Escape from Elba

Arts => Theater => Topic started by: Admin on April 16, 2007, 08:44:28 PM



Title: Theater
Post by: Admin on April 16, 2007, 08:44:28 PM
Share your thoughts about Broadway and beyond.


Title: Re: Theater
Post by: madupont on June 10, 2007, 11:53:55 PM
Tonight was the night for The Tony Awards.  I clicked it on just at the point where Christine Ebersole was doing the excerpt from Grey Gardens as Little Edie, daughter of Edith Bouvier-Beale(Jackie Bouvier Kennedy's aunt; I guess this means that Black Jack Bouvier was her brother? That explains a lot, alcoholism and eccentricity.) and I was truly amazed how well Ebersole was able to actually duplicate the Edie that I'd seen in the film,Grey Gardens( which was a shocker).  Christine Ebersole manages to look like Edie, sound like Edie, Move Like Edie, and that is a bit unnerving.

The documentary film candidly reveals a truly sad story.  The musical version appears to make it more palatable; although let it never be said that Edie was not musical.  If she was exasperatingly corny playing to the camera for the documentary, at one time she did have a trained voice; which she was unable to retain as time went on.

I didn't know until tonight that one of the supporting cast was somebody whom I once knew as a "fellow player" as well as a neighbor along Prospect Avenue.


Title: For Julie Harris, a Stage to Call Her Own
Post by: Admin on June 21, 2007, 01:08:49 PM
For Julie Harris, a Stage to Call Her Own


A new 200-seat stage will be named for Ms. Harris at the Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater in Wellfleet, Mass.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/20/theater/20what.html?ex=1339992000&en=055fba5bf6ffa219&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Re: For Julie Harris, a Stage to Call Her Own
Post by: madupont on June 21, 2007, 01:20:43 PM
That's great news. Thanks for posting it. I identify with her; could not avoid it. Red hair, gawkish,not glamorous enough as a nineteen year old actress...


Title: Theater Review | 'Beyond Glory': Speaking Simply of War and the True Courage of Heroes
Post by: Admin on June 22, 2007, 01:11:02 AM
Theater Review | 'Beyond Glory': Speaking Simply of War and the True Courage of Heroes


This modest show provides a powerful reminder of the hardships, psychic stresses and physical dangers that men and women endure on the front lines.


http://theater2.nytimes.com/2007/06/22/theater/reviews/22beyo.html?ex=1340164800&en=974acbf24d08698a&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Re: Theater Review | 'Beyond Glory': Speaking Simply of War and the True Courage of Heroes
Post by: madupont on June 22, 2007, 12:12:12 PM
WHAT was the name of the play that Tim Robbins produced about the current war; it was performed with masks and the actors could then step into several different roles? I saw parts of it on tv but never caught up with the whole performance.  It is done in an ironic style, of course.


Title: Re: Theater Review | 'Beyond Glory': Speaking Simply of War and the True Courage of Heroes
Post by: liquidsilver on June 22, 2007, 12:14:56 PM
Embedded I think


Title: Theater Review | 'I Google Myself': You Will Never Believe Who Goes by Your Name
Post by: Admin on June 23, 2007, 12:10:01 AM
Theater Review | 'I Google Myself': You Will Never Believe Who Goes by Your Name


Let?s be honest: We?ve all done it. When no one?s looking, in the privacy of our own home, vanity or curiosity compels us to google ourselves.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/23/theater/reviews/23goog.html?ex=1340251200&en=d6725a98b3c7d0ce&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Re: Theater Review | 'I Google Myself': You Will Never Believe Who Goes by Your Name
Post by: madupont on June 23, 2007, 10:22:30 AM
How true. That last remark about, "I'm going home right now and turn off my computer".

I didn't even know it was possible, until by accident the discovery was made as to why it is possible.  There is nothing that isn't recorded.

Operating in a blog a little less than six months ago, a kind of closed forum actually, I'd been participating for awhile, then went on to something else that had to be done but later a reason arose to go back to that original discussion community on same topic -- if only I could locate it. I'd forgotten where it was.

In the course of trying to locate it, or rather to locate where I had been, because I had no idea why I couldn't locate the venue, instead I learn that there are industry digests keeping tabs.  It was a shock to be suddenly confronted with the equivalent of what people say about you after you've left the party.

Haven't you ever wondered, or suspected, what that might be like?  In fact, somebody actually walked into Escape from Elba, a couple of days ago, who is on record at this source ( along with several other people whose names have been changed to protect their  personalities more so than their anonymity at the present time at E f E ), who were being reprimanded by another poster quite a bit more experienced.   They may not even know that took place?

After all, when I found this evidence under my name, it was  at present time something that took place nearly a year ago in real time. I imagine it was presumed that because the place as a public venue had closed up shop that the evidence was no longer for sale?


Title: On This Rock, Build a Future for Musicals
Post by: Admin on June 24, 2007, 01:07:26 AM
On This Rock, Build a Future for Musicals


There are signs that audiences and artists are more at ease with the marriage of rock or pop music and traditional narrative theater.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/24/theater/24ishe.html?ex=1340337600&en=9a0d56fb4141d07f&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Re: On This Rock, Build a Future for Musicals
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 24, 2007, 10:34:11 AM
Speaking of the traditional roots of the musical...caught a bit of the Linda Ronstadt/Rex Smith verson of Pirates of Penzance last night on cable.  It's been a good 20 years since I saw that one.

I never quite got Rex Smith back in the last 70s.  He was considered a "sell out" by the rock community.  Now as I've mellowed I tend to give people more lattitude for doing whatever they want and being less concerned that the do what I want...


Title: Re: On This Rock, Build a Future for Musicals
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 24, 2007, 10:41:15 AM
The music that Rogers & Hammerstein or Gershwin or Gilbert & Sullivan used was roughly the poplular music of the day.   Since "Rock" in its various forms has been the popular music of the day for over decades now, I guess it would be only natural that it would be the music that would draw larger audiences in to watch "musicals."   Unless you think of the musical the way you think of "opera,"  that it needs to be conserved and pure.   

Still Rock Operas of the 70s, paved the way for the resurgence of more traditional opera in the 80s.

Would we have had Les Miserables or Phantom, without the success of J.C. Superstar?


Title: Re: On This Rock, Build a Future for Musicals
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 24, 2007, 10:47:51 AM
I sure have a lot of typos lately.   That should have read "Late 70s"   although I guess technicaly, the last 70s works .

Follow up thought on that post. 

