Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Question: What is the best show of the most anticipated new shows this fall?
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Author Topic: Television  (Read 16409 times)
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harrie
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« Reply #345 on: July 20, 2007, 04:43:35 PM »

I liked Then Came Bronson -- but it was on past my bedtime, and it only ran a year or two, no?  Every once in a while Michael Parks shows up in a flick -- I think QT likes him -- and I'll say "Look! It's Michael Parks!"  And the hubby is all "Who the..? Wha the...? Michael Who?"   So I guess Then Came Bronson wasn't exactly a timeless classic of episodic television.

"Takin' a trip?"
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TrojanHorse
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« Reply #346 on: July 20, 2007, 06:26:10 PM »

Goin' down that long lonesome Highway...
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harrie
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« Reply #347 on: July 20, 2007, 08:12:39 PM »

I didn't realize at the time that Then Came Bronson was sorta like  Kerouac Lite, or Kerouac for the Masses.  I just liked the scenery -- some great shots on that show -- and my brother was all amped up about the Harley.

Madupont, I know you had a problem with the last YouTube link I posted, but see if this one works.  It's a younger Jerry Orbach singing Try to Remember. (sniffle)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=huUmENpJ8p4 
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madupont
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« Reply #348 on: July 20, 2007, 10:02:06 PM »

Thanks,HARRIE,

It appears that this might be a concert version.  I had honestly known nothing about his career in musicals at the time of his death three years,four months ago until suddenly the reprise of his musical experience showed up in the pages of the nytimes covering his death.

Although I would have been very interested in this:
"On different evenings as a young man, sitting in the Theater de Lys on Christopher Street, I saw Orbach as the Street Singer in ''The Threepenny Opera'' and as Mack the Knife."     (from one of the remembrances)

http://tinyurl.com/37pepg

http://tinyurl.com/293s5b

Mr. Orbach lived off Eighth Avenue in Hells Kitchen near the Midtown North precinct. ''He'd be walking down the block, and he'd always stop by and say hello,'' said James Heaphy, 41, a recently retired detective with 20 years on the job. ''He was a really nice guy. I didn't even realize he was ill.''
 
Jerome Bernard Orbach was born in the Bronx on Oct. 20, 1935, the only child of Leon Orbach, a restaurant manager with some experience in vaudeville, and the former Emily Olexy.

The Orbachs moved to Waukegan, Ill., when Jerome was in the seventh grade. In 1952, after graduating from Waukegan High School, he attended the University of Illinois, but stayed only a year. He transferred to Northwestern, where he studied drama. He remained there for about two years, but left without earning a degree.

Mr. Orbach did menial work for stock companies before being awarded small parts; later, he said that the stock experience helped him learn to control his voice and ''not to do too much with my eyebrows.''

In 1955 Mr. Orbach headed to New York and found a job almost immediately as the understudy for the role of the Street Singer in an acclaimed Off Broadway production of ''The Threepenny Opera.'' He remained with the company for three years, eventually taking on Scott Merrill's role of Mack the Knife. He studied acting with Herbert Berghof, Mira Rostova and Lee Strasberg. After leaving ''Threepenny'' in 1959, he worked with stock companies in Ohio, appearing in ''Mister Roberts,'' ''The King and I'' and ''Harvey.''

But it was the now-fabled ''Fantasticks'' that established Mr. Orbach as a star. Soon after, he moved on to Broadway in ''Carnival!'' The critic Frances Herridge called him a ''rare combination of powerful male actor and singer.''

Mr. Orbach remained busy with varied stage work in New York, including ''The Cradle Will Rock'' (1964), revivals of ''Carousel'' and ''Annie Get Your Gun'' in the mid-1960's, Bruce Jay Freidman's comedy of neurosis ''Scuba Duba'' (1967) and ''6 Rms Riv Vu'' (1972). His films include ''Brewster's Millions'' (1985), ''Dirty Dancing'' (1987) and ''Last Exit to Brooklyn'' (1989). On television he appeared on ''The Shari Lewis Show,'' ''The Jack Paar Show,'' ''The Nurses'' and ''Bob Hope Presents.''

Mr. Orbach married Marta Curro in 1958. They were divorced in 1975. In 1979 he married Elaine Cancialla, who survives him. He is also survived by his sons by his first marriage, Anthony, of New Jersey, and Christopher, of Manhattan; and two grandchildren.

After appearing in ''The Gang That Couldn't Shoot Straight,'' Mr. Orbach received a call from Joey Gallo, the mobster. ''A cop that he knew had met us and told him that he'd met the guy who supposedly played him in the movie, that he was a nice guy, not like an actor,'' Marta Orbach recalled shortly after Gallo was gunned down in 1972. Through the Orbachs, Gallo briefly became one of the stranger fixtures of the showbiz social scene in Manhattan and was working on a memoir with Marta Orbach at the time of his death. Gallo lived in the Orbachs' Chelsea brownstone for a month and was married there a month before his murder.

