at the freighter, and it's a day later, then it clearly doesn't have enough fuel to still be up in the air....so Regina is lying...or they've hit one of those time warp thingys bigtime....or they've gone down and somehow Sayid, at least, is going to survive so he can hook up with Ben later.

I'm no physicist or even a sci-fi person, so this puzzles me. If time warps, does fuel warp as well?  I mean, if the copter is moving slower or lost in time or whatever, does the fuel pay out accordingly?  Though others have swum back to the island -- Sawyer, and Jin, right? So maybe Sayid's dog padding as I write.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 22, 2008, 01:53:25 PM
Maybe that whole time thing is a red herring -- I mean, if time really traveled at different speeds on and off-island, then there'd be big discrepancy between Jack's counting of days (Red Sox chats and all) and outside events.  Plus, wouldn't Regina's voice either be like Henry Kissinger or one of the chipmunks, if freighter time were going at a different rate?   

You never know -- Walt could turn up tomorrow with a deep voice and heavy moustache.

My guess on Jack's guilt is that he somehow felt responsible for Claire's fate, whatever it is.  I mean, that seems to be part of Jack's whole post-island angst, that he somehow abandoned people.   I don't think Aaron was kidnapped; more likely, she (Kate) took Aaron because Claire died or turned into a polar bear or whatever and Kate, perhaps driven by a mix of thawing maternal instincts and guilt over her own part in Claire's demise, decided it was the right thing.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 22, 2008, 02:29:57 PM
Why would Jack not want to see Aaron?

A) Aaron is Sawyer's kid with Kate and Jack feels its not his place
B) Jack is somehow responsible for whatever separates Claire from Aaron and feels guilty
C) Any other theories?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 22, 2008, 03:43:14 PM
This isn’t my work, but –

Shawn Moore played Kate’s lawyer last night.
He also played a guy named Jack Shepherd in Frequency (2000).
The tagline for Frequency was “What would you do if you could change the past?”
Elizabeth Mitchell (Juliette) was also in the flick.

What does this mean?  Nothing, I'm sure.  I just enjoy it when the writers/producers mess with us. 

So Kam, you think Kate would have popped one out and named it Aaron?  I'm with you on Option B, maybe -- like if Jack had to make a choice between Kate and Claire, and he chose Kate, then (or does he already know this?) latere on found out that Claire was his half-sister. That could induce a little guilt.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 22, 2008, 03:51:49 PM
And speaking of the time passing slowly on the island, I wonder how that works for the producers with regard to Aaron.  Like, does it work in their favor because Aaron would stay smaller longer, or do they go crazy recasting new Aarons every couple of months because the actor baby grew up too much?

How about Miles being Ben's person on the boat?  That could be one reason why Miles was so determined to see Ben but didn't assault him the second he saw him. Or not.  I was also kind of wondering what Kate was expecting Miles to tell her -- did she think he had some Ghost Whisperer kind of message?   I kind of didn't get the whole "what do you know about me" thing.

I've got a snow day and so (unfortunately) have lots of time to obsess.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 22, 2008, 07:59:36 PM
I thought Kate's question seemed weird at first, but then considered that she's a wanted fugitive and wanting to know if Team Freighter knew that.  But the way she asks, which is part of her being an annoying character, is sort of narcissist-drama queen-ish.   Kate always looks out for Kate -- which is why she and Sawyer seem so kindred souls, because Sawyer takes a similar approach to Sawyer. 

OTOH (watch me obsess, too), she could be asking Miles to ghosbust her, as in, see any dead stepfathers and such hanging around me.

Basically, Kate needs some serious shampoo and conditioner.  The whole strings o' hair thing makes my scalp itch just to see.  She does clean up nice, though, in the FF scenes.

BTW, I LOVE the Frequency connection.  In the realm of sci-fi cheese, it's a favorite of mine, and I get sucked into the whole father-son emotional thing bigtime.  I do remember Elizabeth Mitchell, as Dennis Quaid's wife.  Frequency also has a whole baseball history thing going, too -- that's how Caviezel first convinces his past-Dad that he's really talking to him from 30 years in the future, by predicting what happens in a game that hasn't happened yet in the Dad's present.





Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on February 23, 2008, 02:01:46 PM
Been too busy to visit this thread for a few days. Intriguing Lost discussion, guys, as always. In classic Lost fashion, this episode seemed to have resolved one question (the next Oceanic Six Club member) while introducing several more.

In addition to the ones you've already mentioned, I was very interested in Jack's statement on the witness stand that only eight of the people on the plane survived the crash. If there is an Oceanic Six, then that would seem to imply that that the story that's been agreed to by the group is that two people survived the crash and then those two subsequently...what, exactly? Died? Disappeared? What is it about the circumstances surrounding those two people that would make the other six agree to tell the world that they had survived the crash, but for some reason aren't available for comment now?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 23, 2008, 05:15:19 PM
Hi, Earl.  Glad you stopped by.

It suggests to me that, in the course of the actual rescue, with Team Freighter or whoever, eight people showed up for chopper flights or whatever, and two of them got killed in the process.  IOW, the extra two are in the story because some of Team Freighter, or whoever,  involved in the rescue somehow constitute public witnesses and aren't going to pretend that they didn't see those two.

Another possibility is that Jack et al. DID invent an extra two survivors because they thought six was just too small a number to make a community of survivors that would endure for three months.  Maybe the idea is that eight was a more reasonable number and then, some time before actual rescue, two of them could fall prey to accidents or similar.  Actually, when I think about it, most harrowing tales of survival do involve some % mortality.

Ernest Shackleton being the notable exception -- IIRC, he kept everyone on "Endurance" alive.



Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 23, 2008, 09:42:54 PM
Quote
a town about 20 miles E. called MORIARTY, NM

which holds or at least used to hold an annual dinner for/by the ABQ branch of the Baker Street Irregulars
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baker_Street_Irregulars

(I forget what the ABQ or NM branch was named), an organization that has such events at which there is much imbibing and participants are involved in various arcane rituals, like citing quotes from Conan Doyle for other participants to ID.  I so very much wanted to be a member of the BSI but at the time I was reading those stories there were no female members...dunno about now.

Hmmm. I see their NYC event in January http://www.bsiweekend.com/ featured a William Gillette luncheon.  I am somehow related to Gillette (my formidable dowager aunt would know) who played Holmes (and played Holmes, and played Holmes) on the stage way back when.  I can only hope he wasn't like O'Neill's father who made a living and ruined himself by endlessly playing The Count of Monte Cristo (I think it was--perhaps someone here knows about this) and was the model for the father in A Long Day's Journey Into Night.

Please pardon the digression set off by speculation about the NM town, back to being Lost...or on The Wire...or In Treatment...or...


 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 23, 2008, 10:50:39 PM
Oh, I had to jump episodes, a couple of week's worth, In Treatment last night because I got so far behind and it was scheduled in regular time slot for I think the second or perhaps third appointment of Byrne with "his analyst".   it is a difficult program to "take" as there is so much tension involved with these people.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 23, 2008, 11:05:12 PM
Quote
I was very interested in Jack's statement on the witness stand that only eight of the people on the plane survived the crash.

That struck me, too, because family and I thought there were more, so we started naming those we could remember from the beginning: Charlie, Hurley, John, Jack, Kate, Jin, Sun, Claire, Rose, Sawyer, Michael, Walt (does Vincent count?), Shannon, Boone (there may be more).  So perhaps by "survive" meant not surviving the crash only but surviving the crash and escaping/leaving...Or Jack is mistaken (gasp!), or is lying (double gasp!), for what reason we know not...yet. (It can't be the writers think no one is paying attention, that's for sure!)  


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 23, 2008, 11:22:21 PM
Jack is definitely lying because later on Kate and Jack are talking and Kate says something about how many times she's heard Jack say those things that she thinks he's starting to actually believe it.

They are definitely lying to protect whoever is left on the island.  There are losties who survived the crash that we see in all the episodes who are merely extras and have never been given a story or a name or even a close-up.  Thats one of the funny things about this show. 

