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Messages - REDSTATEWARD

Pages: [1] 2 3 ... 160
1
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: Today at 12:03:22 AM »
This court ruling may by itself change the outcome of the 2020 presidential election.
How?

You figure it out.
Why?  You made the assertion, not me.

2
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 31, 2020, 11:18:32 PM »
This court ruling may by itself change the outcome of the 2020 presidential election.
How?

3
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 08:01:03 PM »
Oh. Well you said that Commerce Clause gives states that authority. You need to write better.

The Federal Government is restricted from national quarantines. The states not so much thanks to the 10th amendment and the Commerce Clause.

I stand by what I wrote.

But you do not understand.

And like your fearful leader, you cannot admit when you make a mistake.

Nothing new.
Hmmm.
You asked me my opinion on the Constitution and quarantines.
I did.
Now you use another posters response to say I made a mistake?

A mistake about what?

4
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 06:34:36 PM »
So, Ward - as our resident originalist and defended of all things Constitutional, what do you think of the claims, in NH and now in TX, that "stay-at-home" orders are unconstitutional?!

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-Supreme-Court-Harris-County-stay-at-home-15166758.php?utm_campaign=CMS+Sharing+Tools+%28Premium%29&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&fbclid=IwAR2gnRXo3C0i-Xs-gdj-VvjEO_yXTDhsoCUpwhLLO9Gt7ziPgkWajq7RD1Q
The Federal Government is restricted from national quarantines. The states not so much thanks to the 10th amendment and the Commerce Clause. on that basis I would says states have Constitutional authority.  At the state level public health safety seems to take precedence. Ohio postponed the democrat primary election citing the threat to health by the corona virus, basically ignoring a judge’s ruling to the contrary. Further the state’s rescheduled election will prohibit in person voting. And Ohio was among the first states to close non essential businesses, schools, etc.
I don’t know if Texas accords the state the same power in overseeing public health.
Every time Red mentions the Commerce Clause, I think of Indigo Montoya. You keep using that phrase. I dont think it means what you think it means.
For what it is worth, the 10th Amendment would not give the States the right to quarantine either.
Of course it does.
Quote
Neither it nor the Commerce Clause grant the states any rights they did not already have.
LOL
Laugh away. It is your away of admitting I am right.
About what?

5
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 06:19:40 PM »

6
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 06:16:29 PM »
Oh. Well you said that Commerce Clause gives states that authority. You need to write better.

The Federal Government is restricted from national quarantines. The states not so much thanks to the 10th amendment and the Commerce Clause.

I stand by what I wrote.

7
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 06:11:44 PM »
So, Ward - as our resident originalist and defended of all things Constitutional, what do you think of the claims, in NH and now in TX, that "stay-at-home" orders are unconstitutional?!

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-Supreme-Court-Harris-County-stay-at-home-15166758.php?utm_campaign=CMS+Sharing+Tools+%28Premium%29&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&fbclid=IwAR2gnRXo3C0i-Xs-gdj-VvjEO_yXTDhsoCUpwhLLO9Gt7ziPgkWajq7RD1Q
The Federal Government is restricted from national quarantines. The states not so much thanks to the 10th amendment and the Commerce Clause. on that basis I would says states have Constitutional authority.  At the state level public health safety seems to take precedence. Ohio postponed the democrat primary election citing the threat to health by the corona virus, basically ignoring a judge’s ruling to the contrary. Further the state’s rescheduled election will prohibit in person voting. And Ohio was among the first states to close non essential businesses, schools, etc.
I don’t know if Texas accords the state the same power in overseeing public health.
Every time Red mentions the Commerce Clause, I think of Indigo Montoya. You keep using that phrase. I dont think it means what you think it means.
For what it is worth, the 10th Amendment would not give the States the right to quarantine either.
Of course it does.
Quote
Neither it nor the Commerce Clause grant the states any rights they did not already have.
LOL

8
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 06:08:21 PM »
So, Ward - as our resident originalist and defended of all things Constitutional, what do you think of the claims, in NH and now in TX, that "stay-at-home" orders are unconstitutional?!

