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Messages - REDSTATEWARD

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1
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 06:34:36 PM »
So, Ward - as our resident originalist and defended of all things Constitutional, what do you think of the claims, in NH and now in TX, that "stay-at-home" orders are unconstitutional?!

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-Supreme-Court-Harris-County-stay-at-home-15166758.php?utm_campaign=CMS+Sharing+Tools+%28Premium%29&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&fbclid=IwAR2gnRXo3C0i-Xs-gdj-VvjEO_yXTDhsoCUpwhLLO9Gt7ziPgkWajq7RD1Q
The Federal Government is restricted from national quarantines. The states not so much thanks to the 10th amendment and the Commerce Clause. on that basis I would says states have Constitutional authority.  At the state level public health safety seems to take precedence. Ohio postponed the democrat primary election citing the threat to health by the corona virus, basically ignoring a judge’s ruling to the contrary. Further the state’s rescheduled election will prohibit in person voting. And Ohio was among the first states to close non essential businesses, schools, etc.
I don’t know if Texas accords the state the same power in overseeing public health.
Every time Red mentions the Commerce Clause, I think of Indigo Montoya. You keep using that phrase. I dont think it means what you think it means.
For what it is worth, the 10th Amendment would not give the States the right to quarantine either.
Of course it does.
Quote
Neither it nor the Commerce Clause grant the states any rights they did not already have.
LOL
Laugh away. It is your away of admitting I am right.
About what?

2
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 06:19:40 PM »
Stand away.
Social distancing.

3
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 06:16:29 PM »
Oh. Well you said that Commerce Clause gives states that authority. You need to write better.

The Federal Government is restricted from national quarantines. The states not so much thanks to the 10th amendment and the Commerce Clause.

I stand by what I wrote.

4
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 06:11:44 PM »
So, Ward - as our resident originalist and defended of all things Constitutional, what do you think of the claims, in NH and now in TX, that "stay-at-home" orders are unconstitutional?!

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-Supreme-Court-Harris-County-stay-at-home-15166758.php?utm_campaign=CMS+Sharing+Tools+%28Premium%29&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&fbclid=IwAR2gnRXo3C0i-Xs-gdj-VvjEO_yXTDhsoCUpwhLLO9Gt7ziPgkWajq7RD1Q
The Federal Government is restricted from national quarantines. The states not so much thanks to the 10th amendment and the Commerce Clause. on that basis I would says states have Constitutional authority.  At the state level public health safety seems to take precedence. Ohio postponed the democrat primary election citing the threat to health by the corona virus, basically ignoring a judge’s ruling to the contrary. Further the state’s rescheduled election will prohibit in person voting. And Ohio was among the first states to close non essential businesses, schools, etc.
I don’t know if Texas accords the state the same power in overseeing public health.
Every time Red mentions the Commerce Clause, I think of Indigo Montoya. You keep using that phrase. I dont think it means what you think it means.
For what it is worth, the 10th Amendment would not give the States the right to quarantine either.
Of course it does.
Quote
Neither it nor the Commerce Clause grant the states any rights they did not already have.
LOL

5
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 06:08:21 PM »
So, Ward - as our resident originalist and defended of all things Constitutional, what do you think of the claims, in NH and now in TX, that "stay-at-home" orders are unconstitutional?!

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-Supreme-Court-Harris-County-stay-at-home-15166758.php?utm_campaign=CMS+Sharing+Tools+%28Premium%29&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&fbclid=IwAR2gnRXo3C0i-Xs-gdj-VvjEO_yXTDhsoCUpwhLLO9Gt7ziPgkWajq7RD1Q
The Federal Government is restricted from national quarantines. The states not so much thanks to the 10th amendment and the Commerce Clause. on that basis I would says states have Constitutional authority.  At the state level public health safety seems to take precedence. Ohio postponed the democrat primary election citing the threat to health by the corona virus, basically ignoring a judge’s ruling to the contrary. Further the state’s rescheduled election will prohibit in person voting. And Ohio was among the first states to close non essential businesses, schools, etc.
I don’t know if Texas accords the state the same power in overseeing public health.
Every time Red mentions the Commerce Clause, I think of Indigo Montoya. You keep using that phrase. I dont think it means what you think it means.
Well it certainly doesn't mean what he thinks it does in that post.
It most certainly does. Federal Law under the Commerce Clause  does not provide for quarantines of individuals who remain within a single state.