I wonder if Lapidus, Farraday, Lewis, or Straum are still alive in the flash-forward where Jack lies under oath. Surely they are not all part of the Oceanic 6 as well, but all of them know that there are more than 8 survivors.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 24, 2008, 01:56:40 PM
I think Oceanic Six refers to people who were on the flight manifest and are, therefore, survivors of that flight.   We know through the FF's that Hurley, Jack, Kate, Sayid, and Aaron are among the six (Aaron, I think, is included because it's understood that he was "on" the flight, even if only a fetus).  It's my understanding that the final Sixer will be revealed this week or next.   As for anyone from Team Freighter, I suspect that they are all, for whatever reasons, compelled to maintain secrecy as to where the survivors were picked up (clearly not at the site of the fake 815 crash in Indonesian waters) and their actual numbers.  Jack's lie is a large one, supported at many levels -- there is a vast web of intrigue between various shadowy groups that share a common purpose in keeping the Island a secret.  Think of the trouble and money that would be needed to put a fake 815 crash at the bottom of the ocean, let alone all the other machinations!



Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 24, 2008, 06:21:21 PM
Which sort of reminds me....is it safe to assume, then, that the seabird to whose leg Claire strapped that lovely, poetic but pretty useless message a season or two back never reached civilization?  Didn't she say there were 40-ish of them, etc. --everything but where to find them, IIRC. 

Maybe the gull can't get out of the zone, like Desmond couldn't in the sailboat. Unless the last shot of the last episode is someone finding a dead gull on the beach. They notice something flapping a little and come closer; then they carefully unwrap the paper from the bird's leg and start to read.....

Scratch that thought -- found the text of Claire's note, and it doesn't mention any numbers. It says: 

To whom it may concern:
We are survivors of Oceanic flight 815. We have survived on this island for eighty days. We were six hours into the flight when the pilot said we were off course and turned back towards Fiji. We hit turbulence and crashed. We have been waiting here all this time, waiting for rescue that has not come. We do not know where we are, we only know that you have not found us. We have done our best to live on this island. Some of us have come to accept that we may never leave it. Not all of us have survived since the crash, but there is new life, too, and with it there is hope. We are alive. Please don't give up on us.


Title: The Wire
Post by: Kam on February 25, 2008, 12:49:12 AM
R.I.P. Omar Little.  Dang that little bastid Kenard. 

This scene was actually set up in Season 3.  Remember when one of the girls in Omar's crew, Toscha, got shot in the head after a robbery of a Barksdale stashhouse?  Bunk later investigates the scene and is disgusted to see some kids re-enacting the event.  One of those kids turns to his friend in the skully and says, "It's my turn to be Omar"  Well that kid who wanted to be Omar, was actually Kenard in his first ever appearance on the show.

(http://i68.photobucket.com/albums/i11/jrodesiler/kenard.jpg)

here's the youtube. (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ksUNm6TZ1rQ)



Title: The Wire - real life
Post by: Kam on February 25, 2008, 03:06:14 PM
There are many real life Baltimoreans who play small to large roles on the Wire.

The Deacon ~ former Drug kingpin.
Big Donnie Anderson ~ former stick-up boy, inspiration for Omar's character.
Detective Norris ~ former BPD Commisioner Norris.
Detective Mello ~ the real life Jay Landsman
Bill Zorzi ~ playing himself, Baltimore Sun reporter Bill Zorzi
Snoop ~ played by the real life 'Snoop' Felicia Pearson who spent time in prison on manslaughter charges.  (She claims self defense)

And many other characters on the show are inspired by people in real life.  Baltimore's current Mayor is one Sheila Dixon.  Dixon was the former City Councilwoman (Nereese Campbell's character) who took over the Mayor's seat when former Mayor O'Malley (Tommy Carcetti's character) ran and won the race for Governor of Maryland.  Art truly imitates life on this show.  Versimilitude galore.

Here's a snippet of current Mayor's Sheila Dixon's "Spotlight on Baltimore"

Bethesda, Md.: You were reportedly the basis for the character Naresse Campbell on HBO's "The Wire." Campbell plays a shrewd, calculating politician intent on winning the mayoral seat. Have you seen the show and, if so, what are your thoughts on the character you inspired?

