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Author Topic: Movies  (Read 49538 times)
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harrie
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« Reply #4365 on: June 08, 2008, 08:13:03 PM »

1    Kung Fu Panda (2008)  $60M   
2    You Don't Mess with the Zohan (2008)  $40M   
3    Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull (2008)  $22.8M   
4    Sex and the City (2008)  $21.3M   
5    The Strangers (2008)  $9.29M   

Whoa, did I ever call it wrong!  But that's okay, means the world is back on its axis. You may be on to something, jbottle, with regard to Sandler starting to lose his mojo (or his audience). 

Movie news I wish I hadn't seen....An A-Team movie has been greenlighted, with Bruce Willis, Tyrese Gibson and Woody Harrelson to star.  I really hope this is an elaborate practical joke.

madupont, I don't know about the age thing having to do with missing stuff like Mickey Rooney in Breakfast at Tiffany's in the movies and not understanding that films are products of their times.  Even before cable movie channels, people (at least in metropolitan areas) were able to see both classic and schlocky movies all the time on regular TV.  I grew up in the NY metro demographic and so had access to the Million Dollar Movie on Channel 9; all kinds of movies all day Sunday plus Chiller Theater (horror flicks) Saturday night on Channel 11; the Bowery Boys series (run over and over and over again!) and some other movies on Channel 5; the afternoon movie (weekdays, 4:30-6:00pm) on Channel 7 (ABC);  and the Late Show, Late Late Show and possibly the Late Late Late Show on Channel 2 (CBS). 

Because of my geographical luck, I saw Warner Oland as Charlie Chan a few times (not the most flattering portrayal, IMO) and a cringe-inducing musical number in Holiday Inn with the cast in blackface, not to mention countless blue-eyed actors (like Burt Lancaster) playing Native Americans -- well, the list could go on forever.  Yeah, it's brutal to watch some older movies these days, but I think it's fairly easy to understand that things were much different at the time. It doesn't necessarily make those things less offensive, but it does provide some perspective.  Just my take on the situation.

Oh - and I'm in the forties age group, just out of Adam Sandler's key demographic.

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madupont
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« Reply #4366 on: June 08, 2008, 11:15:28 PM »

Harrie, re:"...madupont, I don't know about the age thing having to do with missing stuff...
                            Funny, at my age, I can't find anything!
But, that was not quite what I meant; I probably expressed it, badly again.

Let me put it this way, when Audrey Hepburn played Holly Golightly, I was at the age where, 1) We had parties like that and enjoyed them.
                                2) We actually dressed like that.
                                3) We were likely to go visit people like whatisname Tomato; and, if not, we at least knew people like that.
                                4) We didn't go to many movies like that, only European films and Japanese.

Which is the reason, my reaction to her having any interest in George Peppard was, "Are you insane?"

So, it wasn't for lack of urbane exposure to films, prior to that I watched old movies with a friend in the Oranges,New Jersey, because her husband was working at the Battery in the Coast Guard which is a weird schedule and would have induced a lot of loneliness. At a later point while being perfectly comfortable having breakfast at Tiffanys after walking there from uptown and continuing to walk downtown dressed as she was (although, it is my understanding they shot on location at 71st. Street)and my actual favorite location was 57th. Street: parfum, earrings,British movies, I was likely to walk into the Museum of Modern Art for the films, and when not working around any of these vicinities, we actually attempted to make movies. Utter failure.  It would be comparable to amateur nite on Doc Days.

Other oddities, we actually had Japanese friends(and relatives). Relatives did not talk about what had happened in Arizona and California, at that time. Friends were younger and were given educational opportunities by family alliance like brothers-in-law.

About George Peppard*  Eventually, I was able to understand why Truman Capote would see something in George Peppard that I did not. I wonder if George Peppard found out to whom he appealed? I don't recall seeing him in another movie. How Audrey Hepburn survived her movies is a wonder; on the money, I would suppose.

I just think that every generation brings something different to the movies that are out there, whether shot recently or shouldn't have been shot then, whichever.

Although, my son and I see exactly the same point in films, and he's your age, a year give or take one side or the other of Barack Obama; but he lives in California and just visits Manhattan (and other places that I shall probably never see ).
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harrie
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« Reply #4367 on: June 08, 2008, 11:53:55 PM »

Okay, we're all over the place, madupont. My previous post about old movies was in response to one of your posts, and this statement in particular: 

Quote
Unfortunately, it is quite true that the popular culture of the time, reflecting the public's common taste which thought stereotypes were funny, was not very discriminating about discrimination against how other races were portrayed; nor sexual identity, which is why some of the other casting varied greatly from the characters in the novel from which the film was adapted.