6
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 04:20:46 PM »
So, Ward - as our resident originalist and defended of all things Constitutional, what do you think of the claims, in NH and now in TX, that "stay-at-home" orders are unconstitutional?!

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-Supreme-Court-Harris-County-stay-at-home-15166758.php?utm_campaign=CMS+Sharing+Tools+%28Premium%29&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&fbclid=IwAR2gnRXo3C0i-Xs-gdj-VvjEO_yXTDhsoCUpwhLLO9Gt7ziPgkWajq7RD1Q
The Federal Government is restricted from national quarantines. The states not so much thanks to the 10th amendment and the Commerce Clause. on that basis I would says states have Constitutional authority.  At the state level public health safety seems to take precedence. Ohio postponed the democrat primary election citing the threat to health by the corona virus, basically ignoring a judge’s ruling to the contrary. Further the state’s rescheduled election will prohibit in person voting. And Ohio was among the first states to close non essential businesses, schools, etc.
I don’t know if Texas accords the state the same power in overseeing public health.

7
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 02:44:51 PM »
We do have a substantial lead in critical care and ICU neds per capita. It's something like 50% ahead of the nearest other countries.

But among the factors involved are these:
Quote
First are distinct differences in patient populations. Data comparing middle-aged Americans with a similar population in the United Kingdom demonstrated a higher burden of chronic illnesses among the American cohort –double the rate of diabetes and a third higher rate of hypertension. Such comparisons are essential to understanding the relative healthcare needs of populations. Frequency of interventions and surgical procedures may also impact the need for intensive care. For example, patients who receive a liver transplant will require a stay in an ICU. This need for intensive care is, therefore, driven not solely by disease, but also by management choices. An older study comparing admissions to intensive care in Alberta (Canada) and western Massachusetts (US) found that ICU days per million population were two to three times higher in western Massachusetts, primarily due to a higher ICU incidence (i.e. percent of hospitalized patients treated in the ICU). This discrepancy was driven by all of the factors described above.

And in addition to having 50% more beds than Canada, they cost 85% more per bed.

(figures used are 2012. It is likely worse since then.)
Sourceless information.

Good for the goose, good for the gander, Ward.

You often give us sourceless info, but without even indicating it wasn't yours to start with. Now you're complaining?

Hah!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3551445/

Now will you comment on content?
Sure.  An  old study focusing on different components.

8
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 02:40:07 PM »

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Columbus-based Battelle’s system that can decontaminate thousands of masks a day, according to a statement from the company.
Battelle on Sunday night said that the approval is for the use of the technology at “full capacity.”

Good news, Ward. Thank you.

But it is pretty funny your posting this immediately after complaining about the lack of source in mine.
My source was identified and its info quoted directly.

9
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 01:23:10 PM »

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Columbus-based Battelle’s system that can decontaminate thousands of masks a day, according to a statement from the company.
Battelle on Sunday night said that the approval is for the use of the technology at “full capacity.”

According to a press release sent Sunday night from Battelle, the company’s CCDS Critical Care Decontamination System is now operating at Battelle’s West Jefferson, Ohio, facility.
The facility is capable of decontaminating up to 80,000 respirator masks per system each day using concentrated, vapor phase hydrogen peroxide.
According to a Sunday night statement from Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine's office, Battelle intends to send one machine to New York City and one to Stony Brook, New York. Machines will also be dispatched to the state of Washington.
Earlier Sunday, the FDA only approved limited use of the technology at 10,000 surgical masks in the state a day, which was met by criticism from DeWine.
In a press conference on Sunday, DeWine said President Donald Trump assured him that the approval would be handled quickly.
According to Battelle, the respirator masks are exposed to the validated concentration level for 2.5 hours to decontaminate biological contaminates, including COVID-19. The system can decontaminate the same respirator mask up to 20 times without degrading the mask’s performance.
“I want to thank the FDA team for their professionalism and help in authorizing the use of our technology at this critical moment for our nation,” said Lou Von Thaer, President and CEO of Battelle in a statement. “Everybody who has worked on this project shares the same goal of protecting first responders and healthcare workers who are at the front lines of the pandemic.”