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-Supreme-Court-Harris-County-stay-at-home-15166758.php?utm_campaign=CMS+Sharing+Tools+%28Premium%29&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&fbclid=IwAR2gnRXo3C0i-Xs-gdj-VvjEO_yXTDhsoCUpwhLLO9Gt7ziPgkWajq7RD1Q
The Federal Government is restricted from national quarantines. The states not so much thanks to the 10th amendment and the Commerce Clause. on that basis I would says states have Constitutional authority.  At the state level public health safety seems to take precedence. Ohio postponed the democrat primary election citing the threat to health by the corona virus, basically ignoring a judge’s ruling to the contrary. Further the state’s rescheduled election will prohibit in person voting. And Ohio was among the first states to close non essential businesses, schools, etc.
I don’t know if Texas accords the state the same power in overseeing public health.
Every time Red mentions the Commerce Clause, I think of Indigo Montoya. You keep using that phrase. I dont think it means what you think it means.
Well it certainly doesn't mean what he thinks it does in that post.
It most certainly does. Federal Law under the Commerce Clause  does not provide for quarantines of individuals who remain within a single state.

9
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 04:20:46 PM »
So, Ward - as our resident originalist and defended of all things Constitutional, what do you think of the claims, in NH and now in TX, that "stay-at-home" orders are unconstitutional?!

https://www.houstonchronicle.com/news/houston-texas/houston/article/Texas-Supreme-Court-Harris-County-stay-at-home-15166758.php?utm_campaign=CMS+Sharing+Tools+%28Premium%29&utm_source=facebook.com&utm_medium=referral&fbclid=IwAR2gnRXo3C0i-Xs-gdj-VvjEO_yXTDhsoCUpwhLLO9Gt7ziPgkWajq7RD1Q
The Federal Government is restricted from national quarantines. The states not so much thanks to the 10th amendment and the Commerce Clause. on that basis I would says states have Constitutional authority.  At the state level public health safety seems to take precedence. Ohio postponed the democrat primary election citing the threat to health by the corona virus, basically ignoring a judge’s ruling to the contrary. Further the state’s rescheduled election will prohibit in person voting. And Ohio was among the first states to close non essential businesses, schools, etc.
I don’t know if Texas accords the state the same power in overseeing public health.

10
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 02:44:51 PM »
We do have a substantial lead in critical care and ICU neds per capita. It's something like 50% ahead of the nearest other countries.

But among the factors involved are these:
Quote
First are distinct differences in patient populations. Data comparing middle-aged Americans with a similar population in the United Kingdom demonstrated a higher burden of chronic illnesses among the American cohort –double the rate of diabetes and a third higher rate of hypertension. Such comparisons are essential to understanding the relative healthcare needs of populations. Frequency of interventions and surgical procedures may also impact the need for intensive care. For example, patients who receive a liver transplant will require a stay in an ICU. This need for intensive care is, therefore, driven not solely by disease, but also by management choices. An older study comparing admissions to intensive care in Alberta (Canada) and western Massachusetts (US) found that ICU days per million population were two to three times higher in western Massachusetts, primarily due to a higher ICU incidence (i.e. percent of hospitalized patients treated in the ICU). This discrepancy was driven by all of the factors described above.

And in addition to having 50% more beds than Canada, they cost 85% more per bed.

(figures used are 2012. It is likely worse since then.)
Sourceless information.

Good for the goose, good for the gander, Ward.

You often give us sourceless info, but without even indicating it wasn't yours to start with. Now you're complaining?

Hah!

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3551445/

Now will you comment on content?
Sure.  An  old study focusing on different components.

11
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 02:40:07 PM »

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Columbus-based Battelle’s system that can decontaminate thousands of masks a day, according to a statement from the company.
Battelle on Sunday night said that the approval is for the use of the technology at “full capacity.”

Good news, Ward. Thank you.

But it is pretty funny your posting this immediately after complaining about the lack of source in mine.
My source was identified and its info quoted directly.

