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2
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 11:37:55 AM »
Curious what the legality of painting BLM on public streets really is? I know that when they painted that thin blue line on streets inmany towns in NJ it was declared illegal by the feds.

It is a political statement. Should it be painted on a public roadway?  And is legal to do so?

I'm not quibbling about the message. Just curious about whether it's legal to deliver it in this manner.

After all, I am guessing that if I took blue and white paint and wrote Support Israel on the street, their would be a legal consequence.

So what is the legal stature of this political message delivery system? Anyone?

I taught Art courses at a private school in Potomac and a bunch of the boys were targgers who kept getting into rich kid trouble. I told the brats the difference between graffiti art and vandalism was permission.

When the mayors of these towns approve or in the case of DC commission the work I would think legality is not a huge problem.

So...to extend this, if the mayor, town council, etc, approve, it's not a problem?

Wouldn't that apply to all symbols and/or expressions of political pov,, too?

Case by case and you know that.

So, if a town and its mayor and council approved painting the Confederate flag in a crosswalk, that political statement  would be lagal, based on your statements.

Well, yeah... I知 sure someone would kvetch about it, file suit and it would go to court.

But according to you, it's not a problem, since the mayor and government council were involved. So what would be the complaint?


Like I said.


https://www.washingtonpost.com/local/virginia-politics/ginni-thomas-black-lives-matter-clifton/2020/07/09/c7b3bb98-c1f5-11ea-9fdd-b7ac6b051dc8_story.html

Sorry. Couldn't read the piece. Paywall. Could you quote it here?

3
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 11:35:17 AM »
Curious what the legality of painting BLM on public streets really is? I know that when they painted that thin blue line on streets inmany towns in NJ it was declared illegal by the feds.

It is a political statement. Should it be painted on a public roadway?  And is legal to do so?

I'm not quibbling about the message. Just curious about whether it's legal to deliver it in this manner.

After all, I am guessing that if I took blue and white paint and wrote Support Israel on the street, their would be a legal consequence.

So what is the legal stature of this political message delivery system? Anyone?

I taught Art courses at a private school in Potomac and a bunch of the boys were targgers who kept getting into rich kid trouble. I told the brats the difference between graffiti art and vandalism was permission.

When the mayors of these towns approve or in the case of DC commission the work I would think legality is not a huge problem.

So...to extend this, if the mayor, town council, etc, approve, it's not a problem?

Wouldn't that apply to all symbols and/or expressions of political pov,, too?

Case by case and you know that.

So, if a town and its mayor and council approved painting the Confederate flag in a crosswalk, that political statement  would be lagal, based on your statements.

Well, yeah... I知 sure someone would kvetch about it, file suit and it would go to court.

But according to you, it's not a problem, since the mayor and government council were involved. So what would be the complaint?

If only you were that naive.

"Not a problem" as ever does not equal "illegal." But you knew that.

Even if you hadn't know that prior to this year, somehow (and I know you did know it), you would have learned it by now, with the Confederate statues coming down from public (and private) land, although they were legal.

As for what the complaint would be, in a lawsuit to try to remove your brand new spulfty Confederate Battle Flag from the road in front of DAR headquarters, in yet another sign of your new found rampant ignorance, the complaint could and would be anything they could think of! I can hear the McColskeys now, about your having reduced their property value, made it less pleasant to look upon the street, increased the chances of an accident in front of their home, or went against community standards and should have your posting street painting powers suspended. People sue over the stupidest things. Sometimes they win anyway, because some judges are dolts, too.

Then, when someone sues and wins that BLM is using the public streets to deliver a political message and the judge finds it to be an illegal use of that space, regardless of the mayor's and town council's approval, you'll be okay with it.

Understood.

Yes, Ward. That's exactly what I said.

Pat, pat.

I know you take it personally here, sometimes. That would be Ward's game.

I asked a question and used your answer and Larry's to extend the conversation. Don't blame me for asking, and by doing so exposing some inconsistent thinking on your part.