Mayor Sheila Dixon: First of all, I do watch and enjoy The Wire. The fictional City Council President and I have very little in common. One: I'm very focused on results. I'm much less concerned with political ramifications. Two: I don't curse in meetings and while discussing issues.

However, we do have a similar fashion sense. And we are alike in being no-nonsense elected officials.



(http://media3.washingtonpost.com/wp-dyn/content/photo/2008/02/19/PH2008021901461.jpg)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 25, 2008, 03:15:13 PM
I'm sure I wouldn't have recalled that foreshadow, thanks kam.  I did "flash" onto what was about to happen to Omar, though, maybe something about the way he headed down the street, rather heedlessly clearing the youngsters out of his way.  More so than a "final showdown" with Marlo, this way was in keeping with the whole multigenerational story line, from the OGs to the NewGs to the BabyGs.

Not that it matters in the grand scheme, but I'm sure there will be things we'll never know (sure hope it's not just stuff I missed).  Here's one: who was the leak that allowed Prop Joe to obtain secret grand jury TXes?  


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 25, 2008, 04:34:24 PM
who was the leak that allowed Prop Joe to obtain secret grand jury TXes?  

I stayed up late last night to watch the next episode onDemand.  Its the second to last episode.  HBO won't be airing the final episode a week early onDemand so I have two weeks to wait for the special 93 minute series finale.  In that penultimate episode, it is strongly hinted who the leak is.  You will find out.  But i won't spoil it for you. 

By the way, there's still a chance they make a movie.  Wendell Pierce who plays BUNK, and the actress who plays Kima Greggs are supposedly pushing David Simon to do a script for a movie.  He is intrigued with the idea but insists that it would have to be a prequel.  Also insists they won't do it unless the script is worthy. 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Urethra_Franklin on February 25, 2008, 04:53:32 PM
I miss Arrested Development


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 25, 2008, 05:08:44 PM
I used to watch AD.... it was one of the last network sitcoms I followed.  Sitcoms these days just don't do it for me.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Urethra_Franklin on February 25, 2008, 05:16:29 PM
Same here.."The Office" and "30 Rock" are the only major network sitcoms I can stomach anymore. 


Why Fox cancelled AD is beyond me...I wonder which failed show replaced it


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 26, 2008, 02:21:37 AM
Just for the heck of it, ABC did a tv production of the previous Broadway appearance of P. Diddy in Lorraine Hansberry's, Raisin in the Sun. Now, that the thing is nigh unto Fifty years old,nothing shows you better than this late 1950s prize winning drama  or more dramatically what happened that brought it all down to The Wire.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 26, 2008, 05:12:34 PM
an amazing moment of life imitating television:

The Philadelphia Inquirer is running a multipart series about Philadelphia's homeless, inspired by the gruesome death of a homeless man. This is delicious because the Inquirer's editor is none other than Bill Marimow, former Sun managing editor, nemesis of David Simon, and Simon's supposed model for managing editor Thomas Klebanow on The Wire. Klebanow, of course, is supervising the Sun's special homeless investigation, inspired by the gruesome deaths of homeless men.


Marimow was also the name given to the Detective who Rawls puts in charge of Major Crimes and who drives away Lester, Kima, Sydnor et al with his insistance on making street rips instead of building a case against Marlo Stanfield.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: jbottle on February 26, 2008, 06:03:39 PM
I wonder why they made Carcetti Italian when the actor himself is Irish and allegedly patterned on an Irish politician?  I guess they wrote it before they cast it but everyone else seems cast pretty close, maybe they wanted a little distance, but Carcetti is a fairly admirable if hard-nosed, not seeming corrupt at least other than in the manipulations of the machination of government that is his duty.  Everyone on the show is so good and we're used to losing guys but Omar was a good actor and character.


Title: The real life OMAR is still alive
Post by: Kam on February 26, 2008, 07:24:05 PM
http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/09/us/09baltimore.html?_r=1&oref=slogin (http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/09/us/09baltimore.html?_r=1&oref=slogin)

Thats a must-read article.  Donnie Andrews, the main inspiration for the Omar character.

