Escape from Elba

International => Middle East => Topic started by: Admin on April 16, 2007, 09:05:56 PM



Title: Middle East
Post by: Admin on April 16, 2007, 09:05:56 PM
Discuss Middle Eastern politics.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: teddy174c on June 17, 2007, 09:19:36 AM
Discuss Middle Eastern politics.

Well -- let there be at least one post here, given the situation in Gaza and the West-Bank -- Mahmoud Abas finally thrown total support by Israel and the West in a probably too-late effort to stave off Islamist Hamas.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: teddy174c on June 17, 2007, 10:26:39 AM
This is a helpful article -

 http://www.nytimes.com/2007/06/17/world/middleeast/17assess.html?hp. 


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: teddy174c on June 17, 2007, 10:50:19 AM
The lead up to Abbas's move:

 http://observer.guardian.co.uk/world/story/0,,2104858,00.html



Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Wolverine on June 18, 2007, 02:22:31 AM
7 more kids killed by US  Air Force in Afghanistan. Why don't they take those planes away from those idiots until they know how (when) to use them?


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Dzimas on June 21, 2007, 02:08:20 AM
Pretty tough region to fly in.  Just ask the Russians.


Title: Palestine
Post by: Dzimas on June 21, 2007, 02:11:08 AM
I am glad to see the EU will finally unfreeze money to the Palestinian state.  It was ridiculous to hold back funds with the election of Hamas.  After all, Sinn Fein turned out to be more reasonable once engaged at the political table.  A lot of senseless violence has occurred since the EU, US and Israel withheld money, plunging Palestine into a civil war. 


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Wolverine on June 27, 2007, 01:59:44 AM
Pretty tough region to fly in.  Just ask the Russians.

Whatever. Even the lapdog Karzai says the Americans are idiots to be trying to kill a terrorist by lobbing missiles into residential houses. It's a damn pity the US Military now seems to be composed of Video Game Arcade whackos who think you just press 're-set' and all begins with a clean slate.

Who's going to start a movement to force the US to destroy their nuclear weapons (before these cowboys get to use them)?


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Dzimas on June 27, 2007, 03:18:21 AM
Wolverine, I don't think the Americans should be there either.  The restoration of Afghanistan has been an abysmal failure.  Bush has totally diverted the focus from where it should be, the Palestine/Israel crisis.  Unable to deal with it, he chose to pursue other demons, and has saddled the US with two major quagmires that have no resolutions in sight.  And now I hear the military is actively thinking about dropping defoliants on the poppy fields, further echoing their miserable failure in Vietnam.  Anyway you slice it, these have been two failed missions.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Dzimas on July 24, 2007, 10:46:58 AM
The eternal optimist:

http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20070724/ts_nm/palestinians_blair_dc


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Donotremove on July 24, 2007, 12:02:57 PM
Defoliants on the poppy fields?  My God Amighty.  It's true.  We never learn.  We should make the poppies legal.  Let legitimate pain reliever businesses buy the crops.  That does two things right away.  Takes the leverage away from the Taliban insurgents (and some away from the warlords), and puts money in the pockets of Afghan farmers (most Afghans are engaged in some sort of agricultural endeaver.)  People are less likely to engage in malarky when they have full bellies and feel safe.  Americans go home unless involved in rebuilding of some sort.  Close the illegal, secret prisons, put away the firepower (of whatever kind) and really get with some peace building.  There is hardly an Afghan left alive that remembers when there wasn't war.

And, let Karzai stand or fall on his own.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: madupont on July 24, 2007, 06:20:13 PM

Defoliants on the poppy fields?  My God Amighty.  It's true.  We never learn.  We should make the poppies legal.  Let legitimate pain reliever businesses buy the crops.  That does two things right away.  Takes the leverage away from the Taliban insurgents (and some away from the warlords), and puts money in the pockets of Afghan farmers (most Afghans are engaged in some sort of agricultural endeaver.)  People are less likely to engage in malarky when they have full bellies and feel safe.  Americans go home unless involved in rebuilding of some sort.  Close the illegal, secret prisons, put away the firepower (of whatever
kind) and really get with some peace building.  There is hardly an Afghan left alive that remembers when there wasn't war.

And, let Karzai stand or fall on his own.



I have always for the last 37 years advocated the saving of the poppy fields, after the eradication of Southeast Asia's Pharmaceutical supply (what they have done of course is simply ship us the contaminated product of this area in trade as a food supply in every grocery and supermarket in the US, on the shelf in cans, and over at the fish counter which is why I always ask "Which gulf did you say these shrimp[or whatever] came from?").