I didn't really know Kevin Kleine back when this movie came out obviously, because I didn't recall him in the movie.  He's sure a telented guy...


Title: Re: On This Rock, Build a Future for Musicals
Post by: weezo on June 24, 2007, 11:08:14 AM
I recall musicals with great fondness from my childhood. My mother was a great fan of Musicals, and when one came out she celebrated with buying the "album" at that time on a 33-1/3 platter. They were played, intersperced with albums of light classical music, as a background always in our home. I continued the tradition with my sons, one of whom at middle age, has a great capacity to enjoy a wide range of music, the other, is tone deaf and a great fan of rapper music. Go figure!

Many years ago, I attended a live performance of Jesus Christ Superstar, and was completely mesmerized. It was a powerful production. A few weeks ago, I watched "Oklahoma" on a satellite channel, and ever since the song "Poor Jud is Dead" has been running through my head. In high school, I was a member of the Glee Club, and in my senior year, we sang the music from Bali Hi during intermissions of the senior play production. That beautiful music has rung in my head ever since.


Title: Re: On This Rock, Build a Future for Musicals
Post by: TrojanHorse on June 25, 2007, 11:15:51 AM
Funny...I had a very similar childhood experience.  My mom loved musicals and similarly had a lot of different music playing at home on the weekends...


Title: Theater Review | 'Old Acquaintance': Revisiting Old Friends Who Write and Fight
Post by: Admin on June 29, 2007, 01:07:35 AM
Theater Review | 'Old Acquaintance': Revisiting Old Friends Who Write and Fight


Two very different roads to the past are being traveled by two very different actresses in this mildly entertaining, maddeningly disjunctive revival.


http://theater2.nytimes.com/2007/06/29/theater/reviews/29acqu.html?ex=1340769600&en=ec5f0c752a5d98a3&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Enter Acting, Pursued by Applause
Post by: Admin on June 30, 2007, 10:06:25 PM
Enter Acting, Pursued by Applause


Audiences love to show their appreciation when stars walk onstage. How do the stars feel about it?


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/01/theater/01pinc.html?ex=1340942400&en=4ed4bd3d8ffb00b8&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: The Thirty Years? War, All 10 Hours of It
Post by: Admin on June 30, 2007, 10:06:25 PM
The Thirty Years? War, All 10 Hours of It


Peter Stein, Germany?s biggest postwar directing star, is staging a 10-hour version of Friedrich Schiller?s classic 18th-century trilogy ?Wallenstein.?


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/01/theater/01kalb.html?ex=1340942400&en=73c8dce3fcae1752&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Re: The Thirty Years? War, All 10 Hours of It
Post by: madupont on July 01, 2007, 01:44:25 PM
"performed in an abandoned beer warehouse in the gritty working-class district of Neukölln,"  YES!
JAH, That's the mark of what makes it authentically German whether the Drama is of the Theater or Film-art.
Perhaps the director also saw that  show-case of "dilapidated sets" by Soderbergh? Who can forget the production of the criminals' court in a beer warehouse for M by Fritz Lang in 1931.  One must set the mood. What I'm picking up here is that, "prologue, followed by a one-hour play written in knittelvers... that sketches out the war background and the general’s legend through the banter of ordinary soldiers": “Wallenstein’s Camp” speaks to a current mood for which Peter Stein chooses to take  history and use it critically.


"reverence for the text"

"Under these circumstances, experienced and inexperienced theatergoers alike readily surrender to the immediate pleasures of the text after a while."

That has recently been attempted here, more in context of ideas  discussed between segments of a lengthy work and of course I have by now forgotten,  as to production, who wrote what? Reviews had been written from the point of view of the audience interest in this new phenomenon.  So we perhaps do want a theatre of ideas, after  so long an absence. What we have never had is respect for the playwright's text, where we suppose the playwright is just a facilitator who supplies something for the audience's desired gawking at celebrities given something to chew on while being admiringly looked at.

Where it annoys me is where it comes down to the less than professional theatre, community and amateur theatre production where the text is abridged, for various rationales,at the level where the neophyte actor is beginning to discover the purpose of theatre and acting as a profession. The purpose becomes distorted until you are left with a culture that has become entirely ersatz and which has lost its connections with its origins.

When this is done to texts by Shakespeare, you begin to sense something has gone awry.  On the other hand this may be a good thing  if you sense it in Sandusky, Ohio (for purposes of illustration only) as a young actor and head for New York or the Pasadena Playhouse.  It will at least save your soul, even if you do not become famous.


Title: Re: Theater Review | 'Old Acquaintance': Revisiting Old Friends Who Write and Fight
Post by: madupont on July 01, 2007, 01:55:31 PM
Brantley sounds like a very good reviewer, his writing has style, until he gets to that part about "chick-lit".


Title: Re: Enter Acting, Pursued by Applause
Post by: madupont on July 01, 2007, 02:53:57 PM
I am with Frank Langella on this one, not that Christopher Plummer is any less professional at about 50 years in the theatre (and I certainly short-changed him yesterday by inadvertently forgetting the current production when I raised the idea of how the role is played,  as an example, when discussing what Marlon Brando did in a Movie: A Dry White Season, in a courtroom scene.


“Elitism is absolutely the issue,” Professor Konecni said. “I have good taste, I have money, I have sensitivity, I am rewarding myself mentally.” One feels a giddy sense of accomplishment, he said, for having made it into the same room as Kevin Spacey.

"Steppenwolf’s artistic director, said her audiences “would be less inclined to clap, because they feel like they have a conversation with our actors that’s kind of ongoing.”

Now that's the result of repertoire theatre, an ensemble that continually works together, and I was going to attribute Langella's judicious decision to possibly a more European outlook until the article actually took up the matter of the National Theater (UK) and the Chichester Festival Theater,"one person clapped, and was promptly shushed." That seems to be a case where having a longer tradition than our own experience, it is a case where the audience are "professionals" unlike the pleb origins  of audiences in Shakespeare's day.

But when Paula Schwartz goes on to explain the attitudes of  Method acting and directors who prefer the Stanislavsky technique, that better describes Langella's preparation for a role such as he is performing now.

I once caught one episode of a series in which he played a director, and it was fascinating to watch him and listen to his directions, it makes one wish that they had the opportunity, I wish anyway, to have a director of such clarity about what the end results should be if you have prepared properly.  I also wished that I hadn't been so dumb, until witnessing the last episode,as not to tune in to this series from the start !

