Escape from Elba

Please login or register.

Login with username, password and session length
Advanced search  

News:

Pages: 1 ... 13 14 [15] 16

Author Topic: Movies  (Read 9110 times)

UNO

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 2034
  • Democracy beats Autocracy. Vote Democratic Party.
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #210 on: September 15, 2020, 10:45:18 PM »

1973? Got to have some Bowie on that list. Good question, though. Have to think this one through.
Logged
Trump and his supporters are simply traitors to our country.

oilcan

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 809
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #211 on: September 16, 2020, 10:29:16 AM »

Steve Miller,  early phase,  when Boz Scaggs was with the band.   

I was at Woodstock,  too.   I remember getting my diaper changed while Santana played Soul Sacrifice.   Seriously,  that's pretty cool,  Banks.   
Logged

bankshot1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3516
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #212 on: September 16, 2020, 10:43:35 AM »

Steve Miller,  early phase,  when Boz Scaggs was with the band.   

I was at Woodstock,  too.   I remember getting my diaper changed while Santana played Soul Sacrifice.   Seriously,  that's pretty cool,  Banks.

OCB-the line "somebody get me a cheeseburger" is one of my favorite RnR lyrics

Woodstock-Saturday afternoon I was having a cook-out, met a girl, went skinny-dipping, got high. bought a shit load of cheap wine and didn't get to the concert until about 8pm and missed Santana. I'm kind of pissed about that, but the lake felt great and the girl was pretty. 

After sobering up I saw an awesome concert for about the next 8 or so hours.
Logged

barton

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3828
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #213 on: September 17, 2020, 06:06:30 PM »

(sister's vinyl in Almost Famous chat cont.)

I was reading something about Yusuf Islam today,  and was reminded that Tea for the Tillerman and/or Teaser and the Firecat would be sighted in many record collections in those days.   The jacket art for those is as clear in my visual memory as the guy with sticks on his back on the Zepp album. 

I was thirteen the year of Woodstock and wasn't quite at the cheap wine skinny dipping with girls phase though I'm sure I would have polled YES!! on all of those at the time.

Logged
"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes. "

bankshot1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3516
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #214 on: September 18, 2020, 01:50:57 PM »

(sister's vinyl in Almost Famous chat cont.)

I was reading something about Yusuf Islam today,  and was reminded that Tea for the Tillerman and/or Teaser and the Firecat would be sighted in many record collections in those days.   The jacket art for those is as clear in my visual memory as the guy with sticks on his back on the Zepp album. 

I was thirteen the year of Woodstock and wasn't quite at the cheap wine skinny dipping with girls phase though I'm sure I would have polled YES!! on all of those at the time.

And I left out the good part!

Cat Stevens TFTT was a great album. I bought it upon the recco of a record store owner who said, "bankshot-you got to hear this" and I did and bought it and turned a lot my college buddies on to it.

And in the original Anita's Album thread, either I or someone else brought it up for young William to listen to.

Edit-one of my posts from that thread (re Cat S)

I think Anita's 10 (Crowe's) are mostly representative of the time and gives William a pretty good guide to an intro to 60s rock and popular music. I didn't expect Zappa and the Mothers or Bowie , but Joplin might have made the cut, or Aretha, Cat Stevens, The Supremes, or the lads from Liverpool.

Digging into my memories from 50+ years ago, even growing up in Boston, which with all the colleges was a center for music experimentation, most popular music was available on very mainstream WMEX, or WRKO in a pop 40-ish format. A lot of stuff wasn't readily available. It wasn't until early '68 when BCN went on air that my musical bar mitzvah took place and heard a lof stuff that wasn't played in more commercial venues.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2020, 04:03:15 PM by bankshot1 »
Logged

bodiddley

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4559
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #215 on: September 19, 2020, 05:22:32 AM »

In the late 70's and 80's music was still fairly regional, except for the major national acts like Journey.

Sometimes I would make the effort to tune into a Philly station late at night in the late 70's and they were playing a lot of different music than NYC.  Philly turned me on to George Thorogood, from Delaware, who you never heard on a NYC station.  Another example, I barely knew Al Green and had barely heard of the Hi Records stable of soul until I moved to Chicago in 1988.  There it was standard stuff.

These regional cocoons were kind of odd.  I can understand it for small local indie bands (NJ had lots of them), but a lot of record labels mostly had regional sales back then.
Logged
Good Gov't Saves Lives
 --- Bad Gov't Kills ---

josh

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9984
    • View Profile
Re: Movies-Almost Famous
« Reply #216 on: September 19, 2020, 02:05:18 PM »

Almost Famous-Anita's Albums


As an aside, yesterday I gave my collection of vintage '60s and 70s albums to my kid.

Wish I had a kid to give such things to. I am envious of those of you who do.