With his portrayal of Lennie Briscoe on ''Law & Order,'' Mr. Orbach achieved a worldwide fame that had previously eluded him. He became the face of a typical New York cop, and the police liked what they saw. Mr. Orbach took the role seriously, so much so that he appeared in 2001 at a demonstration in which police officers demanded higher wages from Mayor Giuliani's administration.

''All I can do is try and represent you guys on a TV screen and make you look as good as I can,'' Mr. Orbach was quoted as saying in Newsday. ''I could never go out and not know if I'm coming home that night the way you do.''

Mr. Orbach lived in a high-rise off Eighth Avenue in Clinton and was a fixture in that Manhattan neighborhood's restaurants and shops. His glossy publicity photo hangs in Ms. Buffy's French Cleaners, and he was a regular at some of the unpretentious Italian restaurants nearby.

Besides the ''Law & Order'' reruns that appear in an endless cycle on cable television, Lennie Briscoe lives on in several episodes of ''Trial by Jury,'' scheduled for broadcast in the spring. 

Jerry Orbach, who died in 2004, made a Tony-winning splash in ''Promises, Promises,'' then went on to originate roles in ''Chicago'' and ''42nd Street.''


Here are the Balloons:

http://www.nytimes.com/2007/07/20/travel/escapes/20Ahead.html?_r=1&8dpc&oref=slogin
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harrie
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« Reply #349 on: July 21, 2007, 10:25:09 AM »

Quote

Oooohhh, pretty!  Thanks, madupont.
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barton
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« Reply #350 on: July 21, 2007, 10:43:08 AM »

Whoa, hadn't thought about Then Came Bronson in a while.  It wasn't past my bedtime, so I might be a bit older than thou, Harrie.  "Kerouac Lite" is a good description, and I dug the scenery, too.  I bought a little Suzuki 180 shortly thereafter and learned that contact lenses and motorcycling don't mix well.

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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
madupont
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« Reply #351 on: July 21, 2007, 11:08:22 AM »

How long was that show on?  I thought it maybe had two programs and disappeared; really can't remember that far back. But I did have the biggest Michael Parks interest in the short term as a possible Jimmy Dean substitute but I don't remember if Michael could act? As time went on, I wasn't too sure James Dean had been able to act either, when I looked carefully at that first movie about the high-school field trip to the Observatory.  It was just awful with him screaming at his father, like a young Leonard di Caprio, in the living room no less. What would the neighbours say? Oh, we were hell on wheels as adolescents back in the 1950s.

I think what happened was that James Dean really impressed Broadway when he played a seductive Arab boy in a play about a French auteur after the manner of Marlon Brando, moody,seductive, sultry. From then on he had lots of help, particularly from the ladies, in important films. Michael Wood didn't get that far.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #352 on: July 21, 2007, 11:29:00 AM »

So now we have "reality" shows with Chachi and the two Coreys.  Just when you didn't think television could stoop any lower, dredging up these former teen actors, and having them reflect on their lives in the fast lane these past 20+ years.  I suppose Chachi must feel a bit shortchanged, given that his "squeezes" have done better than he has over the years.
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harrie
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« Reply #353 on: July 21, 2007, 12:26:08 PM »

Here's the rundown on Michael Parks.    Quentin Tarantino does like him, thinks he's a great actor.  I can't find the thing where I'd first read that, but there is this:

Perhaps then it's no surprise that no less than Quentin Tarantino refers to parks as the world's greatest living actor. In fact, the longtime appreciator of treasures forgotten or undiscovered has devoted a significant chunk of his filmography trying to win the actor the recognition he deserves. After writing the character of Texas Ranger Earl McGraw in Robert Rodriguez' From Dusk Till Dawn, Tarantino enlisted him to reprise the role in both Kill Bill films as well as his latest opus Grindhouse.

That's part of an intro to an interview with Parks that appeared here:  http://dvd.ign.com/articles/778/778116p1.html

Wherever I read it, I thought QT said Parks was the most naturalistic actor he'd ever seen work, and he greatly admired that in him.  Personally, I tend to consider the source when it's someone like QT; which may be fair or not, because he's done a hell of a lot more than I ever have.  But I think he even admits he's .... quirky; so his assessment of Parks' talent may not be the mainstream perception.

Parks himself has actually had a pretty interesting life, according to the IMDB bio -- lots of odd jobs, turning down an offer to play baseball because he made more money working on caskets, stuff like that.  So maybe he was a natural for TCB-like parts, rather than turning into, say, George Hamilton when the director yells "cut."

Then Came Bronson ran for a year, according to IMDB, and I was eight.  I'm pretty sure it ran Wednesdays at 10, and it was already a neighborhood scandal that I was allowed to stay up 'til 9 at the time.


