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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movie Club  (Read 14576 times)
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #15 on: September 13, 2007, 09:32:11 PM »

If you're Gosselaar you've got to be happy about getting your picture on the cast page on the JFC page at the HBO web site, but then you might not like it that everyone else got a few paragraphs of resume/achievements stuff under their pictures and you just got some blank space. 

But as to Movie Club, I like it (and I already know not to talk about it, so don't waste your pixels telling me the rules) and I submit "Jim Metzler Retrospective" for topical consideration. 
« Last Edit: September 13, 2007, 09:33:42 PM by oilcanboyd23 » Logged
jbottle
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« Reply #16 on: September 13, 2007, 09:47:42 PM »

If that's the case I think he made a vampire/western deserving of serious attention, but I can't say definitively whether this is where that discussion should take place or not, not knowing the nature of this enterprise, however noble, not knowing the scope of this venture, presuming majesty and expecting only ordinary patter, etc.

I think looking at the arc of Ben Affleck vs. Damon as far as "while BA was ___, D was ___" might be an informative series on whether younger members might rather be the hare or the toroise, hmmmmm??
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harrie
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« Reply #17 on: September 13, 2007, 09:48:09 PM »

I can't believe they didn't mention his amazing work in Saved by the Bell, for instance.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #18 on: September 13, 2007, 10:04:27 PM »



"I don't believe in elitism.
I don't think the audience
is this dumb person lower
than me. I am the audience."
-- Quentin Tarantino
« Last Edit: September 13, 2007, 10:08:49 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
jbottle
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« Reply #19 on: September 13, 2007, 11:29:48 PM »

When the grunge era got to be "too much," you always had "Saved By the Bell" to lead you back to some strange approximation of nobody's high school.  In an absurdist theater sort of way, we sat around that fire and had a few beers.  Otherwise, you had the clever dated misonthropic humor of "M.A.S.H." or the clever neediness of "Cheers" or the clever not-really disfunctionality of "Family Ties" or like, maybe switch to "Cops," it was tough sledding in the early afternoon, so I drank beer.
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jbottle
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« Reply #20 on: September 14, 2007, 12:03:29 AM »

The next sink may be the one I puke in, but for now I've got to find out who put us on this little pain capsule...

...oh shut up, Harold, you've lost your credibility now, you've got nothing to shove people around with...

...Quite on the contrary, my dear, I have arrogance at my disposal, an endless supply in fact, and I'll assert it until I'm made a peasant, I don't know specifically why I'm here, can you find the vodka while the others wake up??

...Harold, we're at the bottom of the sea...

...Thank God, I was hoping there was one, again, about the vodka...

...Harold, we need fruit to make alcohol...

...Jeezus, wake up that one, if he's fruity we'll sugar him good and make him liquid...

...He's straight Harold, and a civilian, are you a civilian??

...The problem is that I'm not straight, and I'm not sure, what are we in the service of exactly, or are you just the first to wake up...

...We're in the service of the queen Harold...

...I'm going to need a drink then, I think my flask is unfrozen, a wonder it didn't merge with my, uh, personage, as it were...

...Harold, dear, you could use a change of clothes...

...Quite so, shall I wake up the others and see who wants to switch???
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #21 on: September 14, 2007, 12:27:39 AM »



"I don't really want to see movies from people
that can't get it up anymore, and I don't really
want to make movies if I can't get it up anymore."
-- Quentin Tarantino
« Last Edit: September 14, 2007, 12:30:56 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
jbottle
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« Reply #22 on: September 14, 2007, 12:52:00 AM »

Definition of insanity?

We have a weiner.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #23 on: September 14, 2007, 01:15:50 AM »



The next sink may be the one I puke in...

...I am pitching to the void...

The problem is that I'm not straight...

We're in the service of the queen Harold...

Definition of insanity?
We have a weiner.

May I make a little suggestion, jbottle?

If you've got to puke, dish gays or void out somewhere...

Then do it over in the Gay Rights forum...

And not in the new Movie Club.

It hasn't been up a day yet...

And you've tried to queer it already.

Couldn't wait could you, little jbottle boy...