In 1971, I got my first album at all. Before that, it was all radio or older sibs' music. And at that, I have no memory of my older brother's having played music at all at home. If he did when at prep school or college, it would be news to me, if not shocking news. He was 5 years older and I was pretty much no longer around him from when I was almost 9.

My sister was only a couple years older. Even then, while I knew what 45s she had (and I have those, now), no memory of her playing them - though she must have.

My memories of music, instead, came first from listening to what the camp counselors would play over summers from 65-69, then off to prep school myself (til they invited me to leave), and college, where my musical tastes got educated.

In 1973, I would have listed:
Blood, Sweat, and Tears 3
Yes - Close to the Edge
John Denver - Rocky Mountain High
Don McLean - American Pie
Chicago - Chicago at Carnegie Hall --> I know, not the same thing, but it's what I got and loved.
Partridge Family - The Partridge Family Album

Neil Young - Harvest --> didn't own it, but it was on my top ten of things listened to
Carole King's Tapestry --> another I didn't own, but knew by heart at the time

I think the other album that would have shown up on my top ten most listened to that I can still come up with is not this genre:
Stravinsky's Firebird Suite, 1919 version, on the same Bernstein album with Rite of Spring and some Prokofiev. Not my favorite Prokofiev. I also listened to a ton of Petrushka.

And Pat Paulsen for President.
---------------

Now? Yes, almost all the albums you named would have shown up in a collection, had I had a stereo to play them on before I was 17, instead of a tinny cassette player. But I had no Beatles. No Stones. No Who.

I'd have had Let It Be and Sgt. Pepper. Tommy. Wildflowers (Judy Collins). Sounds of Silence. PPM's The Best of Peter, Paul and Mary: Ten Years Together. Many, many others I didn't know about then but do, now. King Crimson. Moody Blues... I could go on.
Logged
The day Richard Nixon failed to answer that subpoena is the day he was subject to impeachment because he took the power from Congress over the impeachment process away from Congress, and he became the judge and jury." ~Lindsey Graham

barton

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3828
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #217 on: September 19, 2020, 05:36:10 PM »

It's funny how little Yes was recognized in the 70s in my neck of the woods.   The tranformed 80s Yes was more popular.   All I remember of 70s Yes was "Roundabout."

Stravinsky is a great one to have in any collection.   My parents loved Russian composers generally,  and that torch passed successfully to me.   

Partridge Family -- well,  you seem to have survived, reasonably intact.    Was more of a Monkees man meself,  so far as tv show bands go.   

BS&T -- some good covers of other bands/artists -- they incorporated some Prokofiev into their own songs,  too.  Very wide ranging in their motifs,  genres.    I didn't learn until recently,  when playing Erik Satie ("Gymnopedie") on the piano,  that they had adapted the Trois Gymnopedies  on an album.   
Logged
"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes. "

josh

  • Global Moderator
  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 9984
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #218 on: September 19, 2020, 08:26:16 PM »

It's funny how little Yes was recognized in the 70s in my neck of the woods.   The tranformed 80s Yes was more popular.   All I remember of 70s Yes was "Roundabout."

Stravinsky is a great one to have in any collection.   My parents loved Russian composers generally,  and that torch passed successfully to me.   

Partridge Family -- well,  you seem to have survived, reasonably intact.    Was more of a Monkees man meself,  so far as tv show bands go.   

BS&T -- some good covers of other bands/artists -- they incorporated some Prokofiev into their own songs,  too.  Very wide ranging in their motifs,  genres.    I didn't learn until recently,  when playing Erik Satie ("Gymnopedie") on the piano,  that they had adapted the Trois Gymnopedies  on an album.   

Thinking on this (and being a Satie fan), I realize I could not do 10 bands, let alone 10 albums.

Byrds, ELP, Cream, Dr. Hook, The Band, CCR, CSN, etc.
Logged
The day Richard Nixon failed to answer that subpoena is the day he was subject to impeachment because he took the power from Congress over the impeachment process away from Congress, and he became the judge and jury." ~Lindsey Graham

bodiddley

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4559
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #219 on: September 20, 2020, 05:55:36 AM »

Circa 1977, as a pre-teen, some of the first albums I owned were Yes and ELO.  Then I think the Stones compilation High Tide and Green Grass.  I did get Some Girls when it was first released in Summer of '78.  And from there more classic Stones, Doors

My older brother had Alice Cooper's School's Out and Billion Dollar Babies circa '72/73, but then an inexplicable lull without albums for a few years until circa 1976/77, when he got on a big Aerosmith kick, along with The White Album, Dark Side of the Moon, Are You Experienced? and Lynyrd Skynyrd.

My brother was more selective than I was, with a much smaller collection, but fairly well chosen. 

I got both Goat's Head Soup and It's Only Rock and Roll (Xmas presents I asked for) before getting to the classic Stones period.  Basically a lot of guesswork and fumbling around and winging it.  I actually borrowed a cassette of Sticky Fingers from the library, and taped it to 8 track using microphones, but was too dense to realize that the basketball game I was watching in the same room was easily picked up in the background.  So I wound up with the Magic-Bird NCAA Final audio behind the Stones.  So March 26, 1979 was when I decided to pirate the library cassette copy of Sticky Fingers before I had to return it. 