But I've saved the best for last.
"In Japan traditional kabuki theater is known for kakegoe: shouting at actors upon their entrance, and throughout the performance. When an actor strikes a traditional pose along the entrance, audiences will shout out his yago — literally “shop name” or theatrical studio — or lines of encouragement like “You’re better than your father!,” referring to the tradition of passing roles down through the generations.

Kakegoe makes up for the nonexistence of curtain calls. “There’s a saying in kabuki theater that if you wait until the end of the performance, it’s too late,” said David Furumoto, who teaches theater at the University of Wisconsin."

I first became interested in this tradition in about 1954, when reading Donald Keene's accounts of Asian theatre in general and specifically when he was on R and R in India while stationed in Japan during the American occupation of Japan. I had always been interested in Indian music and dance but bit by bit, as his own writings in Japanology coincided with the arrival of Japanese Film in the US, the Japanese acting techniques became captivating along with the culture in general. In one sense, he had  eventually led me  to recognizing when the appropriate mentor came along.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Donald_Keene




Title: Miller?s Tales
Post by: Admin on July 15, 2007, 04:11:30 AM
Miller?s Tales


Arthur Miller?s final book is a short-story collection.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/15/books/review/McCarter-t.html?ex=1342152000&en=b45d49b1e2dc492d&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Re: Miller?s Tales
Post by: madupont on July 15, 2007, 11:30:17 AM
God, this reads like kind of a back-handed slap. On top of that, from somebody to whom they just handed the assignment because, he doesn't have anything too important to contribute this week , in the plum comp-ticket category. It is condescending; does he suppose the book is going to end up on the remainder tables?   Dumb but it probably isn't a generational problem or anything is it?  They will end up as collector's items for which you have to pay a prime price at your on-line book finder service.

I have been continually surprised during the last seven years, that nobody makes a connection to one of this playwright's greatest indictments of this kind of political atmosphere in his play: All My Sons.

When I first saw the heading listed for the Theater forum today, I thought, oh, it would be just like them to do a Miller retrospective of scenes or something at the McCarter Theater, like an opportunity to do
"Summer Stock" in the region.

But no, I guess that I will just have to chalk this one up to some guy with a  carry over crush on Marilyn Monroe; who, therefore, has to be envious of Arthur Miller, while lacking an interest in finding out what the man actually is noted for writing.

Well, at least the guy knows who Dustin Hoffman is.


Title: Life Is a Weimar Dream, Old Chum, and Downtown Loves a Nouveau Cabaret
Post by: Admin on July 16, 2007, 07:08:35 PM
Life Is a Weimar Dream, Old Chum, and Downtown Loves a Nouveau Cabaret


Cabaret acts are superimposing a risqu? German style onto the performance art and theater scene below 14th Street.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/17/theater/17caba.html?ex=1342324800&en=afc8d3e7f01028ff&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Broadway to Serve Dinner
Post by: Admin on July 17, 2007, 07:08:02 PM
Broadway to Serve Dinner


Kenny Leon is to direct a stage version of the 1967 movie ?Guess Who?s Coming to Dinner.?


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/18/theater/18arts-BROADWAYTOSE_BRF.html?ex=1342411200&en=b90dd11edd30a3e1&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Dance Review | Company So Go No: When Librarians Go Bad, Texts Tumble
Post by: Admin on July 18, 2007, 12:07:50 PM
Dance Review | Company So Go No: When Librarians Go Bad, Texts Tumble


There?s a lot going on in Company So Go No?s ?Art of Memory,? a 50-minute dance-theater romp conceived and directed by Tanya Calamoneri that spans several continents and decades in source materials alone.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/18/arts/dance/18memo.html?ex=1342411200&en=13d11b41b97de438&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Re: Dance Review | Company So Go No: When Librarians Go Bad, Texts Tumble
Post by: madupont on July 18, 2007, 01:33:04 PM
YES!


Title: Re: Broadway to Serve Dinner
Post by: madupont on July 18, 2007, 01:43:30 PM
I'll give it a maybe; entirely on the strength of an August Wilson affiliation. That's the positive side. If they make an unfortunate casting choice as happened to a remake of -- Raisin in the Sun, then it won't matter anyway.  These roles call for an actor and not a celebrity who someone thinks appears to live like they always act.  But in either case Poitier was the actor -- of choice originally;and, at that time in our history, Sidney obviously did not aspire to be Diddy Anybody.

Guess who is  --  flew on the basis of the parental pair who had been a pair for at least a couple of generations by then, the unstated Silver nonwedded anniversary perhaps, if not longer.

I guess that I'll wait until production takes place and then I can carp at the reviewers. Right?


Title: Re: Life Is a Weimar Dream, Old Chum, and Downtown Loves a Nouveau Cabaret
Post by: madupont on July 18, 2007, 02:19:09 PM
“Weimar New York” is also meant as entertainment, albeit of a darker sort. Its creators envision the show as happening “between the first terrorist attack and the next.”

"...And for those in “Weimar” and the other shows, the sexy, risqué material feels like a throwback to an earlier New York, before the new Times Square and the newer, posher Lower East Side. ...

“No one moved here from their hometown, U.S.A., to go to the Disney store.”    That reminder can have a dark edge. As Mr. Hammerstein put it: “This is the end of the world. Let’s have as much fun as possible.”

I PICKED UP ON THAT from the word go! Start reading this review!  Of course it turns German history on its head because Weimar led to the rubble in Berlin, despite all the intentions of  sexually rousing critique in a George Grosz style of reflection plus Egon Schiele in your face.  New York psychologically is now the Berliner realism of Lotte Lenya.

But then, about five years ago, you could not get The New York Times critical editor, James Traub, to recognize that fact, when he wrote a piece in which he called us,"Weimar Whiners", which led me to ask in public, Who is James Traub?   

I am now very suspect of people of whom it used to be said, "they can not connect the dots". Basically, when they have had a stake in never wanting to do so.  Having worked for a Munich cabaret director following the war, who was now being persecuted in the US for not being a Nazi at the time of the war, was just too absurd a proposition and made me a dot connector for life.

But,thanks,nonetheless for leaving a trail of crumbs back to my mein own kinder. That's nichts-deutsch.


