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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movie Club  (Read 14573 times)
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #480 on: October 17, 2007, 03:31:03 PM »

Madupont...the links aren't working for me....But as to the difference between Pittsburg and Philadelphia, I suspect that NY and Hollywood publishers don't get it.  But the Pennsylvanians get their own.  I like driving and so occasionally choose to drive to Manhattan rather than fly.  On these drives from Michigan to Manhattan, there are signs in Ohio telling me how far to NYC, and signs in New Jersey telling how far to NYC....absolutely no mention of New York on the drive through Pennsylvania. 
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madupont
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« Reply #481 on: October 17, 2007, 08:49:31 PM »

That's odd?

Try these however because I thought you would have found these by now; they are some that I originally saw, some better, some worse,both her and the fashions. You can notice a variation in her weight from time to time. Putting on weight, then others with a weight loss. Always need to remind yourself that even on the skinnier shots, the camera has added ten pounds.

http://brooksie.vintage-sky.net/gallery/displayimage.php?album=38&pos=24

(and, these are the Denishawn photos. As you see, Ted Shawn was into American Indians)
http://brooksie.vintage-sky.net/gallery/displayimage.php?album=30&pos=0
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #482 on: October 17, 2007, 11:54:23 PM »

Nice sites.  Thank you.  I was able to watch "Lulu in Berlin" today.  Quite interesting, although some of it is contradictory to "Looking for LuLu."  "Lulu in Berlin" is an interview format, Richard Leacock and Louise Brooks.  One interesting contradiction:  The rumor was that Brooks turned down the offer to work in Hollywood talking pictures and on her way out the door, received a telegram from Berlin with an offer to work for Pabst.  Brooks says in this interview that she knew of the offer beforehand.  She would have turned down hollywood either way, but she did know that she had work to do.

Brooks claims that Pabst didn't know she could dance until they were shooting the early dance scene in PB.  The scene called for her to dance for Schigolch, unchoreographed.  Brooks asked what to do and Pabst told her to just dance.  So she pulled out something similar to what she had done in the Denis company.  (Could this be true, or did Pabst know of her work with Zeigfield?)

Brooks also talks about her fascination with Riefenstahl and would study Riefenstahl whenever she hung around the set during the time of her love affair with Pabst.  She wasn't impressed with Reifenstahl's looks or politics, but was a bit jealous of her legs.

On Alice Roberts as the Countess:  "She spoke just enough English to insult me."

On Pabst having her favorite suit ruined to add realism to the movie:  "The skirt had been torn and ripped and dipped in oil.  The lovely blouse was a mess.  The coat he threw away.....I said 'That's my suit.'  Anyone else would have gotten some ragtag...would have bought something....but he wanted something that was mine that I loved so that I would feel terrible in it.  And I did.  Here is was in my beautiful suit and it was ruined....and that's how I was at the end of the picture."  (Although she also says the final scene with Gustav Diessl was the happiest scene in the picture because she found him immensely attractive.  "And we had a lovely time....here he is with the knife that he's going to stick up into my interior thrown on the table and we were singing and you would never know, you'd think we were throwing a Christmas party."

From Brooks essay on the ending:  "It is in the worn and filthy garments of the streetwalker that she feels passion for the first time.  She comes to life so that she might die when she picks up Jack the Ripper on a foggy London street.  He tells her he has no money to pay.  She says 'Never mind, I like you.'  It is Christmas Eve, she is about the receive the gift which has been her dream since childhood...death by a sexual maniac." 


Back to Pandora's Box....I like the piano score, too.  It is quite thoughtful.



« Last Edit: October 17, 2007, 11:56:26 PM by Lhoffman » Logged
jbottle
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« Reply #483 on: October 18, 2007, 12:08:17 AM »

I like to score, too, (holding up the "Party Animal" and base frat-boy humor redolent of my participation in the NYTFF), especially when I WINFIRST, apologies).
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Dzimas
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« Reply #484 on: October 18, 2007, 04:00:14 AM »

Quote
Back to Pandora's Box....I like the piano score, too.  It is quite thoughtful.

I found the music a bit too detached from the action, which sadly is true of most silent films, although at times the score did synch nicely with the actions.  It would be great if Kronos Quartet did a score for the movie like they did with Philip Glass for Dracula,

http://www.amazon.com/Philip-Glass-Dracula/dp/B00000JZCI

incorporating the music of Kurt Weill of course.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #485 on: October 18, 2007, 04:06:28 AM »

Joy of joys!  You can now get Dracula with the option to listen to it with Glass' score,



http://www.amazon.com/exec/obidos/tg/detail/-/B000GPIPSS/ref=ord_cart_shr/105-5791205-4542015?%5Fencoding=UTF8&m=ATVPDKIKX0DER&v=glance

and at a nice price.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #486 on: October 18, 2007, 08:36:26 AM »



Another silent era siren, probably best remembered for Wings.
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #487 on: October 18, 2007, 11:49:21 AM »

I've got that Dracula soundtrack with the Kronos Quartet.  I like it better than most of Glass's stuff....probably because of the quartet.  Glass to me never seems to go anywhere...endless loops of the same chord patterns, no melody, few cadences.  If I ever saw the man conduct in person, I'd feel compelled to go up to the podium and give him a little shove. 

As to Clara Bow, the only thing I own of hers is "It."
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #488 on: October 18, 2007, 11:50:31 AM »

A Kronos Quartet score for Pandora's Box
like they did with Philip Glass for Dracula...
wouldn't that be exquisite? Something
somewhat evil and ethereal. Kronos adds
new meaning to these silent movies...
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Dzimas
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« Reply #489 on: October 18, 2007, 03:37:52 PM »

About 5 years, Philip Glass and the Kronos Quartet were in Vilnius and performed their soundtrack for Dracula in the old Lietuva cinema, with the movie playing on a wrap-around screen behind them.  It was grand!
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Detective_Winslow
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« Reply #490 on: October 18, 2007, 06:10:26 PM »

Just curious, but why the fuck would anyone want to watch a movie made in the 1930's?
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I hope that I haven't offended anyone.
Lhoffman
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« Reply #491 on: October 18, 2007, 08:32:12 PM »

Winslow...beauty, art.  Back in the days before special effects took over, directors had to rely on more than shock and awe to get the point across.  Back then, there was something called writing, acting, plot....
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #492 on: October 18, 2007, 09:59:36 PM »

Plus Weimar cinema is déjà vu...

Thirties Deutschland kinda like now...

A brief decadent little pause...

Before the nazi boot...

Comes down on our face...
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“Other people's obsessions
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Lhoffman
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« Reply #493 on: October 18, 2007, 10:12:25 PM »

But which do you suppose changed the world more or robbed us of any lingering illusions we might have harbored about the goodness of man?  WWI or WWII? 
« Last Edit: October 18, 2007, 10:14:40 PM by Lhoffman » Logged
Dzimas
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« Reply #494 on: October 19, 2007, 12:01:54 AM »

I guess our thought-provoking Winslow never saw Birth of a Nation or Alexander Nevsky or Wings, all of which were technological marvels in their day, and could still teach directors a few lessons today.  Of course, BN dates back a little earlier.  But, probably my favorite movie from the era is,



La Passion de Jeanne d'Arc
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0rQzsqrkbrU

not that I'm particuarly a religious person, but this film is a true cinematic gem.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2007, 04:34:26 AM by Dzimas » Logged
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