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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 49560 times)
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jbottle
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« Reply #2895 on: December 20, 2007, 03:25:49 PM »

I think '79 is a good choice, particularly because it has "Alien" and "Apocalypse Now," two masterpieces that are probably in my all time top-20 maybe, top 50 for sure.  

Maud, you want to rethink that no third idea?  "Alien" is top-ten sci-fi of all time and AN is a top-twenty war film of all time, without much disagreement.  I think AN is a masterpiece, while something like "Being There" is imperfect but brilliant in execution of the joke by Peter Sellers, with some of the satire lacking the crispness or something.  The film I've always thought was suffused with a sort of melancholy or outright sadness, and it comes out of the Sellers portrayal of a simpleton in part, but there's something in the ether of the film that is terribly just sad to me, I don't know whether that's because I saw it at the theater when I was 11, because Sellers died shortly thereafter, or because the film simply presents that way.  It's a very good movie, though, and definitely on the top-10 of the year but too complicated and at times sloppy to be considered "great" as a film and I mean a really slim field and rigorous examination, while AN and "Alien" are almost unparalleled auteurist works of near-unfathomable filmic genius, from the work of Baker on the monster, Cameron's blend of horror and sci-fi, and the poignancy or AN's metaphor of war leading down the river from a concept of civilization to a realization of terror and horror and madness.
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ponderosa
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« Reply #2896 on: December 20, 2007, 03:27:29 PM »

Like buttah.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #2897 on: December 20, 2007, 03:37:02 PM »

Maud, you want to rethink that no third idea?  "Alien" is top-ten sci-fi of all time and AN is a top-twenty war film of all time, without much disagreement.  

Word!!

Some people (not me) might also submit "Manhattan", "Breaking Away" and "Meatballs" as examples of great 1979 releases.
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harrie
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« Reply #2898 on: December 20, 2007, 03:50:38 PM »

And I think Candyman is very worthy of mention, though for some reason I thought it was older than 1992.  I hate to say "for what it is..." but it is very well done, IMO.  I can still freak out the hubby by saying "Candyman" into the bathroom mirror a couple times, so for me that means it has legs of some kind or other.
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madupont
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« Reply #2899 on: December 20, 2007, 03:54:33 PM »

Another Onion reviewer

Tasha Robinson has #7 for: The Lives of Others

I liked it a lot more than that or, Eastern Promises, which she put in
her Next Five.

She mentions that   Perfume: The Story of A Murderer, was underrated.

If it is what I read, I would have to agree.
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jbottle
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« Reply #2900 on: December 20, 2007, 04:04:42 PM »

Agree, oil, "Meatballs" is a comedy with a heart and I guess it's the kid actor who brings the same sort of vulnerability to "My Bodyguard" whatever year that's in.  I didn't look at a list before I posted about AN and "Alien" and BT, but "Manhattan" is fantastic, of course, on any top-fifty (after 1950), and "Breaking Away" is also very good on the level of "Meatballs," with more heart than you could expect from what seems like an almost independent production casting "unknowns," surprisingly cohesive storytelling on no money, and "Meatballs," disarmingly titled as a beert**ty movie, with a hackneyed camp vs. camp plotline, surprisingly compelling in not only the camp vs. camp storytelling but the "coming of age" story seeming easier and funnier and less heartbreaking than it can be told with the help of a compassionate camp counselor who is too funny to let any teen skulk around for too long without knocking a smile out of him.
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ponderosa
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« Reply #2901 on: December 20, 2007, 04:18:26 PM »

and...

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0079817/
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harrie
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« Reply #2902 on: December 20, 2007, 04:25:41 PM »

Also from 1979 were 10 and The Black Stallion.  TBS was if nothing else, beautiful to look at - the first half or so, anyway. 

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harrie
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« Reply #2903 on: December 20, 2007, 04:33:21 PM »

'79 looks very good, but if you go to 1977, you get

Star Wars
Close Encounters of the Third Kind
Annie Hall
Saturday Night Fever
Eraserhead

and two great satires,
Slap Shot and
Semi-Tough


1975 looked promising with Jaws and Dog Day Afternoon, but then (for me anyway) it kind of petered out.
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madupont
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« Reply #2904 on: December 20, 2007, 04:34:46 PM »

Jbottle.

So, I go over to IMDB to see what I missed in the 1970's and this is what I saw so I didn't miss these after all but they are saying these are in the 250 of All Time greatest movies ever....    Along with, Manhattan(1979), which you
liked but they insist is a 7.9

I found Woody Allen somewhat uneven in those years. Some things, you like; others, you don't.  I suspect I was not enamoured of Ms.Hemingway enough to make it the Picture; what I took away was the camera work on parts of the city that cause me to say, "oh, look at that, I remember...".

They start in the 8's, and at a rating of 8.8., I like: One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest(1975).

Monty Python and the Holy Grail, also came out that year but takes a demotion to 8.4

8.3 and you get     The Sting (1973)
8.1 take your pick, which would you rather?    Annie Hall (1977                                        

or,  The Deer Hunter(1978)

A Coppola film comes in at
8.0 The Conversation(1974)
8.0 Patton(1970)
8.0 The Exorcist (1973)

I definitely went with The Exorcist.

One left. (1974) same year as the Coppola film; I went with Young Frankenstein at just 7.9 like Manhattan.

So, is it all a matter of taste or what they put into the advertising?
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madupont
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« Reply #2905 on: December 20, 2007, 04:36:15 PM »

Dog Day Afternoon

That is probably what I mix into Reservoir Dogs. Will have to check the scenarios.
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ponderosa
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« Reply #2906 on: December 20, 2007, 04:42:13 PM »

"Is there any special country you want to go to?"

"Um... Wyoming."
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harrie
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« Reply #2907 on: December 20, 2007, 04:51:58 PM »

Though I'm also turning into a fan of 1939 with

The Wizard of Oz
Gone with the Wind
Mr. Smith Goes to Washington
Stagecoach
Dark Victory
The Hunchback of Notre Dame
Gunga Din
Wuthering Heights
Ninotchka
Destry Rides Again

to mention a few
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madupont
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« Reply #2908 on: December 20, 2007, 04:54:41 PM »

Nathan Rabin at the Onion

Drops -- No Country for Old Men, to #4 and behind -- Zodiac at #3

Gee, this is like horse racing.


KEITH PHIPPS, who eats his Onion raw, gives us two Philip Seymour Hoffmans, with The Savages(opposite Laura Linney) in his Next Five, after  Before The Devil Knows You're Dead
at #6

NOEL MURRAY as the lead man for no other reason than alphabetical order agrees that No Country for Old Men should be #1 (if memory serves me right that is two out of five) and puts    I'm Not There
into his Next Five.

I am working backwards of course ala Mick Jagger and will probably neglect to see Hairspray, although John Waters is so much like the boy that was my best buddy in grade school that it's a little bit like being Harper Lee for a day and being big sister to Truman Capote.



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madupont
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« Reply #2909 on: December 20, 2007, 05:00:52 PM »

Harrie, did you know I had to wait until I was an adult to see all your picks for 1939 because that was the stop of weekly movies, no doubt, at the Uptown with big date night for Mom and Dad in an era when you skipped the baby sitter and took the baby to the movie instead. They bought a house to move into for 1940. But there was 1938 having something to do with it, dropping my cousin off in Arizona where she belonged, I must have slept all the way there and all the way back(or, most of it) because it was just desert as far as I was concerned.
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