Title: Theater Review | 'Hokaibo': Guilty Pleasures of Comic Kabuki
Post by: Admin on July 19, 2007, 01:10:55 AM
Theater Review | 'Hokaibo': Guilty Pleasures of Comic Kabuki


In this rollicking sex comedy from 1784, Nakamura Kanzaburo XVIII, the master Kabuki artist, cuts up with an audience-seducing brio.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/19/theater/reviews/19kabu.html?ex=1342497600&en=1008516318d825a3&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Theater Review | 'Un Hombre que se Ahoga': Chekhov Compacted, in Spanish
Post by: Admin on July 19, 2007, 01:10:55 AM
Theater Review | 'Un Hombre que se Ahoga': Chekhov Compacted, in Spanish


This Argentine adaptation of Chekhov?s ?Three Sisters? is arranged as efficiently as a businessman?s valise.


http://theater2.nytimes.com/2007/07/19/theater/reviews/19homb.html?ex=1342497600&en=3ceebde9f984b297&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: How They Did It. The Show, That Is.
Post by: Admin on July 19, 2007, 07:07:38 PM
How They Did It. The Show, That Is.


?My First Time? is a new Off Broadway play in which four actors recount stories about people?s first sexual experiences.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/20/theater/20firs.html?ex=1342584000&en=4ef27bc3c00e869f&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Summer Rituals | Shakespeare in the Suburbs: Well West of Broadway, the Stage Is Their World
Post by: Admin on July 21, 2007, 03:07:23 PM
Summer Rituals | Shakespeare in the Suburbs: Well West of Broadway, the Stage Is Their World


Central New Jersey is swarming with community theaters, and summer stocks offer lively showcases for the region?s amateur actors.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/21/nyregion/21summer.html?ex=1342670400&en=c2a5265acd1db696&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Theater Review | 'Monsters and Prodigies': Those 18th-Century Castrati Got All the Money and, Yes, Girls
Post by: Admin on July 23, 2007, 01:09:58 AM
Theater Review | 'Monsters and Prodigies': Those 18th-Century Castrati Got All the Money and, Yes, Girls


?Monsters and Prodigies? by the Mexican company Teatro de Ciertos Habitantes gives a zany account of the century of music ruled by castrati.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/23/theater/reviews/23cast.html?ex=1342843200&en=feda1b716372df73&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: When Trust Is Lost, Only Disconnect
Post by: Admin on July 23, 2007, 06:07:14 PM
When Trust Is Lost, Only Disconnect


A negative sensibility in London is generating a crackling positive charge in drama.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/24/theater/24bran.html?ex=1342929600&en=6c4297fa2eada709&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Stagehands Bracing for Broadway Showdown
Post by: Admin on July 25, 2007, 06:07:41 PM
Stagehands Bracing for Broadway Showdown


Starting next week members of the union that represents the carpenters, electricians, props workers and sound technicians on Broadway will be reporting to work without a contract.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/26/theater/26hand.html?ex=1343102400&en=62c333600806cb2f&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Re: Stagehands Bracing for Broadway Showdown
Post by: madupont on July 26, 2007, 01:06:47 PM
That could be rather dangerous for the actors.   (I'd better read up on emoticons)



Title: Encores! Season to Feature Some Well-Known Names
Post by: Admin on July 26, 2007, 06:08:52 PM
Encores! Season to Feature Some Well-Known Names


Christine Ebersole, Beth Leavel and Rosie O?Donnell will all star in productions during City Center?s 15th Encores! season.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/27/theater/27enco.html?ex=1343188800&en=9415490bd6d1f165&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Like Brigadoon, the Music Had Vanished
Post by: Admin on July 26, 2007, 08:09:33 PM
Like Brigadoon, the Music Had Vanished


The story of the revival of ?The Day Before Spring,? a lesser-known Lerner and Loewe musical that played on Broadway in 1945, began with a simple conversation over lunch.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/27/theater/27loew.html?ex=1343188800&en=395907fe2e35e4cf&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Theater Review | 'Divinas Palabras': Unrelenting Bleakness and Outrage, With No Mitigating Circumstances
Post by: Admin on July 28, 2007, 01:11:24 AM
Theater Review | 'Divinas Palabras': Unrelenting Bleakness and Outrage, With No Mitigating Circumstances


Ram?n del Valle-Incl?n's grotesque parody ?Divinas Palabras? is being given a stark staging by the Centro Dram?tico Nacional of Madrid at the Lincoln Center Festival.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/28/theater/reviews/28divi.html?ex=1343275200&en=19125460a6c6d18a&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Rendezvous at Rydell High, Off 42nd Street
Post by: Admin on July 29, 2007, 06:07:22 PM
Rendezvous at Rydell High, Off 42nd Street


Max Crumm and Laura Osnes were reality-show winners. Now their reality is ?Grease? on Broadway.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/29/theater/29mcge.html?ex=1343361600&en=b9fd94cd67ab4d4d&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Michel Serrault, Star of ?La Cage aux Folles,? Dies at 79
Post by: Admin on July 31, 2007, 03:08:01 PM
Michel Serrault, Star of ?La Cage aux Folles,? Dies at 79


Michel Serrault was a French film star known internationally for his role as the temperamental drag queen Zaza in the original film version of ?La Cage aux Folles.?


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/31/movies/31serrault.html?ex=1343534400&en=e83b9181f37b80dd&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: The Theme Is Ancient, but the Subject Is Modern
Post by: Admin on July 31, 2007, 08:07:43 PM
The Theme Is Ancient, but the Subject Is Modern


?Masked,? a play written by an Israeli, Ilan Hatsor, about three Palestinian brothers, feels remarkably of the moment.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/01/theater/01mask.html?ex=1343620800&en=836d7dcecc9b0587&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Titters, Snickers and Guffaws, With a British Accent
Post by: Admin on August 01, 2007, 07:08:38 PM
Titters, Snickers and Guffaws, With a British Accent


Examples of tales told ticklingly are in unusual abundance on London stages this summer.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/02/theater/02bran.html?ex=1343707200&en=76fb709d37e6e04c&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Theater Review | 'Masked': A Family Torn Apart by Deception, Betrayal and War
Post by: Admin on August 03, 2007, 02:12:53 AM
Theater Review | 'Masked': A Family Torn Apart by Deception, Betrayal and War


In this powerful play by Ilan Hatsor, three Palestinian brothers are locked in a life-and-death struggle over issues of deception and betrayal.


http://theater2.nytimes.com/2007/08/03/theater/reviews/03mask.html?ex=1343793600&en=ef462a90ecf9d16f&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Spectacle for the Heart and Soul
Post by: Admin on August 05, 2007, 12:09:35 AM
Spectacle for the Heart and Soul


The Bread and Puppet Theater continues to live an ideal of art as collective enterprise.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/05/theater/05cott.html?ex=1343966400&en=c494a9c6ce54acb9&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Theater Review | 'The Corn Is Green': Rescuing a Student From a Life in the Mines
Post by: Admin on August 07, 2007, 01:11:40 AM
Theater Review | 'The Corn Is Green': Rescuing a Student From a Life in the Mines


