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Author Topic: Movie Club  (Read 14578 times)
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #510 on: October 20, 2007, 06:34:28 AM »



Schigolch

Every forum has its sad has-been clown—
still desperate for the spotlight that always
moves on once the drunk clown fades and
his hot-dog tricks become boring and sad…






I'm your boy...

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jbottle
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« Reply #511 on: October 20, 2007, 06:40:55 PM »

What, validate you by "fuck you"...sure.

And Dzimas, this "movie club" has been nothing but a pugetopolis cut and paste festival, and if you are having fun with that and the pubescent boy he uses as his moniker, great, you guys have a blast.

But I'm still here, and I'm not going to leave you alone.  And if you throw a "jealous" blast, don't expect not to get hammered back in the grill.  I don't did the pedopheliac subculture that's being generated here, because, guess what, I like movies, and puget likes young boys.

He's a sick fuck, and you're not, and you should distinguish yourself as such even if we disagree on whether I'm trying to bully a forum or not.  I'm not, until that creep showed up, and now I'll do whatever I feel like.

Nothing personal, seriously.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #512 on: October 20, 2007, 07:00:13 PM »



Charming conversationalist, isn't she?

« Last Edit: October 20, 2007, 07:04:03 PM by pugetopolis » Logged

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Dzimas
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« Reply #513 on: October 21, 2007, 01:49:27 AM »

I wrapped up Pandora's Box last night.  The last three acts are quite a transition from the first five, although Schigolch serves an ominous link.  Somehow the tragedy doesn't work for me.  Maybe if there had been a darker tone set to the earlier acts, it may have worked, but there was too much a comic element to the action.  I couldn't stand Quast and was so glad to see him iced.  I suppose he felt he could have Lulu for himself if he sprung her free and was a bit jealous of Alwa, who sunk into the pit of depravity just as his father had forwarned.  I guess the hardest part for me to imagine is Lulu as a femme fatale in all this.  She seemed more a victim of circumstance.

The Countess is probably the most intriguing character for me.  Pabst creates a very obvious love interest between her and Lulu.  It is she she wants, but Lulu brazenly sends her in the direction of Quast to try to save her own hide.  The Countess would do anything for Lulu, but obviously didn't share her interest in men.

I thought it was quite interesting the way Pabst showed so much anguish in Jack the Ripper's face, seemingly smitten by the lovely Lulu as well, but then he seemed smitten by the Salvation Army girl as well.  Jack desperately tried to fight back his urge to kill, but there were simply too many demons.  Reminded me of Leland Palmer in Twin Peaks. 



I tried the second half with the more modern score, but didn't hear much improvement.  The music takes away from the tragedy that befalls Lulu and Alwa, being so light and airy.  Definitely a job for Kronos Quartet.
« Last Edit: October 21, 2007, 01:57:01 AM by Dzimas » Logged
pugetopolis
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« Reply #514 on: October 21, 2007, 02:27:12 AM »


I tried the second half with the more modern score, but didn't hear much improvement.  The music takes away from the tragedy that befalls Lulu and Alwa, being so light and airy.  Definitely a job for Kronos Quartet.


The final Jack the Ripper scene is improved immensely by the Kronos/Glass/Dracula soundtrack. It worked fairly well for me during the opening art deco apartment scene as well.

I guess what I like about the Kronos soundtrack is that it makes the Weimar Period more relevant and authentic to me.

It was a very difficult and complex time for Germany. Especially for German artists, writers and intellectuals caught up between economic chaos... and the nazi pack of wolves waiting to grab power and jumpstart their 1000 year Empire agenda.

Kronos and Glass and Dracula... This alternate quartet soundtrack for me captures the angst and weltschmerz nicely...

Pandora's Box seen and heard this way... is just as scary and horrifying as the classic Universal horror movies...

I look around at the current Zeitgeist... and what do I see? I see Weimar... all around me...



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pugetopolis
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« Reply #515 on: October 21, 2007, 02:56:48 AM »


I guess the hardest part for me to imagine is Lulu as a femme fatale in all this.  She seemed more a victim of circumstance.

The Countess is probably the most intriguing character for me.  Pabst creates a very obvious love interest between her and Lulu. 


Louise Brooks imho was more a victim than femme fatale througout her whole life. She was caught up in early Hollywood power-politics when films were shifting to sound and the producers were trying to save money by cutting actor salaries for the new sound equipment. This is one of the things one can learn from the 2nd disc interview with Brooks and how in retrospect she saw her life. She wasn't as burlesque as Marlene Dietrich who almost got the part. In many ways she stayed the small town Kansas girl that she was... the Bible Belt mindset and all that...

I think it's in the Lulu Berlin commentary... where Brooks humorously mentions Alice Roberts difficulty playing the lesbian Countess Geschwitz. The dance scene for example. What Pabst did was to have Roberts concentrate on Pabst's face during the dance scene...which supposedly gave Roberts the, well, proper mindset to be and feel in love with Lulu.

The lesbian bars in Berlin catering to those who liked the Marlene Dietrich tuxedo-drag cabaret scene perhaps influenced Pabst to portray the Countess as the icy aloof smooth lover of Lulu. She reminded me somewhat of Angelina Jolie the lesbian commander in Sky Captain and the World of Tomorrow (1994).

