Escape from Elba
Exiles of the New York Times
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Question: What is the best show of the most anticipated new shows this fall?
Pushing Daisies
Private Practice
Bionic Woman
Chuck
Dirty Sexy Money
Back to You
Big Shots
Cane
Journeyman
Samantha Who?
Other

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Author Topic: Television  (Read 16493 times)
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madupont
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« Reply #885 on: December 28, 2007, 09:35:26 AM »

Lulu,

I don't know which is worse, that they have a new dumb show to figuratively cross the picket-lines  with something probably of no better caliber than what we watched at the beginning of the season with Glenn Close and Ted Danson(all production values and too much Mystery?)...

"The continuing Hollywood writers' strike looks like giving the young British actress Billie Piper an unexpected career break in the US. Executives at the cable channel Showtime had been planning to adapt Piper's provocative ITV2 series Secret Diary of a Call Girl for the States, just as shows like The Office have been re-cast and 'translated' in recent years. But with the strike still not settled, Showtime is taking the plunge and buying the series itself.

Showtime president Robert Greenblatt said he was "captivated" by Piper's performance. Will American audiences be equally captivated by Piper's portrayal of Hannah, the legal secretary who moonlights as high-class prostitute Belle? With the former Doctor Who actress seen in several semi-nude scenes and lesbian romps, the answer is probably yes - as long as they can understand Secret Diary of a Call Girl's distinctly British accent.

Meanwhile, Showtime rival HBO has its own prostitution project in the pipeline, from Darren Star, the creator of Beverly Hills 90210 and Sex and the City. It is currently dubbed Diary of a Manhattan Call Girl."

...Or, letting Darren Star loose on  us again  while failing to mention that he brought us that "really quality show"(said with, tongue in cheek; which is not easy to do):Melrose Place  ?
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MrUtley3
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« Reply #886 on: December 28, 2007, 10:35:03 PM »

I am enjoying Donald Sutherland's performance on Dirty Sexy Money.
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barton
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« Reply #887 on: December 31, 2007, 01:15:47 PM »

Anyone who liked "Futurama" might check out some direct-to-video movie releases in the coming year -- the first one is "Futurama, the Movie:  Bender's Big Score" -- the synopsis looks hilarious, and there's some major ensemble voice talent behind it.  It's in my queue, so I'll report back when it arrives.

Happy Completely Trivial Arbitrary Calendar Event!

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"History doesn't repeat itself, but it often rhymes."
Donotremove
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« Reply #888 on: December 31, 2007, 03:44:02 PM »

I've worn out the batteries on my remote channel surfing to get away from politics and car commercials. I may join up with netflix myself.
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madupont
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« Reply #889 on: December 31, 2007, 08:51:03 PM »

Donotremove,

I have no problem finding weird stuff, all of which I could watch but some choices have to be made.  HERE,have patience while I TELL you a tale in two posts, probably....

I know this is somewhat asking a lot but do you remember this quite famous elderly woman detective?
 
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0441885/plotsummary   and then we have this much younger woman:
 
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0441885/                      and, if you will just be so kind, to run down the cast list--
 
you will notice that she is Janet McTeer, playing Anne Protheroe; and it is kind of hard to miss her because she is 6 foot, 1 inch tall which allows her to carry off those 1940's fashions quite well( post-War, of course).
She was blond in this episode. But, if you add to it by making her a red headed,6 ft.1 inch, Taurean, she
becomes the exceptionally famous actress,Gertrude Lawrence, a mere three years later for the film,Daphne.
http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0963169/
 
How shall I explain how I got into this? Last night, when having had enough stuff and nonsense, and noticing nothing on television, I perused the push button intense movies and thought I ought to watch two of my favorite actors torture each other,again, Isabelle Adjani and Gerard Depardieu, in Camille Claudel.
 
Since,Depardieu is Auguste Rodin, he gets to torture his mistress, his model and assistant who began to be her own sculptor in her own right.  On the other hand, Isabelle,playing Camille, brought her boyfriend along as cinematographer and director:Bruno Nuytten
 
Camille's real brother was the poet about whom W.H.Auden wrote:
"Time that with this strange excuse/Pardoned Kipling and his views,/And will pardon Paul Claudel,/Pardons him for writing well."
 