Kate Burton displays appealing zest in the Williamstown Theater Festival?s spirited revival of Emlyn Williams?s 1938 comedy.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/07/theater/reviews/07corn.html?ex=1344139200&en=4071436019f7fea1&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Signature Theater?s Hunt for New Home Continues
Post by: Admin on August 07, 2007, 06:07:34 PM
Signature Theater?s Hunt for New Home Continues


Having already lost a place it had been promised at ground zero, the company will not relocate, as planned, to Fiterman Hall on West Broadway.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/08/theater/08sign.html?ex=1344225600&en=493361ff4028a316&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Signature Theater?s Hunt for New Home Continues
Post by: Admin on August 08, 2007, 12:08:28 AM
Signature Theater?s Hunt for New Home Continues


Having already lost a place it had been promised at ground zero, the company will not relocate.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/08/theater/08sign.html?ex=1344225600&en=493361ff4028a316&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: As Off Broadway Changes, Some Venerable Theaters Vanish
Post by: Admin on August 08, 2007, 06:07:48 PM
As Off Broadway Changes, Some Venerable Theaters Vanish


A reasonable assumption might be that the closing of six theaters in the last two years is ushering in the decline of commercial Off Broadway. But it turns out the situation is more complicated than that.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/09/theater/09venu.html?ex=1344312000&en=eaab077e4f824e38&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Re: As Off Broadway Changes, Some Venerable Theaters Vanish
Post by: madupont on August 09, 2007, 03:48:11 PM
Yes, well, if they continue doing this, Manhattan will become a different kind of city in which it may be less desirable to live.  I just referred to it in the last 24 hours as the real capitol of the US; not Washington,D.C, which having overestimated the political importance of role-play, leaves the city of New York as the cultural leadership.

Once, however you do away with the communication of culture, as has been occurring through the "communications industry" where the public will become resentful of paying the subscription costs for tv that has a content value becoming ragged for lack of either intellectual content or entertainment, from the rapid acquisition of local radio stations and tv channel ownership beginning about four years ago to suit the requirements of political D.C., if you remove the intellectual communication as well which has been the entertainment mode of Manhattan and also Brooklyn re: BAM. You have "culture" with a big C on the way out. No longer Cosmopolitan. 

The other arts are also commercial ventures, also business driven, for the end result of materialism. You can make an allowance for publishing houses, but if the literary content and political criticism gravitates entirely into the academic presses situated as they are outside the Financial buzz-saw of downtown Manhattan, you are left with those who own the  traders and those in the service industries who serve the traders. Apparently, they still need Lincoln Center; the owners that is.

Other intellectuals at any remove further than Columbia, will be as monastic as Umberto Eco predicted in -- The Name of the Rose, among other writings. The film barely conveyed that message,concentrated as it was on the introduction of a brash young new face learning little that an old scholar and actor could have conveyed. However, most of the political criticism is coming out of the same reviewing periodical that is capable of reviewing the academic press.

When the news-print journalism and its on-line editions failed to give adequate commentary on the cultural changes as social-political alterations that have occurred this was the inevitable result.

Oh, don't misunderstand me, the high-rents will continue attracting new residents who always wanted to live in Manhattan or somewhere somewhat near abouts but I guess they will just have to club-hop for the usual stimulation and buy the things necessary to go with that. Probably not going to the sort of theatre, an ad for which I immediately ran into in following  the link to As Off Broadway Changes, Some Venerable Theaters Vanish. As the young actors go West to the film industry,the new residents will not have a big interest in listening to a book by Joan Didion enacted by Vanessa Redgrave.

It's not that NYC is over when parents hesitate about whether their offspring should attend classes there because of "the international situation", but it probably does not remain the promising place that it was for over three and a half centuries plus attracting the complete scale of social classes from every part of the world.

There's an active resentment of New York in the states merely to the west of the Greater Metropolitan area.  I found that in a bloody racist critique underwritten by my computer service carrier that took place in response to Elizabeth Edward's complaints, as the bloggers piled on and mention from time to time that the city of New York is in their minds where Hilliary Clinton and Barack(Hussein, they never fail to mention)Obama are held in high regard but not where they live, not in their neighborhood will you see that sort of thing.  What thing?, you may ask. Well, I can't tell you in civil language.  Are you ready for the Barbarians to make their entrance, before rehearsal is halted on The Fall of Rome?

They are all red-stated Americans who even scared the returned veterans from Iraq. Although I somehow doubt that Manhattanites will go to the baths and commit suicide, and I think they will put up resistance like nobody's business, they may be in need of a major high quality transfusion in theatrical high cultural arts.


Title: Theater Review | 'Human Error': Side by Side at a Crash Site, and Love Amid the Bodies
Post by: Admin on August 10, 2007, 01:08:25 AM
Theater Review | 'Human Error': Side by Side at a Crash Site, and Love Amid the Bodies


Keith Reddin gets something out of the characters in his new play by simple juxtaposition, showing admirable subtlety in the process.


http://theater2.nytimes.com/2007/08/10/theater/reviews/10huma.html?ex=1344398400&en=2efac05f6bbc61aa&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Theater Review | 'High School Musical': A Prayerful Three-Pointer From the Orchestra Pit
Post by: Admin on August 11, 2007, 01:08:21 AM
Theater Review | 'High School Musical': A Prayerful Three-Pointer From the Orchestra Pit


The stage adaptation of ?High School Musical? represents a significant philosophical evolution of the Greasian liturgy.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/11/theater/reviews/11high.html?ex=1344484800&en=cc20dd3149d8df99&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: It May Look Like Chaos, but It?s the Fringe
Post by: Admin on August 11, 2007, 10:08:58 PM
It May Look Like Chaos, but It?s the Fringe


This year's New York International Fringe Festival offers nearly 200 productions and a battle to stay eclectic.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/12/theater/12blan.html?ex=1344571200&en=e15c37d69a6042a7&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Theater Review | 'August: Osage County': A Matriarch After Your Attention, if Not Heart
Post by: Admin on August 13, 2007, 01:10:46 AM
Theater Review | 'August: Osage County': A Matriarch After Your Attention, if Not Heart


?August: Osage County? is a hugely entertaining (also just plain huge) new play by Tracy Letts at the Steppenwolf Theater Company in Chicago.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/13/theater/reviews/13augu.html?ex=1344657600&en=b65a57eb71ef418f&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: It Ain?t ?Damn Yankees? but It?s Got Legs
Post by: Admin on August 13, 2007, 08:09:05 PM
It Ain?t ?Damn Yankees? but It?s Got Legs