Wish I kept that 8 track, it would be a very weird late 70's artifact.  I could probably sell it for thousands of ... pennies.  Maybe.  So people could laugh at what retards and technological doofuses folks were back in 1979.  8-tracks!
Logged
Good Gov't Saves Lives
 --- Bad Gov't Kills ---

bankshot1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3516
    • View Profile
Re: Movies-Almost Famous
« Reply #220 on: September 20, 2020, 04:53:04 PM »

Almost Famous-Anita's Albums


As an aside, yesterday I gave my collection of vintage '60s and 70s albums to my kid.

Wish I had a kid to give such things to. I am envious of those of you who do.

I'd have had Let It Be and Sgt. Pepper. Tommy. Wildflowers (Judy Collins). Sounds of Silence. PPM's The Best of Peter, Paul and Mary: Ten Years Together. Many, many others I didn't know about then but do, now. King Crimson. Moody Blues... I could go on.

It was a good feeling to give my daughter something tangible that hopefully she will enjoy for years long after I've departed this mortal turntable.

I hadn't seen her in about 3 months, she's in NYC, me in Jersey, and we had brunch last Sunday and post-brunch we spent some time going through my albums, mostly circa '65-'75, and they've been in storage for years . I made no promises or guarantees for these vinyl treasures but hoped they held up over the years.

There were about 300 albums and almost all had personal back stories and memories, where I bought them, concerts that inspired the purchase, friends I got high with listening to them, girl friends, some loves of my life, some loves for a night, and some heart-breakers, and yet with a happy heart, and a brief tutorial on album handling and hygiene, I passed on my mini-treasure trove of 12" good good good vibrations for the next generation to groove to.

She was a finance major in school but minored in music and loves 60s music. As we were flipping through the albums, many of which she knew from car trips with me, youtube or spotify, she was getting off on the covers (including King Crimson's scream album-what an iconic cover) and my running commentaries and critiques of the albums. I felt like a cross between Anita gifting her albums to William, and one of those old-farts on American Pickers selling their priceless artifacts, rusted junk, and ephemera to Mike Wolfe who promises to find it its next loving home.

I think I found them a good home.
Logged

barton

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3828
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #221 on: September 23, 2020, 12:55:41 PM »

Read your post that day but neglected to reply how it resonated.   My daughter (music major) took some of our old LPs (son is less collector,  more minimalist) though often with less backstory.   She had heard a lot of old tracks on the web,  too,  and would startle me in her coffee shop performances with some oldie I'd had no idea she was aware of. 

As far as owning collections,  I have sort of come to the Marie Kondo paradigm,  that your stuff doesn't have to be about who you were so much as about who you are becoming.   It's like,  if you had a chunk of rose quartz when you were a kid,  and a hundred pounds of other rocks,  then either it's a part of who you became (like a spelunker or a rockhound or a geologist)  or it isn't  (just a brief phase, then it all went into a basement crate).   Either way,  one choice specimen reminds you who you became,  or didn't become.   
Logged
"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes. "

bankshot1

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3516
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #222 on: September 23, 2020, 05:01:15 PM »

if you had a chunk of rose quartz when you were a kid, 

Bart-ironically it was quarts of Rose that I imbibed on that fateful Woodstock Sat. afternoon...

the folly and excesses of youth

re daughters and our music- it would absolutely astound and delight me when I heard my kid sing along to oldies she realistically should be clueless about, with that perfect timing that we develop from hearing those songs over and over again.
Logged

bodiddley

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 4559
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #223 on: September 24, 2020, 11:09:19 AM »

I've hooked my niece (now 25) on to lots of old music.
She seems to have pretty eclectic taste and not into any one set style of music.

My theory is that there's 100 years of recorded music out there, so why not listen to stuff that is great, classic, enduring.  I'm also interested in finding recent recordings that will or should be listened to 20 or 50 years from now.
Logged
Good Gov't Saves Lives
 --- Bad Gov't Kills ---

barton

  • Hero Member
  • *****
  • Posts: 3828
    • View Profile
Re: Movies
« Reply #224 on: September 24, 2020, 11:59:57 AM »

LoL at that bit about recording Sticky Fingers/NCAA onto 8-track. 

Weirdly 8-track somehow passed me by.   Had vinyl,  and a cassette player,  but never had a car with 8t.

Yeah,  it's great how your niece and all the young ones range so freely through a century of recorded music.  And further,  thanks to piano rolls that someone with a player piano will upload, that kind of thing.   (not that piano rolls are fully "recordings" since dynamics and inflection is lost)
Logged
"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes. "
Pages: 1 ... 13 14 [15] 16