4
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 11:32:16 AM »

5
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 11:17:52 AM »
Curious what the legality of painting BLM on public streets really is? I know that when they painted that thin blue line on streets inmany towns in NJ it was declared illegal by the feds.

It is a political statement. Should it be painted on a public roadway?  And is legal to do so?

I'm not quibbling about the message. Just curious about whether it's legal to deliver it in this manner.

After all, I am guessing that if I took blue and white paint and wrote Support Israel on the street, their would be a legal consequence.

So what is the legal stature of this political message delivery system? Anyone?

I taught Art courses at a private school in Potomac and a bunch of the boys were targgers who kept getting into rich kid trouble. I told the brats the difference between graffiti art and vandalism was permission.

When the mayors of these towns approve or in the case of DC commission the work I would think legality is not a huge problem.

So...to extend this, if the mayor, town council, etc, approve, it's not a problem?

Wouldn't that apply to all symbols and/or expressions of political pov,, too?

Case by case and you know that.

So, if a town and its mayor and council approved painting the Confederate flag in a crosswalk, that political statement  would be lagal, based on your statements.

Well, yeah... I知 sure someone would kvetch about it, file suit and it would go to court.

But according to you, it's not a problem, since the mayor and government council were involved. So what would be the complaint?

If only you were that naive.

"Not a problem" as ever does not equal "illegal." But you knew that.

Even if you hadn't know that prior to this year, somehow (and I know you did know it), you would have learned it by now, with the Confederate statues coming down from public (and private) land, although they were legal.

As for what the complaint would be, in a lawsuit to try to remove your brand new spulfty Confederate Battle Flag from the road in front of DAR headquarters, in yet another sign of your new found rampant ignorance, the complaint could and would be anything they could think of! I can hear the McColskeys now, about your having reduced their property value, made it less pleasant to look upon the street, increased the chances of an accident in front of their home, or went against community standards and should have your posting street painting powers suspended. People sue over the stupidest things. Sometimes they win anyway, because some judges are dolts, too.

Then, when someone sues and wins that BLM is using the public streets to deliver a political message and the judge finds it to be an illegal use of that space, regardless of the mayor's and town council's approval, you'll be okay with it.

Understood.

6
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 11:13:27 AM »
Curious what the legality of painting BLM on public streets really is? I know that when they painted that thin blue line on streets inmany towns in NJ it was declared illegal by the feds.

It is a political statement. Should it be painted on a public roadway?  And is legal to do so?

I'm not quibbling about the message. Just curious about whether it's legal to deliver it in this manner.

After all, I am guessing that if I took blue and white paint and wrote Support Israel on the street, their would be a legal consequence.

So what is the legal stature of this political message delivery system? Anyone?

I taught Art courses at a private school in Potomac and a bunch of the boys were targgers who kept getting into rich kid trouble. I told the brats the difference between graffiti art and vandalism was permission.

When the mayors of these towns approve or in the case of DC commission the work I would think legality is not a huge problem.

So...to extend this, if the mayor, town council, etc, approve, it's not a problem?

Wouldn't that apply to all symbols and/or expressions of political pov,, too?

Case by case and you know that.

So, if a town and its mayor and council approved painting the Confederate flag in a crosswalk, that political statement  would be lagal, based on your statements.

Well, yeah... I知 sure someone would kvetch about it, file suit and it would go to court.

But according to you, it's not a problem, since the mayor and government council were involved. So what would be the complaint?
Tbat the .mayor and government council were fucking racists and should resign, or be voted out of office.

And that would be fine with me. But against Larry's law here.

7
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 10:14:57 AM »
Curious what the legality of painting BLM on public streets really is? I know that when they painted that thin blue line on streets inmany towns in NJ it was declared illegal by the feds.

It is a political statement. Should it be painted on a public roadway?  And is legal to do so?

I'm not quibbling about the message. Just curious about whether it's legal to deliver it in this manner.

After all, I am guessing that if I took blue and white paint and wrote Support Israel on the street, their would be a legal consequence.