The actor who plays Omar, Michael K Williams, answers an interviewer's question below.

Toward the end, did Omar’s exploits ever get too unbelievable?
I’m talking about when he jumped from that building and landed with only a broken leg.


That actually really happened. Omar’s character is based on a brother named Donnie Andrews. [On The Wire, the real-life Andrews played] the gentleman that got shot and killed in that apartment with Omar. I said, “Donnie, man, what happened that night? What was going through your mind to jump through the window?” He said, “Michael, I wasn’t thinking. There was no time to think. I was just trying to escape some hot ones.” Your partner just got murdered. You got people gunning at you. And there’s an open window? What are you going to do?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on February 26, 2008, 07:46:51 PM
I'm working on a case now involving a 50-something woman so terrified when her boyfriend held a knife to her forehead then her throat, asking her whether he should cut her eyes out first or cut her throat, that when he went to the phone she jumped out a 2nd story window onto a paved driveway, crushed both heels, 2 weeks in hospital, 5 months in wheelchair, will wear special shoes always.  How did the incident start?  She woke him up asking him to go out and get his scary pitbull that had got out of the yard, so her mother & sister (also terrified of pitbull) could come visit.  Apparently he wasn't at his best in the mornings.

I'm musing on who may have given up the secret grand jury docs., judging (get it?) by who had easiest access...and who doesn't seem averse to cutting legal corners...and who didn't want to pay for his lunch with Pearlman & McNulty...

Seen any interviews with Felicia Pearson?  Her character seems scarily genuine, sure wish I could understand more of what she says.  The first episode of the show I ever saw was the one that opened with the purchase of the nail gun; still a stunner.   


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 27, 2008, 03:37:08 PM
interview with Felicia Pearson (http://jasmynecannick.typepad.com/jasmynecannickcom/2008/02/felicia-snoop-p.html)

A Black lesbian female who was born premature to two drug-addicted and incarcerated parents and ended up in a foster home where she was raised by the hardcore streets of Baltimore, Felicia earned her G.E.D. while serving 8 years in prison for second-degree murder.  Yes, she’s not your typical Hollywood story.

Snoop and Chris are two of the scariest characters to ever grace the TV screen.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on February 27, 2008, 04:45:11 PM
I miss Arrested Development

Take it from me, where ever you are, Arrested Development is there with you!


Title: Re: Television
Post by: obertray on February 28, 2008, 09:21:57 AM
The other morning I said to the isusmay, "I sure hate these Dr. Jarvic ads for Lipitor"

I mean really, come on! The guy weighs 125 lbs, eats to make Euell Gibbons look like a junk food junkie, and exercizes his ass off. If he still needs a cholesterol drug, what chance do the rest of us have?

But then it turns out that it wasn't Jarvik rowing that shell across that lake anyhow! Oh, BTW, he's not a licensed medical doctor! And he didn't invent that artificial heat in the first place.

Apparently he's going to be ok though, he has signed up to sell Izuzu cars. (whatever became of them?)


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Earl on February 29, 2008, 07:50:54 AM
I trust all you Losties out there noticed during last night's episode the item that was up for bid at the auction: A painting of the ship The Black Rock. Then there was the delicious lot number assigned to that auction item: #2342. Not to mention the mention of the name "Hanso" by the auctioneer.

Still trying to wrap my brain around all the time-bending stuff. I'll think more about it...umm...later.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: harrie on February 29, 2008, 09:20:09 AM
Yeah, I didn't understand, oh, just about everything time-travel related -- but thought it was a kickass episode nonetheless.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 29, 2008, 12:34:43 PM
One of those episodes where you have to simply say, okay my mind is utterly blown...and then, if you've had the flu all week and are slightly delirious with fever, go and write a song called "The Ballad of Eloise Rat" at 4 a.m

Here (cough) it is:

Come and listen to my tale 'bout a rat named Eloise
Worked for Dan Faraday, always had the finest cheese
Then one day she was running through a maze
Fell through a timewarp, 11 Hz. in-phase...

Spacetime anomaly, that is, black hole gold, unapproved-by-Oxford....

