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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 35122 times)
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jbottle
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« Reply #2865 on: December 19, 2007, 07:09:28 PM »

There was a time in the early to mid-1990's when there were some really great Miller Genuine Draft commercials, very strange and indie with obscure bands before it was cool to hire the Shins for McDonalds and Apple, Modest Mouse for Honda, etc. 

There were also some very slick Coors Light spots during the cocaine 80's where they all look like preppies in polos slamming Coors light to a driving rock jingle--"Cooooooorrrrrrsss Liiiiiggggghhhhhttttt.......it's the right be-eeear, nooowwwwwww....."--and then the guy who had caught one beer in each hand had to duck the third one (no more hands), which hit the opened cooler lid and bounced into the ice...so no prob, the logo appears and the good-looking guy shakes off the last toss with an arrogant laugh. 

Stella Artois is a very poor-tasting beer with a bitter aftertaste that is imported because it is produced cheaply to compete supposedly with Heineieikin and St. Pauli Girl, etc.  I think it sucks and prefer Beck's, but it's slightly cheaper with the beer snob presumption of the others, maybe the PBR of the indie crowd who thinks Heinekin too "country club," but I'm not sure of the metrics nowadays.  I stick to Bud Light and Vodka, never in that order.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2866 on: December 19, 2007, 07:11:55 PM »

And I really don't like people who prefer a vodka, like "Make it a 'grey goose,'" I mean, it's fucking vodka, their bar brand is Smirnoff, what the fuch do you care??
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harrie
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« Reply #2867 on: December 19, 2007, 08:39:01 PM »

Clyde's Vodka occupies a very dear place in my heart.  He makes a tasty gin, too.

Saw Jarhead (or most of it, missed the first few minutes) today. Excellent flick, highly recommend it no matter where you fit on the hawk/dove scale, because that really doesn't matter in this case.
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harrie
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« Reply #2868 on: December 19, 2007, 08:54:44 PM »

But I see that a significant percentage of people (on IMDB, RottenTomatoes) didn't care for it (Jarhead).  Maybe it's me --oh, hell, it is me, I'm the one talking -- but I thought the performances were good pretty much all around. Some of the photography was stunning.  I didn't find some of the story as unbelievable as others did, perhaps because my brother (a Marine who served in Desert Storm) had some wild tales to tell.  But then, he always did.  But hearing some of the stories that I have, I probably wasn't as prone to say "Aw come on, that would never happen...."

So, maybe don't see Jarhead based on my recommendation. But I liked it a lot.  Not necessarily in a "you'll want to watch this again and again" way, but more like in a "it really moved me" way.
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madupont
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« Reply #2869 on: December 19, 2007, 10:42:29 PM »

It was the scene with the horse,that made it real.  I agree, it was a film,true to what is, in that age group.  It took me awhile to get around to it, so you are not the only one, maybe last winter(?), because I got turned off by certain factions discussing the book back when. There are an awful lot of guys talking, I wouldn't say exactly "romantic" in an anti-Chris Hedges kind of way but more of an economically deferred mandate of white collared instead. You know those Romans, they had it all figured who would do what among the slaves.

So war at one remove masculinely speaking does not appeal to me, not after the day I finally figured out that there had never been a time in my lifetime when I was excused from dealing with a man who had been there and this does not make things turn out other than not so  hot.

But looking at Jarhead from an artistic point of view, it captured the essentially plebian aspects of trying to be like everybody else your age, and gee that is what the military as an institution counts on.  We couldn't have had anybody better than Don Rumsfield to star in this role of Chief Honcho Incorporated, as long as that lasted. Who's the Guy, now? I've lost track  This has put me into a Get Thee to a Monastery mode, for sure.

What I just finished telling a friend of mine, after we signed a few petitions, is that after last weekend, Murdoch having been invited to a wedding, you know of whom I speak, does not bode well when in financing production he has some say about what Message is the Medium.

All the "little" Murdochs, within the family that is, no copy-cats allowed, think this is just swell, why wouldn't they? They call it getting more of the word out to more of the people; monopoly would never cross their mind. But when Dad gets invited to a wedding at one of the homes of one of the heaviest producers in the film industry, there is a potential of having supported the entry into the most influential medium that there is for getting the message across. People are visual. At least in the world at large. Reading is fine, writing is fine as far as the appreciative but shock the hell out of them with something they've never seen before and you have made a life-long impression. Wouldn't you say that Jarhead had that for at least one or two points about humanity? You know what it reminded me of?   Troy ala Brad Pitt.