So what is the legal stature of this political message delivery system? Anyone?

I taught Art courses at a private school in Potomac and a bunch of the boys were targgers who kept getting into rich kid trouble. I told the brats the difference between graffiti art and vandalism was permission.

When the mayors of these towns approve or in the case of DC commission the work I would think legality is not a huge problem.

So...to extend this, if the mayor, town council, etc, approve, it's not a problem?

Wouldn't that apply to all symbols and/or expressions of political pov,, too?

Case by case and you know that.

So, if a town and its mayor and council approved painting the Confederate flag in a crosswalk, that political statement  would be lagal, based on your statements.

Well, yeah... I知 sure someone would kvetch about it, file suit and it would go to court.

But according to you, it's not a problem, since the mayor and government council were involved. So what would be the complaint?

8
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: July 11, 2020, 11:22:37 PM »
Curious what the legality of painting BLM on public streets really is? I know that when they painted that thin blue line on streets inmany towns in NJ it was declared illegal by the feds.

It is a political statement. Should it be painted on a public roadway?  And is legal to do so?

I'm not quibbling about the message. Just curious about whether it's legal to deliver it in this manner.

After all, I am guessing that if I took blue and white paint and wrote Support Israel on the street, their would be a legal consequence.

So what is the legal stature of this political message delivery system? Anyone?

I taught Art courses at a private school in Potomac and a bunch of the boys were targgers who kept getting into rich kid trouble. I told the brats the difference between graffiti art and vandalism was permission.

When the mayors of these towns approve or in the case of DC commission the work I would think legality is not a huge problem.

So...to extend this, if the mayor, town council, etc, approve, it's not a problem?

Wouldn't that apply to all symbols and/or expressions of political pov,, too?

Case by case and you know that.

So, if a town and its mayor and council approved painting the Confederate flag in a crosswalk, that political statement  would be lagal, based on your statements.


9
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: July 11, 2020, 10:40:55 PM »
Curious what the legality of painting BLM on public streets really is? I know that when they painted that thin blue line on streets inmany towns in NJ it was declared illegal by the feds.

It is a political statement. Should it be painted on a public roadway?  And is legal to do so?

I'm not quibbling about the message. Just curious about whether it's legal to deliver it in this manner.

After all, I am guessing that if I took blue and white paint and wrote Support Israel on the street, their would be a legal consequence.

So what is the legal stature of this political message delivery system? Anyone?

I taught Art courses at a private school in Potomac and a bunch of the boys were targgers who kept getting into rich kid trouble. I told the brats the difference between graffiti art and vandalism was permission.

When the mayors of these towns approve or in the case of DC commission the work I would think legality is not a huge problem.

So...to extend this, if the mayor, town council, etc, approve, it's not a problem?

Wouldn't that apply to all symbols and/or expressions of political pov,, too?

Like rainbow crosswalks?

Exactly.

They have to be problematic in and of themselves. There are limits, but these are not they.

Define "limits".

10
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: July 11, 2020, 07:55:22 PM »
Curious what the legality of painting BLM on public streets really is? I know that when they painted that thin blue line on streets inmany towns in NJ it was declared illegal by the feds.

It is a political statement. Should it be painted on a public roadway?  And is legal to do so?

I'm not quibbling about the message. Just curious about whether it's legal to deliver it in this manner.

After all, I am guessing that if I took blue and white paint and wrote Support Israel on the street, their would be a legal consequence.

So what is the legal stature of this political message delivery system? Anyone?

I taught Art courses at a private school in Potomac and a bunch of the boys were targgers who kept getting into rich kid trouble. I told the brats the difference between graffiti art and vandalism was permission.

When the mayors of these towns approve or in the case of DC commission the work I would think legality is not a huge problem.

So...to extend this, if the mayor, town council, etc, approve, it's not a problem?

Wouldn't that apply to all symbols and/or expressions of political pov,, too?