They keep yammering visa vis the State Department that the "terrorists only use it to buy weapons, therefore it must be destroyed.";but, to me,
"fancy pants" Donald Rumsfeld formerly at Defense carries pharmaceutical stock in this country, so you tell me what the jig-saw puzzle is about?  My attitude has always been, we are going to need this stuff when the shit goes down ala Tom Lehr  or was it Tom Lear? Either way, we are just not covered, by this righteousness.

As to your almost end comment,"There is hardly an Afghan left alive that remembers when there wasn't war." One day last winter going into Spring, I found myself writing to the the darn shop at nytimes.com, the photos, where they sell the picture of The Girl with Blue Eyes (no doubt they take their cut from marketing what is copyrighted by a photographer from National Geographic), this was born out in a program they did on where she is now, as mother of several and she never smiles because the bombs still drop, her husband is a baker with a tandoori oven and she takes the kids with her up to her field-garden for what they eat.

I asked the nytimes. shopkeeper or said,"I hope you are sending some of the profit from sales, of-- The Girl with Blue Eyes,to her.  Of course, they never answered. It is a very popular picture. Okantaleonard and I first discussed this back in Western European forum with ohfuchs(who is by the way with a pharmaceutical company in Switzerland)who has changed names for the present forums at Exiles when occasionally posting, probably in years 2003,2004?



Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: madupont on July 24, 2007, 06:29:04 PM
Dzimas re:#8

I was under the impression that Bush had handed this off to our allies, the care and feeding and defending of Afghanis by the British military (sorry,UK? I'm OK); of course, Mr. Blair  is no longer a power there. There is no there, there anymore as far as London. thantopsy could use your input, tickets to selling of the seats on the board of polling place votes is going faster than fresh cut sugar cane. Is Bob feeling better, or worse? He may crash and burn,if sorting does not happen quickly.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Dzimas on July 25, 2007, 12:45:37 AM
Maybe it is the pharmaceutical companies who are behind the bombing of the poppy fields?  I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw the story a few weeks back.  Jesus, how quickly we forget.  I believe the US also threatened Bolivian cocoa fields when Evo Morales came to power.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Dzimas on July 25, 2007, 12:51:11 AM
I was a bit stunned by length of the voting ballot in American history as well.  But, then I guess weezo believes in fairness and transcribed every book that had been mentioned the past two weeks so as not to leave anyone out. Bob seems to be holding up fine.  It is amazing how long he has served as the anchor of the Am History forum.

Anyway, in regard to the ME, I find it interesting that the British press is no longer treating Hamas like a pack of rogues and is actually trying to balance their reporting.  If only CNN would do the same.  Hamas has long been a two-headed front, like Fatah, with a domestic and military wing.  They've done so much work in helping people out at the grass roots level that it is little wonder that they won the last election, and were able to so easily drive Fatah out of Gaza.  Fatah, as BBC correctly noted, is led by returned exiles and has long had a high and mighty tone when it comes to Palestinian politics.  Maybe Blair can cut through some of the hostilities, but I would think Carter has the advantage in the region, particularly in dealing with Palestine.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: madupont on July 25, 2007, 04:40:36 AM
Maybe it is the pharmaceutical companies who are behind the bombing of the poppy fields?  I couldn't believe my eyes when I saw the story a few weeks back.  Jesus, how quickly we forget.  I believe the US also threatened Bolivian cocoa fields when Evo Morales came to power.
[/color]

Yes, they did, which reminds me, I did have something to post on him in immigration lest we create an impression that all South Americans are pushing to be allowed into the US instead of working through the problems  which burdened them(I'm thinking in terms of the old Kissinger domino effect which many in this country fear for some reason in the Republican mind-washing of another generation.  One problem obvious in Bolivia was reported some months ago in the nytimes, and has to do with the Mennonites having been there over many years and leaving behind a very much poorer generation of young people than they would be at home in the US  where it appeared to me that they would never be able to afford to farm if they did return which is probably why the Mennonite missions have not made, thus far, a sound that I've picked up about liberating them. Probably because they realize that they are attached to the land that they have worked.  The Bolivians want them out--not because they proselytize but under the standard "land for the peasants", and these are barefoot whites unless they have to purchase heavy-duty boots for protection, like not having an animal step on your arch, and they have coops of cheap goods exactly the same as available in the States.