Next thing you know, Eloise finds future cheese,
Camembert and Gouda and very stinky Bries
Now all that fine dinin' is making her quite fat
Pretty soon she don't know which time she's at....

Dis-Orientation, that is, George Minkowski-style....

Meanwhile Desmond Hume is coming loose in time too,
Doesn't know Sayid, acts like he's sniffin' glue
Has to get to Oxford and let Past-Dan lend a hand,
Before he dies from time snappin' like a rubber band....

Fried brain, that is, nosebleeds, ears steamin'...

Poor Eloise gets all snarled up in temporal knots,
Turns out she was needin' a Penny for her thoughts
Without no "constant" fixed into her little brain,
She dies like Minkowski, but it wasn't all in vain....

Data, that is, in-for-mation, science stuff...

Now it's time to say goodbye to 1996,
Penny's pissed at Desmond for five more years, or six,
But after that it's cool and he makes his Christmas call--
there follows an emotional scene could make a feller bawl!

Y'all come back now, on a bearing of 315, y'hear?



Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 29, 2008, 12:41:53 PM
Bravo Barton.

And yes, that was the best Episode of the Season (making up for that Kate stinkeroo snoozefest last week) and in my opinion their best episode ever.  Funny that I say that and yet there was no Kate, Ben, Sawyer, Jin, Hurley, Locke... barely any Jack... the annoying Losties.

Sayid and Desmond are the best characters and the love angle between Penny and Desmond puts Kate's crushes to utter shame.  Desmond's backstory IS Lost.  I could give two shits about Kate.  If they never show another Kate story again thats fine by me.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on February 29, 2008, 01:04:25 PM
Pretty much nodding my head like one of those dashboard puppies that, um, nod quite a bit.  Yeah, this show captured the wild sci-fi down-the-rabbit-hole Philip K. Dick-on-steroids quality that is the true heart of "Lost." 

And I think some kudos go to Jeremy Davies, in particular the scene where Desmond shows up at his Oxford lab...Faraday puts on this rather skimpy-looking apron/vest thing to fend off radiation and Desmond says, "What about your head?"  And there's this great moment of hesitation, this absent-minded professor moment where he might be considering, hmmm, yeah what about my head?   I think Davies is revealing some comic potential that I wasn't initially expecting.  LOL funny scene.






 


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 29, 2008, 05:16:28 PM
J.D. manages to do that, even without written dialogue. It may be his delivery,or maybe he makes up his own lines as he goes along through life.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: Kam on February 29, 2008, 05:34:23 PM
Quote
"What about your head?"  And there's this great moment of hesitation, this absent-minded professor moment where he might be considering, hmmm, yeah what about my head?

The first time we saw him this season, he was crying over the news of the discovery of Oceanic 815.  He looked like he had a bandage on his head and a nurse attending him.  It could be that his exposure to radiation and time-travel caused him to have the same malady that Desmond and Minkowski experienced but "everyone experiences it in different ways" he said.  Remember CS Lewis doing the card game with him last episode as if testing his memory?

The scene at the end where Daniel Farraday is on the island leafing through his notebook... it says "If anything goes wrong, Desmond Hume will be my constant" ... and he looks up and smiles... maybe that CURED him?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on February 29, 2008, 08:34:58 PM
Anyone who was considering watching Sarah Silverman on tv est 10 ish?

forwarned heavy duty Sundance already have shown, Chasing the Rhino (I have to look up some reruns for this film that will explain to weezo what we have talked about in Kurlansky's 1968) about Soviet bloc anti-semitism in this period starting with the Fifties  and reimposing the same conditions from which they had liberated Jews from Nazis.

As one of the lines goes: "It is sometimes hard for people in the West to wrap their minds around the Soviet mentality".

This and the following film, showing now,The Death of Mr.Lazarescu, take place in Roumania, from which, to make a long story short, my sister's son in law's parents come. He has no aunts and uncles because no other family members survived one persecution following the other. My sister and nieces when not getting together for holidays, in California, often spend these holidays with the parents of the son-in-law who live in the same great big town as Donotremove.