11
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: July 11, 2020, 07:08:22 PM »
Curious what the legality of painting BLM on public streets really is? I know that when they painted that thin blue line on streets inmany towns in NJ it was declared illegal by the feds.

It is a political statement. Should it be painted on a public roadway?  And is legal to do so?

I'm not quibbling about the message. Just curious about whether it's legal to deliver it in this manner.

After all, I am guessing that if I took blue and white paint and wrote Support Israel on the street, their would be a legal consequence.

So what is the legal stature of this political message delivery system? Anyone?

If you did it, it would be illegal. If it is approved by the Mayor and whatever committee controls such things, then it is as legal as renaming the road (as happened just down the street from the White House not long ago) and putting up new signs.

Some towns put painting of some sort on the roads regularly.

I'm not sure you're right. The feds have also declared rainbow crosswalks illegal.

https://usa.streetsblog.org/2019/09/30/feds-keep-cracking-down-on-crosswalk-art/]
Curious what the legality of painting BLM on public streets really is? I know that when they painted that thin blue line on streets inmany towns in NJ it was declared illegal by the feds.

It is a political statement. Should it be painted on a public roadway?  And is legal to do so?

I'm not quibbling about the message. Just curious about whether it's legal to deliver it in this manner.

After all, I am guessing that if I took blue and white paint and wrote Support Israel on the street, their would be a legal consequence.

So what is the legal stature of this political message delivery system? Anyone?

If you did it, it would be illegal. If it is approved by the Mayor and whatever committee controls such things, then it is as legal as renaming the road (as happened just down the street from the White House not long ago) and putting up new signs.

Some towns put painting of some sort on the roads regularly.

I'm not sure you're right. The feds have also declared rainbow crosswalks illegal.

https://usa.streetsblog.org/2019/09/30/feds-keep-cracking-down-on-crosswalk-art/

12
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: July 11, 2020, 03:15:04 PM »
 Curious what the legality of painting BLM on public streets really is? I know that when they painted that thin blue line on streets inmany towns in NJ it was declared illegal by the feds.

It is a political statement. Should it be painted on a public roadway?  And is legal to do so?

I'm not quibbling about the message. Just curious about whether it's legal to deliver it in this manner.

After all, I am guessing that if I took blue and white paint and wrote Support Israel on the street, their would be a legal consequence.

So what is the legal stature of this political message delivery system? Anyone?

13
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: July 11, 2020, 08:40:30 AM »
Anyone here read "The Nickel Boys", yet?

14
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: July 11, 2020, 08:39:36 AM »
Tucker Carlson's top writer resigns after getting caught being exactly who we thought he (and Tucker) would be.

https://www.cnn.com/2020/07/10/media/tucker-carlson-writer-blake-neff/index.html

Racist, sexist crap that he posted secretly. Well, he thought he had posted secretly. Folks, it's 2020 and there is no such thing as "posted secretly" unless it's inside your own head. And they're working on that!

Something perhaps some of us here should keep in mind.

15
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: July 10, 2020, 05:14:32 PM »
All?

All?

That's convenient to believe, but ignores a multitude of other factors.

Even so, the change is about CONVINCING THE MAJORITY to change, and telling them to pony up SOLELY based on race is a non-starter for about 75% of the population you wish to sway.

You fund whatever initiatives you finally decide on to address racism and racial inequities through a wealth tax that is based on a numeric calculation of net wealth and or real property and or corporate earnings, and is thus race blind in terms of ponying up.

You are harvesting funds from all those who fairly have the good fortune to qualify to provide for the needs of a smaller subset with a particular need just as we do for veteran痴 benefits, social security, and fossil fuel subsidies or flood insurance.

I'm okay with addressing racial inequities. But how do we define them? Who defines them?  When you start ticking off "numeric calculations of net worth and real property", now you are talking wealth redistribution on a very large scale, it seems.

So tell me how you would calculate that. Because I can tell you right now the IRS doesn't do that fairly or equitably. $100000 in Kansas aint the same as $100000 in NY or NJ, but it gets taxed the same by Uncle Sam.

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