Title: Juan Cole: Apologist or sane voice?
Post by: thebizneverloses on October 17, 2007, 10:27:43 PM
http://www.salon.com/opinion/feature/2007/10/17/iran/


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Dzimas on October 17, 2007, 11:50:50 PM
Another war with Iran would be a tough sell to an electorate already weary of two wars in the Middle East and Central Asia.  Going into Iran would stir up an even bigger hornets' nest than the US has already stirred up in the region.  Giuliani and Hillary are just plain stupid to even consider it, especially since the US has no real case against Iran, but of course that didn't stop Bush from going into Iraq.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 09, 2008, 05:49:32 PM
Anyone read "The Kite Runner"?


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Donotremove on March 09, 2008, 10:45:05 PM
I did.  I'd have to read it again to freshen up, though.  I also read his second book, about the two women who helped each other survive all the regime changes over the years.  Extremely sad book.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on March 10, 2008, 09:06:22 AM
Extremely sad might be a little understated. But at least those books give a glimpse into the fact that there are actual people in places like Afghanistan and all those other "Stans", not just crazies with AK47s.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Dzimas on March 10, 2008, 09:10:48 AM
Piece on dog fighting in Afghanistan last night on CNN.  Michael Vick would feel right at home.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: Donotremove on March 10, 2008, 09:29:35 AM
I read somewhere that they fight chickens, too.  Listen folks, the history of Afghanistan is bloody and violent.  Males dominate.  Tribes abound.  Changing this will take 100s of years, or force.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: thanatopsy on May 17, 2008, 09:32:21 AM
Treasonous Bush and his fellow right wing extremists have had a field day in pretending that newly found Iranian weapons were being used to attack Iraqis.  In fact, much publicity was given re the dates and Iranian inscriptions on those weapons.  Bush continually uses these "facts" in order to stir up further hatred and warmongering.

Yet, when it is again proven that the finding was a sham (yes, it has happened several times) the disclosure gets no publicity at all:

http://www.campaigniran.org/casmii/index.php?q=node/4886


US confession: Weapons were not made in Iran after all



It is time to IMPEACH BUSH!


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: NoneoftheAbove on May 17, 2008, 10:14:04 AM
"It is time to IMPEACH BUSH!"

No, let's let him eviscerate the republican party for another few months...


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: FlyingVProd on October 23, 2017, 05:40:08 PM
The Middle East has changed a lot, and many bad guys have died, and many bad guys have been removed from power.

And now Israel is protected by the Iron Dome system...

Link...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_Dome (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Iron_Dome)

Life seems to have improved for the people of Israel.

The poor people of Israel have suffered so much. It is wonderful that conditions are improving for the people of Israel. I pray that conditions will continue to improve for the people of Israel.

Salute,

Tony V.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: josh on November 25, 2017, 06:23:57 PM
The crown prince has big plans to bring back a level of tolerance to his society.
By THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN
NOV. 23, 2017 | The New York Times

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia — I never thought I’d live long enough to write this sentence: The most significant reform process underway anywhere in the Middle East today is in Saudi Arabia. Yes, you read that right. Though I came here at the start of Saudi winter, I found the country going through its own Arab Spring, Saudi style.

Unlike the other Arab Springs — all of which emerged bottom up and failed miserably, except in Tunisia — this one is led from the top down by the country’s 32-year-old crown prince, Mohammed bin Salman, and, if it succeeds, it will not only change the character of Saudi Arabia but the tone and tenor of Islam across the globe. Only a fool would predict its success — but only a fool would not root for it.

To better understand it I flew to Riyadh to interview the crown prince, known as “M.B.S.,” who had not spoken about the extraordinary events here of early November, when his government arrested scores of Saudi princes and businessmen on charges of corruption and threw them into a makeshift gilded jail — the Riyadh Ritz-Carlton — until they agreed to surrender their ill-gotten gains. You don’t see that every day.

We met at night at his family’s ornate adobe-walled palace in Ouja, north of Riyadh. M.B.S. spoke in English, while his brother, Prince Khalid, the new Saudi ambassador to the U.S., and several senior ministers shared different lamb dishes and spiced the conversation. After nearly four hours together, I surrendered at 1:15 a.m. to M.B.S.’s youth, pointing out that I was exactly twice his age. It’s been a long, long time, though, since any Arab leader wore me out with a fire hose of new ideas about transforming his country.