Sky Captain had many nazi super-science themes like Lawrence Olivier playing Dr. Totenkopf... as well as the giant robots doing in NYC and much of the futuristic decor and uniforms. If the nazis had won the war...the world of tomorrow would be very different today. Phillip K. Dick of course in The Man in the High Castle postulated the reverse...two alternate worlds one in which the Axis Powers rule as victors of WWII... interfacing with our world... Something like Weimar interfacting with the Third Reich...

It's the Glass/Kronos/Dracula soundtrack, however, that made me think these thoughts. Something, dzimas, I thank you for because of the way it opened up Pabst's film for me. Plus it renews my interest in the darker side of Weimar cinema in ways I didn't anticipate...

One of the advantages of doing one film at a time... and really concentrating on it...

Thank you...





« Last Edit: October 21, 2007, 03:14:50 AM by pugetopolis » Logged

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« Reply #516 on: October 21, 2007, 11:30:30 AM »

Dzimas, re:#513

Basically,the Wedekind plays (he was a playwright) with the theme of Lulu and the Countess have been more recently adapted in the New York theater.  I have absolutely no idea however under what sort of title, nor recall the timing on this one, merely that I saw them reviewed and that was about it; seemed to have left the impression that it did not maintain interest at the time.  If I run across any thing turning up, which is harder than ever to count on these days from the "usual sources", will post.

You may be interested however in how Frank Wedekind, forerunner of Expressionism as a German art-form, all of which was considered "decadent-art", strongly influenced Bertold Brecht as a playwright from a politic point of view.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #517 on: October 21, 2007, 12:27:09 PM »

I didn't make the connection, until you mentioned it maddie, but Pandora's Box is very much structured like a play, and Pabst obviously took his ideas from Wedekind, who wrote the "Lulu" plays, apparently even playing Jack the Ripper in one of the productions.  All though, to read the brief bio in wikipedia, Wedekind was much more graphic in his tales, not to mention lurid, whereas Pabst chose to imply these more seamy elements of the life of Lulu.  Interesting essay comparing Wedekind with O'Neill,

http://www.eoneill.com/library/newsletter/vi_1/vi-1e.htm
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #518 on: October 21, 2007, 12:55:32 PM »


I am rather surprised in the competitive interest with Movies and Movie Club that no one caught TCM the other night -- which was a night of Tod Browning, the original purveyor of  Dracula.




Olga Baclanova

Three Sinners (1928)
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« Reply #519 on: October 21, 2007, 12:57:00 PM »



Olga Baclanova

Publicity Photo
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« Reply #520 on: October 21, 2007, 12:58:29 PM »



Baclanova in the MGM commissary, probably during the filming of Freaks, judging by the styling of her hair.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #521 on: October 21, 2007, 01:00:19 PM »



Roscoe in drag, having a spat with Hercules about their performance. The script synopsis reveals that act featured Hercules rescuing "Roman Lady" Roscoe from a wild bull.

(Me and Jbottle...)
   Smiley Smiley Smiley
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Dzimas
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« Reply #522 on: October 21, 2007, 01:11:58 PM »

That whole "Hercules" thing with Quast was something.  He seemed to serve only one purpose in the movie and that was to spring Lulu from the courtroom.  I don't know why they needed the courtroom scene anyway.  She and Alwa could have fled the night of his father's death and really been fugitives, but I suppose it made for added drama.  If you have someone like Louise Brooks you want to stretch out the action as long as possible.  Has anyone read the "Lulu" plays to see how Pabst put this film together?

I couldn't stand Schigolch at first but he came to play a vital role in the film.  He seemed to be pimping out Lulu with Alwa oblivious to how these little gifts were coming into their garret.  The three of them together really represented the lowest state of depravity, but I guess the two needed some kind of father figure to keep them going, since they were both so innocent.  However, it seemed Lulu had lost her innocence by this point.  Interesting how Pabst chose to let Schigolch have his Christmas pudding while Alwa went off with the Salvation Army, leaving poor Lulu alone in her death. 

I thought Brooks played those closing scenes quite well, and she looked grand in the riverboat scene.  So many lurid elements hinted at, including the attempt to sell her off to the Egyptian.  I imagine the movie caused quite a stir in its day, even if it was a tamer version of the Lulu plays.
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pugetopolis
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« Reply #523 on: October 21, 2007, 01:45:45 PM »





BROOKS, LOUISE Lulu In Hollywood

New York Knopf 1982 First Edition. Quarto. Signed presentation copy from Louise Brooks, inscribed by the author: “To Gareth L. Pawlowski, Louise Brooks, 13 Aug, 1982.” Fine in a fine dust jacket. The intriguing and candid memoirs of the great silent film star. Illustrated. Listed in 100 Books on Hollywood & the Movies.
Price: $3,000.00 other currencies   order no. 10805E
offered by: James Pepper Rare Books, Inc.   (USA)


http://search.abaa.org/dbp2/search.php
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« Reply #524 on: October 21, 2007, 02:07:10 PM »

Kraft Raschig as Rodrigo Quast (as Carl Raschig)

Also as Mackie Messer's Gang Member

In 3groschenoper, Die (1931)

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0021818/
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