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Exiles of the New York Times
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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 35236 times)
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2880 on: December 20, 2007, 01:50:02 PM »

I just went to IMDB's yearly index, and looked under "most votes" - that way there isn't a list of 23,000 titles to look through...

Here's the 2004 list, for example:

  http://us.imdb.com/List?year=2004&&votersort=on&&votes=1000&&nav=/Sections/Years/2004/include-totalvotes&&heading=7;Most%20popular%20titles;2004%20by%20total%20votes

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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2881 on: December 20, 2007, 01:50:47 PM »

There's also this site:

http://www.movieweb.com/movies/releases/year.php?y=2007&page=4
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madupont
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« Reply #2882 on: December 20, 2007, 01:50:57 PM »

]
madupont, jbottle and anyone else,
I think I looked at Jarhead as more of a character flick than a war flick.  That is, I didn't consider it a factual treatment of the current war, but more of a character study of people under the extreme stress and surreal conditions/experiences of (in this instance) the current war. 

That said, the movie did have some of the basic war movie cliches, ie the lifer sergeant and "egad, he's gone nutty!" moments; but the performances were solid enough that I was willing to buy into them.  I totally bought Jake G., even though I haven't been a big fan of his in the past, and I thought Jamie Foxx was excellent, too.  But hey, different strokes and all that.

Perhaps I should not have given it the ringing endorsement right off the bat, though; because having slept on it, as I think about Jarhead more, I come up with more and more flaws.  So far none of them are huge and glaring enough to make a wholesale change of opinion, but I'm not so whooped up about it. 


No,seriously, I meant it about the horse! The rest of these guys signed on for the trip, and I hate to say it but it is usually with enthusiasm. As that war began,early Nineties, my son was going back to the Coast after visiting with me in New Jersey. I saw him off at the air-port, Philadelphia International(I think); and,when I went to watch his plane depart, I just happened to have a bunch of what looked like happy campers/ boy scouts and girl guides pass me like they were going to a party, I mean they could have been running enthusiastically to catch their plane to Kuwait with butter-fly nets in their hands!  It was then that I  realized they weren't "children" but "very young". Which is really what I also saw in the cast of characters in Jarhead. (I think most war movies are made up of character study to make the cast interesting).

By the way, although I can not recall when I first laid eyes on Gyllenhaal, he's been an interesting actor right along; likewise his sister. The Secretary was hilarious. Jake's performance in Brokeback Mountain, put me on his side.

And, about Harvey, you are right,no need to worry, there isn't a thing we could do about it anyway.

But thanks, for pointing out the book.  Now, it is time for me to do that poll of what movies made the cut when, for comparative purposes only.
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madupont
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« Reply #2883 on: December 20, 2007, 01:52:43 PM »

Ps, harrie, I forget to tell you  my favorite title for Jarhead. From Germany:    Willkommen im Dreck
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harrie
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« Reply #2884 on: December 20, 2007, 02:21:10 PM »

Wow, I don't know if I can commit to just one year.

madupont,
I thought the horse scene was a beautiful, eerie moment - before I started thinking about the horse's likely fate.   

Funny about your recall of the airport trip -- my brother is/was one of the youngsters who signed on enthusiastically to, as Arlo Guthrie put it, "Kill.  I wanna, I wanna see, I wanna see blood and gore and guts and veins in my teeth.  Eat dead burnt bodies. I mean kill, Kill, KILL, KILL."    I apologize if I seem flip, but I am not; he was really like that. 

Except my bro signed up to go to Iran and free the hostages.  Which he never did; he played the waiting game, much as Jake G. and company did, but in places like Yuma (AZ), Hawaii, Japan from whence I heard all kinds of stories of strange, wild adventures.  He finally did see action, in Desert Storm. The thing is, he booked out right after his DS hitch was up and never looked back.  He sure as hell didn't volunteer to re-up for this debacle, which I guess tells me enough about how much fun war really is, even the short, slam-dunk so-called bloodless ones.

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ponderosa
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« Reply #2885 on: December 20, 2007, 02:28:18 PM »

1979 was a year for a handful of great flicks and a bunch of fun ones.