Battelle is a private, non-profit research firm created through a Charitable Trust set up in 1923 by Ohio steel industrialist Gordon Battelle. Its customers are private companies and government agencies.

10
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 01:01:57 PM »
We do have a substantial lead in critical care and ICU neds per capita. It's something like 50% ahead of the nearest other countries.

But among the factors involved are these:
Quote
First are distinct differences in patient populations. Data comparing middle-aged Americans with a similar population in the United Kingdom demonstrated a higher burden of chronic illnesses among the American cohort –double the rate of diabetes and a third higher rate of hypertension. Such comparisons are essential to understanding the relative healthcare needs of populations. Frequency of interventions and surgical procedures may also impact the need for intensive care. For example, patients who receive a liver transplant will require a stay in an ICU. This need for intensive care is, therefore, driven not solely by disease, but also by management choices. An older study comparing admissions to intensive care in Alberta (Canada) and western Massachusetts (US) found that ICU days per million population were two to three times higher in western Massachusetts, primarily due to a higher ICU incidence (i.e. percent of hospitalized patients treated in the ICU). This discrepancy was driven by all of the factors described above.

And in addition to having 50% more beds than Canada, they cost 85% more per bed.

(figures used are 2012. It is likely worse since then.)
Sourceless information.

11
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 12:09:56 PM »

It's really best to take the profit motive and skimming middlemen out of public health decisions.

The spouse and I were just talking about the disparity in US hospital beds per capita and other developed nations.  Sickening.   Literally.  Profit is the principal religion of America.   Some guy named Karl tried to warn us where that leads.
LOL!
Cherry picking one statistic to prove what?  That Karl Marx was misunderstood? Does your wife know you linked her to such foolishness?
The USA leads the world in critical care hospital beds per capita. That is due in part to the focus on out-patient procedures. In many cases such procedures as hip replacements, and a multitude of others which used to require a hospital stay no longer do in America. That’ leads to faster treatment and a huge reduction in waiting time. Not to mention that exposure to other illnesses is increased in many hospital stays. And, of course, the number of overnight hospital beds

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.forbes.com/sites/niallmccarthy/2020/03/12/the-countries-with-the-most-critical-care-beds-per-capita-infographic/amp/

12
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 29, 2020, 09:09:21 PM »
I think by the time Trump is done with them CNN may just be flat out of business.

Keep those resumes handy.
CNN will be around long after he's gone.
As long as airports survive.

13
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 29, 2020, 06:01:00 PM »
About the existing drugs being tested to fight Covid-19.
An update from doctor heading up trials.


Physicians are using two drugs in combination— hydroxychloroquine and azithromycin,
which I’ll abbreviate HC and AZ—to treat patients with advanced Covid-19 symptoms. We use a regimen reported in a recent open-label trial in Marseille, France, which was updated March 26, and which doctors may modify in any given case.
For HC, two bodies of evidence support its potential in treating Covid-19: in vitro (test tube) studies and initial clinical reports from the field. After the 2002-03 global outbreak of SARS, a coronavirus related to the one that causes Covid-19, an in vitro study conducted by doctors from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention identified chloroquine (a relative of HC) as an attractive option for prevention and treatment. If added before the virus was introduced, the drug was highly effective in preventing cellular infection. Even later application markedly inhibited infection. Another contemporaneous study showed similar results. As for Covid, a Chinese study published March 9 showed HC has excellent in vitro effects. Other recent information suggests potential antiviral mechanisms of HC and chloroquine.

The bedrock of all infectious medicine, from developing treatments for specific infections to treating individual patients, is in vitro laboratory testing and patient trials. Covid-19 is no exception. Current laboratory data suggest that HC should work.
Clinical information has also emerged from Covid treatment. During the initial Chinese outbreak, Wuhan doctors observed that patients with lupus—a disease for which HC is a common treatment—did not seem to develop Covid-19. Of 178 hospital patients who tested positive, none had lupus and none were on HC. None of this Wuhan hospital’s dermatology department’s 80 lupus patients were infected with the novel coronavirus. The Wuhan doctors hypothesized that this may be due to long-term use of HC. They treated 20 Covid-19 patients with HC. Their result: “Clinical symptoms improve significantly in 1 to 2 days. After five days of chest CT examination, 19 cases showed significant absorption improvement.”