We caught part of the Chachi show while flipping, and it qualifies for "like watching a train wreck" viewing.  He's sitting there smoking cigars with his buddies and wondering why he's never been married.  Well, you could put out the cigar for one thing.....  It's produced by the guy who played older brother Wayne on The Wonder Years, Jason Hervey.   IIRC, he's kind of a producer or business whiz, but I don't recall what else he's done.  As the hubby noted, well the Bonaduce show is done, will the next loser please step up?  Which would also explain the show about the Coreys, I guess.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #354 on: July 21, 2007, 03:37:47 PM »

I caught part of one of those VH1 celebreality shows while in Seattle a few years back.  It included Flavor Fav and Brigette Nielsen, which evolved into one of the most surreal screen romances I had ever seen. It was so pathetic that I was drawn into it like a train wreck, as you note Harrie.  I suppose if given the choice between total nobodies or washed-up actors, the second holds more appeal because they appeal to one's curiosity, if nothing else.
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Dzimas
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« Reply #355 on: July 21, 2007, 03:41:22 PM »

I thought Tarrantino was maturing into a seasoned director when I saw Jackie Brown, but then he came out with Kill Bill and totally lost me.  It was the kind of movie he fantasized making as a teenager.  I don't have any patience for him anymore.
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madupont
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« Reply #356 on: July 21, 2007, 06:34:47 PM »

Exactly.

But Harrie, did you ever see the Tarantino HBO Iconoclasts with the little pianist in the green dress?   I could not watch it.  He's a very quirky guy and I still think the best thing he ever did was that strange duo or, The Jackson two,that included John Trovolta, and didn't Harvey Keitel do a "Cleaner" in that pic?

Unfortunately, Uma Thurman, who  could mesmerize any guy in that get-up and at that point in her career, was side-tracked into working for him again,and again.  She did much better for her rep when working for Merchant/Ivory.
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harrie
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« Reply #357 on: July 21, 2007, 07:50:56 PM »

madupont,
We don't get HBO, but Iconoclasts also ran on Sundance, which we do get. That being said, I did not watch the one with QT and Fiona Apple (right?) because I'm not a big fan.  I absolutely love Reservoir Dogs, like Jackie Brown a lot, and can pretty much leave the rest, including Pulp Fiction.   I understand that Pulp Fiction is a highly thought of flick, a veritable piece of cinematic art; but I get annoyed by so many parts of it that I just don't watch it.  I accept my lack of appreciation for PF as my shortcoming, not necessarily QTs.

I very much liked the Iconoclasts episodes featuing Laird Hamilton and Eddie Vedder, and Newman and Redford (of course).
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madupont
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« Reply #358 on: July 21, 2007, 08:29:13 PM »

No wonder I kept picking up that signal, I almost described her dress as "apple" green, as I had no idea what her name  was; she was fair, he was a jerk. Perhaps under other circumstances, I could actually listen to her music without being annoyed at his Punchinello grotteries.

I can well imagine what you disliked about this film,PF.  The humor of Keitel came through, which was necessary; people would not have taken those sequences "seriously", if he had not signaled this is not real folks or I would not be here.  He did this, as I recall, with The Piano, as well, to lighten up the nudity. These are the odd things that he brings to his roles,including something he did with Sorvino who is an excellent "actress" as we used to say, in which he is a Greenwich Village Jazz musician and she is a girl whom he discovers by complete coincidence. I can not for the life of me remember that name either,"something On the Bridge", was it Lulu on the Bridge ? By Paul Auster, the rest of the cast was not memorable despite their fame. I vaguely recall  Gina Gershon as Mira's friend unless that has really escaped me too. I love her acting,Gina that is. Mira has done some  class French Theatre roles for film with Ben Kingsley as a lead but my mind has become over-taxed today explaining the deceptive ways of a no-good man. It will click on at some weird point,to which I'll respond,"Oh,yeah? Now you tell me."

Redford and Newman was a priceless take on the secret lives of old actors' relationships to each other; best part of which was sitting in Joanne's theatre discussing their memories of their experiences when they started out.

Did you get to see the Maya Angelou/Dave Chapelle visit? I am longing to get somebody else's take on this because it was hilarious to eavesdrop while entirely quaintly sweet but neverless funny in other ways.
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harrie
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« Reply #359 on: July 21, 2007, 10:03:00 PM »

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Redford and Newman was a priceless take on the secret lives of old actors' relationships to each other; best part of which was sitting in Joanne's theatre discussing their memories of their experiences when they started out.

Okay, here's where I have to point out that it's only been "Joanne's theatre" for a few years, while the Westport Country Playhouse itself has been around since the 1930s, IIRC.  An awful lot of actors have started (or re-started, or attempted to revive) their careers there over the years, and that rich history is documented photographically (and with posters - posterly?)  in the lobby. Or, it used to be -- I haven't been there since the renovation.

I did really enjoy the back-and-forth between Redford and Newman on their Iconoclasts episode -- even without a script, they just click.  I missed the Angelou/Chappelle one; but the show seems to come back periodically, so if I see it coming around, I'll definitely try to catch it.
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