Yes, although he knew young Arthur Rimbaud and the Symbolists, he was not That Paul [that was Verlaine].
 
 
Yet, wait a minute. I could also see, Mindwalk, you know right away what that word synthesis brings to mind if you lived through the Seventies.
 
Filmed by Berndt Capra who has a brother named Fritjof Capra(they are Austrians), he decides to make a film about two impossible brothers(or, are they just friends?) who represent two different mentalities. Sam Waterston is of course the Lawyer (wasn't that novel?)ergo Politician and John Heard is the Poet.  They meet Luv Ullmann (for those of you who have viewed Ingmar Bergman films) and have an intense dialog about the nature of men and women because She is the Scientist. Perhaps this is a trialog(?) but, as different as the two men are in their tolerance of each other, Luv really flaps her gums about the development of the process of Scientific thinking and the philosophy it has fostered or was that the development of the process of Scientific Philosophy and the Science that it fabricated.   What is the thing that makes it possible to even begin to tolerate the intensity of the battle of the sexes. Smart guy that Berndt, he shoots it at Mont.St. Michel
 
By now, I have found Daphne, in which Janet McTeer plays Gertrude Lawrence. Daphne is, of course, du Maurier and Janet, who makes an overwhelming over 6ft. star of Stage and Screen, was  Daphne's father's mistress.  got that?  Well of course, he was Gerald du Maurier, Actor-Manager. So that accounts for it. What more is there to say?
 
Oh, I suppose that I could throw in the suggestion -- if you want to know what an Actor-Manager was in those days, take a look at Jeremy Irons in: Being Julia (where Julia is Annette Benning).
 
By the way, in regard to that 6 foot Amazon Comedienne, make that "Daphne's father's 'last' mistress. She  performed in Noel Coward's light comedies and sang the songs of that risque Cole Porter whom as you grow up in the Fifties you will eventually grasp the fundamental truth of their talent but Daphne du Maurier of course insists that her father became ultimately homophobic as a result of impressario-ing the careers of actors and talent that had to be managed somehow.
 
But get this, that is why she developed a male personality, she insists.

(to be continued...)
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madupont
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« Reply #890 on: December 31, 2007, 09:00:46 PM »

Now, I ask you, who have been around, reading the copy that spews out of Meander While We May, these many years, do you remember or recall anything of this being said by either isabel_k or Stodolka, any other ladies who were there chime in if you will on Lady Daphne du Maurier, because we had a very good chat-group going completely off the wall one afternoon, or morning, or whatever about these novels that she wrote,Daphne, and how they became movies, and then we went right on to the Brontes who had been her influence other than the repression of her boyish nature by Dad.
 
Not once did anybody mention in Meander that when Daphne du Maurier went to talk with Doubleday publishing house, that she instantly became infatuated with Ellen Doubleday, who for our purposes is exotically, enticingly played as a femme-fatale with near Southern flirtatiousness, only  she isn't Southern just very sophisticated and reminds me of my Little Rock,Baltimore,Flint,General Motors auntie. She is however a ravishing brunette as played by Elizabeth McGovern who will knock your socks off. You won't believe she could possibly be doing this role in 2007.  I think that occurs when you have a statuesque red head like Janet McTeer ready to make an entrance from the wings on the other side of the stage.
 
Between the two of them, Daphne comes across as pale by comparison,but talented, because she walks like a boy in her husband's pants since trousers are what you wear when you sit all day writing mystery novels, sometimes of the arcane, like a Wilkie Collins but,personally, kicking your cuffs is not a comfortable way to get through life. Yet, dear Daphne is considered to be one of the few rare women who was able to write as a man.  Not with a man's nom de plume but as a man speaks and writes when she is writing from that point of view. She writes whole novels like that. Easier said than done.
 
isabel_k, as you know, collects the great feminist writers of Britain (and the British-Canadians like Atwood);despite her other hobbies, isabel was the foremost authority on British writers we had in the entire house of forums.  But, it was just an aside with her, reading for pleasure, they were the women who wrote in her native land.
 