Members of Broadway and Off Broadway shows trade their costumes for cleats when they play for the Broadway Show League.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/14/theater/14soft.html?ex=1344744000&en=0bfcfcad94f2729d&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Establishment Threads in a Radical Fringe
Post by: Admin on August 15, 2007, 07:09:32 PM
Establishment Threads in a Radical Fringe


Serious drama isn?t pushed to the sidelines at the Edinburgh Fringe festival.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/16/theater/16frin.html?ex=1344916800&en=2d0c652d11204cc1&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Lebanon Bans Tale of Fighters in Militias
Post by: Admin on August 18, 2007, 01:08:14 AM
Lebanon Bans Tale of Fighters in Militias


Over the next three months, the Lebanese artist Rabih Mrou? will stage his new performance piece in Paris, Rome and the capitals of Tunisia, Morocco and Egypt. But he will not present it here, for the audience with whom it might resonate most.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/18/theater/18perf.html?ex=1345089600&en=89cb97ca2747b043&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: High-Energy Behemoth Devours Edinburgh
Post by: Admin on August 19, 2007, 01:08:38 AM
High-Energy Behemoth Devours Edinburgh


The shows that generated much of the attention at this year?s Edinburgh Festival Fringe were eye-popping adrenaline rushes.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/19/theater/19zino.html?ex=1345176000&en=9988c31308cd080d&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Theater Review | 'Grease': As Seen on TV! Danny and Sandy 4-Ever and Ever
Post by: Admin on August 20, 2007, 01:08:23 AM
Theater Review | 'Grease': As Seen on TV! Danny and Sandy 4-Ever and Ever


The message of this latest ?Grease? is that anyone, famous or not, can star in a Broadway musical.


http://theater2.nytimes.com/2007/08/20/theater/reviews/20grea.html?ex=1345262400&en=666092745c1bd913&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Imitation or Flattery in Dueling Shows
Post by: Admin on August 21, 2007, 07:08:04 PM
Imitation or Flattery in Dueling Shows


The battles over who owns what are some of the hairiest in the theater business. Take the cases of ?Three Mo? Tenors? and ?Naked Boys Singing!?


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/22/theater/22copy.html?ex=1345435200&en=4b71f2beaf05936a&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Theater Review | 'Fair Game': Presidential Candidates, Beware Your Children
Post by: Admin on August 23, 2007, 01:08:33 AM
Theater Review | 'Fair Game': Presidential Candidates, Beware Your Children


Karl Gajdusek?s play would be much better if it were half as full of twists and closet skeletons.


http://theater2.nytimes.com/2007/08/23/theater/reviews/23game.html?ex=1345521600&en=057e151e7b17280b&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Theater Review | 'A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Rude Mechanical?s Dream
Post by: Admin on August 24, 2007, 01:07:41 AM
Theater Review | 'A Midsummer Night's Dream: A Rude Mechanical?s Dream


A jaunty assortment of parlor magician?s tricks ornament this fast and funny production. But the real magic happens when the bad actors take over.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/24/theater/reviews/24drea.html?ex=1345608000&en=674aa53bc7de0d93&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: What? And Leave Show Business?
Post by: Admin on August 25, 2007, 10:08:44 PM
What? And Leave Show Business?


Five working New York City theater professionals talk about the part of the show business life that happens offstage.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/08/26/theater/26robe.html?ex=1345780800&en=5b0c1af88e3486c4&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss


Title: Re: How They Did It. The Show, That Is.
Post by: madupont on January 01, 2008, 08:51:44 PM
]
How They Did It. The Show, That Is.


?My First Time? is a new Off Broadway play in which four actors recount stories about people?s first sexual experiences.


http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/20/theater/20firs.html?ex=1342584000&en=4ef27bc3c00e869f&ei=5088&partner=rssnyt&emc=rss





I'm only (nearly) six months overdue(no pun intended) to respond to this one but I was in here looking for a scholar critic and when I found this. When reading about the web-sites, it is a fact. Dick Cavett took it up seriously which was astonishing that this very wry humored man could be so serious at his age but that's only natural. People posted as fast as they could get on-line;  and, since I am a senior citizen myself, I wrote in and told him it was hysterically funny. At  my age, other people's sex-lives elicit nothing but laughs.


Title: Porgy Meets Katrina, and Life's Not So Easy
Post by: madupont on January 30, 2008, 03:55:52 AM
Porgy’ Meets Katrina, and Life’s Not So Easy

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/29/arts/music/29porg.html?th&emc=th

Do you know who Zachary Scott was?


Title: Re: Theater Law120b
Post by: madupont on January 31, 2008, 07:16:50 PM
Law120b

Speed-the-Plow opens 1 Feb

 

We’ve welcomed a new cast into the theatre over the last couple of weeks, and rehearsals for Speed-the-Plow are in full swing.  Matthew Warchus directs Jeff Goldblum, Laura Michelle Kelly and Kevin Spacey in David Mamet’s witty satire of Hollywood.

 

Preview tickets are £2.50 off top 3 prices, £5 if you are a Friend of The Old Vic. Previews run from 1 – 11 February.

 

For more information click here

 

From 1 February to 26 April 2008

12 weeks only

 

Book now by calling 0870 060 6628

Book online at www.oldvictheatre.com

 

 

BRANDED by Simon Bent

 

We are looking for talented performers to join our company. If you are an actor or acrobat, dancer or DJ, singer or street runner, MC or musician and can move well or have natural rhythm then we want to hear from you.

 

BRANDED begins with the launch of the most sought after shoe on earth. As the world clamours for this season's 'must have' who is prepared to sell their soul for a sole?

 

Click here for more details and to download an application form

 

 

Old Vic New Voices Theatre503 Award

 

The second play in the season of award winning new works is now on at Theatre503.

 

Mad, Funny, Just (22 Jan – 9 Feb)

 

For more information click here

 

Tickets cost £12 (£8 conc)

Book now by calling 020 7978 7040

 

The Aditya Mittal tickets for under 25s 100 £12 tickets are available for every performance at The Old Vic. Tickets can be purchased in advance, but must be collected from the Box Office with proof of age. Please phone 0870 060 6628 for more details.
 
Take advantage of priority booking, reduced priced preview tickets, special offers, no booking fees and more by becoming a Friend of The Old Vic.
 