We started with the obvious question: What’s happening at the Ritz? And was this his power play to eliminate his family and private sector rivals before his ailing father, King Salman, turns the keys of the kingdom over to him?

It’s “ludicrous,” he said, to suggest that this anticorruption campaign was a power grab. He pointed out that many prominent members of the Ritz crowd had already publicly pledged allegiance to him and his reforms, and that “a majority of the royal family” is already behind him. This is what happened, he said: “Our country has suffered a lot from corruption from the 1980s until today. The calculation of our experts is that roughly 10 percent of all government spending was siphoned off by corruption each year, from the top levels to the bottom. Over the years the government launched more than one ‘war on corruption’ and they all failed. Why? Because they all started from the bottom up.”

So when his father, who has never been tainted by corruption charges during his nearly five decades as governor of Riyadh, ascended to the throne in 2015 (at a time of falling oil prices), he vowed to put a stop to it all, M.B.S. said:
“My father saw that there is no way we can stay in the G-20 and grow with this level of corruption. In early 2015, one of his first orders to his team was to collect all the information about corruption — at the top. This team worked for two years until they collected the most accurate information,

When all the data was ready, the public prosecutor, Saud al-Mojib, took action, M.B.S. said, explaining that each suspected billionaire or prince was arrested and given two choices: “We show them all the files that we have and as soon as they see those about 95 percent agree to a settlement,” which means signing over cash or shares of their business to the Saudi state treasury.

“About 1 percent,” he added, “are able to prove they are clean and their case is dropped right there. About 4 percent say they are not corrupt and with their lawyers want to go to court. Under Saudi law, the public prosecutor is independent. We cannot interfere with his job — the king can dismiss him, but he is driving the process … We have experts making sure no businesses are bankrupted in the process” — to avoid causing unemployment.

“How much money are they recovering?” I asked.

The public prosecutor says it could eventually “be around $100 billion in settlements,” said M.B.S.

There is no way, he added, to root out all corruption from top to the bottom, “So you have to send a signal, and the signal going forward now is, ‘You will not escape.’ And we are already seeing the impact,” like people writing on social media, “I called my middle man and he doesn’t answer.” Saudi business people who paid bribes to get services done by bureaucrats are not being prosecuted, explained M.B.S. “It’s those who shook the money out of the government” — by overcharging and getting kickbacks.

The stakes are high for M.B.S. in this anticorruption drive. If the public feels that he is truly purging corruption that was sapping the system and doing so in a way that is transparent and makes clear to future Saudi and foreign investors that the rule of law will prevail, it will really instill a lot of new confidence in the system. But if the process ends up feeling arbitrary, bullying and opaque, aimed more at aggregating power for power’s sake and unchecked by any rule of law, it will end up instilling fear that will unnerve Saudi and foreign investors in ways the country can’t afford.

But one thing I know for sure: Not a single Saudi I spoke to here over three days expressed anything other than effusive support for this anticorruption drive. The Saudi silent majority is clearly fed up with the injustice of so many princes and billionaires ripping off their country. While foreigners, like me, were inquiring about the legal framework for this operation, the mood among Saudis I spoke with was: “Just turn them all upside down, shake the money out of their pockets and don’t stop shaking them until it’s all out!”

But guess what? This anticorruption drive is only the second-most unusual and important initiative launched by M.B.S. The first is to bring Saudi Islam back to its more open and modern orientation — whence it diverted in 1979. That is, back to what M.B.S. described to a recent global investment conference here as a “moderate, balanced Islam that is open to the world and to all religions and all traditions and peoples.”

I know that year well. I started my career as a reporter in the Middle East in Beirut in 1979, and so much of the region that I have covered since was shaped by the three big events of that year: the takeover of the Grand Mosque in Mecca by Saudi puritanical extremists — who denounced the Saudi ruling family as corrupt, impious sellouts to Western values; the Iranian Islamic revolution; and the Soviet invasion of Afghanistan.

These three events together freaked out the Saudi ruling family at the time, and prompted it to try to shore up its legitimacy by allowing its Wahhabi clerics to impose a much more austere Islam on the society and by launching a worldwide competition with Iran’s ayatollahs over who could export more fundamentalist Islam. It didn’t help that the U.S. tried to leverage this trend by using Islamist fighters against Russia in Afghanistan. In all, it pushed Islam globally way to the right and helped nurture 9/11.