12
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 01:23:10 PM »

COLUMBUS, Ohio – The U.S. Food and Drug Administration approved Columbus-based Battelle’s system that can decontaminate thousands of masks a day, according to a statement from the company.
Battelle on Sunday night said that the approval is for the use of the technology at “full capacity.”

According to a press release sent Sunday night from Battelle, the company’s CCDS Critical Care Decontamination System is now operating at Battelle’s West Jefferson, Ohio, facility.
The facility is capable of decontaminating up to 80,000 respirator masks per system each day using concentrated, vapor phase hydrogen peroxide.
According to a Sunday night statement from Ohio Gov. Mike DeWine's office, Battelle intends to send one machine to New York City and one to Stony Brook, New York. Machines will also be dispatched to the state of Washington.
Earlier Sunday, the FDA only approved limited use of the technology at 10,000 surgical masks in the state a day, which was met by criticism from DeWine.
In a press conference on Sunday, DeWine said President Donald Trump assured him that the approval would be handled quickly.
According to Battelle, the respirator masks are exposed to the validated concentration level for 2.5 hours to decontaminate biological contaminates, including COVID-19. The system can decontaminate the same respirator mask up to 20 times without degrading the mask’s performance.
“I want to thank the FDA team for their professionalism and help in authorizing the use of our technology at this critical moment for our nation,” said Lou Von Thaer, President and CEO of Battelle in a statement. “Everybody who has worked on this project shares the same goal of protecting first responders and healthcare workers who are at the front lines of the pandemic.”

Battelle is a private, non-profit research firm created through a Charitable Trust set up in 1923 by Ohio steel industrialist Gordon Battelle. Its customers are private companies and government agencies.

13
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 01:01:57 PM »
We do have a substantial lead in critical care and ICU neds per capita. It's something like 50% ahead of the nearest other countries.

But among the factors involved are these:
Quote
First are distinct differences in patient populations. Data comparing middle-aged Americans with a similar population in the United Kingdom demonstrated a higher burden of chronic illnesses among the American cohort –double the rate of diabetes and a third higher rate of hypertension. Such comparisons are essential to understanding the relative healthcare needs of populations. Frequency of interventions and surgical procedures may also impact the need for intensive care. For example, patients who receive a liver transplant will require a stay in an ICU. This need for intensive care is, therefore, driven not solely by disease, but also by management choices. An older study comparing admissions to intensive care in Alberta (Canada) and western Massachusetts (US) found that ICU days per million population were two to three times higher in western Massachusetts, primarily due to a higher ICU incidence (i.e. percent of hospitalized patients treated in the ICU). This discrepancy was driven by all of the factors described above.

And in addition to having 50% more beds than Canada, they cost 85% more per bed.

(figures used are 2012. It is likely worse since then.)
Sourceless information.

14
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 30, 2020, 12:09:56 PM »

It's really best to take the profit motive and skimming middlemen out of public health decisions.

The spouse and I were just talking about the disparity in US hospital beds per capita and other developed nations.  Sickening.   Literally.  Profit is the principal religion of America.   Some guy named Karl tried to warn us where that leads.
LOL!
Cherry picking one statistic to prove what?  That Karl Marx was misunderstood? Does your wife know you linked her to such foolishness?
The USA leads the world in critical care hospital beds per capita. That is due in part to the focus on out-patient procedures. In many cases such procedures as hip replacements, and a multitude of others which used to require a hospital stay no longer do in America. That’ leads to faster treatment and a huge reduction in waiting time. Not to mention that exposure to other illnesses is increased in many hospital stays. And, of course, the number of overnight hospital beds

https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.forbes.com/sites/niallmccarthy/2020/03/12/the-countries-with-the-most-critical-care-beds-per-capita-infographic/amp/

15
Trump Administration / Re: Trump Administration
« on: March 29, 2020, 09:09:21 PM »
I think by the time Trump is done with them CNN may just be flat out of business.

Keep those resumes handy.
CNN will be around long after he's gone.
As long as airports survive.

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