Second, consider AZ—the antibiotic marketed as Z-Pak—combined with HC. The French study showed that 57% of 14 Covid-19 patients receiving HC without AZ tested negative for the virus on a nasal swab on day six. But 100% of the six patients who received both HC and AZ tested negative on day six. Compare that with 16 infected patients at another hospital who didn’t receive either treatment: only 12% tested negative on day six. These are small samples, but significant.
The authors of the French study last week published the results of an additional 80 hospitalized patients receiving a combination of HC and AZ. By day eight of treatment, 93% showed a negative nasopharyngeal swab for the virus. “This allowed patients to rapidly be discharged from highly contagious wards with a mean length of stay of five days,” the authors write. “Other teams should urgently evaluate this cost-effective therapeutic strategy, to both avoid the spread of the disease and treat patients as soon as possible before severe respiratory irreversible complications take hold.” I agree.
What are the risks?
The World Health Organization lists both HC and AZ as essential medicines, “considered to be the most effective and safe to meet the most important needs in a health system.” These drugs have been in use for many years—HC since 1955 and AZ since 1988. Only the combination is new. For now it isn’t well understood why the mix is so effective.
The clinical information service Lexicomp lists the interaction between HC and AZ as Category B, which means the majority of patients require no special caution. Long-term HC use can have adverse effects. Chronic use can cause eye problems, Heartbeat arrhythmia is occasionally observed. Increased electrocardiogram tracking may be appropriate for patients at risk of the latter effect. Potential mental-health effects should be closely observed.

All drugs have side effects, and HC’s overall record is safe. Yes, this is an “off label” use. But that isn’t unusual, either. One study showed 21% of U.S. prescriptions were for off-label use.
These drugs are still needed to treat malaria, lupus and other diseases, which makes it important not to exhaust supplies treating Covid-19 patients. Yet this is a historic pandemic, and treatment with HC and AZ shows considerable promise. That is reason to increase supplies quickly.
What are the next steps?
New York state has started a large controlled clinical trial, and there are reports of others. Many believe that patients who can’t be in a trial should be allowed to decide, in consultation with a physician, whether to use this treatment. This is happening in some U.S. practices.
In a perfect world with unlimited supplies, any infected patient could receive treatment. With limited supplies, we should treat the sickest first and be strategic about it. We should consider this regimen for highly exposed people such as health-care workers and first responders. These heroes in the war against Covid-19 deserve protection.
Early treatment is always better, whether for cancer, diabetes or infection. The in vitro results, field experience and French trial suggest Covid-19 is no different. If this regimen’s promise is borne out by more data, and if supply is ramped up, then we can expand treatment.

For my entire career, I have taken a conservative approach to medicine. I don’t want to give false or premature hope. All of this is subject to further refinement as more information arrives. But likewise I can’t ignore the available evidence. This appears to be the best widely available option for treating Covid-19 and not merely easing the suffering from the disease. It would be irresponsible not to pursue this option aggressively.



Dr. Jeff Colyer is a practicing physician. He served as governor of Kansas, 2018-19.
His article appears in the Monday edition of the Wall Street Journal.

14
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 28, 2020, 02:44:34 PM »
So many interesting posts,  so much to absorb.   Stay well,  Larry.   



Red,  have you actually read Reich,  or Fukuyama?  I doubt it.   Why engage?
A better question for you since you trying to equate Fukuyama with a partisan hack like Reich.


15
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 28, 2020, 12:19:28 PM »
The epicenter of the United States’ COVID-19 pandemic has started clinical trials on pharmaceutical drugs that could potentially treat the virus. According to a news release by New York Gov., Andrew Cuomo the observational studies began on Tuesday.
The news release stated
Acquires 70,000 Doses of Hydroxychloroquine, 10,000 doses of Zithromax and 750,000 Doses of Chloroquine to Implement Drug Trials - Trials Will Start Tuesday( March 24).

During a press conference on Tuesday, the governor showed confidence in the face of unprecedented concern. “We hope for optimistic results,” Cuomo said of the clinical trials. “The president and the FDA accelerated that drug coming to New York the hospitals will start using that drug today

Desperate times lead to desperate measures.
Or excellent cooperation between state and federal officials.

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