A lawyer by training, who rose up in his family’s education-social welfare foundation, M.B.S. is on a mission to bring Saudi Islam back to the center. He has not only curbed the authority of the once feared Saudi religious police to berate a woman for not covering every inch of her skin, he has also let women drive. And unlike any Saudi leader before him, he has taken the hard-liners on ideologically. As one U.S.-educated 28-year-old Saudi woman told me: M.B.S. “uses a different language. He says, ‘We are going to destroy extremism.’ He’s not sugar-coating. That is reassuring to me that the change is real.”

Indeed, M.B.S. instructed me: “Do not write that we are ‘reinterpreting’ Islam — we are ‘restoring’ Islam to its origins — and our biggest tools are the Prophet’s practices and [daily life in] Saudi Arabia before 1979.” At the time of the Prophet Muhammad, he argued, there were musical theaters, there was mixing between men and women, there was respect for Christians and Jews in Arabia. “The first commercial judge in Medina was a woman!” So if the Prophet embraced all of this, M.B.S. asked, “Do you mean the Prophet was not a Muslim?”

Then one of his ministers got out his cellphone and shared with me pictures and YouTube videos of Saudi Arabia in the 1950s — women without heads covered, wearing skirts and walking with men in public, as well as concerts and cinemas. It was still a traditional and modest place, but not one where fun had been outlawed, which is what happened after 1979.

If this virus of an antipluralistic, misogynistic Islam that came out of Saudi Arabia in 1979 can be reversed by Saudi Arabia, it would drive moderation across the Muslim world and surely be welcomed here where 65 percent of the population is under 30.

One middle-age Saudi banker said to me: “My generation was held hostage by 1979. I know now that my kids will not be hostages.” Added a 28-year-old Saudi woman social entrepreneur: “Ten years ago when we talked about music in Riyadh it meant buying a CD — now it is about the concert next month and what ticket are you buying and which of your friends will go with you.”

Saudi Arabia would have a very long way to go before it approached anything like Western standards for free speech and women’s rights. But as someone who has been coming here for almost 30 years, it blew my mind to learn that you can hear Western classical music concerts in Riyadh now, that country singer Toby Keith held a men-only concert here in September, where he even sang with a Saudi, and that Lebanese soprano Hiba Tawaji will be among the first woman singers to perform a women-only concert here on Dec. 6. And M.B.S told me, it was just decided that women will be able to go to stadiums and attend soccer games. The Saudi clerics have completely acquiesced.

The Saudi education minister chimed in that among a broad set of education reforms, he’s redoing and digitizing all textbooks, sending 1,700 Saudi teachers each year to world-class schools in places like Finland to upgrade their skills, announcing that for the first time Saudi girls will have physical education classes in public schools and this year adding an hour to the Saudi school day for kids to explore their passions in science and social issues, under a teacher’s supervision, with their own projects.

So many of these reforms were so long overdue it’s ridiculous. Better late than never, though.

On foreign policy, M.B.S. would not discuss the strange goings on with Prime Minister Saad Hariri of Lebanon coming to Saudi Arabia and announcing his resignation, seemingly under Saudi pressure, and now returning to Beirut and rescinding that resignation. He simply insisted that the bottom line of the whole affair is that Hariri, a Sunni Muslim, is not going to continue providing political cover for a Lebanese government that is essentially controlled by the Lebanese Shiite Hezbollah militia, which is essentially controlled by Tehran.

He insisted that the Saudi-backed war in Yemen, which has been a humanitarian nightmare, was tilting in the direction of the pro-Saudi legitimate government there, which, he said is now in control of 85 percent of the country, but given the fact that pro-Iranian Houthi rebels, who hold the rest, launched a missile at Riyadh airport, anything less than 100 percent is still problematic.

His general view seemed to be that with the backing of the Trump administration — he praised President Trump as “the right person at the right time” — the Saudis and their Arab allies were slowly building a coalition to stand up to Iran. I am skeptical. The dysfunction and rivalries within the Sunni Arab world generally have prevented forming a unified front up to now, which is why Iran indirectly controls four Arab capitals today — Damascus, Sana, Baghdad and Beirut. That Iranian over-reach is one reason M.B.S. was scathing about Iran’s supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.
Iran’s “supreme leader is the new Hitler of the Middle East,” said M.B.S. “But we learned from Europe that appeasement doesn’t work. We don’t want the new Hitler in Iran to repeat what happened in Europe in the Middle East.” What matters most, though, is what Saudi Arabia does at home to build its strength and economy.