And for  you Kate Winslet fans out there, let it be known that her Finding Neverland pose, dying for Johnny Depp, as the mother of  J.M.Barrie's boys, the Llewelyn Davies tribe whom he wrote into Peter Pan, or the Boy Who Never Grew Up, they were of course Daphne Du Maurier's cousins. Which may have been how she got that idea that she was still a boy.
 
It is not at all unlikely that being her father's child, and being in the environment of his profession that she would have noticed that some of the most famous actresses in his day were Peter Pan. She may have been a little too young to have realized that about Maud Adams, or Zena Dare, but surely by the time of Eva Le Gallienne? And she lived some thirty years beyond Mary Martin flying into the wings from one side of the stage to the other. Here is the all-time great of her Grandad's era(he started Punch magazine with "cartoons";
http://www.dgillan.screaming.net/stage/th-frames.html?http&&&www.dgillan.screaming.net/stage/boucicault/boucicault-n.html

(the first Peter Pan)

 
Ah,well, enough said.  But, why couldn't you  have told me, Pugetopolis, about Logo channel?  Having seen the creme de la creme, I probably won't watch it much if at all.  Then I wouldn't have had to write this for the du Maurier fans out there of Dame Daphne du Maurier( did you  get that? She was"knighted" by the Queen ) and I could have instead looked up the famous last words because probably poet W. Stafford was in CPS Camp with Kenneth Rexroth, whereas i think that when Gary Snyder was up there in the Northwest, that was a bit later toward the end of WW2 whereas he went to Daitokuji  Monastery during Vietnam; or maybe with William Everson, at Walport    http://www.santacruzpl.org/history/people/everson.shtml  (who became Brother Antoninus).
 
Or, maybe the Objectivist poets. Or, the Feb.15,2003  war objectors who protested in 800 cities around the world.
 
Peace.

« Last Edit: December 31, 2007, 09:56:38 PM by madupont » Logged
Kam
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« Reply #891 on: January 02, 2008, 04:49:40 PM »

HISTORY CHANNEL has been airing a series(?) called 'The Universe'.  Last night I stayed up late to watch their episode on The Moon.  Fascinating stuff.  The moon used to be much closer to us and moves away from us at the rate of about 1-2 inches per year.  That means, in an average lifespan the moon will drift further away from the earth by about the length of the average wingspan, give or take a few inches.  Eventually, it will get so far away that the earth's gravitational hold on the moon will be lost and the moon will go speeding off into space.  Without the moon, our tides would be very different.  Without tides, scientists claim that life as we know it would never have formed.  Billions of years ago, the moon, being closer, produced 1,000-10,000 foot tides, churning up the earth and sending earth subtrate into shallow pools where primordial life could form.  Without the moon, the days would be 6 hours long and our biological clocks would be all screwy. This is not too much of a concern as the Sun is supposed to go kaplooey way before that happens.  So we'll need a new home anyway.  Maybe we could put people on the moon in a state of suspended animation.... wait til the moon leaves orbit and cruise the universe waiting for a landing spot with a nice bright sun nearby.
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kidcarter8
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« Reply #892 on: January 04, 2008, 10:55:16 AM »

Huckaby would disagree.  Smiley
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madupont
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« Reply #893 on: January 04, 2008, 11:10:59 AM »

I sat up way too late in the wee hours opening my e-mail from Sundance which has begun their entire full January countdown to the Sundance festival at Park City,Utah.  I've ticked off numerous films playing on their channel, as long as I remember to turn on my tv set and notice their Reminders. They are sponsored by the Stella Artois people that I linked into -- I think it was -- this forum,just for the laughs occasioned by their advertising.  So, I'll be catching up with all the movies that I didn't watch while watching their movies that I did watch.