Find out more about access at The Old Vic
 
If you no longer wish to receive information from The Old Vic, please let us know.

 

We hope to see you soon at The Old Vic

 

Best wishes,

 

Sarah Cook

Sales and Marketing Manager

 

PS

 

The Lover & The Collection by Harold Pinter
Starring Richard Coyle, Gina McKee, Charlie Cox & Timothy West
From Tue 15 January at the Comedy Theatre
Click here to book

 

Sweet William
Written and performed by Michael Pennington
Trafalgar Studio 2 from Mon 4 - Sat 16 February
"In his brilliant one man show Pennington embraces the infinite variety found in Shakespeare's world" **** The Guardian
www.theambassadors.com/trafalgarstudios

http://www.oldvictheatre.com/whatson.php?id=41

 

 


Title: Re: Porgy Meets Katrina, and Life's Not So Easy
Post by: ponderosa on February 01, 2008, 09:28:46 AM
Porgy’ Meets Katrina, and Life’s Not So Easy

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/01/29/arts/music/29porg.html?th&emc=th

Do you know who Zachary Scott was?

Yes.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Zachary_Scott


Title: Re: Theater
Post by: madupont on February 01, 2008, 03:14:11 PM
You just think you do. Yet much depends on how soon you began spotting him in his movies in your childhood, what year that was  or how old you were and the length of time the movie had been made before you saw it.  He was one of my childhood favorites and,he certainly gave me a few lessons that every girl ought to know. OF COURSE, the packaging comes differently in every generation as to style.

I hadn't thought about him much recently, since so many people mention Peter Lorre instead, and I mention Sidney Greenstreet from time to time, so maybe ZAK was just a repressed memory until this production in Austin was given a link by The New York Times. 

As you probably noticed as you read, he wanted an acting career on the stage and look what happened instead, so he had to invent variations on a role in films since he couldn't break the chain and return to the stage for different roles.  I hate to say that one could develop bad karma just from play-acting bad guys in the movies. That was just the appearance. Although he did many good works for other people, he somehow accidently had bad luck.  A very sophisticated guy who should be better appreciated.


Title: Re: Theater
Post by: ponderosa on February 01, 2008, 03:29:28 PM
You just think you do.

I didn't say I knew him personally, ma. You asked "Do you know who Zachary Scott was". Yes, I know who he was. Sorry, but I tend to take folks literally.


Title: Re: Theater
Post by: madupont on February 01, 2008, 11:29:37 PM
Was really asking which of his movies did you like?  I was a fan.


Title: Re: Theater
Post by: ponderosa on February 02, 2008, 06:27:34 AM
That's cool, ma. I only know about him because I live there... uh, here. Been to the theater that bears his name. Can't say that I have seen him on film tho'.


Title: Re: Theater
Post by: madupont on February 02, 2008, 02:56:14 PM
On television; they are "oldies" from the 1940s.  My cousin lives out in Austin as well, with her daughter and in-laws, but is very elderly.


Title: Re:Theater Paul Newman, Stage Director
Post by: madupont on February 05, 2008, 11:42:19 PM
"Paul Newman will make his debut as a theater director when he stages a production based on John Steinbeck’s novella “Of Mice and Men” at the Westport Country Playhouse in Connecticut from Oct. 7 to 25 and from Oct. 30 to Nov. 1."

Compiled by LAWRENCE VAN GELDER
Published: February 6, 2008
Arts, Briefly

This is of course "Joanne Woodward's Theater", as Harrie reminded me and I'm so glad that she did that.  I found so many interesting things on why this couple met, all those years ago; because of posting a photo-link of Paul in the Movie Forums, that Harrie commented upon.  More later.




Title: Re: Theater Spacey and Goldblum hailed as ‘greatest double act’ in Mamet play
Post by: madupont on February 13, 2008, 12:30:38 PM
Law120b

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/people,674,spacey-and-goldblum-hailed-as-greatest-double-act-in-mamet-play,17473

The London theatre has a new hit show on its hands - David Mamet's play Speed the Plow, starring two Hollywood actors, Jeff Goldblum and Kevin Spacey, at the Old Vic. The critics are ecstatic this morning, Charles Spencer of the Daily Telegraph calling the casting inspired: "Goldblum and Spacey offer one of the greatest double acts I have ever had the pleasure of witnessing, right up there with Lemmon and Matthau, Morecambe and Wise, and Cary Grant and Rosalind Russell in His Girl Friday."

Benedict Nightingale in the Times writes: "Nobody with the least interest in acting should miss the snap and crackle, whizz and fizz of, in particular, their opening scene."

Speed the Plow is Mamet's satire on Hollywood greed and triviality. It provides, as Nightingale puts it, "two super roles for men able to cope with his [Mamet's] brash, breathless dialogue". Goldblum plays the head of production at a Hollywood studio, while Spacey plays the coked-up independent producer who thinks he has a script and a star that will make his fortune.

The English actress Laura Michelle Kelly (pictured above, between Goldblum and Spacey), acclaimed for her Mary Poppins in the West End, plays the temporary secretary, the role taken by Madonna when the play premiered in 1988.

Spencer concludes his review: "The charismatic brilliance of Spacey and Goldblum, and the subtle radiance of Kelly, silence all niggling criticism of Mamet's brilliant but flawed script. There's no doubt: the Old Vic has an absolute blast of a smash hit on its hands."


Title: Re: Theater Patriot-Traitors
Post by: madupont on February 23, 2008, 05:13:05 PM
Oscar-winning writer Ronald Harwood's new play is to open this week, examining the true story of Nazi sympathiser John Amery, son of a Tory cabinet minister, who was hanged for treason in 1945. Amery famously greeted the hangman with the words: "I have always wanted to meet you, although not, of course, under these circumstances."

No doubt derived from this book:

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Patriot-Traitors-Casement-Meaning-Treason/dp/0670884987/ref=sr_1_17?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1203803679&sr=1-17

Ronald Harwood is  known both for his plays[The Dresser] and his screen-writing


Title: Re:Thinking Russian but at American Speed
Post by: madupont on March 03, 2008, 01:08:31 AM
Dzimas,

http://www.nytimes.com/2008/03/02/theater/02tich.html?_r=1&8dpc&oref=slogin


Title: Re: Theater Olivier Awards
Post by: madupont on March 10, 2008, 11:03:31 PM
http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/people,756,chiwetel-ejiofor-wins-olivier-for-othello-role,20476

and,
      Kristen Scott Thomas as Arkadina in the Seagull by Chekov


Title: Re: Theater David Mamet
Post by: madupont on March 17, 2008, 09:18:38 AM
http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/people,768,mamet-shuns-his-brain-dead-liberal-past,21151


Title: Re: TheaterPaul Scofield
Post by: madupont on March 20, 2008, 10:35:57 PM
Good take of Man for All Seasons.   Look at his eyes.