I had advocated to a friend from East Africa who had asked, television literacy would be very useful to you in teaching the abc's of non-British value-system education, seeing that the aim is post-colonial, with politically educated citizens. Then, Kennedy was assassinated. Yet, I told a little anecdotal description of the man who fasted for the truth and introduced the Satyagraha movement to India after his British education in England, and was assassinated, and I mentioned it about almost a month ago, thinking surely somebody would remember; not a one recalled it was the anniversary of what killed Kennedy 44 years ago.

I think things as they are, where we've gone since, you find yourself a film maker in a society that is already blitheringly literate and you've got yourself a problem. But I suspect they already had their star turn with someone who knew how to let charisma work it when making an entrance.After all, he and they started out with the premise that you should not make "images". Designs, maybe but,certainly not images to bow down to as if they were real.  Can you imagine these people watching Jarhead. Oh, that's right, they already saw Jarhead.

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jbottle
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« Reply #2870 on: December 20, 2007, 12:03:31 AM »

I hate war movies now that we're at war.  I used to like the difference between being the hand and the blade, and the guy that go, hey, we're just the blade, don't worry so much, nobody cares about you upstairs, etc., the grunt ethic in spite of the fact that war is distasteful, despite the fact the cause may be noble, forget that, too, you are just a killer of men, but when the mission is so fucked up, and I guess I kind of took Vietnam for granted as if it wouldn't happen again, like, wow, that was a really dumb mistake that thank goodness won't be repeated in my lifetime, etc.

I don't even mind war as a metaphor to put the ordinariness of life in refrain, as an art tool, like a wake up call, but when you're in a war like we are in now, I don't know, I know the movie Harrie cites is a good movie and I've seen some of it but it seemed workmanlike to me and I couldn't connect to what's his face, and war is absurd, especially with the remove of a sniper.....I mean, I know it's good, but I think I just don't like the actor or I'm over war.

All "war movies" used to be ultimately "anti-war," but I'm so ambivalent about being "anti-war" or "pro-war" now that it's hard to say.....I kind of fall back on the absurdism of "Apocalypse Now" as being the genuine article.....especially when you think of the sort of lens placed on Robert Duvall, he looks alien to the landscape, and master of it at the same time, a curious creature that's scary and insane and powerful, as if believing he was there and yelling was the reason for being and the reason for war.....so anyway I fall back on the curiosity of Coppola more than the wryness of recent war movies...
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Urethra_Franklin
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« Reply #2871 on: December 20, 2007, 02:55:21 AM »

There was a time in the early to mid-1990's when there were some really great Miller Genuine Draft commercials, very strange and indie with obscure bands before it was cool to hire the Shins for McDonalds and Apple, Modest Mouse for Honda, etc. 

There were also some very slick Coors Light spots during the cocaine 80's where they all look like preppies in polos slamming Coors light to a driving rock jingle--"Cooooooorrrrrrsss Liiiiiggggghhhhhttttt.......it's the right be-eeear, nooowwwwwww....."--and then the guy who had caught one beer in each hand had to duck the third one (no more hands), which hit the opened cooler lid and bounced into the ice...so no prob, the logo appears and the good-looking guy shakes off the last toss with an arrogant laugh. 

Stella Artois is a very poor-tasting beer with a bitter aftertaste that is imported because it is produced cheaply to compete supposedly with Heineieikin and St. Pauli Girl, etc.  I think it sucks and prefer Beck's, but it's slightly cheaper with the beer snob presumption of the others, maybe the PBR of the indie crowd who thinks Heinekin too "country club," but I'm not sure of the metrics nowadays.  I stick to Bud Light and Vodka, never in that order.


Have you tried a beer called "Two Hearted Ale"?  I've recently become somewhat of a beer connoisseur myself, and this THA is definitely my all-time favorite.  It's bottled by Bell's Brewery, in Kalamazoo Michigan.  Try it if you can get ahold of it, you won't be disappointed. 


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jbottle
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« Reply #2872 on: December 20, 2007, 03:23:21 AM »

Sure, I like the bottle.
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harrie
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« Reply #2873 on: December 20, 2007, 10:01:31 AM »

madupont, jbottle and anyone else,
I think I looked at Jarhead as more of a character flick than a war flick.  That is, I didn't consider it a factual treatment of the current war, but more of a character study of people under the extreme stress and surreal conditions/experiences of (in this instance) the current war. 