Apocalypse Now
Alien
All That Jazz
Being There
Escape from Alcatraz
The Great Santini
The In-Laws
The Muppet Movie
Never Mind the Sex Pistols, Here's the Bullocks
The Onion Field
Quadrophenia
Rock 'N Roll High School
The Warriors
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madupont
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« Reply #2886 on: December 20, 2007, 02:32:45 PM »

Harrie, that's what I thought you meant. What got me about the "cub scouts" impression was that at the time I was living down the street from Gen.Norman Schwartzkopf's childhood home in Lawrenceville. Thus the end product was truly what you said about the horse: "...scene was a beautiful, eerie moment - before I started thinking about the horse's likely fate."

Which while watching on tv, I got immediately; the horse would die of oil-coated lungs.  
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barton
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« Reply #2887 on: December 20, 2007, 02:33:59 PM »

Oil, I've seen TBL listed both ways, as either 1997 or 1998, so I'm thinking it might have been released in late autumn or something, but I haven't researched the matter in any depth.  You have a strong list, though films like Candyman or Under Siege probably wouldn't make any best-of lists that I would construct.  Clearly, we're just operating from subjective cinematic enjoyment and nothing too rigorous in the way of standards, so there's no real debate -- just the fun of seeing who prizes which films.

I think 2007 could be shaping into a pretty great year.  I have yet to see There Will Be Blood or Atonement or Sweeney Todd, but I've already seen a half-dozen just terrific films in theaters this year, which is way better than the previous few years.
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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
barton
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« Reply #2888 on: December 20, 2007, 02:34:57 PM »

Pond, many see the 70s as a golden age for U.S. film.
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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
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« Reply #2889 on: December 20, 2007, 02:50:22 PM »

So far I've compared with fellow-posters for their years and it seems to boil down to an average of three films per.

Oilcanboyd23:      1992

The Crying Game
Glengarry Glen Ross                  
The Player    

[I can't remember the significance of Reservoir Dogs although the scenes occasionally flash a few seconds but I have no continuity.]    


Barton:               1997

L.A. Confidential
Boogie Nights
The Spanish Prisoner

[Naturally, I went to see Donnie Brasco because who wouldn't want to look at Johnny Depp? By the way, that Esquire coverage on him and Burton was flip and only there as publicity for Sweeney Todd]


Ponderosa           1979

Being There
The Onion Field
(No third)

Thus far, at the Onion,  No Country for Old Men, is it, as I predicted.    

And there are a few other things, I noted besides that I wasn't really very interested in this year's films.   I will place -- Zodiac, on my list.

I'm going back to the column for the individual reviewers and give what interested me about their choices, some of which I have to look forward to because I really hadn't enough info to go out there and see them at the time. Or, I didn't have transportation.  Man, that was a fast year.
                                                      
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madupont
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« Reply #2890 on: December 20, 2007, 02:51:02 PM »

Barton, that's the year(1979) I lost out on films.  Divorce, you know how that goes.  But as I vaguely recall there had to be others throughout the Seventies that stirred my imagination.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2891 on: December 20, 2007, 02:51:27 PM »

Pond, many see the 70s as a golden age for U.S. film.

I see 1990-1994 as the Golden Age for US film.
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ponderosa
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« Reply #2892 on: December 20, 2007, 02:53:04 PM »

Pond, many see the 70s as a golden age for U.S. film.

There was a lot of cheezy stuff, but some great flicks came out then. We are definitely in a different era of film making and I believe I fully appreciate the direction the new "Turks" are taking us. Lotsa good stuff the last few years. I approached the idea of a list by going to one of my favs, Apocalypse Now, and tried to piece together a string of supporting films. I found only a few, but was somewhat surprised to see a few more that I realy liked if not classify as great, for the ages, types of movies.

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ponderosa
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« Reply #2893 on: December 20, 2007, 02:57:44 PM »

So far I've compared with fellow-posters for their years and it seems to boil down to an average of three films per.

Ponderosa           1979

Being There
The Onion Field
(No third)

Not a Muppet Movie fan, huh? :'(
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madupont
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« Reply #2894 on: December 20, 2007, 03:19:40 PM »

The Onion on this year's told me...

I liked Blood Diamond which Scott Tobias did not in one of his asides.

But, look forward to Black Book -- his #9

Amidst his next five:  Atonement; was given a really bad review as a book; but I might want to evaluate the visual production.

I'll want to see: Persepolis

I agree that   Away From Her, was "Overrated" and Sarah Polley is at fault for
"absence of imagination" dulling the volatile emotions at play.
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