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/people,789,paul-scofield-dies-aged-86,22504


Title: Re: Theater Dick Cavett
Post by: madupont on March 28, 2008, 08:41:52 PM
Yesterday, I noticed, I think at my on-line issue of The New Yorker, that Dick Cavett is opening on Broadway again in a matter of weeks.  Watch for it being advertised. If I see more, will let you know.  He won't be doing any columns for a bit in that case, get him while he's available; that's what happens when so many of his posters, to what was thought of as a blog, encourage him to return to tv or "something". He has.

Gosh, we'll miss him again out here on the internet.  Of course you know, he didn't bite his tongue on personalities and issues which have currently been making news for most of eight years and their party in general, even before, and The New York Times has not been used to waves rolling up toward their building, at least not for the last two or three years. Possibly they got more then they bargained for, when they had officially become polite as can be to The Powers who are now allowing you to have another one of your elections like a circus of crazy making audacity.


Title: Re: Theater
Post by: madupont on April 01, 2008, 04:33:27 PM
Spoke too soon, his fans posting to him at nytimes make it rather more clear, Dick Cavett is doing a one night stand.  It's really for the Dupont award.


Title: Re: Theater: Any would be actors out there?
Post by: madupont on May 08, 2008, 11:02:21 AM
A LEAP FROM THE METHOD:
An Organic Approach to Acting

Author: Rich, Allan

Review Date: APRIL 01, 2008
Publisher:AuthorHouse (164 pp.)
Price (hardback): $24.95
Publication Date: January 11, 2007
ISBN (hardback): 978-1-4208-2223-6
Category: AUTHORS
Classification: NONFICTION

Respected character actor and stage coach reinterprets Stanislavsky’s Method for a modern audience.

Rich, a Los Angeles personality with a long career in show business, re-envisions the actor’s craft, offering practical advice to those that aspire to the stage and screen. With short, vivid chapters, Rich succinctly dispels with the notion that performers must have a natural talent to succeed—plenty of hard work, a willingness to defer to the playwright and the courage to dig deep into a role to discover the central truth of a character will do in its absence. Rich pokes holes into Konstantin Stanislavsky’s psychological approach to acting that asks a performer to search for personal memories to add emotional resonance to a performance. He suggests instead that the actor must not reproduce, but reinterpret a role when playing it night after night. The basis of Rich’s new, simplified approach is the philosophy that an actor must search the text for insights into the character rather than rely on their own past experiences. To be economical on the stage and not rely on physical movement are also important elements to an effective performance, as is the discovery of the essence of the character’s behavior. Rich offers practical recommendations that run from knowing the entire play in order to understand the playwright’s intentions to never sleeping with your leading man or lady, lest the intensity of the stage romance be diminished. A quick autobiographical narrative kicks off this charming, informative manual. The author recounts his early Broadway appearances and the crisis of confidence that led to several lean years and a midlife career as a businessman and art dealer with an itch to return to the stage. Unfortunately, a last section filled with testimonials on the effectiveness of Rich’s method and gaudy plethora of celebrity photographs distract from the polish and professionalism established by the author’s instructive theories.

Great advice from a show-business veteran.


Title: Re: Theater
Post by: FlyingVProd on October 22, 2017, 03:59:19 PM
There is a Broadway play in the works about the late Roy Rogers, the play will probably happen next year.

My brother, Wes, married Roy and Dale's granddaughter, Kristen, and he had three children with her, so I plan to attend on opening night with the Rogers family. It will be great. Broadway will be full of cowboys when the play opens.

Here is link for the Facebook page for the Broadway play about Roy and Dale...

https://www.facebook.com/HappyTrailsBway?fref=ts (https://www.facebook.com/HappyTrailsBway?fref=ts)

Here is a link for The Happy Trails Children's Foundation, which is a charity which Roy and Dale founded...

http://www.happytrails.org/ (http://www.happytrails.org/)

And here is a link for the Dale Rogers Training Center...

http://www.drtc.org/ (http://www.drtc.org/)

Here is a video about Roy Rogers' trip to South America, Si, Amigos, There is a Santa Claus...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NgazRpzpNBM (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NgazRpzpNBM)

I look forward to visiting New York, and seeing the play.

Salute,

Tony V.


Title: Re: Theater
Post by: FlyingVProd on October 25, 2017, 09:12:38 PM
Here is an acting scene on You Tube of me doing the Second Chorus from Anouilh's Antigone. My Uncle Dennis was my cameraman (He died in January of 2012, I miss him). I did a few takes that I liked better, but this was one of the few that I made it all of the way through without any mistakes, all in 1 shot with zero editing and without a teleprompter, my Uncle Dennis got tired of shooting it, and so we had to settle on this take. I hope that you enjoy it. I will make more You Tube videos eventually.

"Antigone, an adaptation of Sophocles's classic produced in the context of the anti-fascist French resistance, is Jean Anouilh's (1910–1987) most often-produced work today. Antigone premiered in Paris in 1944, but Anouilh had written his tale of lone rebellion against the state two years earlier, inspired by an act of resistance during Paris's occupation by the Nazis. In August 1942, a young man named Paul Collette fired at and wounded a group of directors during a meeting of the collaborationist Légion des volontaires français. Collette did not belong to a Resistance network or organized political group, but acted entirely alone and in full knowledge of his certain death. For Anouilh, Collette's solitary act—at once heroic, gratuitous, and futile—captured the essence of tragedy and demanded an immediate revival of Antigone. Aware of Anouilh's thinly veiled attack on the Vichy government, the Nazis censored Antigone immediately upon its release. It premiered two years later at the Théâtre de l'Atelier in Paris under the direction of André Barsacq, a few months before Paris' liberation. The play starred (his wife) Monelle Valentin as the doomed princess."

Here is a link for the video:

http://youtu.be/2NnXQpikxyk (http://youtu.be/2NnXQpikxyk)

Hopefully you enjoy it.

Tout les meilleur,

Tony V.


Title: Re: Theater
Post by: FlyingVProd on November 13, 2017, 10:11:00 PM
Roy Rogers is riding tonight....

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cz8qJmZhzPM&feature=youtu.be (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cz8qJmZhzPM&feature=youtu.be)

Salute,

Tony V.