Plus, the new Iconoclasts. I want to see the Norman Lear episode, also Sean Penn in the wilderness without having to necessarilly see his film lest it gross me out, and maybe I'll even stand stand for Madeleine. Albright giving Ashley Judd the tour of Washington.
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Kam
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« Reply #894 on: January 07, 2008, 03:10:42 PM »

Watch out fans, there are spoilers in here: http://blogs.kansascity.com/tvbarn/2008/01/the-wire-season.html

I've watched the first 2 episodes of the season so far.  I pay for HBO onDemand, so I have already seen the first episode three times.  And last night, I stayed up until 2am to watch Episode 2, as soon as onDemand had it.  For any fans, nytempsperdu et al... you won't be let down by the first episode.  For those of us who've seen the first four seasons, you will love where they go in Episode 2.  For the uninitiated, you will be too confused by the newness of what you're seeing to understand how neatly woven the fabric has become.  That first 20 minutes of Episode 1 is flawless in its execution and so rewarding in its scope.  All the pieces matter.

HBO is also advertising having three 'The Wire' prequels on HBO onDemand.  Thats BS.  The closest they get is a scene where Bunk first meets Jimmy.  Its all of 3 minutes long.  The other prequels are just as shallow.  Very dissapointing.
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You know when, like, you're little, your dad, you think he's Superman. Then when you grow up and realize he's just a regular guy who wears a cape.
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« Reply #895 on: January 09, 2008, 12:25:04 PM »

Kidcarter8,

I don't know how's yours going, but I still have no Fiosity and still no kind of servicing from Verizon.

Innerstingly, Vermont nixed the deal to sell Verizon's lines to Fairpoint Communications because they don't want a dimunition of service from a smaller company. ARE THEY FOR REAL? Worse than Verizon? And what do they think? That VZ is going to start treating Vter like human beings that live in clustered communities? Not gonna happen VT! VZ is going to sink their dough into Fios in the more heavily populated suburban markets (Meaning, I'm not sure when/if NYC is going to get upgraded either).
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Kam
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« Reply #896 on: January 09, 2008, 04:57:50 PM »



Tommy: Hey, Norman, you know what I had for dinner last night? Tuna sub. I ate it in the car.

Norman: When I finish my memoirs, that shit'll be in there, no doubt.

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You know when, like, you're little, your dad, you think he's Superman. Then when you grow up and realize he's just a regular guy who wears a cape.
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« Reply #897 on: January 09, 2008, 09:26:16 PM »

Ahhh, kam, thank you for acknowledging the new season of The Wire.  As with the other institutions delineated, I've enjoyed the old-timers' "war stories" this season at the newspaper, and the prospect of more to come.  I'm a little confused about how the lead newsroom guy (whatever the position is of the guy played by an actor who was in Homicide) connects to the others in the story line, if indeed a connection was established, other than via the overall theme of Season 5 Ep 1: cutbacks at the PD, the paper and the drug-dealing co-op. 
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madupont
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« Reply #898 on: January 10, 2008, 12:31:56 AM »

Larry David Curbed by Obama Loss

http://www.thefirstpost.co.uk/people,554,larry-david-shows-his-enthusiasm-for-barack-obama,11999

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Kam
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« Reply #899 on: January 10, 2008, 01:13:39 AM »

Ahhh, kam, thank you for acknowledging the new season of The Wire.  As with the other institutions delineated, I've enjoyed the old-timers' "war stories" this season at the newspaper, and the prospect of more to come.  I'm a little confused about how the lead newsroom guy (whatever the position is of the guy played by an actor who was in Homicide) connects to the others in the story line, if indeed a connection was established, other than via the overall theme of Season 5 Ep 1: cutbacks at the PD, the paper and the drug-dealing co-op. 



City Desk Editor Gus Haynes played by Clark Johnson.  Fact:  Clark Johnson actually directed the first two Episodes of the Wire from Season 1.

Norman has a connection to the Sun.  He worked there for years before joining the Carcetti campaign.
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You know when, like, you're little, your dad, you think he's Superman. Then when you grow up and realize he's just a regular guy who wears a cape.
-Dave Attell
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