But, I'm generally so amazed when I find that somebody posting is actually in their forties, that No Wonder they disbelieve what I am saying about a movie made back in 1961 release. That's 47 years ago and they weren't born yet, so their interpretation comes from seeing it with new eyes and unaware of what we referred to as the mores in those days.

I basically said (or believe I said) that despite my being of that certain age that might not get a movie made 47 years ago, I (and others) do understand that mores, "acceptable" prejudices and other assorted social conventions have changed over the years and will continue to change.  With the stock of older films that are available through whatever means (cable, rental, etc.), we are continually reminded of how things were at the time a given film was made. For better or worse.


Let me put it this way, when Audrey Hepburn played Holly Golightly, I was at the age where, 1) We had parties like that and enjoyed them.
                                2) We actually dressed like that.
                                3) We were likely to go visit people like whatisname Tomato; and, if not, we at least knew people like that.
                                4) We didn't go to many movies like that, only European films and Japanese.

Which is the reason, my reaction to her having any interest in George Peppard was, "Are you insane?"

Except that at her core, Holly Golightly was a country girl hiding from Doc (Buddy Ebsen) in glamorous NYC; perhaps Paul (Peppard) was sort of comfortable for her, someone around whom she didn't have to keep up the facade.  When Holly was going to marry the South American guy, she certainly quit the glamourous party circuit and settled down in comfy clothes, knitting the sweater that ate the world. So as far as having any interest in Paul....I don't consider it all that insane. But that's my take on it.  And I know that Peppard is the narrator of sorts, so he equals Truman Capote, in which case it wouldn't matter how interested Holly was in him; but I also realize that this was 1961 and that certain aspects of the story were glossed over because those things weren't discussed.

Just for giggles, off the top of my head I can name about two George Peppard movies - The Carpetbaggers and The Blue Max.  You didn't miss much in either case.  He also had a pretty successful TV show, Banacek, which rotated on the Sunday Night Mystery Movies on NBC (while you were at the parties, I was glued to the tube) and, coincidentally, the aforementioned A-Team.  And I believe he was married to Elizabeth Ashley for a while.

Must sleep. Will argue more tomorrow, depending how work load looks.
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barton
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« Reply #4368 on: June 09, 2008, 10:01:47 AM »

I had forgotten Banacek -- I watched sporadically the Sunday Night Mystery Movies, the ones with McCloud, Columbo, and McMillan & Wife (mostly Columbo, the other two not as compelling for me), but never caught the Banacek, or maybe saw one and promptly forgot.

Really, I never thought BaT's was all that great of a movie.  It's like other movies that somehow become classics, and gain a deep sentimental foothold in many people's psyches, but not everyone is going to jump on the bandwagon.  Having read the book, I have to wonder if Capote much cared for it -- if I'd written the book, I would have viewed the film as butchery, but some authors are more charitable than others about having their stuff transmogrified on the screen.  Maybe part of the problem of BaT is that the book is so very good, such a tour de force of wit and humor and tremendous compassion and insight into human nature, that any film version is bound to fail somewhat.   
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harrie
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« Reply #4369 on: June 09, 2008, 11:04:19 AM »

Really, I never thought BaT's was all that great of a movie. 

Same here, barton; though I guess I've seen BAT a few times.  I found parts of it handled in a heavy-handed manner, ie the guitar-strumming and singing on the fire escape (a prelude to the semi-obligatory lyrical interlude a la Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid?); the big rain at the end -- okay, we get it, it's emotional -- though it may have been raining in the book as well.  And George Peppard, handsome son of Detroit that he was, just wasn't...."it" for this part. In my humble opinion, of course. 

The book (novella?), on the other hand -- excellent.  It's probably about time to give it another read and clarify that nagging rain question.

The only thing I recall about Banacek was him sculling on the (Boston) Thames River in the show's opening. That, and I think he was an insurance investigator because I do vaguely recall watching an episode about a race horse.  I preferred McCloud, good for at least one good chase on horseback per show, and Columbo as well.
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #4370 on: June 09, 2008, 12:45:32 PM »

For Richard Jenkins doing the whole repressed / quiet-desperation thing very well, look no further than "The Visitor".  It was pretty dullsville, but if the idea of Richard Jenkins in a leading role sounds good to you (it did to me), then you'll like it as much as I did, which is a lot.  Maybe the old saying is true, that you don't put Wally Beery in a fruity movie about suffering, but "The Visitor" proves that you can put Richard Jenkins in one and not have any complaints.  And yes, it's funny.
« Last Edit: June 09, 2008, 01:06:01 PM by oilcanboyd23 » Logged
harrie
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« Reply #4371 on: June 09, 2008, 11:16:30 PM »

oilcan, I read the description for The Visitor, and it looked neat; but the release dates looked wacky for some reason.  Did you see this on TV/cable, via rental, or at the theater?   I'd like to catch it, just trying to figure out where to look for it.   Thanks!