Like the proverbial skunk at the picnic...

Homophobes like you are dime-a-dozen...

Just like skanky whores...

The internet is full of losers...

And you're one of them, baby.

You're on Ingore now, have fun...

Playing with yourself...

& Detective_Winslow.  Smiley

« Last Edit: September 14, 2007, 01:17:58 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
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—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
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« Reply #24 on: September 14, 2007, 01:39:06 AM »

All right!!!!

Subgenres rule, baby...

In fact, a dive into subgenres sounds like lots of fun, jbottle.

Like maybe a hip compare / contrast discussion between the two Things...hmmm.

Or how about the two Blobs...? Weekend Teenexploitation Drive In Thrills!!!

Maybe a little Blaxpoitation chill...like the two Shafts?

Of course, for the true hardcore film fanatics...

...there's the Tarantino / Rodriguez Boys and From Dusk till Dawn series, oh man...

Dusk till Dawn 3: The Hangman's Daughter a must-see thrill ride!!! I watch it every weekend, baby!!!

Quentin Tarantino is God in my book...as in Pulp Fiction, dude...

So many great movies...so little time...  Smiley Smiley Smiley

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“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
pugetopolis
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« Reply #25 on: September 14, 2007, 02:39:48 AM »



“I like it when somebody tells
me a story, and I actually really
feel that that's becoming like a
lost art in American cinema.”
—Quentin Tarantino


For some reason, I don’t seem to be interested in subgenres anymore…I wonder why?

I’m sure jbottle, harrie and oilcanboyd23—will soon tell me why…   Smiley

The new Movie Club began today—I’ve read the posts.

I’m not impressed—in fact I’m disappointed.

Tarantino is right—telling a story has become a lost art in American cinema.

The you-tube generation has lost it—cinematic storytelling.

I’ve read their posts here—they’re not about movies.

I want to talk about The Third Man (1949)…

And other classics like Pandora’s Box (1929)…

As well as Curt Siodmak’s People on Sunday (1930)…

Movies that still tell stories…

Dzimas, Hoffman and me…

I couldn’t ask for a better group of cineastes…

The three of us had a lively NYTimes book discussion.

Said’s Orientalism in the Big Apple days…

That was then—this is now…

Thank you.




« Last Edit: September 14, 2007, 02:45:21 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

“Other people's obsessions
are more often funny than tragic.”
—Vincent Canby, The New York Times
Lhoffman
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« Reply #26 on: September 14, 2007, 04:13:32 AM »

I saw People on Sunday a ways back.  It always strikes me that German cinema has quite a different feel than the stuff Hollywood puts out.   Even in the comedies, there is an interesting mingling of futility and optimism.   I don't want to post plot lines, but a few examples are People on Sunday, Schulze Gets the Blues, Good-bye Lenin....the characters in these movies find themselves in situations that seem promising, but in the end they've misanalyzed.   Much of the humor seems a response to political instability.....Lenin doesn't even attempt to disguise this aspect.  The whole film become a spotlight for the confusion and apprehension over the fall of the wall.

Dramas have the same mix....futility...optimism.  Why is Metropolis so different than Modern Times?

« Last Edit: September 14, 2007, 04:18:29 AM by Lhoffman » Logged
Dzimas
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« Reply #27 on: September 14, 2007, 05:47:41 AM »

As I understand it, the point of this new forum is to explore movies in a little more depth, keeping bathroom humor to a miniumum, as cute as some of Mr. Bottle's comments can be sometimes. 
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Dzimas
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« Reply #28 on: September 14, 2007, 05:54:13 AM »

Dramas have the same mix....futility...optimism.  Why is Metropolis so different than Modern Times? - hoffman

I think WWI had a lot to do with it.  The Europeans suffered through the war while Americans saw themselves as knights in shining armor, this is particuarly true of war films of the era.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #29 on: September 14, 2007, 10:04:06 AM »

William Wyler was was a notable exception to the Hollywood films at the time, but I see that perhaps his greatest work, iThe Best Years of Our Lives, was made in 1946 after WWII,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Best_Years_of_Our_Lives

But then Wyler was European by birth,

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/William_Wyler

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