But can M.B.S. and his team see this through? Again, I make no predictions. He has his flaws that he will have to control, insiders here tell me. They include relying on a very tight circle of advisers who don’t always challenge him sufficiently, and a tendency to start too many things that don’t get finished. There’s a whole list. But guess what? Perfect is not on the menu here. Someone had to do this job — wrench Saudi Arabia into the 21st century — and M.B.S. stepped up. I, for one, am rooting for him to succeed in his reform efforts.

And so are a lot of young Saudis. There was something a 30-year-old Saudi woman social entrepreneur said to me that stuck in my ear. “We are privileged to be the generation that has seen the before and the after.” The previous generation of Saudi women, she explained, could never imagine a day when a woman could drive and the coming generation will never be able to imagine a day when a woman couldn’t.

“But I will always remember not being able to drive,” she told me. And the fact that starting in June that will never again be so “gives me so much hope. It proves to me that anything is possible — that this is a time of opportunity. We have seen things change and we are young enough to make the transition.”

This reform push is giving the youth here a new pride in their country, almost a new identity, which many of them clearly relish. Being a Saudi student in post-9/11 America, young Saudis confess, is to always feel you are being looked at as a potential terrorist or someone who comes from a country locked in the Stone Age.

Now they have a young leader who is driving religious and economic reform, who talks the language of high tech, and whose biggest sin may be that he wants to go too fast. Most ministers are now in their 40s — and not 60s. And with the suffocating hand of a puritanical Islam being lifted, it’s giving them a chance to think afresh about their country and their identity as Saudis.

“We need to restore our culture to what it was before the [Islamic] radical culture took over,” a Saudi woman friend who works with an N.G.O. said to me. ”`We have 13 regions in this country, and they each have a different cuisine. But nobody knows that. Did you know that? But I never saw one Saudi dish go global. It is time for us to embrace who we are and who we were.”

Alas, who Saudi Arabia is also includes a large cohort of older, more rural, more traditional Saudis, and pulling them into the 21st century will be a challenge. But that’s in part why every senior bureaucrat is working crazy hours now. They know M.B.S. can call them on the phone at any of those hours to find out if something he wanted done is getting done. I told him his work habits reminded me of a line in the play “Hamilton,” when the chorus asks: Why does he always work like “he’s running out of time.”

“Because,” said M.B.S., ``I fear that the day I die I am going to die without accomplishing what I have in my mind. Life is too short and a lot of things can happen, and I am really keen to see it with my own eyes — and that is why I am in a hurry.”
************

A version of this editorial appears in print on November 24, 2017, on Page A27 of the New York edition with the headline: Saudi Arabia’s Arab Spring.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: bodiddley on December 03, 2017, 07:54:30 AM
Interesting.
You can already see some cracks especially in foreign policy, with regard to a fierce hatred of Iran, the Yemen disaster, meddling in Lebanon, Syria, etc.

It will be interesting to see how/if MBS will reign in the Wahhabi training centers set up all over the world.  The money flowing to those is likely from fundamentalist foundations and rich supporters. 

Also we'll see if he really plans to remove corruption or is just using it to sideline de-wealth his opponents.  that's the usual MO, and then cronies move in and do the same old corruption.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: FlyingVProd on January 07, 2018, 09:07:25 PM
Beverly Hills, California, is the home of many Persian Jews, and many of the Persian Jews are extremely wealthy. I would expect that the Persian Jews would rise up to support improved human rights in Iran, and improved human rights for the women of Iran, and I am sure that the Persian Jews support a free and democratic government in Iran, etc...

--------------------------

The Persian Conquest

https://www.wmagazine.com/story/persian-beverly-hills-2

------------

Persian Jews, Wikipedia page...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Persian_Jews

-----------------

History of the Iranian Americans in Los Angeles

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Iranian_Americans_in_Los_Angeles

---------

Iranian Jews Find a Beverly Hills Refuge

http://articles.latimes.com/1990-02-13/local/me-543_1_beverly-hills

-----------------------

IRANIAN JEW ELECTED BEVERLY HILLS MAYOR

http://www.jpost.com/Jewish-World/Jewish-News/Iranian-Jew-elected-Beverly-Hills-mayor

-----------------------------

The Persian Jews need to rise up and help in the fight for freedom and democracy and improved human rights, and improved women's rights, in Iran.

Salute,

Tony V.


Title: Re: Middle East
Post by: kidcarter8 on January 07, 2018, 09:28:42 PM
Thanks for the links.