Scratch that -- it's playing in a couple theaters near me!
« Last Edit: June 09, 2008, 11:22:41 PM by harrie » Logged
Detective_Winslow
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« Reply #4372 on: June 10, 2008, 06:49:25 AM »

Seriously, don't waste your fucking time or dime.

I wasn't expecting much, but I walked into what became the worst comedy I have ever had to endure in a theater.  Sandler saw $$$$$$$.  I've always been a big fan, but this has to be rock bottom for him.


"Kung Fu Panda", on the other hand was much more acceptable.  Some very funny moments, and it's not quite the kiddie movie many will expect.  Jack Black lending his voice sure didn't hurt
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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #4373 on: June 10, 2008, 09:27:27 AM »

Scratch that -- it's playing in a couple theaters near me!

Go see it and report back to us as soon as it's done.
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barton
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« Reply #4374 on: June 10, 2008, 09:49:53 AM »

I wouldn't mind seeing The Visitor -- I'm something of a Jenkins fan, for his many supporting roles and for "Nathaniel Fisher" in 6FU.

Haven't been to a thee-ater movie in ages, but The Visitor and the Shyamalan attempt to pull out of career nosedive have both caught my eye. 

On DVD tonight:  The Lathe of Heaven, the 2001 A&E production.  Will report back.

Harrie, come to think on it, BaT's is a novella, not a novel.  About 80-100 pages, depending on the edition's typeface.  But I remember it as a novel, because Capote is one of those writer's writers who makes every word count. 

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oilcanboyd23
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« Reply #4375 on: June 10, 2008, 12:28:25 PM »

I wouldn't mind seeing The Visitor -- I'm something of a Jenkins fan...

I predict you will enjoy "The Visitor" very much.  It might be the first time Jenkins has had a chance to play a character with an "arc" or whatever, and he really nails it. 

It's written and directed by Thomas McCarthy (actor from "The Wire"), who also did "The Station Agent", which I haven't seen yet.  If "TSA" is as good as "The Visitor", maybe we have our American answer to Mike Leigh in the whole "understated, character-driven study of the human condition" movie genre.

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harrie
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« Reply #4376 on: June 10, 2008, 01:04:27 PM »

I liked The Station Agent a lot; it runs periodically on Sundance or IFC (I think it's IFC) if you get those channels. Even more incentive to catch The Visitor.
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jbottle
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« Reply #4377 on: June 10, 2008, 01:49:31 PM »

I didn't realize until now that McCarthy of "The Wire" did TSA, "The Visitor" looks pretty good too.

Sorry to hear that "Zohan" is no "animal_house."
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jbottle
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« Reply #4378 on: June 10, 2008, 09:32:36 PM »

Sheesh, you guys need emoticons, well go f-yourself:

Smiley

Wink

 Cheesy

 Grin

 Grin

 Grin

 Angry

 Embarrassed

 Cry
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madupont
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« Reply #4379 on: June 11, 2008, 02:39:53 AM »

Just finished watching Marina Zenovich's, Wanted and Desired. Steve Soderbergh produced it for her. I think that it is very well considered Polanski. Everything is there, nothing is missing, there is no way that you can't get the point (although there is no point talking about it if you have not seen it).

I've been waiting for this one, for a long time; ever since she announced it at Sundance Festival. Then when I think about it, I've been waiting a lot longer than that.  I'm glad, I made it my business to get to the showing of,The Pianist, when that was possible, even if it was a little out of the way, just to realize that it was one of the most important films of our era up against the ridiculous juxtaposition of George Bush's America as the fitting place to discuss the Warsaw Ghetto.  It was Adrien Brody's triumph to portray Wladyslaw Szpilman survivor reflecting  as a hall of mirrors how Roman Polanski had survived Cracow and Poland under occupation   and experienced horror in the United States.

Of course, the day that Adrien Brody got up and received his Oscar for playing the part of,The Pianist, was the day when the stars all wore black, and some planted claque in the balcony  booed Michael Moore for having made a film that revealed what George Bush's war in Iraq looked like.  It is the history of things, in retrospect, which reveal everything.
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