That said, the movie did have some of the basic war movie cliches, ie the lifer sergeant and "egad, he's gone nutty!" moments; but the performances were solid enough that I was willing to buy into them.  I totally bought Jake G., even though I haven't been a big fan of his in the past, and I thought Jamie Foxx was excellent, too.  But hey, different strokes and all that.

Perhaps I should not have given it the ringing endorsement right off the bat, though; because having slept on it, as I think about Jarhead more, I come up with more and more flaws.  So far none of them are huge and glaring enough to make a wholesale change of opinion, but I'm not so whooped up about it. 
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harrie
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« Reply #2874 on: December 20, 2007, 11:23:44 AM »

madupont, I'm not so sure I'd worry about Murdoch and Weinstein getting too cozy.  From what I've read and heard, Harvey can hold his own and bully and double-cross with the best of them.  You may already have read it, but the Biskind book on indie films paints a not really flattering portrait of Mr. W.  I get the feeling he likes Murdoch's money, but plans to do what he wants with it in the end.  And I get the feeling that Murdoch might not take too kindly to being taken, which could make for some interesting gossip page reading.  Could turn into a win-win situation, entertainment-wise.

This book - http://www.amazon.com/Down-Dirty-Pictures-Sundance-Independent/dp/068486259X
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barton
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« Reply #2875 on: December 20, 2007, 11:31:17 AM »

Jbot raises an issue that I think is big for a lot of people, me included -- not wanting to watch a war movie when there's a real war, esp. one that's grinding on into its fifth year with essentially the same news stories recycled day after day, week after week, etc.  It's as if we have too much perspective, too much information, too much everything....a glut which, when more is heaped on, doesn't enlarge one's understanding or sympathies.

That said, I agree that Jarhead is more a character story than a war story (as all the good ones are).



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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2876 on: December 20, 2007, 12:11:25 PM »

Anyone reading the "My Favorite Movie Year" columns at The Onion?   One guy chose 1974, and I think there's another one, can't remember the year.  Anyways, mine is...

1992

Unforgiven
One False Move
Bad Lieutenant
The Crying Game
Reservoir Dogs
Glengarry Glen Ross
Hard Boiled
The Player
Dead Alive
Under Siege
Candyman
Passenger 57
El Mariachi
Captain Ron

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barton
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« Reply #2877 on: December 20, 2007, 12:30:25 PM »

Oilcan, I've been saying for several years that 1997 stood out (and the mid-90s were generally pretty strong)....

1997 films:

LA Confidential
Princess Mononoke (orig. Japanese release)
The Big Lebowski
Gattaca
Donnie Brasco
Jackie Brown
Boogie nights
The Apostle
the Full Monty
The Sweet Hereafter
Face/off
The Fifth Element
Conspiracy theory
Lost Highway
The Spanish Prisoner

Not bad, eh?

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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2878 on: December 20, 2007, 12:52:18 PM »

Hmm... I've got "TBL" as a 1998 release.

In any event, even with "TBL" in there (and you know "TBL" is my 3rd favorite movie of all time), I still have 1992 ahead of 1997.

Of the 1997's you have listed, I can say "liked it a lot" about several, including "LA Confidential", "Donnie Brasco" and "Jackie Brown", and "liked it" about all of the rest.  But with 1992, the first 7 listed are in my Top-50 Favorite Movies of All Time, and the only one that would make that list from your 1997 list is "TBL".

So anyways, I applaud your 1997 list, but I'll take 1992.  That's just my perception, tastes and preferences, there is no right answer, etc.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2879 on: December 20, 2007, 01:41:41 PM »

I think the next article is Rabin on '94, which I think includes "Pulp Fiction" and others, are you guys hunting and pecking, going from memory, or are there lists of movies by year on THE NET somewhere.  I have always wanted a breakdown of films by year by studio just to compare the slates and strategies by release date as well, but I still haven't found what I'm looking for (ahem, Bono) on THE WEB or even in CYBERSPACE.  Since I don't have sound memory from being a SLACKER listening to the SEATTLE SOUND during the GRUNGE era as a member of GENERATION X, somebody else's list would be awesum.
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