I've known only one other person from the area(Roumania) who is a Transylvanian met in Northern Wisconsin near where my godmother worked in the Paper Mills as a nurse.  Cyril was an expert with wood, when building a home, he also built a wood burning furnace, and cleared forest thinnings during the summer months to burn in the winter. As younger women, my friends and I tossed logs in relay to each other to keep fires stoked which needed refill at least three times a day, while the huskies stood on the snow drifts observing us calmly while the wind ruffled their fur and mane. We wore padded clothes night and day. Other people in the area were Hungarian dairy farmers(guys) who made us treats like cream cheese in dates. The Transylvanian did me the honor of offering to let me borrow his snow-shoes. At first they had me convinced that they had a shortage of women in the wilderness because of the climate. But they were out there, in the bars tossing back shots of Hot Pepper Sauce in their glasses of beer and line-dancing their as..s off.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on March 01, 2008, 06:51:58 PM
Another pack o' praises for this week's Lost, upon which wave we rode, turning to each other saying "Whew!" at commercial times. 

And a big WOOT to you, barton -- sure hope that's getting wider exposure than just this neighborhood (however nice it be).



Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on March 01, 2008, 07:42:14 PM
And thanks much to kam for the scoop on Snoop.  Interesting that 2 of the few main female characters are both black and lesbian, either in the show or in fact.

I'm having fun spotting actors from The Wire when they turn up elsewhere like  Lance Reddick ("Daniels") turning up on Lost.  Someone in here (kam?) pointed out that David Costabile ("Klebanow") was previously in Flight of the Conchords. I saw someone else recently but didn't note/keep track...don't want to get sucked into "6 Degrees of The Wire."         


Title: Wire actors in Commercials
Post by: Kam on March 02, 2008, 12:05:28 PM
Look for Lawyer Levy in an Arbys spot where construction workers are whistling at him as he walks by.

Also, Isiah Whitlock (Clay Davis) is doing commercials for Southwest airlines.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: barton on March 02, 2008, 02:09:26 PM
If anyone is curious about all these books that Sawyer et al. are reading, this has a comprehensive list of all books being read, to date:

http://lostbooks.blogspot.com/


Certainly a clever way to sell books.  "The Invention of Morel" looks sort of interesting, but then again, we've seen Sawyer absolutely engrossed by Judy Blume, so who knows really?

Nytemps, thanks for the WOOT, though I'm not sure of your Net acronym, there.  I once came up with SCOCKAM (Spewing Coffee on Computer Keyboard And Monitor), but it doesn't seem to have caught on.


Title: Re: Television
Post by: madupont on March 02, 2008, 04:39:52 PM
BARTON, i also stumbled up a Huffington Post hill of beans in odd hours of the night (following down our flaps at Campaign Forum), in which it was revealed that In Treatment, despite Gabriel Byrne, was "a crashing bore". I wondered if it was just me turning off the intensity of his patients bringing too much tension into my life by their half-hours analytic sessions.   

I never did find the Bill Maher program from Friday Night that I was looking up because it was over the top excellent.  Anybody know how many days it takes for HBO's New Rules to post their latest episode?


Title: Re: Television
Post by: nytempsperdu on March 04, 2008, 11:58:04 PM
Hi barton: I used WOOT (wasn't strict, should have been W007), not an acronym but 'net/gamer lingo that made it into dictionary of late (see http://www.cbc.ca/technology/story/2007/12/12/tech-woot.html )
and is often used by my kid to signify that which in other times/places was rendered HOORAY, or OLE, or BRAVO (you get the idea). 

And another W007! to kam for Wired actors elsewhere--did see "Levy" in ad but not the other one...yet.  Am a bit itchy for the final ep and yet am not entirely ready 'cause I want to try to work out my own version of how some elements play out.  Does that make sense?  (One of "those" questions, like "Do these pants make my butt look fat?")

Am also still watching Breaking Bad (or main parts of same), learning not just chem. (ah yes, ye olde  fulminate of mercury!) but much about health care system, cancer & its treatment and other subjects I was hitherto unaware of. . .doesn't exactly sound like entertainment, but you just never know when something pertinent may show up. . .


Title: Re: Television
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 07, 2008, 03:44:11 PM